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000
NOUS43 KFGF 022012
PNSFGF
NDZ006>008-014>016-054-030815-

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE GRAND FORKS ND
312 PM CDT THU JUL 2 2015

...PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT...

THE LANGDON NOAA WEATHER RADIO TRANSMITTER KWN-43 AT 162.500 MHZ
IS BEING WORKED ON BY MAINTENANCE PERSONNEL. THE TRANSMITTER WILL
BE BROADCASTING INTERMITTENTLY DURING THIS PERIOD.

$$

HOPKINS


000
NOUS43 KFGF 022012
PNSFGF
NDZ006>008-014>016-054-030815-

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE GRAND FORKS ND
312 PM CDT THU JUL 2 2015

...PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT...

THE LANGDON NOAA WEATHER RADIO TRANSMITTER KWN-43 AT 162.500 MHZ
IS BEING WORKED ON BY MAINTENANCE PERSONNEL. THE TRANSMITTER WILL
BE BROADCASTING INTERMITTENTLY DURING THIS PERIOD.

$$

HOPKINS



000
NOUS45 KGJT 021920
PNSGJT

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
PRELIMINARY RECORD EVENT REPORT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE GRAND JUNCTION CO
220 PM MDT THU JUL 2 2015

...RECORD HIGH TEMPERATURES SET OR TIED YESTERDAY...

IN WESTERN COLORADO...

AT RIDGWAY, THE HIGH TEMPERATURE YESTERDAY WAS 93 DEGREES. THIS TIED
THE RECORD HIGH FOR JULY 1ST, LAST SET IN 2007.


IN EASTERN UTAH...

AT 1 MILE SOUTHEAST OF CASTLE VALLEY, THE HIGH TEMPERATURE YESTERDAY
WAS 104 DEGREES. THIS SET A NEW RECORD HIGH FOR JULY 1ST IN THE
CASTLE VALLEY AREA, BREAKING THE PREVIOUS RECORD OF 103, SET IN 2002.

$$

MDA



000
NOUS45 KGJT 021920
PNSGJT

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
PRELIMINARY RECORD EVENT REPORT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE GRAND JUNCTION CO
220 PM MDT THU JUL 2 2015

...RECORD HIGH TEMPERATURES SET OR TIED YESTERDAY...

IN WESTERN COLORADO...

AT RIDGWAY, THE HIGH TEMPERATURE YESTERDAY WAS 93 DEGREES. THIS TIED
THE RECORD HIGH FOR JULY 1ST, LAST SET IN 2007.


IN EASTERN UTAH...

AT 1 MILE SOUTHEAST OF CASTLE VALLEY, THE HIGH TEMPERATURE YESTERDAY
WAS 104 DEGREES. THIS SET A NEW RECORD HIGH FOR JULY 1ST IN THE
CASTLE VALLEY AREA, BREAKING THE PREVIOUS RECORD OF 103, SET IN 2002.

$$

MDA



000
NOUS45 KGJT 021920
PNSGJT

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
PRELIMINARY RECORD EVENT REPORT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE GRAND JUNCTION CO
220 PM MDT THU JUL 2 2015

...RECORD HIGH TEMPERATURES SET OR TIED YESTERDAY...

IN WESTERN COLORADO...

AT RIDGWAY, THE HIGH TEMPERATURE YESTERDAY WAS 93 DEGREES. THIS TIED
THE RECORD HIGH FOR JULY 1ST, LAST SET IN 2007.


IN EASTERN UTAH...

AT 1 MILE SOUTHEAST OF CASTLE VALLEY, THE HIGH TEMPERATURE YESTERDAY
WAS 104 DEGREES. THIS SET A NEW RECORD HIGH FOR JULY 1ST IN THE
CASTLE VALLEY AREA, BREAKING THE PREVIOUS RECORD OF 103, SET IN 2002.

$$

MDA



000
NOUS45 KGJT 021920
PNSGJT

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
PRELIMINARY RECORD EVENT REPORT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE GRAND JUNCTION CO
220 PM MDT THU JUL 2 2015

...RECORD HIGH TEMPERATURES SET OR TIED YESTERDAY...

IN WESTERN COLORADO...

AT RIDGWAY, THE HIGH TEMPERATURE YESTERDAY WAS 93 DEGREES. THIS TIED
THE RECORD HIGH FOR JULY 1ST, LAST SET IN 2007.


IN EASTERN UTAH...

AT 1 MILE SOUTHEAST OF CASTLE VALLEY, THE HIGH TEMPERATURE YESTERDAY
WAS 104 DEGREES. THIS SET A NEW RECORD HIGH FOR JULY 1ST IN THE
CASTLE VALLEY AREA, BREAKING THE PREVIOUS RECORD OF 103, SET IN 2002.

$$

MDA



000
NOUS43 KEAX 021917
PNSEAX
KSZ025-057-060-102>105-MOZ001>008-011>017-020>025-028>033-037>040-
043>046-053-054-030730-

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE KANSAS CITY/PLEASANT HILL
217 PM CDT Thu Jul 2 2015

...NWS DAMAGE SURVEY FOR 7/1/15 TORNADO EVENT...

.LEES SUMMIT MO TORNADO #1...

RATING:                 EF-1
ESTIMATED PEAK WIND:    100 MPH
PATH LENGTH /STATUTE/:  1 MILE
PATH WIDTH /MAXIMUM/:   100 YARDS
FATALITIES:             0
INJURIES:               0

START DATE:             JULY 1 2015
START TIME:             651 PM CDT
START LOCATION:         2 MILES NORTH DOWNTOWN LEES SUMMIT MO
START LAT/LON:          38.941/-94.385

END DATE:               JULY 1 2015
END TIME:               655 PM CDT
END LOCATION:           1 MILE NORTH DOWNTOWN LEES SUMMIT MO
END_LAT/LON:            38.929/-94.377

.LEES SUMMIT MO TORNADO #2...

RATING:                 EF-0
ESTIMATED PEAK WIND:    75 MPH
PATH LENGTH /STATUTE/:  0.2 MILES
PATH WIDTH /MAXIMUM/:   50 YARDS
FATALITIES:             0
INJURIES:               0

START DATE:             JULY 1 2015
START TIME:             704 PM CDT
START LOCATION:         2.5 MILES ESE DOWNTOWN LEES SUMMIT MO
START LAT/LON:          38.897/-94.341

END DATE:               JULY 1 2015
END TIME:               704 PM CDT
END LOCATION:           2.5 MILES ESE DOWNTOWN LEES SUMMIT MO
END_LAT/LON:            38.897/-94.341

.PLEASANT HILL MO TORNADO...

RATING:                 EF-0
ESTIMATED PEAK WIND:    85 MPH
PATH LENGTH /STATUTE/:  1.5 MILES
PATH WIDTH /MAXIMUM/:   100 YARDS
FATALITIES:             0
INJURIES:               0

START DATE:             JULY 1 2015
START TIME:             801 PM CDT
START LOCATION:         2 MILES WSW PLEASANT HILL MO
START LAT/LON:          38.776/-94.307

END DATE:               JULY 1 2015
END TIME:               807 PM CDT
END LOCATION:           1.5 MILES SW PLEASANT HILL MO
END_LAT/LON:            38.770/-94.282

EF SCALE: THE ENHANCED FUJITA SCALE CLASSIFIES
TORNADOES INTO THE FOLLOWING CATEGORIES.

EF0...WEAK......65 TO 85 MPH
EF1...WEAK......86 TO 110 MPH
EF2...STRONG....111 TO 135 MPH
EF3...STRONG....136 TO 165 MPH
EF4...VIOLENT...166 TO 200 MPH
EF5...VIOLENT...>200 MPH

NOTE:
THE INFORMATION IN THIS STATEMENT IS PRELIMINARY AND SUBJECT TO
CHANGE PENDING FINAL REVIEW OF THE EVENTS AND PUBLICATION IN
NWS STORM DATA.

$$

BLAIR





000
NOUS43 KEAX 021917
PNSEAX
KSZ025-057-060-102>105-MOZ001>008-011>017-020>025-028>033-037>040-
043>046-053-054-030730-

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE KANSAS CITY/PLEASANT HILL
217 PM CDT Thu Jul 2 2015

...NWS DAMAGE SURVEY FOR 7/1/15 TORNADO EVENT...

.LEES SUMMIT MO TORNADO #1...

RATING:                 EF-1
ESTIMATED PEAK WIND:    100 MPH
PATH LENGTH /STATUTE/:  1 MILE
PATH WIDTH /MAXIMUM/:   100 YARDS
FATALITIES:             0
INJURIES:               0

START DATE:             JULY 1 2015
START TIME:             651 PM CDT
START LOCATION:         2 MILES NORTH DOWNTOWN LEES SUMMIT MO
START LAT/LON:          38.941/-94.385

END DATE:               JULY 1 2015
END TIME:               655 PM CDT
END LOCATION:           1 MILE NORTH DOWNTOWN LEES SUMMIT MO
END_LAT/LON:            38.929/-94.377

.LEES SUMMIT MO TORNADO #2...

RATING:                 EF-0
ESTIMATED PEAK WIND:    75 MPH
PATH LENGTH /STATUTE/:  0.2 MILES
PATH WIDTH /MAXIMUM/:   50 YARDS
FATALITIES:             0
INJURIES:               0

START DATE:             JULY 1 2015
START TIME:             704 PM CDT
START LOCATION:         2.5 MILES ESE DOWNTOWN LEES SUMMIT MO
START LAT/LON:          38.897/-94.341

END DATE:               JULY 1 2015
END TIME:               704 PM CDT
END LOCATION:           2.5 MILES ESE DOWNTOWN LEES SUMMIT MO
END_LAT/LON:            38.897/-94.341

.PLEASANT HILL MO TORNADO...

RATING:                 EF-0
ESTIMATED PEAK WIND:    85 MPH
PATH LENGTH /STATUTE/:  1.5 MILES
PATH WIDTH /MAXIMUM/:   100 YARDS
FATALITIES:             0
INJURIES:               0

START DATE:             JULY 1 2015
START TIME:             801 PM CDT
START LOCATION:         2 MILES WSW PLEASANT HILL MO
START LAT/LON:          38.776/-94.307

END DATE:               JULY 1 2015
END TIME:               807 PM CDT
END LOCATION:           1.5 MILES SW PLEASANT HILL MO
END_LAT/LON:            38.770/-94.282

EF SCALE: THE ENHANCED FUJITA SCALE CLASSIFIES
TORNADOES INTO THE FOLLOWING CATEGORIES.

EF0...WEAK......65 TO 85 MPH
EF1...WEAK......86 TO 110 MPH
EF2...STRONG....111 TO 135 MPH
EF3...STRONG....136 TO 165 MPH
EF4...VIOLENT...166 TO 200 MPH
EF5...VIOLENT...>200 MPH

NOTE:
THE INFORMATION IN THIS STATEMENT IS PRELIMINARY AND SUBJECT TO
CHANGE PENDING FINAL REVIEW OF THE EVENTS AND PUBLICATION IN
NWS STORM DATA.

$$

BLAIR






000
NOUS43 KEAX 021917
PNSEAX
KSZ025-057-060-102>105-MOZ001>008-011>017-020>025-028>033-037>040-
043>046-053-054-030730-

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE KANSAS CITY/PLEASANT HILL
217 PM CDT Thu Jul 2 2015

...NWS DAMAGE SURVEY FOR 7/1/15 TORNADO EVENT...

.LEES SUMMIT MO TORNADO #1...

RATING:                 EF-1
ESTIMATED PEAK WIND:    100 MPH
PATH LENGTH /STATUTE/:  1 MILE
PATH WIDTH /MAXIMUM/:   100 YARDS
FATALITIES:             0
INJURIES:               0

START DATE:             JULY 1 2015
START TIME:             651 PM CDT
START LOCATION:         2 MILES NORTH DOWNTOWN LEES SUMMIT MO
START LAT/LON:          38.941/-94.385

END DATE:               JULY 1 2015
END TIME:               655 PM CDT
END LOCATION:           1 MILE NORTH DOWNTOWN LEES SUMMIT MO
END_LAT/LON:            38.929/-94.377

.LEES SUMMIT MO TORNADO #2...

