Social Media: Heat
#HeatSafety #SummerSafety

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Please help the NWS spread these important safety messages on social media! Everyone is welcome to use the text and images provided below to help the NWS build a Weather-Ready Nation.

Basic Heat Safety InfoGraphic

Facebook
Heat is typically the leading cause of weather related fatalities each year.  Heat waves have the potential to cover a large area, exposing a high number of people to a hazardous combination of heat and humidity, which can be very taxing on the body. Learn how to stay safe during a heat wave at www.weather.gov/heat #HeatSafety

Twitter
Heat wave: a period of abnormally hot & humid weather, lasting 2+ days.
Stay cool www.weather.gov/heat #HeatSafety

Heat Wave

Basic Heat Safety

Facebook
Heat is typically the leading cause of weather-related fatalities each year. A heat wave is a period of abnormally hot and humid weather, generally lasting more than 2 days. Heat waves have the potential to cover a large area, exposing a high number of people to a hazardous combination of heat and humidity, which can be very taxing on the body. Learn how to stay safe during a heat wave at www.weather.gov/heat #HeatSafety

Twitter
Heat wave: a period of abnormally hot & humid weather, lasting 2+ days. Stay cool www.weather.gov/heat #HeatSafety

Being Outside

Auto Safety InfoGraphic

Facebook
Never leave children, disabled adults or pets in parked vehicles. Studies have shown that the temperature inside a parked vehicle can rapidly rise to a dangerous level for children, pets and even adults. Leaving the windows slightly open does not significantly decrease the heating rate. The effects can be more severe on children because their bodies have not developed the ability to efficiently regulate its internal temperature.
http://www.nws.noaa.gov/om/heat/children_pets.shtml  #HeatSafety

Twitter
Never leave children, disabled adults or pets in parked vehicles.
http://www.nws.noaa.gov/om/heat/children_pets.shtml
#HeatSafety

Spring Break

Auto Safety

Facebook
Never leave children, disabled adults or pets in parked vehicles. Studies have shown that the temperature inside a parked vehicle can rapidly rise to a dangerous level for children, pets and even adults. Leaving the windows slightly open does not significantly decrease the heating rate. The effects can be more severe on children because their bodies have not developed the ability to efficiently regulate its internal temperature.
http://www.nws.noaa.gov/om/heat/children_pets.shtml  #HeatSafety

Twitter
Never leave children, disabled adults or pets in parked vehicles.
http://www.nws.noaa.gov/om/heat/children_pets.shtml #HeatSafety

Dress to Beat the Heat

Heat Clothing at the Beach

Facebook
When it is hot, wear lightweight, loose lifting, light-colored clothing to reflect heat and sunlight. Hats are also a good idea to protect your face and scalp from harmful UV rays if you will be spending time directly in the sunshine. And apply sunscreen liberally. www.weather.gov/heatsafety #HeatSafety

Twitter
Find out how to dress for the weather  www.weather.gov/heatsafety #HeatSafety

Check Your Car

Worker Safety

Facebook
Summer weather poses unique hazards for workers and employers on the ground working to rebuild our communities and businesses, especially during response and recovery operations.
 
OSHA and NOAA encourage employers to stay aware of weather forecasts, train workers on severe weather plans, and keep emergency supplies, including a battery-operated weather radio, on hand to be better prepared.
  http://www.osha.gov/SLTC/emergencypreparedness/index.html

Facebook
Outdoor workers can be at a higher risk to the effects of excessive #heat. When working under hot conditions, OSHA recommends #WaterRestShade and allowing more frequent breaks for new workers or workers who have been away from the job for a week or more (acclimatization). Knowing symptoms, prevention and emergency response methods can help prevent heat-related illnesses and death. Check weather forecasts ahead of time to be better prepared. https://www.osha.gov/SLTC/heatillness/index.html

Twitter
Download the free #OSHA heat app to keep track of the heat index & make sure workers get #WaterRestShade: http://ow.ly/mZxrx

Twitter
Working outside in the #heat today? Make sure you get #WaterRestShade! Learn more at https://www.osha.gov/SLTC/heatillness/index.html #OSHA

Heat Index

Sunburn Safety

Facebook
Spending time in the sun on vacation this summer? Apply plenty of sunscreen! Also keep in mind that heat related illness is a possibility if you don’t take certain precautions. Find out more about heat related illnesses and how to prevent them at www.weather.gov/heat #HeatSafety

Twitter
Spending time in the sun? Apply sunscreen and avoid heat related illness: www.weather.gov/heat #HeatSafety

Working Outside

Heat Index

Facebook
Did you know the air temperature can actually feel hotter than what the thermometer reads? The Heat Index is a measure of how hot it really feels when relative humidity is factored in. To find out how hot it feels, you can use the pictured chart or the Heat Index calculator found at: http://www.nws.noaa.gov/om/heat/heat_index.shtml #HeatSafety

Twitter
The Heat Index tells you how hot it feels when relative humidity is factored in. http://1.usa.gov/1GLRN7n #HeatSafety

Excessive Heat Exposure

Heat Symptoms

Facebook
During extremely hot and humid weather, your body's ability to cool itself is challenged. When the body heats too rapidly to cool itself properly, or when too much fluid or salt is lost through dehydration or sweating, body temperature rises and you or someone you care about may experience a heat-related illness. Learn the symptoms of excessive heat exposure and the appropriate responses. http://www.nws.noaa.gov/om/heat/heat-illness.shtml #HeatSafety

Twitter
Learn the symptoms of excessive heat exposure and the appropriate responses.
http://www.nws.noaa.gov/om/heat/heat-illness.shtml #HeatSafety

Excessive Heat Exposure

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