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  Home > Experimental Tropical Cyclone Hazards Graphics > Tropical Cyclone Impact
See this office's Graphical Hurricane Local Statement:

Tallahassee, Florida
Coastal Flooding Impact
Wind Tornadoes Inland Flooding Coastal Flooding
Impacts by County from coastal flooding for the NWS Tallahassee, Florida warning area
 
None
 
Low
 
Moderate
 
High
 
Extreme
Alabama
Mobile

Florida
Jacksonville
Key West
Melbourne
Miami
Pensacola
Tallahassee
Tampa Bay

Louisiana
Lake Charles

Maryland
Baltimore/Washington

New Jersey
Mount Holly

New York
New York City/Upton

North Carolina
Newport/Morehead City
Wilmington

Pennsylvania
Philadelphia

South Carolina
Charleston

Texas
Brownsville
Corpus Christi

Virginia
Wakefield

Washington, DC
Baltimore/Washington


Coastal Flooding Impacts Definitions
Read this office's detailed Hurricane Local Statement

None

Threat - Less than 3 feet of storm tide. Minor tidal overwash possible.

Impact - Coastal Residents in typically flood prone areas can expect tidal "run-up" and perhaps some overwash during high tide. Others will experience little change.

Low

Threat - Storm tide values of 3 to 6 feet expected. Minor to moderate flooding in coastal communities.

Impact - All residents living on prone shorelines can expect some water incursion near or into their homes. Those in typically flood prone areas may have a foot or two of water in their homes, causing minor damage. Shoreline roads may briefly close or become cut off. Moderate beach erosion is possible, becoming likely if conditions extend through multiple high tide cycles.

Conditions will be worsened by battering waves. Such waves will increase the likelihood of property damage, especially to structures on or very near the shoreline.

Moderate

Threat - Storm tide values of 6 to 9 feet expected. Moderate to major flooding in coastal communities.

Impact - Coastal Inundation of Prone Communities Possible
All residents living on the shoreline will experience significant flooding during high tide. Homes will likely become uninhabitable in flood prone areas. Entire flood-prone coastal communities will be temporarily cutoff; water levels may exceed 6 feet more than a mile inland. Coastal residents of one story homes who do not evacuate will face life-threatening consequences; those in multi-story or multi-unit facilities risk being cutoff for days. Parked vehicles will be severely damaged in the flood zone.

Conditions will be worsened by battering waves. Such waves will exacerbate property damage, including destruction of homes and washing away vehicles. Beach erosion will be substantial, and require months to clean up.

Recent examples of moderate surge include Dennis (2005) in Wakulla County and Ivan (2004) in Walton County.

High

Threat – Storm tide values of 9 to 12 feet. Major to extreme flooding in coastal communities.

Impact - Life-Threatening Inundation Likely.

All neighborhoods, and possibly entire coastal communities, will be inundated. People not heeding evacuation orders in single family one or two story homes will face certain death. Many residences of average construction directly on the coast will be destroyed; widespread, devastating personal property damage is likely elsewhere.

Vehicles left behind will likely be swept away. Numerous roads will be swamped; some may be washed away by the water. Entire flood-prone coastal communities will be cutoff, perhaps for more than a week; water levels may exceed 9 feet more than three miles inland. Coastal residents in multi-story facilities risk being cutoff for a week or more.

Conditions will be worsened by battering waves. Such waves will exacerbate property damage, with likely massive destruction of homes, including those of block construction.

Damage from beach erosion could take years to repair. Examples of high storm surge have not occurred in our region in modern times. Several strong category two hurricanes in the 19th century produced devastating storm surges in Apalachee Bay. Most notably, the 1843 hurricane that made landfall near Carrabelle, Florida, produced a 10 foot storm surge that destroyed the community of Port Leon, near the mouth of the Saint Marks River.

Extreme

Threat - Storm tide values in excess of 12 feet.

Impact - Unprecedented Inundation Likely!
Entire coastal cities and towns will be inundated. Some barrier island beaches will be destroyed beyond recognition; permanent breaches may be cut. Thousands of homes and vehicles will be washed away; larger structures such as condominiums and hotels may also be destroyed; others with poor support may collapse. People who fail to evacuate will be swept to their deaths, as will livestock in the flood zone. Should the storm surge envelop any of the larger coastal urban centers such as Panama City, dollar damage may be a modern-day record.

Hundreds of roads will be washed away; full recovery will take months, if not years. Water levels may exceed 12 feet more than five miles inland. Conditions will be worsened by battering waves. Such waves will not only exacerbate property damage, but wash out solid road and bridge structures.

Damage from beach erosion will take years to repair. A previous hurricane in our region that produced a storm surge of this category was the Middle Florida Hurricane of 1851. This hurricane made landfall near Apalachicola and produced a storm surge in excess of 12 feet at Saint Marks that washed away fortifications and entire buildings. Similar damage was reported in Apalachicola where numerous warehouses were destroyed.

Recent Gulf of Mexico devastating surge examples include Katrina (2005) and Camille (1969).

Wind
Click for wind impacts for the NWS Tallahassee, Florida warning area
Tornadoes
Click for tornado impacts for the NWS Tallahassee, Florida warning area
Inland Flooding
Click for inland flooding impacts for the NWS Tallahassee, Florida warning area
Coastal Flooding
Click for coastal flooding impacts for the NWS Tallahassee, Florida warning area
None Low Moderate High Extreme
 

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     Page last Modified: 8 June, 2009 11:45 AM