RATING:                 EF-0
ESTIMATED PEAK WIND:    75 MPH
PATH LENGTH /STATUTE/:  0.2 MILES
PATH WIDTH /MAXIMUM/:   50 YARDS
FATALITIES:             0
INJURIES:               0

START DATE:             JULY 1 2015
START TIME:             704 PM CDT
START LOCATION:         2.5 MILES ESE DOWNTOWN LEES SUMMIT MO
START LAT/LON:          38.897/-94.341

END DATE:               JULY 1 2015
END TIME:               704 PM CDT
END LOCATION:           2.5 MILES ESE DOWNTOWN LEES SUMMIT MO
END_LAT/LON:            38.897/-94.341

.PLEASANT HILL MO TORNADO...

RATING:                 EF-0
ESTIMATED PEAK WIND:    85 MPH
PATH LENGTH /STATUTE/:  1.5 MILES
PATH WIDTH /MAXIMUM/:   100 YARDS
FATALITIES:             0
INJURIES:               0

START DATE:             JULY 1 2015
START TIME:             801 PM CDT
START LOCATION:         2 MILES WSW PLEASANT HILL MO
START LAT/LON:          38.776/-94.307

END DATE:               JULY 1 2015
END TIME:               807 PM CDT
END LOCATION:           1.5 MILES SW PLEASANT HILL MO
END_LAT/LON:            38.770/-94.282

EF SCALE: THE ENHANCED FUJITA SCALE CLASSIFIES
TORNADOES INTO THE FOLLOWING CATEGORIES.

EF0...WEAK......65 TO 85 MPH
EF1...WEAK......86 TO 110 MPH
EF2...STRONG....111 TO 135 MPH
EF3...STRONG....136 TO 165 MPH
EF4...VIOLENT...166 TO 200 MPH
EF5...VIOLENT...>200 MPH

NOTE:
THE INFORMATION IN THIS STATEMENT IS PRELIMINARY AND SUBJECT TO
CHANGE PENDING FINAL REVIEW OF THE EVENTS AND PUBLICATION IN
NWS STORM DATA.

$$

BLAIR





000
NOUS43 KEAX 021917
PNSEAX
KSZ025-057-060-102>105-MOZ001>008-011>017-020>025-028>033-037>040-
043>046-053-054-030730-

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE KANSAS CITY/PLEASANT HILL
217 PM CDT Thu Jul 2 2015

...NWS DAMAGE SURVEY FOR 7/1/15 TORNADO EVENT...

.LEES SUMMIT MO TORNADO #1...

RATING:                 EF-1
ESTIMATED PEAK WIND:    100 MPH
PATH LENGTH /STATUTE/:  1 MILE
PATH WIDTH /MAXIMUM/:   100 YARDS
FATALITIES:             0
INJURIES:               0

START DATE:             JULY 1 2015
START TIME:             651 PM CDT
START LOCATION:         2 MILES NORTH DOWNTOWN LEES SUMMIT MO
START LAT/LON:          38.941/-94.385

END DATE:               JULY 1 2015
END TIME:               655 PM CDT
END LOCATION:           1 MILE NORTH DOWNTOWN LEES SUMMIT MO
END_LAT/LON:            38.929/-94.377

.LEES SUMMIT MO TORNADO #2...

RATING:                 EF-0
ESTIMATED PEAK WIND:    75 MPH
PATH LENGTH /STATUTE/:  0.2 MILES
PATH WIDTH /MAXIMUM/:   50 YARDS
FATALITIES:             0
INJURIES:               0

START DATE:             JULY 1 2015
START TIME:             704 PM CDT
START LOCATION:         2.5 MILES ESE DOWNTOWN LEES SUMMIT MO
START LAT/LON:          38.897/-94.341

END DATE:               JULY 1 2015
END TIME:               704 PM CDT
END LOCATION:           2.5 MILES ESE DOWNTOWN LEES SUMMIT MO
END_LAT/LON:            38.897/-94.341

.PLEASANT HILL MO TORNADO...

RATING:                 EF-0
ESTIMATED PEAK WIND:    85 MPH
PATH LENGTH /STATUTE/:  1.5 MILES
PATH WIDTH /MAXIMUM/:   100 YARDS
FATALITIES:             0
INJURIES:               0

START DATE:             JULY 1 2015
START TIME:             801 PM CDT
START LOCATION:         2 MILES WSW PLEASANT HILL MO
START LAT/LON:          38.776/-94.307

END DATE:               JULY 1 2015
END TIME:               807 PM CDT
END LOCATION:           1.5 MILES SW PLEASANT HILL MO
END_LAT/LON:            38.770/-94.282

EF SCALE: THE ENHANCED FUJITA SCALE CLASSIFIES
TORNADOES INTO THE FOLLOWING CATEGORIES.

EF0...WEAK......65 TO 85 MPH
EF1...WEAK......86 TO 110 MPH
EF2...STRONG....111 TO 135 MPH
EF3...STRONG....136 TO 165 MPH
EF4...VIOLENT...166 TO 200 MPH
EF5...VIOLENT...>200 MPH

NOTE:
THE INFORMATION IN THIS STATEMENT IS PRELIMINARY AND SUBJECT TO
CHANGE PENDING FINAL REVIEW OF THE EVENTS AND PUBLICATION IN
NWS STORM DATA.

$$

BLAIR






000
NOUS43 KSGF 021912 CCA
PNSSGF
KSZ073-097-101-MOZ055>058-066>071-077>083-088>098-101>106-030100-
PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE SPRINGFIELD MO
158 PM CDT Thu Jul 2 2015

...EF-1 tornado confirmed in Benton County(correction for date)...

* Date...07/01/2015
* Begin Location...3 miles northwest of Warsaw
* End Location...0.5 miles west of Warsaw
* Estimated begin time...9:56 PM CDT
* Estimated end time...10:03 PM CDT
* MAXIMUM EF-SCALE RATING...EF-1
* Estimated maximum wind speed...94 MPH
* Estimated path width...1/4 to 1/2 mile.
* Path length...3.25 miles.
* Fatalities...None.
* Injuries...None.
* Begin Lat/Lon...38.28435 N / -93.42776 W
* End Lat/Lon...38.24306 N / -93.39658 W

* This preliminary information was determined by a National
  Weather Service Survey Team and is subject to change pending
  final review ot the event and publication in National Weather
  Service Storm Data.

Additional information...

Numerous trees were uprooted along the path. A metal building was
damaged. A boat dock was flipped with 7 boats sunk at the dock. A
fireworks tent was blown over.


This information can also be found on our website at
 www.weather.gov/sgf .

For reference...the Enhanced Fujita scale classifies tornadoes
into the following categories:

EF0...Wind speeds  65 to  85 MPH.
EF1...Wind speeds  86 to 110 MPH.
EF2...Wind speeds 111 to 135 MPH.
EF3...Wind speeds 136 to 165 MPH.
EF4...Wind speeds 166 to 200 MPH.
EF5...Wind speeds GREATER than 200 MPH.


&&

$$

LINDENBERG







000
NOUS43 KSGF 021912 CCA
PNSSGF
KSZ073-097-101-MOZ055>058-066>071-077>083-088>098-101>106-030100-
PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE SPRINGFIELD MO
158 PM CDT Thu Jul 2 2015

...EF-1 tornado confirmed in Benton County(correction for date)...

* Date...07/01/2015
* Begin Location...3 miles northwest of Warsaw
* End Location...0.5 miles west of Warsaw
* Estimated begin time...9:56 PM CDT
* Estimated end time...10:03 PM CDT
* MAXIMUM EF-SCALE RATING...EF-1
* Estimated maximum wind speed...94 MPH
* Estimated path width...1/4 to 1/2 mile.
* Path length...3.25 miles.
* Fatalities...None.
* Injuries...None.
* Begin Lat/Lon...38.28435 N / -93.42776 W
* End Lat/Lon...38.24306 N / -93.39658 W

* This preliminary information was determined by a National
  Weather Service Survey Team and is subject to change pending
  final review ot the event and publication in National Weather
  Service Storm Data.

Additional information...

Numerous trees were uprooted along the path. A metal building was
damaged. A boat dock was flipped with 7 boats sunk at the dock. A
fireworks tent was blown over.


This information can also be found on our website at
 www.weather.gov/sgf .

For reference...the Enhanced Fujita scale classifies tornadoes
into the following categories:

EF0...Wind speeds  65 to  85 MPH.
EF1...Wind speeds  86 to 110 MPH.
EF2...Wind speeds 111 to 135 MPH.
EF3...Wind speeds 136 to 165 MPH.
EF4...Wind speeds 166 to 200 MPH.
EF5...Wind speeds GREATER than 200 MPH.


&&

$$

LINDENBERG






000
NOUS43 KSGF 021858
PNSSGF

KSZ073-097-101-MOZ055>058-066>071-077>083-088>098-101>106-030100-
PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE SPRINGFIELD MO
158 PM CDT Thu Jul 2 2015

...EF-1 tornado confirmed in Benton County...

* Date...07/02/2015
* Begin Location...3 miles northwest of Warsaw
* End Location...0.5 miles west of Warsaw
* Estimated begin time...9:56 PM CDT
* Estimated end time...10:03 PM CDT
* MAXIMUM EF-SCALE RATING...EF-1
* Estimated maximum wind speed...94 MPH
* Estimated path width...1/4 to 1/2 mile.
* Path length...3.25 miles.
* Fatalities...None.
* Injuries...None.
* Begin Lat/Lon...38.28435 N / -93.42776 W
* End Lat/Lon...38.24306 N / -93.39658 W

* This preliminary information was determined by a National
  Weather Service Survey Team and is subject to change pending
  final review ot the event and publication in National Weather
  Service Storm Data.

Additional information...

Numerous trees were uprooted along the path. A metal building was
damaged. A boat dock was flipped with 7 boats sunk at the dock. A
fireworks tent was blown over.


This information can also be found on our website at
 www.weather.gov/sgf .

For reference...the Enhanced Fujita scale classifies tornadoes
into the following categories:

EF0...Wind speeds  65 to  85 MPH.
EF1...Wind speeds  86 t0 110 MPH.
EF2...Wind speeds 111 to 135 MPH.
EF3...Wind speeds 136 to 165 MPH.
EF4...Wind speeds 166 to 200 MPH.
EF5...Wind speeds GREATER than 200 MPH.


&&

$$

LINDENBERG





000
NOUS43 KSGF 021858
PNSSGF

KSZ073-097-101-MOZ055>058-066>071-077>083-088>098-101>106-030100-
PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE SPRINGFIELD MO
158 PM CDT Thu Jul 2 2015

...EF-1 tornado confirmed in Benton County...

* Date...07/02/2015
* Begin Location...3 miles northwest of Warsaw
* End Location...0.5 miles west of Warsaw
* Estimated begin time...9:56 PM CDT
* Estimated end time...10:03 PM CDT
* MAXIMUM EF-SCALE RATING...EF-1
* Estimated maximum wind speed...94 MPH
* Estimated path width...1/4 to 1/2 mile.
* Path length...3.25 miles.
* Fatalities...None.
* Injuries...None.
* Begin Lat/Lon...38.28435 N / -93.42776 W
* End Lat/Lon...38.24306 N / -93.39658 W

* This preliminary information was determined by a National
  Weather Service Survey Team and is subject to change pending
  final review ot the event and publication in National Weather
  Service Storm Data.

Additional information...

Numerous trees were uprooted along the path. A metal building was
damaged. A boat dock was flipped with 7 boats sunk at the dock. A
fireworks tent was blown over.


This information can also be found on our website at
 www.weather.gov/sgf .

For reference...the Enhanced Fujita scale classifies tornadoes
into the following categories:

EF0...Wind speeds  65 to  85 MPH.
EF1...Wind speeds  86 t0 110 MPH.
EF2...Wind speeds 111 to 135 MPH.
EF3...Wind speeds 136 to 165 MPH.
EF4...Wind speeds 166 to 200 MPH.
EF5...Wind speeds GREATER than 200 MPH.


&&

$$

LINDENBERG




000
NZUS45 KPUB 021850
PNSPUB
COZ058>089-093>099-030700-

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE PUEBLO CO
1250 PM MDT THU JUL 2 2015

THE FOLLOWING IS A LIST OF SOME THUNDERSTORM SAFETY RULES THAT
CAN BE PASSED ALONG TO RESIDENTS OF...AND VISITORS TO...SOUTHERN
COLORADO.

