Social Media: Tsunami Preparedness
#TsunamiPrep #tsunami

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Please help the NWS spread these important safety messages on social media! Everyone is welcome to use the text and images provided below to help the NWS build a Weather-Ready Nation.

Tsunami Preparedness

Facebook
Even though tsunamis don't happen very often, they pose a major threat to coastal communities. There is no season for tsunamis. A tsunami can strike any ocean coast at any time. But, there are things you can do to prepare. Get some tips from this new fast draw video. https://youtu.be/x0GX_kc7JZo.

Twitter
If you live, work or play on the coast, you should prepare for a #tsunami https://youtu.be/x0GX_kc7JZo #TsunamiPrep

 

En espanol

Esta animación de pizarrón blanco de NOAA explica cómo prepararse y responder ante un tsunami. Si vives, trabajas o pasas tiempo en la costa, prepárate y mantente a salvo. https://youtu.be/7U4rJ2bdSuc

What Is a Tsunami?

Facebook
What is a tsunami? It’s a series of waves (not just one) caused by a large and sudden disturbance of the sea. Most tsunamis are caused by undersea earthquakes. There is no season for tsunamis. A tsunami can strike anywhere along an ocean coast at any time and can be very dangerous to life and property. Learn more at http://www.nws.noaa.gov/om/Tsunami/about.shtml.

Twitter
What is a #tsunami? A series of waves that can strike anywhere on a coast, any time http://www.nws.noaa.gov/om/Tsunami/about.shtml


What Is a Tsunami?

Tsunami Dangers

Facebook
A tsunami can be very dangerous to life and property on the coast. It can produce dangerously strong currents, rapidly flood the land and cause great destruction. Even small tsunamis can be dangerous. Strong currents can injure and drown swimmers and damage and destroy boats in harbors. http://www.nws.noaa.gov/om/Tsunami/about.shtml

Twitter
A #tsunami, which may resemble a fast-rising flood, can be very dangerous to life & property http://www.nws.noaa.gov/om/Tsunami/about.shtml

Tsunami Dangers

Know Your Risk

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Do you live, work or play on the coast? Do you know your community’s tsunami risk? Your community may have identified and mapped tsunami hazard and evacuation zones. Check out links to tsunami maps on this page http://nws.weather.gov/nthmp/maps.html or ask your local/state emergency management office or your local NWS forecast office for more info. 

Twitter
Live, work or play on the coast? Know your #tsunami risk & evacuation zones http://nws.weather.gov/nthmp/maps.html #TsunamiPrep

Know Your Risk

U.S. Tsunami Alerts

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Official tsunami warnings are broadcast through local radio and tv, wireless emergency alerts, NOAA Weather Radio and NOAA websites. They may also come through outdoor sirens, local officials, text message alerts and telephone notifications. Learn about the four levels of tsunami alerts for the U.S. http://www.nws.noaa.gov/om/Tsunami/alerts.shtml.

Twitter
Tsunami alerts come from many sources like @NOAA websites & @NOAA Weather Radio http://www.nws.noaa.gov/om/Tsunami/alerts.shtml #TsunamiPrep

U.S. Tsunami Alerts

Natural Tsunami Warnings

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If a tsunami strikes, there may not be enough time for an official warning, so it is important to understand natural warnings. If you are at the coast and feel a strong or long earthquake, see a sudden rise or fall of the ocean or hear a loud roar from the ocean, a tsunami may follow. Move quickly to high ground or inland, away from the water. Watch http://youtu.be/0Kh3iVvlnPg. http://www.nws.noaa.gov/om/Tsunami/before.shtml

Twitter
Know nature's #tsunami warnings: strong or long quake, sudden ocean rise or fall, ocean roar http://youtu.be/0Kh3iVvlnPg http://www.nws.noaa.gov/om/Tsunami/before.shtml

How to Respond to a Tsunami Warning

Facebook
Some tsunami warnings will be natural, some will be official. Both are equally important. Official tsunami warnings will tell you what to do. Get updates from local radio/tv or your mobile phone. Follow instructions from local officials. http://www.nws.noaa.gov/om/Tsunami/during.shtml

Twitter
Both official & natural #tsunami warnings are important. Learn how to respond: http://www.nws.noaa.gov/om/Tsunami/during.shtml #TsunamiPrep

How to Respond to a Tsunami Warning

Prepare for a Tsunami

Facebook
If tsunamis are a threat in your community, you should include tsunami-specific preparations in your emergency plan. Learn the evacuation routes, identify safety areas and practice evacuating. http://www.nws.noaa.gov/om/Tsunami/before.shtml

Twitter
At risk from #tsunamis? Plan for and practice evacuation.http://www.nws.noaa.gov/om/Tsunami/before.shtml#TsunamiPrep

Prepare for a Tsunami

TsunamiReady

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Communication and education are important parts of the tsunami warning system. Through NOAA’s TsunamiReady program, a voluntary community recognition program, the National Weather Service works with communities to help them minimize the risk posed by tsunamis. Areas of emphasis include risk assessment, planning, education and warning communications.
Becoming TsunamiReady can improve public safety and reduce tsunami losses. Learn more: http://www.tsunamiready.noaa.gov/

Twitter
Becoming TsunamiReady can improve public safety & reduce #tsunami losses: http://www.tsunamiready.noaa.gov/ #TsunamiPrepTsunamiReady

National Tsunami Hazard Mitigation Program

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Led by NOAA, the National Tsunami Hazard Mitigation Program (NTHMP) works to protect lives and reduce economic losses from tsunamis at the community level. The NTHMP includes NOAA, FEMA, the USGS and 28 U.S. states/territories. Through collaboration, coordination, and support to partner states/territories, the NTHMP focuses on three key functions: hazard assessment, warning guidance and mitigation. Learn more: http://nws.weather.gov/nthmp/index.html.

Twitter
National Tsunami Hazard Mitigation Program aims to protect lives, reduce economic losses. http://nws.weather.gov/nthmp/index.html

National Tsunami Hazard Mitigation Program

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