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  Home > Experimental Tropical Cyclone Hazards Graphics > Tropical Cyclone Impact
See this office's Graphical Hurricane Local Statement:

New York City/Upton, New York
Tropical Cyclone Impact

Click on each thumbnail graphic to obtain full-sized graphics and detailed impacts definitions.

Wind
Click for wind impacts for the NWS New York City/Upton, New York warning area
Tornadoes
Click for tornado impacts for the NWS New York City/Upton, New York warning area
Inland Flooding
Click for inland flooding impacts for the NWS New York City/Upton, New York warning area
Coastal Flooding
Click for coastal flooding impacts for the NWS New York City/Upton, New York warning area

Wind is often the first weather impact a person thinks about from hurricanes. While the wind speed alone can cause considerable damage, it is the debris in the wind that results in the most destruction. Flying objects cut power lines, break windows and break branches that themselves become flying missiles.

Learn more about hurricane wind impacts.

Tornadoes associated with hurricanes are less intense than those that occur in the Great Plains. Nonetheless, the effects of tornadoes, added to the larger area of hurricane-force winds, can produce substantial damage.

Learn more about tornadoes and their impacts.

Inland flooding can be a major threat to communities hundreds of miles from the coast.  Intense rainfall is not directly related to the wind speed of tropical cyclones. In fact, some of the greatest rainfall amounts occur from weaker storms that move slowly or stall over an area.

Learn more about inland flooding impacts.

Coastal flooding is a result of the storm surge where local sea levels to rise often resulting in weakening or destruction of coastal structures. As the sea level rises, the constant battering waves and floating debris damage structures. It is these battering waves that cause most beach erosion and extensive damage to coastal structures.

Learn more about coastal flooding and impacts.

 

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     Page last Modified: 8 June, 2009 11:43 AM