IF YOU PLAN TO BE OUTDOORS...CHECK THE LATEST WEATHER
INFORMATION. IF THUNDERSTORMS ARE IN THE FORECAST...YOU MAY WANT
TO CURTAIL OUTDOOR ACTIVITIES.

IF YOU ARE OUTDOORS AND HEAR THUNDER...YOU SHOULD IMMEDIATELY GET
INDOORS INTO A SUBSTANTIAL BUILDING...OR GET INTO ANY HARD TOPPED
VEHICLE. LIGHTNING CAN STRIKE SEVERAL MILES AWAY FROM THE STORM...
WHERE IT IS NOT RAINING AND WHERE YOU MAY BE.

IN COLORADO...LIGHTNING CAN OCCUR WITH THUNDERSTORMS THAT PRODUCE
LITTLE...IF ANY...RAIN. DO NOT WAIT TOO LONG TO TAKE ACTION.
DEADLY LIGHTNING CAN OCCUR WITH ALL THUNDERSTORMS. WAIT
30 MINUTES UNTIL THE LAST RUMBLE OF THUNDER BEFORE RESUMING
OUTDOOR ACTIVITIES.

IF YOU ARE CAUGHT OUTDOORS DURING A LIGHTNING STORM...AND THERE
IS NO SAFE SHELTER NEARBY...THERE IS NOT MUCH YOU CAN DO TO
REDUCE YOUR RISK OF BEING STRUCK BY LIGHTNING.  THE BEST THING TO
DO IS FIND A LOW SPOT AND STAY AWAY FROM TREES.  IF YOU ARE IN
THE MOUNTAINS AND ARE ABOVE TIMBERLINE...GO TO A LOWER AREA.  IF
YOU ARE BELOW TIMBERLINE...TRY TO FIND AN OPEN AREA AWAY FROM
TREES.  IF YOU ARE IN AN AREA OF DENSE TREES...DO YOUR BEST TO
STAY AWAY FROM THE TALLEST TREES.

IF YOU ARE IN A GROUP...STAY APART.  IF SOMEONE IS STRUCK...
OTHERS WILL BE ABLE TO HELP THE VICTIM.

REMEMBER...WHEN THUNDER ROARS...GO INDOORS.

$$


000
NZUS45 KPUB 021850
PNSPUB
COZ058>089-093>099-030700-

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE PUEBLO CO
1250 PM MDT THU JUL 2 2015

THE FOLLOWING IS A LIST OF SOME THUNDERSTORM SAFETY RULES THAT
CAN BE PASSED ALONG TO RESIDENTS OF...AND VISITORS TO...SOUTHERN
COLORADO.

IF YOU PLAN TO BE OUTDOORS...CHECK THE LATEST WEATHER
INFORMATION. IF THUNDERSTORMS ARE IN THE FORECAST...YOU MAY WANT
TO CURTAIL OUTDOOR ACTIVITIES.

IF YOU ARE OUTDOORS AND HEAR THUNDER...YOU SHOULD IMMEDIATELY GET
INDOORS INTO A SUBSTANTIAL BUILDING...OR GET INTO ANY HARD TOPPED
VEHICLE. LIGHTNING CAN STRIKE SEVERAL MILES AWAY FROM THE STORM...
WHERE IT IS NOT RAINING AND WHERE YOU MAY BE.

IN COLORADO...LIGHTNING CAN OCCUR WITH THUNDERSTORMS THAT PRODUCE
LITTLE...IF ANY...RAIN. DO NOT WAIT TOO LONG TO TAKE ACTION.
DEADLY LIGHTNING CAN OCCUR WITH ALL THUNDERSTORMS. WAIT
30 MINUTES UNTIL THE LAST RUMBLE OF THUNDER BEFORE RESUMING
OUTDOOR ACTIVITIES.

IF YOU ARE CAUGHT OUTDOORS DURING A LIGHTNING STORM...AND THERE
IS NO SAFE SHELTER NEARBY...THERE IS NOT MUCH YOU CAN DO TO
REDUCE YOUR RISK OF BEING STRUCK BY LIGHTNING.  THE BEST THING TO
DO IS FIND A LOW SPOT AND STAY AWAY FROM TREES.  IF YOU ARE IN
THE MOUNTAINS AND ARE ABOVE TIMBERLINE...GO TO A LOWER AREA.  IF
YOU ARE BELOW TIMBERLINE...TRY TO FIND AN OPEN AREA AWAY FROM
TREES.  IF YOU ARE IN AN AREA OF DENSE TREES...DO YOUR BEST TO
STAY AWAY FROM THE TALLEST TREES.

IF YOU ARE IN A GROUP...STAY APART.  IF SOMEONE IS STRUCK...
OTHERS WILL BE ABLE TO HELP THE VICTIM.

REMEMBER...WHEN THUNDER ROARS...GO INDOORS.

$$



000
NZUS45 KPUB 021850
PNSPUB
COZ058>089-093>099-030700-

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE PUEBLO CO
1250 PM MDT THU JUL 2 2015

THE FOLLOWING IS A LIST OF SOME THUNDERSTORM SAFETY RULES THAT
CAN BE PASSED ALONG TO RESIDENTS OF...AND VISITORS TO...SOUTHERN
COLORADO.

IF YOU PLAN TO BE OUTDOORS...CHECK THE LATEST WEATHER
INFORMATION. IF THUNDERSTORMS ARE IN THE FORECAST...YOU MAY WANT
TO CURTAIL OUTDOOR ACTIVITIES.

IF YOU ARE OUTDOORS AND HEAR THUNDER...YOU SHOULD IMMEDIATELY GET
INDOORS INTO A SUBSTANTIAL BUILDING...OR GET INTO ANY HARD TOPPED
VEHICLE. LIGHTNING CAN STRIKE SEVERAL MILES AWAY FROM THE STORM...
WHERE IT IS NOT RAINING AND WHERE YOU MAY BE.

IN COLORADO...LIGHTNING CAN OCCUR WITH THUNDERSTORMS THAT PRODUCE
LITTLE...IF ANY...RAIN. DO NOT WAIT TOO LONG TO TAKE ACTION.
DEADLY LIGHTNING CAN OCCUR WITH ALL THUNDERSTORMS. WAIT
30 MINUTES UNTIL THE LAST RUMBLE OF THUNDER BEFORE RESUMING
OUTDOOR ACTIVITIES.

IF YOU ARE CAUGHT OUTDOORS DURING A LIGHTNING STORM...AND THERE
IS NO SAFE SHELTER NEARBY...THERE IS NOT MUCH YOU CAN DO TO
REDUCE YOUR RISK OF BEING STRUCK BY LIGHTNING.  THE BEST THING TO
DO IS FIND A LOW SPOT AND STAY AWAY FROM TREES.  IF YOU ARE IN
THE MOUNTAINS AND ARE ABOVE TIMBERLINE...GO TO A LOWER AREA.  IF
YOU ARE BELOW TIMBERLINE...TRY TO FIND AN OPEN AREA AWAY FROM
TREES.  IF YOU ARE IN AN AREA OF DENSE TREES...DO YOUR BEST TO
STAY AWAY FROM THE TALLEST TREES.

IF YOU ARE IN A GROUP...STAY APART.  IF SOMEONE IS STRUCK...
OTHERS WILL BE ABLE TO HELP THE VICTIM.

REMEMBER...WHEN THUNDER ROARS...GO INDOORS.

$$



000
NZUS45 KPUB 021850
PNSPUB
COZ058>089-093>099-030700-

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE PUEBLO CO
1250 PM MDT THU JUL 2 2015

THE FOLLOWING IS A LIST OF SOME THUNDERSTORM SAFETY RULES THAT
CAN BE PASSED ALONG TO RESIDENTS OF...AND VISITORS TO...SOUTHERN
COLORADO.

IF YOU PLAN TO BE OUTDOORS...CHECK THE LATEST WEATHER
INFORMATION. IF THUNDERSTORMS ARE IN THE FORECAST...YOU MAY WANT
TO CURTAIL OUTDOOR ACTIVITIES.

IF YOU ARE OUTDOORS AND HEAR THUNDER...YOU SHOULD IMMEDIATELY GET
INDOORS INTO A SUBSTANTIAL BUILDING...OR GET INTO ANY HARD TOPPED
VEHICLE. LIGHTNING CAN STRIKE SEVERAL MILES AWAY FROM THE STORM...
WHERE IT IS NOT RAINING AND WHERE YOU MAY BE.

IN COLORADO...LIGHTNING CAN OCCUR WITH THUNDERSTORMS THAT PRODUCE
LITTLE...IF ANY...RAIN. DO NOT WAIT TOO LONG TO TAKE ACTION.
DEADLY LIGHTNING CAN OCCUR WITH ALL THUNDERSTORMS. WAIT
30 MINUTES UNTIL THE LAST RUMBLE OF THUNDER BEFORE RESUMING
OUTDOOR ACTIVITIES.

IF YOU ARE CAUGHT OUTDOORS DURING A LIGHTNING STORM...AND THERE
IS NO SAFE SHELTER NEARBY...THERE IS NOT MUCH YOU CAN DO TO
REDUCE YOUR RISK OF BEING STRUCK BY LIGHTNING.  THE BEST THING TO
DO IS FIND A LOW SPOT AND STAY AWAY FROM TREES.  IF YOU ARE IN
THE MOUNTAINS AND ARE ABOVE TIMBERLINE...GO TO A LOWER AREA.  IF
YOU ARE BELOW TIMBERLINE...TRY TO FIND AN OPEN AREA AWAY FROM
TREES.  IF YOU ARE IN AN AREA OF DENSE TREES...DO YOUR BEST TO
STAY AWAY FROM THE TALLEST TREES.

IF YOU ARE IN A GROUP...STAY APART.  IF SOMEONE IS STRUCK...
OTHERS WILL BE ABLE TO HELP THE VICTIM.

REMEMBER...WHEN THUNDER ROARS...GO INDOORS.

$$


000
NOUS45 KGJT 021849
PNSGJT
COZ001>014-017>023-UTZ022>025-027>029-030649-

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
SPOTTER REPORTS
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE GRAND JUNCTION CO
1249 PM MDT THU JUL 02 2015

THE FOLLOWING ARE PRELIMINARY 24 HOUR PRECIPITATION AMOUNTS FROM
EASTERN UTAH AND WESTERN COLORADO ENDING AROUND 9 AM JULY 2ND.
AMOUNTS ARE IN INCHES.

**********************24 HOUR PRECIPITATION**********************

LOCATION              24 HOUR     TIME/DATE   COMMENTS
                     PRECIPITATION           OF
                     /INCHES/   MEASUREMENT

COLORADO

...ARCHULETA COUNTY...
   PAGOSA SPRINGS 4.2 W  0.06   707 AM  7/02  COCORAHS

...DOLORES COUNTY...
   DOVE CREEK 12.4 SSW   0.05   701 AM  7/02  COCORAHS

...EAGLE COUNTY...
   EDWARDS 1.3 WNW       0.18   646 AM  7/02  COCORAHS
   CARBONDALE 5.7 E      0.04   712 AM  7/02  COCORAHS
   VAIL 0.9 WNW          0.02   647 AM  7/02  COCORAHS
   WOLCOTT 2.3 N         0.01   722 AM  7/02  COCORAHS
   WOLCOTT 2N            0.01   800 AM  7/02  UNOFFICIAL STATION

...GUNNISON COUNTY...
   PITKIN 1.1 SW         0.07   748 AM  7/02  COCORAHS
   GOTHIC                0.02   800 AM  7/02  UNOFFICIAL STATION
   CRESTED BUTTE 6.2 N   0.02   750 AM  7/02  COCORAHS

...LA PLATA COUNTY...
   ROCKWOOD 6.7 N        0.41   859 AM  7/02  COCORAHS
   HESPERUS 13.3 SSW     0.13   824 AM  7/02  COCORAHS
   HESPERUS 5.7 SW       0.10   714 AM  7/02  COCORAHS
   DURANGO 10 NNE        0.07   853 AM  7/02  COCORAHS
   REDMESA 4.2 NW        0.05   743 AM  7/02  COCORAHS
   HESPERUS 4.9 SE       0.05   708 AM  7/02  COCORAHS
   DURANGO 7.1 N         0.05   734 AM  7/02  COCORAHS
   DURANGO .35 E         0.04   715 AM  7/02  COCORAHS
   DURANGO 7.1 WSW       0.03   705 AM  7/02  COCORAHS
   DURANGO 4.8 WSW       0.03   811 AM  7/02  COCORAHS
   DURANGO 2.8 S         0.03   726 AM  7/02  COCORAHS
   DURANGO 5S            0.02   800 AM  7/02  UNOFFICIAL STATION

...MONTEZUMA COUNTY...
   MANCOS 3.5 ENE        0.10   935 AM  7/02  COCORAHS
   CORTEZ 2.0 NW         0.08   830 AM  7/02  COCORAHS
   DOLORES 4.8 ENE       0.07  1010 AM  7/02  COCORAHS
   CORTEZ 2.3 NW         0.06   719 AM  7/02  COCORAHS
   CORTEZ                0.04   900 AM  7/02  W CO COOP SITE
   CORTEZ 1.2 SW         0.02   709 AM  7/02  COCORAHS
   MESA VERDE NP         0.01   720 AM  7/02  W CO COOP SITE
   CORTEZ 1.0 ESE        0.01   802 AM  7/02  COCORAHS

...MONTROSE COUNTY...
   PARADOX 2N            0.03   700 AM  7/02  W CO COOP SITE

...OURAY COUNTY...
   OURAY .23 NNW         0.22   644 AM  7/02  COCORAHS
   OURAY                 0.22   733 AM  7/02  W CO COOP SITE
   RIDGWAY               0.08   800 AM  7/02  W CO COOP SITE

...ROUTT COUNTY...
   CLARK 0.7 NW          0.10   702 AM  7/02  COCORAHS

...SAN MIGUEL COUNTY...
   NORWOOD 1.4 W         0.03   658 AM  7/02  COCORAHS

UTAH

...SAN JUAN COUNTY...
   MONTICELLO #2         0.06   700 AM  7/02  E UT COOP SITE
   MONTICELLO 2.3 SW     0.03   817 AM  7/02  COCORAHS
   BLUFF 32NW            0.02   100 AM  7/02  E UT CRN SITE

$$

MALEKSA


000
NOUS46 KSEW 021801
PNSSEW

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE SEATTLE WA
1100 AM PDT THU JUL 2 2015

...INDEPENDENCE DAY WEATHER STATISTICS...

.SEA-TAC AIRPORT...

OBSERVATIONS BEGAN IN 1945

HIGHEST TEMPERATURE...91 DEGREES IN 1972
LOWEST TEMPERATURE...43 DEGREES IN 1949

LOWEST MAXIMUM TEMPERATURE...61 DEGREES IN 1992
HIGHEST MINIMUM TEMPERATURE...61 DEGREES IN 2007

MOST PRECIPITATION...0.57 INCHES IN 1992

NORMAL HIGH TEMPERATURE...74 DEGREES
NORMAL LOW TEMPERATURE...54 DEGREES
NORMAL PRECIPITATION...0.03 INCHES

CLIMATIC DATA FOR THE PAST 10 INDEPENDENCE DAYS

YEAR    HIGH    LOW     PRECIP

2014    75      57      0.00
2013    71      57      0.00
2012    69      49      0.00
2011    78      51      0.00
2010    65      52      0.11
2009    87      57      0.00
2008    71      59      0.00
2007    84      61      0.00
2006    75      54      0.02
2005    79      53      0.00


.OLYMPIA AIRPORT...

OBSERVATIONS BEGAN IN 1948

HIGHEST TEMPERATURE...93 DEGREES IN 1972
LOWEST TEMPERATURE...41 DEGREES IN 1949

LOWEST MAXIMUM TEMPERATURE...61 DEGREES IN 1992
HIGHEST MINIMUM TEMPERATURE...58 DEGREES IN 2008

MOST PRECIPITATION...0.38 INCHES IN 1987

NORMAL HIGH TEMPERATURE...75 DEGREES
NORMAL LOW TEMPERATURE...50 DEGREES
NORMAL PRECIPITATION...0.03 INCHES

CLIMATIC DATA FOR THE PAST 10 INDEPENDENCE DAYS

YEAR    HIGH    LOW     PRECIP

2014    77      48      0.00
2013    71      52      TRACE
2012    71      44      0.00
2011    79      43      0.00
2010    66      45      0.00
2009    88      49      0.00
2008    71      58      0.11
2007    87      53      0.00
2006    73      52      TRACE
2005    81      46      0.00


.QUILLAYUTE AIRPORT...

OBSERVATIONS BEGAN IN 1966

HIGHEST TEMPERATURE...92 DEGREES IN 1975
LOWEST TEMPERATURE...40 DEGREES IN 2011*

LOWEST MAXIMUM TEMPERATURE...57 DEGREES IN 1998
HIGHEST MINIMUM TEMPERATURE...57 DEGREES IN 1990

MOST PRECIPITATION...0.50 INCHES IN 1987

NORMAL HIGH TEMPERATURE...66 DEGREES
NORMAL LOW TEMPERATURE...50 DEGREES
NORMAL PRECIPITATION...0.08 INCHES

CLIMATIC DATA FOR THE PAST 10 INDEPENDENCE DAYS

YEAR    HIGH    LOW     PRECIP

2014    65      44      0.02
2013    68      59      0.00
2012    65      46      0.00
2011    65      40      0.00
2010    59      53      0.07
2009    66      49      0.00
2008    64      56      0.07
2007    72      49      0.00
2006    60      52      0.00
2005    66      53      TRACE


.HOQUIAM AIRPORT...

OBSERVATIONS BEGAN IN 1953

HIGHEST TEMPERATURE...82 DEGREES IN 1997*
LOWEST TEMPERATURE...46 DEGREES IN 2011*

LOWEST MAXIMUM TEMPERATURE...57 DEGREES IN 1955
HIGHEST MINIMUM TEMPERATURE...58 DEGREES IN 1990*

MOST PRECIPITATION...0.50 INCHES IN 1989

NORMAL HIGH TEMPERATURE...66 DEGREES
NORMAL LOW TEMPERATURE...52 DEGREES
NORMAL PRECIPITATION...0.05 INCHES

CLIMATIC DATA FOR THE PAST 10 INDEPENDENCE DAYS

YEAR    HIGH    LOW     PRECIP

2104    67      50      0.00
2013    66      57      0.00
2012    64      48      0.00
2011    67      46      0.00
2010    60      53      TRACE
2009    62      52      0.00
2008    65      57      0.01
2007    76      55      0.00
2006    64      53      0.00
2005         MISSING


.BELLINGHAM AIRPORT...

OBSERVATIONS BEGAN IN 1949

HIGHEST TEMPERATURE...85 DEGREES IN 1958
LOWEST TEMPERATURE...44 DEGREES IN 2011*

LOWEST MAXIMUM TEMPERATURE...61 DEGREES IN 1988*
HIGHEST MINIMUM TEMPERATURE...58 DEGREES IN 1995*

MOST PRECIPITATION...0.99 INCHES IN 1987

NORMAL HIGH TEMPERATURE...70 DEGREES
NORMAL LOW TEMPERATURE...52 DEGREES
NORMAL PRECIPITATION...0.05 INCHES

CLIMATIC DATA FOR THE PAST 10 INDEPENDENCE DAYS

2014
YEAR    HIGH    LOW     PRECIP

2014    70      50      TRACE
2013    69      55      0.00
2012    67      47      0.00
2011    75      44      0.00
2010    62      54      TRACE
2009    77      53      0.00
2008    59      56      0.00
2007    78      52      0.00
2006    68      54      TRACE
2005    71      54      TRACE


.WFO SEATTLE AT SANDPOINT...

OBSERVATIONS BEGAN IN 1986

HIGHEST TEMPERATURE...88 DEGREES IN 1997
LOWEST TEMPERATURE...48 DEGREES IN 2011

LOWEST MAXIMUM TEMPERATURE...61 DEGREES IN 1992
HIGHEST MINIMUM TEMPERATURE...59 DEGREES IN 2008

MOST PRECIPITATION...0.78 INCHES IN 1994

NORMAL HIGH TEMPERATURE...74 DEGREES
NORMAL LOW TEMPERATURE...55 DEGREES
NORMAL PRECIPITATION...0.03 INCHES

CLIMATIC DATA FOR THE PAST 10 INDEPENDENCE DAYS

YEAR    HIGH    LOW     PRECIP

2014    75      57      TRACE
2013    72      57      0.00
2012    69      51      0.00
2011    75      48      0.00
2010    66      53      TRACE
2009    83      56      0.00
2008    74      59      0.00
2007    80      56      0.00
2006    76      56      0.02
2005    78      52      0.00


NORMAL TEMPS AND PRECIPITATION ARE THE 1981 TO 2010 CLIMATE NORMALS.
*RECORDS WERE TIED IN MULTIPLE YEARS WITH THE LATEST YEAR SHOWN.

$$
GRUB



000
NOUS46 KSEW 021801
PNSSEW

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE SEATTLE WA
1100 AM PDT THU JUL 2 2015

...INDEPENDENCE DAY WEATHER STATISTICS...

.SEA-TAC AIRPORT...

OBSERVATIONS BEGAN IN 1945

HIGHEST TEMPERATURE...91 DEGREES IN 1972
LOWEST TEMPERATURE...43 DEGREES IN 1949

LOWEST MAXIMUM TEMPERATURE...61 DEGREES IN 1992
HIGHEST MINIMUM TEMPERATURE...61 DEGREES IN 2007

MOST PRECIPITATION...0.57 INCHES IN 1992

NORMAL HIGH TEMPERATURE...74 DEGREES
NORMAL LOW TEMPERATURE...54 DEGREES
NORMAL PRECIPITATION...0.03 INCHES

CLIMATIC DATA FOR THE PAST 10 INDEPENDENCE DAYS

YEAR    HIGH    LOW     PRECIP

2014    75      57      0.00
2013    71      57      0.00
2012    69      49      0.00
2011    78      51      0.00
2010    65      52      0.11
2009    87      57      0.00
2008    71      59      0.00
2007    84      61      0.00
2006    75      54      0.02
2005    79      53      0.00


.OLYMPIA AIRPORT...

OBSERVATIONS BEGAN IN 1948

HIGHEST TEMPERATURE...93 DEGREES IN 1972
LOWEST TEMPERATURE...41 DEGREES IN 1949

LOWEST MAXIMUM TEMPERATURE...61 DEGREES IN 1992
HIGHEST MINIMUM TEMPERATURE...58 DEGREES IN 2008

MOST PRECIPITATION...0.38 INCHES IN 1987

NORMAL HIGH TEMPERATURE...75 DEGREES
NORMAL LOW TEMPERATURE...50 DEGREES
NORMAL PRECIPITATION...0.03 INCHES

CLIMATIC DATA FOR THE PAST 10 INDEPENDENCE DAYS

YEAR    HIGH    LOW     PRECIP

2014    77      48      0.00
2013    71      52      TRACE
2012    71      44      0.00
2011    79      43      0.00
2010    66      45      0.00
2009    88      49      0.00
2008    71      58      0.11
2007    87      53      0.00
2006    73      52      TRACE
2005    81      46      0.00


.QUILLAYUTE AIRPORT...

OBSERVATIONS BEGAN IN 1966

HIGHEST TEMPERATURE...92 DEGREES IN 1975
LOWEST TEMPERATURE...40 DEGREES IN 2011*

LOWEST MAXIMUM TEMPERATURE...57 DEGREES IN 1998
HIGHEST MINIMUM TEMPERATURE...57 DEGREES IN 1990

MOST PRECIPITATION...0.50 INCHES IN 1987

NORMAL HIGH TEMPERATURE...66 DEGREES
NORMAL LOW TEMPERATURE...50 DEGREES
NORMAL PRECIPITATION...0.08 INCHES

CLIMATIC DATA FOR THE PAST 10 INDEPENDENCE DAYS

YEAR    HIGH    LOW     PRECIP

2014    65      44      0.02
2013    68      59      0.00
2012    65      46      0.00
2011    65      40      0.00
2010    59      53      0.07
2009    66      49      0.00
2008    64      56      0.07
2007    72      49      0.00
2006    60      52      0.00
2005    66      53      TRACE


.HOQUIAM AIRPORT...

OBSERVATIONS BEGAN IN 1953

HIGHEST TEMPERATURE...82 DEGREES IN 1997*
LOWEST TEMPERATURE...46 DEGREES IN 2011*

LOWEST MAXIMUM TEMPERATURE...57 DEGREES IN 1955
HIGHEST MINIMUM TEMPERATURE...58 DEGREES IN 1990*

MOST PRECIPITATION...0.50 INCHES IN 1989

NORMAL HIGH TEMPERATURE...66 DEGREES
NORMAL LOW TEMPERATURE...52 DEGREES
NORMAL PRECIPITATION...0.05 INCHES

CLIMATIC DATA FOR THE PAST 10 INDEPENDENCE DAYS

YEAR    HIGH    LOW     PRECIP

2104    67      50      0.00
2013    66      57      0.00
2012    64      48      0.00
2011    67      46      0.00
2010    60      53      TRACE
2009    62      52      0.00
2008    65      57      0.01
2007    76      55      0.00
2006    64      53      0.00
2005         MISSING


.BELLINGHAM AIRPORT...

OBSERVATIONS BEGAN IN 1949

HIGHEST TEMPERATURE...85 DEGREES IN 1958
LOWEST TEMPERATURE...44 DEGREES IN 2011*

LOWEST MAXIMUM TEMPERATURE...61 DEGREES IN 1988*
HIGHEST MINIMUM TEMPERATURE...58 DEGREES IN 1995*

MOST PRECIPITATION...0.99 INCHES IN 1987

NORMAL HIGH TEMPERATURE...70 DEGREES
NORMAL LOW TEMPERATURE...52 DEGREES
NORMAL PRECIPITATION...0.05 INCHES

CLIMATIC DATA FOR THE PAST 10 INDEPENDENCE DAYS

2014
YEAR    HIGH    LOW     PRECIP

2014    70      50      TRACE
2013    69      55      0.00
2012    67      47      0.00
2011    75      44      0.00
2010    62      54      TRACE
2009    77      53      0.00
2008    59      56      0.00
2007    78      52      0.00
2006    68      54      TRACE
2005    71      54      TRACE


.WFO SEATTLE AT SANDPOINT...

OBSERVATIONS BEGAN IN 1986

HIGHEST TEMPERATURE...88 DEGREES IN 1997
LOWEST TEMPERATURE...48 DEGREES IN 2011

LOWEST MAXIMUM TEMPERATURE...61 DEGREES IN 1992
HIGHEST MINIMUM TEMPERATURE...59 DEGREES IN 2008

MOST PRECIPITATION...0.78 INCHES IN 1994

NORMAL HIGH TEMPERATURE...74 DEGREES
NORMAL LOW TEMPERATURE...55 DEGREES
NORMAL PRECIPITATION...0.03 INCHES

CLIMATIC DATA FOR THE PAST 10 INDEPENDENCE DAYS

YEAR    HIGH    LOW     PRECIP

2014    75      57      TRACE
2013    72      57      0.00
2012    69      51      0.00
2011    75      48      0.00
2010    66      53      TRACE
2009    83      56      0.00
2008    74      59      0.00
2007    80      56      0.00
2006    76      56      0.02
2005    78      52      0.00


NORMAL TEMPS AND PRECIPITATION ARE THE 1981 TO 2010 CLIMATE NORMALS.
*RECORDS WERE TIED IN MULTIPLE YEARS WITH THE LATEST YEAR SHOWN.

$$
GRUB


000
NOUS41 KWBC 021710
PNSWSH

Technical Implementation Notice 14-49 Corrected
National Weather Service Headquarters Washington DC
112 PM EDT Thu Jul 2 2015

To:       Subscribers:
          -Family of Services
          -NOAA Weather Wire Service
          -Emergency Managers Weather Information Network
          -NOAAPORT
          -Other NWS Partners, Users and Employees

From:     Timothy McClung
          Chief Operating Officer
          Office of Science and Technology Integration

Subject:  Corrected: Multi-Radar, Multi-Sensor System Products
Added to SBN and NOAAPORT Effective November 24, 2014

The unanticipated technical problems with a component of the SBN
software has been fixed and implemented. On or about Wednesday,
July 8, 2015, the NOAA AWIPS Program Office will add the Multi-
Radar, Multi-Sensor (MRMS) to the Satellite Broadcast Network
(SBN) and NOAAPORT.

Once implemented, selected products from the MRMS System produced
by the National Centers for Environmental Prediction will be
added to the SBN and NOAAPORT. MRMS began operational production
of GRIB2 formatted products on September 29, 2014.

MRMS is a system with automated algorithms that quickly and
intelligently integrate data streams from multiple radars,
surface and upper air observations, lightning detection systems,
and satellite and forecast models. MRMS generates a high
resolution 3D radar mosaic and related 2D severe weather products
for NWP model data assimilation and aviation applications. MMRS
also produces a suite of quantitative precipitation estimation
products for the monitoring and warnings of floods and flash
floods and in support of comprehensive hydrologic and ecosystem
modeling. Numerous two-dimensional multiple-sensor products offer
assistance for hail, wind, tornado, quantitative precipitation
estimation forecasts, convection, icing, and turbulence
diagnosis. A product reference guide and training for users are
publicly available from the NWS Warning Decision Training Branch
website at:
http://www.wdtb.noaa.gov/courses/mrms.

Most MRMS products are generated on a 1km grid over the
Contiguous United States (CONUS) domain and updated as frequently
as every 2 minutes. Data volume will vary, depending on the
current meteorological conditions, but could be as high as 14GB
per day or 13MB every 2 minutes. Due to the large data volumes
this system generates, users who do not wish to receive MRMS
products are advised to filter out the applicable WMO headers
from their NOAAPORT feed.

WMO Headers and official WMO title for the new products are as
follows:

YAUC01   Composite Reflectivity
YAUC02   Composite Reflectivity Height
YAUC03   Composite Reflectivity [0-4 km]
YAUD01   Radar Quality Index
YAUD02   Seamless Hybrid Scan Reflectivity
YAUL01   Cloud-to-Ground Lightning Density (1, 5, 15, & 30 min.)
YAUL02   Cloud-to-Ground Lightning Probability (0-30 min.)
YAUM03   Probability of Warm Rain (POWR)
YAUP01   Surface Precipitation Type
YAUP02   Instantaneous Radar Precipitation Rate
YAUP03   Radar 1H, 3H, 6H, 12H, 24H, 48H, 72H QPE
YAUP04   Local Gauge Bias Corrected 1H, 3H, 6H, 12H, 24H, 48H,
            & 72H QPE
YAUP06   Mountain Mapper 1H, 3H, 6H, 12H, 24H, 48H, 72H QPE
YAUQ01   Base Reflectivity
YAUS04   Low-Level Rotation Tracks (60 & 1440 min. accum.)
YAUS06   Mid-Level Rotation Tracks (60 & 1440 min. accum.)
YAUS10   Maximum Estimated Size of Hail (MESH)
YAUS11   MESH Tracks (60 & 1440 min. accum.)
YAUS13   Vertically Integrated Liquid (VIL)
YAUS15   Vertically Integrated Ice (VII)
YAUS16   18, 30, 50, & 60 dBZ Echo Top (ET)
YAUS17   Height of 50dBZ Echo Above -20C
YAUS18   Height of 50dBZ Echo Above 0C
YAUS20   Height of 60dBZ Echo Above 0C
YAUS21   Reflectivity at 0C, -10C, -20C
YAUS22   Reflectivity At Lowest Altitude (RALA)

CCCC = KWNR

In addition to NOAAPORT dissemination, MRMS products can be
retrieved via Local Data Manager (LDM) directly from NCEP Central
Operations. To learn more about this dissemination path please
contact the POCs listed below. Additional technical information
regarding the MRMS system can be found at

http://www.nssl.noaa.gov/projects/mrms/

Information on WMO Headers and NCEP GRIB messages is online at:

http://www.nco.ncep.noaa.gov/pmb/docs/on388/appendixa.html

For questions concerning the MRMS system, contact:

  Ken Howard
  National Severe Storms Lab (NSSL)
  Norman, OK 73072
  Phone: (405) 535-9863
  Email: kenneth.howard@noaa.gov

For questions regarding SBN and NOAAPORT activation contact:

  Walter Smith
  NCEP/NCO
  Silver Spring, MD  20910
  Phone: (301) 427-3906
  Email: walter.smith@noaa.gov

National Technical Implementation Notices are online at:

  http://www.weather.gov/os/notif.htm

$$




000
NOUS41 KWBC 021710
PNSWSH

Technical Implementation Notice 14-49 Corrected
National Weather Service Headquarters Washington DC
112 PM EDT Thu Jul 2 2015

To:       Subscribers:
          -Family of Services
          -NOAA Weather Wire Service
          -Emergency Managers Weather Information Network
          -NOAAPORT
          -Other NWS Partners, Users and Employees

From:     Timothy McClung
          Chief Operating Officer
          Office of Science and Technology Integration

Subject:  Corrected: Multi-Radar, Multi-Sensor System Products
Added to SBN and NOAAPORT Effective November 24, 2014

The unanticipated technical problems with a component of the SBN
software has been fixed and implemented. On or about Wednesday,
July 8, 2015, the NOAA AWIPS Program Office will add the Multi-
Radar, Multi-Sensor (MRMS) to the Satellite Broadcast Network
(SBN) and NOAAPORT.

Once implemented, selected products from the MRMS System produced
by the National Centers for Environmental Prediction will be
added to the SBN and NOAAPORT. MRMS began operational production
of GRIB2 formatted products on September 29, 2014.

MRMS is a system with automated algorithms that quickly and
intelligently integrate data streams from multiple radars,
surface and upper air observations, lightning detection systems,
and satellite and forecast models. MRMS generates a high
resolution 3D radar mosaic and related 2D severe weather products
for NWP model data assimilation and aviation applications. MMRS
also produces a suite of quantitative precipitation estimation
products for the monitoring and warnings of floods and flash
floods and in support of comprehensive hydrologic and ecosystem
modeling. Numerous two-dimensional multiple-sensor products offer
assistance for hail, wind, tornado, quantitative precipitation
estimation forecasts, convection, icing, and turbulence
diagnosis. A product reference guide and training for users are
publicly available from the NWS Warning Decision Training Branch
website at:
http://www.wdtb.noaa.gov/courses/mrms.

Most MRMS products are generated on a 1km grid over the
Contiguous United States (CONUS) domain and updated as frequently
as every 2 minutes. Data volume will vary, depending on the
current meteorological conditions, but could be as high as 14GB
per day or 13MB every 2 minutes. Due to the large data volumes
this system generates, users who do not wish to receive MRMS
products are advised to filter out the applicable WMO headers
from their NOAAPORT feed.

WMO Headers and official WMO title for the new products are as
follows:

YAUC01   Composite Reflectivity
YAUC02   Composite Reflectivity Height
YAUC03   Composite Reflectivity [0-4 km]
YAUD01   Radar Quality Index
YAUD02   Seamless Hybrid Scan Reflectivity
YAUL01   Cloud-to-Ground Lightning Density (1, 5, 15, & 30 min.)
YAUL02   Cloud-to-Ground Lightning Probability (0-30 min.)
YAUM03   Probability of Warm Rain (POWR)
YAUP01   Surface Precipitation Type
YAUP02   Instantaneous Radar Precipitation Rate
YAUP03   Radar 1H, 3H, 6H, 12H, 24H, 48H, 72H QPE
YAUP04   Local Gauge Bias Corrected 1H, 3H, 6H, 12H, 24H, 48H,
            & 72H QPE
YAUP06   Mountain Mapper 1H, 3H, 6H, 12H, 24H, 48H, 72H QPE
YAUQ01   Base Reflectivity
YAUS04   Low-Level Rotation Tracks (60 & 1440 min. accum.)
YAUS06   Mid-Level Rotation Tracks (60 & 1440 min. accum.)
YAUS10   Maximum Estimated Size of Hail (MESH)
YAUS11   MESH Tracks (60 & 1440 min. accum.)
YAUS13   Vertically Integrated Liquid (VIL)
YAUS15   Vertically Integrated Ice (VII)
YAUS16   18, 30, 50, & 60 dBZ Echo Top (ET)
YAUS17   Height of 50dBZ Echo Above -20C
YAUS18   Height of 50dBZ Echo Above 0C
YAUS20   Height of 60dBZ Echo Above 0C
YAUS21   Reflectivity at 0C, -10C, -20C
YAUS22   Reflectivity At Lowest Altitude (RALA)

CCCC = KWNR

In addition to NOAAPORT dissemination, MRMS products can be
retrieved via Local Data Manager (LDM) directly from NCEP Central
Operations. To learn more about this dissemination path please
contact the POCs listed below. Additional technical information
regarding the MRMS system can be found at

http://www.nssl.noaa.gov/projects/mrms/

Information on WMO Headers and NCEP GRIB messages is online at:

http://www.nco.ncep.noaa.gov/pmb/docs/on388/appendixa.html

For questions concerning the MRMS system, contact:

  Ken Howard
  National Severe Storms Lab (NSSL)
  Norman, OK 73072
  Phone: (405) 535-9863
  Email: kenneth.howard@noaa.gov

For questions regarding SBN and NOAAPORT activation contact:

  Walter Smith
  NCEP/NCO
  Silver Spring, MD  20910
  Phone: (301) 427-3906
  Email: walter.smith@noaa.gov

National Technical Implementation Notices are online at:

  http://www.weather.gov/os/notif.htm

$$





000
NOUS41 KWBC 021710
PNSWSH

Technical Implementation Notice 14-49 Corrected
National Weather Service Headquarters Washington DC
112 PM EDT Thu Jul 2 2015

To:       Subscribers:
          -Family of Services
          -NOAA Weather Wire Service
          -Emergency Managers Weather Information Network
          -NOAAPORT
          -Other NWS Partners, Users and Employees

From:     Timothy McClung
          Chief Operating Officer
          Office of Science and Technology Integration

Subject:  Corrected: Multi-Radar, Multi-Sensor System Products
Added to SBN and NOAAPORT Effective November 24, 2014

The unanticipated technical problems with a component of the SBN
software has been fixed and implemented. On or about Wednesday,
July 8, 2015, the NOAA AWIPS Program Office will add the Multi-
Radar, Multi-Sensor (MRMS) to the Satellite Broadcast Network
(SBN) and NOAAPORT.

Once implemented, selected products from the MRMS System produced
by the National Centers for Environmental Prediction will be
added to the SBN and NOAAPORT. MRMS began operational production
of GRIB2 formatted products on September 29, 2014.

MRMS is a system with automated algorithms that quickly and
intelligently integrate data streams from multiple radars,
surface and upper air observations, lightning detection systems,
and satellite and forecast models. MRMS generates a high
resolution 3D radar mosaic and related 2D severe weather products
for NWP model data assimilation and aviation applications. MMRS
also produces a suite of quantitative precipitation estimation
products for the monitoring and warnings of floods and flash
floods and in support of comprehensive hydrologic and ecosystem
modeling. Numerous two-dimensional multiple-sensor products offer
assistance for hail, wind, tornado, quantitative precipitation
estimation forecasts, convection, icing, and turbulence
diagnosis. A product reference guide and training for users are
publicly available from the NWS Warning Decision Training Branch
website at:
http://www.wdtb.noaa.gov/courses/mrms.

Most MRMS products are generated on a 1km grid over the
Contiguous United States (CONUS) domain and updated as frequently
as every 2 minutes. Data volume will vary, depending on the
current meteorological conditions, but could be as high as 14GB
per day or 13MB every 2 minutes. Due to the large data volumes
this system generates, users who do not wish to receive MRMS
products are advised to filter out the applicable WMO headers
from their NOAAPORT feed.

WMO Headers and official WMO title for the new products are as
follows:

YAUC01   Composite Reflectivity
YAUC02   Composite Reflectivity Height
YAUC03   Composite Reflectivity [0-4 km]
YAUD01   Radar Quality Index
YAUD02   Seamless Hybrid Scan Reflectivity
YAUL01   Cloud-to-Ground Lightning Density (1, 5, 15, & 30 min.)
YAUL02   Cloud-to-Ground Lightning Probability (0-30 min.)
YAUM03   Probability of Warm Rain (POWR)
YAUP01   Surface Precipitation Type
YAUP02   Instantaneous Radar Precipitation Rate
YAUP03   Radar 1H, 3H, 6H, 12H, 24H, 48H, 72H QPE
YAUP04   Local Gauge Bias Corrected 1H, 3H, 6H, 12H, 24H, 48H,
            & 72H QPE
YAUP06   Mountain Mapper 1H, 3H, 6H, 12H, 24H, 48H, 72H QPE
YAUQ01   Base Reflectivity
YAUS04   Low-Level Rotation Tracks (60 & 1440 min. accum.)
YAUS06   Mid-Level Rotation Tracks (60 & 1440 min. accum.)
YAUS10   Maximum Estimated Size of Hail (MESH)
YAUS11   MESH Tracks (60 & 1440 min. accum.)
YAUS13   Vertically Integrated Liquid (VIL)
YAUS15   Vertically Integrated Ice (VII)
YAUS16   18, 30, 50, & 60 dBZ Echo Top (ET)
YAUS17   Height of 50dBZ Echo Above -20C
YAUS18   Height of 50dBZ Echo Above 0C
YAUS20   Height of 60dBZ Echo Above 0C
YAUS21   Reflectivity at 0C, -10C, -20C
YAUS22   Reflectivity At Lowest Altitude (RALA)

CCCC = KWNR

In addition to NOAAPORT dissemination, MRMS products can be
retrieved via Local Data Manager (LDM) directly from NCEP Central
Operations. To learn more about this dissemination path please
contact the POCs listed below. Additional technical information
regarding the MRMS system can be found at

http://www.nssl.noaa.gov/projects/mrms/

Information on WMO Headers and NCEP GRIB messages is online at:

http://www.nco.ncep.noaa.gov/pmb/docs/on388/appendixa.html

For questions concerning the MRMS system, contact:

  Ken Howard
  National Severe Storms Lab (NSSL)
  Norman, OK 73072
  Phone: (405) 535-9863
  Email: kenneth.howard@noaa.gov

For questions regarding SBN and NOAAPORT activation contact:

  Walter Smith
  NCEP/NCO
  Silver Spring, MD  20910
  Phone: (301) 427-3906
  Email: walter.smith@noaa.gov

National Technical Implementation Notices are online at:

  http://www.weather.gov/os/notif.htm

$$




000
NOUS41 KWBC 021654
PNSWSH

Technical Implementation Notice 15-35
National Weather Service Headquarters Washington DC
1255 PM EDT Thu Jul 2 2015

To:        Subscribers:
           -Family of Services
           -NOAA Weather Wire Service
           -Emergency Managers Weather Information Network
           -NOAAPORT
           Other NWS partners, Users and Employees

From:      Rebecca Cosgrove
           Chief, NCEP Production Management Branch

Subject:   Addition of new RTMA Airport Temperature Text
           Product Effective: July 7, 2015

Effective on July 7, 2015, at 1400 Coordinated Universal Time
(UTC), the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP)
will be introducing a new text product for the Real-Time
Mesoscale Analysis (RTMA)

RTMA temperature data, interpolated at 139 airports, is designed
to serve as a real-time temperature observation at those airports
where an observation is unavailable. Use of the RTMA is expected
to help mitigate the problem of flight delays, diversions, and
cancellations caused by the lack of a temperature report.
Users can download the hourly text product, alphabetized by the
airport 4 letter code, on the NCEP server at:

http://nomads.ncep.noaa.gov/pub/data/nccf/com/rtma/prod/airport_t
emps

For questions regarding product content, contact:

 Geoff DiMego
 NCEP/EMC Mesoscale Modeling Branch
 College Park, MD
 301-683-3764
 geoff.dimego@noaa.gov

For questions regarding data flow aspects, contact:

 NCEP/NCO Dataflow Team
 College Park, MD
 301-683-0567
 ncep.list.pmb-dataflow@noaa.gov

NWS National Technical Implementation Notices are online at:

 http://www.nws.noaa.gov/os/notif.htm

$$


000
NOUS41 KWBC 021654
PNSWSH

Technical Implementation Notice 15-35
National Weather Service Headquarters Washington DC
1255 PM EDT Thu Jul 2 2015

To:        Subscribers:
           -Family of Services
           -NOAA Weather Wire Service
           -Emergency Managers Weather Information Network
           -NOAAPORT
           Other NWS partners, Users and Employees

From:      Rebecca Cosgrove
           Chief, NCEP Production Management Branch

Subject:   Addition of new RTMA Airport Temperature Text
           Product Effective: July 7, 2015

Effective on July 7, 2015, at 1400 Coordinated Universal Time
(UTC), the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP)
will be introducing a new text product for the Real-Time
Mesoscale Analysis (RTMA)

RTMA temperature data, interpolated at 139 airports, is designed
to serve as a real-time temperature observation at those airports
where an observation is unavailable. Use of the RTMA is expected
to help mitigate the problem of flight delays, diversions, and
cancellations caused by the lack of a temperature report.
Users can download the hourly text product, alphabetized by the
airport 4 letter code, on the NCEP server at:

http://nomads.ncep.noaa.gov/pub/data/nccf/com/rtma/prod/airport_t
emps

For questions regarding product content, contact:

 Geoff DiMego
 NCEP/EMC Mesoscale Modeling Branch
 College Park, MD
 301-683-3764
 geoff.dimego@noaa.gov

For questions regarding data flow aspects, contact:

 NCEP/NCO Dataflow Team
 College Park, MD
 301-683-0567
 ncep.list.pmb-dataflow@noaa.gov

NWS National Technical Implementation Notices are online at:

 http://www.nws.noaa.gov/os/notif.htm

$$



000
NOUS44 KOHX 021609
PNSOHX
TNZ027-030000-

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE NASHVILLE, TN
1109 AM CDT THU JUL 2 2015

...NO WEEKLY NOAA WEATHER RADIO TEST TODAY...

THE REGULARLY SCHEDULED WEEKLY NOAA WEATHER RADIO TEST FOR TODAY HAS
BEEN POSTPONED DUE TO INCLEMENT WEATHER.

THE WEEKLY TEST WILL BE CONDUCTED AT THE NORMAL TIME NEXT
WEDNESDAY...JULY 8 BETWEEN 11 AM AND NOON.

$$



000
NOUS44 KOHX 021609
PNSOHX
TNZ027-030000-

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE NASHVILLE, TN
1109 AM CDT THU JUL 2 2015

...NO WEEKLY NOAA WEATHER RADIO TEST TODAY...

THE REGULARLY SCHEDULED WEEKLY NOAA WEATHER RADIO TEST FOR TODAY HAS
BEEN POSTPONED DUE TO INCLEMENT WEATHER.

THE WEEKLY TEST WILL BE CONDUCTED AT THE NORMAL TIME NEXT
WEDNESDAY...JULY 8 BETWEEN 11 AM AND NOON.

$$


000
NOUS43 KLBF 021540
PNSLBF
NEZ004>010-022>029-035>038-056>059-069>071-094-031500-

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE NORTH PLATTE NE
1040 AM CDT THU JUL 2 2015

WIDESPREAD SHOWERS AND SOME THUNDERSTORMS THIS MORNING PROVIDED WET
CONDITIONS ACROSS THE REGION. LOCATIONS REPORTED AMOUNTS FROM A
TRACE TO A LITTLE OVER 1 INCH. THERE WILL BE ANOTHER OPPORTUNITY
LATER TODAY FOR SOME LOCATIONS TO RECEIVE MORE RAINFALL.


...LOCATION...                  ...AMOUNT...

LAKESIDE 6SSE                       1.18
HAY SPRINGS 13SSW                   1.00
RUSHVILLE 19N                       0.97
HYANNIS 4N                          0.93
HAY SPRINGS 14SE                    0.90
TRYON 13ENE                         0.89
TRYON 11ENE                         0.87
HERSHEY 6NW                         0.83
OSHKOSH 10NE                        0.83
HAY SPRINGS 13N                     0.75
ARTHUR                              0.70
CAMBRIDGE 7N                        0.70
SUTHERLAND 35NNW                    0.66
CURTIS 1W                           0.64
CHAPPELL 10NNE                      0.64
STAPLETON 9WSW                      0.60
WHITMAN 26N                         0.60
WHITMAN 6SE                         0.60
RUSHVILLE 7SSW                      0.59
WELLFLEET 4ENE                      0.57
MULLEN 16SW                         0.55
ELSIE 10SSE                         0.53
MADRID 8SW                          0.52
STAPLETON 5W                        0.50
GORDON 5E                           0.49
BIG SPRINGS 1W                      0.48
KINGSLEY DAM                        0.48
WELLFLEET 8NNE                      0.43
LODGEPOLE 4ENE                      0.42
GRANT 9NNE                          0.42
MULLEN                              0.41
LISCO                               0.40
NORTH PLATTE 7WNW                   0.38
OSHKOSH                             0.38
BERWYN 4NNE                         0.37
SUTHERLAND 8WSW                     0.37
CURTIS                              0.36
GORDON 6N                           0.36
MULLEN 10SW                         0.35
ARNOLD                              0.33
MERNA 11W                           0.32
MAYWOOD                             0.32
NORTH PLATTE 4S                     0.31
NEWPORT                             0.30
OGALLALA                            0.30
PAXTON 4NE                          0.30
CURTIS 6SE                          0.29
NORTH PLATTE 6NE                    0.27
MADRID 7NW                          0.27
GRANT 3N                            0.26
EUSTIS 8SSW                         0.25
NORTH PLATTE 2SW                    0.25
GRANT                               0.24
SUTHERLAND 2SW                      0.23
NORTH PLATTE W                      0.21
NORTH PLATTE 2WNW                   0.21
ELSIE                               0.20
IMPERIAL 12N                        0.20
MERNA 8SSW                          0.20
ELSIE 4NE                           0.19
BIG SPRINGS 8S                      0.18
MASON CITY                          0.17
BERWYN 6SSW                         0.16
CALLAWAY 8WSW                       0.16
GRANT 4ENE                          0.16
NORTH PLATTE 5S                     0.15
HAYES CENTER 1NW                    0.14
NORTH PLATTE EX FARM                0.13
HAYES CENTER                        0.12
ANSELMO 2SE                         0.11
MADRID                              0.11
NORTH PLATTE AIRPORT                0.11
CHAMPION 8W                         0.10
LAMAR 3S                            0.10
WALLACE 9WSW                        0.10
EUSTIS 4WNW                         0.08
CHAMBERS                            0.07
HALSEY                              0.07
EDDYVILLE 11N                       0.07
ANSELMO 9NW                         0.06
KILGORE 1NE                         0.05
ENDERS 1NNW                         0.04
BROKEN BOW AIRPORT                  0.03
ENDERS 3W                           0.03
IMPERIAL AIRPORT                    0.03
VALENTINE AIRPORT                   0.03
IMPERIAL                            0.02
VALENTINE 4N                        0.02
WAUNETA 6W                          0.02
WAUNETA 5E                          0.02
BARTLETT                              T
SPRINGVIEW 2NW                        T

$$

BAKER







000
NOUS43 KLBF 021540
PNSLBF
NEZ004>010-022>029-035>038-056>059-069>071-094-031500-

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE NORTH PLATTE NE
1040 AM CDT THU JUL 2 2015

WIDESPREAD SHOWERS AND SOME THUNDERSTORMS THIS MORNING PROVIDED WET
CONDITIONS ACROSS THE REGION. LOCATIONS REPORTED AMOUNTS FROM A
TRACE TO A LITTLE OVER 1 INCH. THERE WILL BE ANOTHER OPPORTUNITY
LATER TODAY FOR SOME LOCATIONS TO RECEIVE MORE RAINFALL.


...LOCATION...                  ...AMOUNT...

LAKESIDE 6SSE                       1.18
HAY SPRINGS 13SSW                   1.00
RUSHVILLE 19N                       0.97
HYANNIS 4N                          0.93
HAY SPRINGS 14SE                    0.90
TRYON 13ENE                         0.89
TRYON 11ENE                         0.87
HERSHEY 6NW                         0.83
OSHKOSH 10NE                        0.83
HAY SPRINGS 13N                     0.75
ARTHUR                              0.70
CAMBRIDGE 7N                        0.70
SUTHERLAND 35NNW                    0.66
CURTIS 1W                           0.64
CHAPPELL 10NNE                      0.64
STAPLETON 9WSW                      0.60
WHITMAN 26N                         0.60
WHITMAN 6SE                         0.60
RUSHVILLE 7SSW                      0.59
WELLFLEET 4ENE                      0.57
MULLEN 16SW                         0.55
ELSIE 10SSE                         0.53
MADRID 8SW                          0.52
STAPLETON 5W                        0.50
GORDON 5E                           0.49
BIG SPRINGS 1W                      0.48
KINGSLEY DAM                        0.48
WELLFLEET 8NNE                      0.43
LODGEPOLE 4ENE                      0.42
GRANT 9NNE                          0.42
MULLEN                              0.41
LISCO                               0.40
NORTH PLATTE 7WNW                   0.38
OSHKOSH                             0.38
BERWYN 4NNE                         0.37
SUTHERLAND 8WSW                     0.37
CURTIS                              0.36
GORDON 6N                           0.36
MULLEN 10SW                         0.35
ARNOLD                              0.33
MERNA 11W                           0.32
MAYWOOD                             0.32
NORTH PLATTE 4S                     0.31
NEWPORT                             0.30
OGALLALA                            0.30
PAXTON 4NE                          0.30
CURTIS 6SE                          0.29
NORTH PLATTE 6NE                    0.27
MADRID 7NW                          0.27
GRANT 3N                            0.26
EUSTIS 8SSW                         0.25
NORTH PLATTE 2SW                    0.25
GRANT                               0.24
SUTHERLAND 2SW                      0.23
NORTH PLATTE W                      0.21
NORTH PLATTE 2WNW                   0.21
ELSIE                               0.20
IMPERIAL 12N                        0.20
MERNA 8SSW                          0.20
ELSIE 4NE                           0.19
BIG SPRINGS 8S                      0.18
MASON CITY                          0.17
BERWYN 6SSW                         0.16
CALLAWAY 8WSW                       0.16
GRANT 4ENE                          0.16
NORTH PLATTE 5S                     0.15
HAYES CENTER 1NW                    0.14
NORTH PLATTE EX FARM                0.13
HAYES CENTER                        0.12
ANSELMO 2SE                         0.11
MADRID                              0.11
NORTH PLATTE AIRPORT                0.11
CHAMPION 8W                         0.10
LAMAR 3S                            0.10
WALLACE 9WSW                        0.10
EUSTIS 4WNW                         0.08
CHAMBERS                            0.07
HALSEY                              0.07
EDDYVILLE 11N                       0.07
ANSELMO 9NW                         0.06
KILGORE 1NE                         0.05
ENDERS 1NNW                         0.04
BROKEN BOW AIRPORT                  0.03
ENDERS 3W                           0.03
IMPERIAL AIRPORT                    0.03
VALENTINE AIRPORT                   0.03
IMPERIAL                            0.02
VALENTINE 4N                        0.02
WAUNETA 6W                          0.02
WAUNETA 5E                          0.02
BARTLETT                              T
SPRINGVIEW 2NW                        T

$$

BAKER








000
NOUS43 KLBF 021540
PNSLBF
NEZ004>010-022>029-035>038-056>059-069>071-094-031500-

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE NORTH PLATTE NE
1040 AM CDT THU JUL 2 2015

WIDESPREAD SHOWERS AND SOME THUNDERSTORMS THIS MORNING PROVIDED WET
CONDITIONS ACROSS THE REGION. LOCATIONS REPORTED AMOUNTS FROM A
TRACE TO A LITTLE OVER 1 INCH. THERE WILL BE ANOTHER OPPORTUNITY
LATER TODAY FOR SOME LOCATIONS TO RECEIVE MORE RAINFALL.


...LOCATION...                  ...AMOUNT...

LAKESIDE 6SSE                       1.18
HAY SPRINGS 13SSW                   1.00
RUSHVILLE 19N                       0.97
HYANNIS 4N                          0.93
HAY SPRINGS 14SE                    0.90
TRYON 13ENE                         0.89
TRYON 11ENE                         0.87
HERSHEY 6NW                         0.83
OSHKOSH 10NE                        0.83
HAY SPRINGS 13N                     0.75
ARTHUR                              0.70
CAMBRIDGE 7N                        0.70
SUTHERLAND 35NNW                    0.66
CURTIS 1W                           0.64
CHAPPELL 10NNE                      0.64
STAPLETON 9WSW                      0.60
WHITMAN 26N                         0.60
WHITMAN 6SE                         0.60
RUSHVILLE 7SSW                      0.59
WELLFLEET 4ENE                      0.57
MULLEN 16SW                         0.55
ELSIE 10SSE                         0.53
MADRID 8SW                          0.52
STAPLETON 5W                        0.50
GORDON 5E                           0.49
BIG SPRINGS 1W                      0.48
KINGSLEY DAM                        0.48
WELLFLEET 8NNE                      0.43
LODGEPOLE 4ENE                      0.42
GRANT 9NNE                          0.42
MULLEN                              0.41
LISCO                               0.40
NORTH PLATTE 7WNW                   0.38
OSHKOSH                             0.38
BERWYN 4NNE                         0.37
SUTHERLAND 8WSW                     0.37
CURTIS                              0.36
GORDON 6N                           0.36
MULLEN 10SW                         0.35
ARNOLD                              0.33
MERNA 11W                           0.32
MAYWOOD                             0.32
NORTH PLATTE 4S                     0.31
NEWPORT                             0.30
OGALLALA                            0.30
PAXTON 4NE                          0.30
CURTIS 6SE                          0.29
NORTH PLATTE 6NE                    0.27
MADRID 7NW                          0.27
GRANT 3N                            0.26
EUSTIS 8SSW                         0.25
NORTH PLATTE 2SW                    0.25
GRANT                               0.24
SUTHERLAND 2SW                      0.23
NORTH PLATTE W                      0.21
NORTH PLATTE 2WNW                   0.21
ELSIE                               0.20
IMPERIAL 12N                        0.20
MERNA 8SSW                          0.20
ELSIE 4NE                           0.19
BIG SPRINGS 8S                      0.18
MASON CITY                          0.17
BERWYN 6SSW                         0.16
CALLAWAY 8WSW                       0.16
GRANT 4ENE                          0.16
NORTH PLATTE 5S                     0.15
HAYES CENTER 1NW                    0.14
NORTH PLATTE EX FARM                0.13
HAYES CENTER                        0.12
ANSELMO 2SE                         0.11
MADRID                              0.11
NORTH PLATTE AIRPORT                0.11
CHAMPION 8W                         0.10
LAMAR 3S                            0.10
WALLACE 9WSW                        0.10
EUSTIS 4WNW                         0.08
CHAMBERS                            0.07
HALSEY                              0.07
EDDYVILLE 11N                       0.07
ANSELMO 9NW                         0.06
KILGORE 1NE                         0.05
ENDERS 1NNW                         0.04
BROKEN BOW AIRPORT                  0.03
ENDERS 3W                           0.03
IMPERIAL AIRPORT                    0.03
VALENTINE AIRPORT                   0.03
IMPERIAL                            0.02
VALENTINE 4N                        0.02
WAUNETA 6W                          0.02
WAUNETA 5E                          0.02
BARTLETT                              T
SPRINGVIEW 2NW                        T

$$

BAKER







000
NOUS46 KHNX 021407
PNSHNX
CAZ089>099-030206-

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE HANFORD CA
706 AM PDT THU JUL 2 2015


...RAINFALL REPORTS PAST 24 HOURS ...

LOCATION                     AMOUNT    TIME/DATE       ELEVATION

...EAST-CENTRAL SAN JOAQUIN VALLEY...
OWENS CREEK DAM              0.25 IN   0400 AM 07/02   424 FT
MARIPOSA CK D                0.23 IN   0400 AM 07/02   459 FT
NORTHEAST MERCED             0.12 IN   0642 AM 07/02   177 FT
FRESNO AIR TERMINAL          0.06 IN   0453 AM 07/02   333 FT
3 NNE FOWLER                 0.05 IN   0642 AM 07/02   328 FT
CLOVIS 2.9 N                 0.04 IN   0600 AM 07/02   0 FT
FANCHER CREEK                0.04 IN   0600 AM 07/02   916 FT
FRIANT                       0.01 IN   0651 AM 07/02   662 FT

...FOOTHILLS...
PRATHER                      0.14 IN   0639 AM 07/02   2076 FT
THREE RIVERS HISTORICAL      0.11 IN   0635 AM 07/02   860 FT

...INDIAN WELLS VALLEY...
INDIAN WELLS CANYON          0.06 IN   0626 AM 07/02   4000 FT
LAURAL MOUNTAIN              0.03 IN   0626 AM 07/02   4390 FT
RIDGECREST 7SSW              0.02 IN   0637 AM 07/02   2464 FT

...KERN COUNTY DESERT...
RIDGECREST CITY HALL         0.03 IN   0642 AM 07/02   2315 FT

...KERN COUNTY MOUNTAINS...
BLUE MAX                     0.14 IN   0532 AM 07/02   5350 FT
BIRD SPRINGS PASS            0.12 IN   0627 AM 07/02   7466 FT
JAWBONE CANYON RAWS          0.08 IN   0614 AM 07/02   4300 FT
CACHE CREEK CHP              0.01 IN   0653 AM 07/02   3622 FT

...KERN COUNTY MTNS...
BEAR VALLEY SKYLINE          0.03 IN   0648 AM 07/02   5147 FT

...KERN COUNTY MOUNTAINS...
PIUTES                       0.36 IN   0551 AM 07/02   6227 FT
BRECKENRIDGE MTN             0.22 IN   0551 AM 07/02   7485 FT
BOB RABBIT ALERT             0.20 IN   0630 AM 07/02   3850 FT
BURNING MOSCOW               0.16 IN   0630 AM 07/02   5520 FT
PACK SPRING                  0.16 IN   0630 AM 07/02   3170 FT
CLARAVILLE                   0.16 IN   0652 AM 07/02   6248 FT
PINON CREEK                  0.12 IN   0630 AM 07/02   4930 FT
WALKER PASS                  0.12 IN   0600 AM 07/02   5572 FT
WALKER PASS EAST             0.11 IN   0625 AM 07/02   5217 FT
MOUNTAIN MESA                0.08 IN   0618 AM 07/02   3141 FT
WOFFORD HEIGHTS              0.08 IN   0600 AM 07/02   3150 FT
TEHACHAPI MTN PARK           0.04 IN   0553 AM 07/02   5672 FT
DEMOCRAT RAWS                0.03 IN   0625 AM 07/02   2363 FT
RIVERKERN                    0.03 IN   0557 AM 07/02   3044 FT
TEHACHAPI N GOLDEN HILLS     0.02 IN   0653 AM 07/02   3956 FT
GRAPEVINE PEAK               0.02 IN   0513 AM 07/02   4647 FT
TEHACHAPI EAST KCF           0.02 IN   0553 AM 07/02   3882 FT
KEENE                        0.01 IN   0654 AM 07/02   2854 FT
TEHACHAPI-GOLDEN HILLS       0.01 IN   0638 AM 07/02   4027 FT
TEHACHAPI MTN VALLEY APT     0.01 IN   0645 AM 07/02   4219 FT
FRAZIER PARK FIRE            0.01 IN   0518 AM 07/02   4981 FT

...MARIPOSA, MADERA, AND FRESNO COUNTY FOOTHILLS...
TOLLHOUSE 6.2 SSE            0.05 IN   0545 AM 07/02   1397 FT
SQUAW VALLEY                 0.04 IN   0652 AM 07/02   1788 FT
MIAMI MOUNTAIN               0.04 IN   0559 AM 07/02   4267 FT
PINEHURST                    0.04 IN   0558 AM 07/02   4060 FT
TRIMMER SPRINGS              0.04 IN   0552 AM 07/02   1488 FT
NORTHFORK TEAFORD SADDLE     0.03 IN   0636 AM 07/02   3093 FT
COARSEGOLD                   0.03 IN   0646 AM 07/02   3313 FT
MARIPOSA USONA RIDGE         0.02 IN   0637 AM 07/02   2749 FT
NORTHFORK                    0.02 IN   0640 AM 07/02   3133 FT
SW OAKHURST                  0.02 IN   0637 AM 07/02   2322 FT
OAKHURST MIAMI HIGHLANDS     0.02 IN   0655 AM 07/02   2549 FT
METCALF GAP                  0.02 IN   0602 AM 07/02   3118 FT
OAKHURST SHERIFF STATION     0.01 IN   0653 AM 07/02   2382 FT
YOSEMITE LAKES PARK          0.01 IN   0651 AM 07/02   1266 FT
COARSEGOLD RANCHO RAMON      0.01 IN   0653 AM 07/02   1624 FT
NORTH FORK                   0.01 IN   0555 AM 07/02   2721 FT
HURLEY                       0.01 IN   0627 AM 07/02   1228 FT

...SIERRA NEVADA...
BEAR PEAK                    0.21 IN   0610 AM 07/02   8228 FT
CALIFORNIA HOT SPRINGS       0.01 IN   0643 AM 07/02   3930 FT

...SIERRA NEVADA FROM YOSEMITE TO KINGS CANYON...
CEDAR GROVE                  0.40 IN   0600 AM 07/02   4720 FT
WISHON DAM                   0.27 IN   0600 AM 07/02   6550 FT
DINKEY CREEK                 0.26 IN   0605 AM 07/02   5737 FT
HIGH SIERRA                  0.24 IN   0551 AM 07/02   7431 FT
MINARETS                     0.23 IN   0559 AM 07/02   5313 FT
MOUNT TOM                    0.14 IN   0552 AM 07/02   8982 FT
FENCE MEADOW                 0.10 IN   0600 AM 07/02   5266 FT
SHAVER LAKE                  0.07 IN   0556 AM 07/02   5632 FT
DEVILS POST PILE             0.05 IN   0614 AM 07/02   7560 FT
MOUNTAIN REST                0.05 IN   0552 AM 07/02   4110 FT
FISH CAMP                    0.04 IN   0631 AM 07/02   4980 FT
BALCH POWER HOUSE            0.04 IN   0600 AM 07/02   1720 FT
WHITE WOLF                   0.04 IN   0553 AM 07/02   8000 FT
WAWONA                       0.02 IN   0551 AM 07/02   4309 FT
BASS LAKE MARINA             0.01 IN   0649 AM 07/02   3425 FT
BATTERSON                    0.01 IN   0648 AM 07/02   3176 FT

...SOUTHEASTERN KERN COUNTY DESERT...
NORTHWEST MOJAVE             0.11 IN   0625 AM 07/02   2870 FT
OAK CREEK CANYON             0.03 IN   0641 AM 07/02   5705 FT
REDROCK CANYON               0.02 IN   0655 AM 07/02   2575 FT
NORTH EDWARDS                0.01 IN   0455 AM 07/02   2300 FT
ROSAMOND                     0.01 IN   0520 AM 07/02   2336 FT
WEST ROSAMOND                0.01 IN   0531 AM 07/02   2410 FT
SOUTH SLOPE TEHACHAPI MTNS   0.01 IN   0640 AM 07/02   4649 FT
MOJAVE NAT TEST PILOT        0.01 IN   0516 AM 07/02   2785 FT
JAWBONE STATION              0.01 IN   0650 AM 07/02   2158 FT
BORON                        0.01 IN   0617 AM 07/02   2450 FT
CALIFORNIA CITY              0.01 IN   0459 AM 07/02   2372 FT

...SOUTHEASTERN SAN JOAQUIN VALLEY...
VISALIA AIRPORT              0.02 IN   0455 AM 07/02   295 FT
BAKERSFIELD-ROSEDALE         0.01 IN   0617 AM 07/02   400 FT
3 NNE BAKERSFIELD            0.01 IN   0638 AM 07/02   586 FT
TULARE                       0.01 IN   0648 AM 07/02   298 FT

...SOUTHWESTERN SAN JOAQUIN VALLEY...
KETTLEMAN HILLS              0.03 IN   0550 AM 07/02   810 FT

...TULARE COUNTY FOOTHILLS...
CASE MOUNTAIN                0.19 IN   0635 AM 07/02   6450 FT
THREE RIVERS PUMPKIN HOLLOW  0.18 IN   0644 AM 07/02   1240 FT
SEQUOIA NP ASH MTN           0.08 IN   0604 AM 07/02   1730 FT
SHADEQUARTER                 0.07 IN   0555 AM 07/02   4340 FT

...TULARE COUNTY MOUNTAINS...
RATTLESNAKE                  0.62 IN   0611 AM 07/02   8600 FT
BALD MOUNTAIN                0.32 IN   0630 AM 07/02   8290 FT
BIG PINE MEADOW              0.32 IN   0630 AM 07/02   7340 FT
SUGARLOAF RAWS               0.27 IN   0611 AM 07/02   7970 FT
LODGEPOLE                    0.17 IN   0652 AM 07/02   6689 FT
CAMP NELSON                  0.15 IN   0626 AM 07/02   4465 FT
ATWELL CAMP                  0.10 IN   0615 AM 07/02   6400 FT
PARK RIDGE                   0.10 IN   0600 AM 07/02   7540 FT
PONDEROSA                    0.09 IN   0653 AM 07/02   7201 FT
OAK OPENING                  0.09 IN   0612 AM 07/02   3091 FT
WOLVERTON POINT              0.09 IN   0624 AM 07/02   5240 FT
GRANT GROVE                  0.08 IN   0650 AM 07/02   6578 FT
BUCK ROCK                    0.07 IN   0649 AM 07/02   8432 FT
PEPPERMINT                   0.05 IN   0558 AM 07/02   7385 FT
JOHNSONDALE                  0.03 IN   0555 AM 07/02   4684 FT
BEACH MEADOWS                0.02 IN   0600 AM 07/02   7650 FT
HOSSACK                      0.01 IN   0500 AM 07/02   7100 FT

...WEST-CENTRAL SAN JOAQUIN VALLEY...
SELMA                        0.02 IN   0645 AM 07/02   269 FT
SANTA RITA PEAK              0.02 IN   0557 AM 07/02   5000 FT

OBSERVATIONS ARE COLLECTED FROM A VARIETY OF SOURCES WITH VARYING
EQUIPMENT AND EXPOSURE. NOT ALL DATA LISTED ARE CONSIDERED OFFICIAL.

$$

NWS SAN JOAQUIN VALLEY
HANFORD CA


000
NOUS46 KHNX 021407
PNSHNX
CAZ089>099-030206-

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE HANFORD CA
706 AM PDT THU JUL 2 2015


...RAINFALL REPORTS PAST 24 HOURS ...

LOCATION                     AMOUNT    TIME/DATE       ELEVATION

...EAST-CENTRAL SAN JOAQUIN VALLEY...
OWENS CREEK DAM              0.25 IN   0400 AM 07/02   424 FT
MARIPOSA CK D                0.23 IN   0400 AM 07/02   459 FT
NORTHEAST MERCED             0.12 IN   0642 AM 07/02   177 FT
FRESNO AIR TERMINAL          0.06 IN   0453 AM 07/02   333 FT
3 NNE FOWLER                 0.05 IN   0642 AM 07/02   328 FT
CLOVIS 2.9 N                 0.04 IN   0600 AM 07/02   0 FT
FANCHER CREEK                0.04 IN   0600 AM 07/02   916 FT
FRIANT                       0.01 IN   0651 AM 07/02   662 FT

...FOOTHILLS...
PRATHER                      0.14 IN   0639 AM 07/02   2076 FT
THREE RIVERS HISTORICAL      0.11 IN   0635 AM 07/02   860 FT

...INDIAN WELLS VALLEY...
INDIAN WELLS CANYON          0.06 IN   0626 AM 07/02   4000 FT
LAURAL MOUNTAIN              0.03 IN   0626 AM 07/02   4390 FT
RIDGECREST 7SSW              0.02 IN   0637 AM 07/02   2464 FT

...KERN COUNTY DESERT...
RIDGECREST CITY HALL         0.03 IN   0642 AM 07/02   2315 FT

...KERN COUNTY MOUNTAINS...
BLUE MAX                     0.14 IN   0532 AM 07/02   5350 FT
BIRD SPRINGS PASS            0.12 IN   0627 AM 07/02   7466 FT
JAWBONE CANYON RAWS          0.08 IN   0614 AM 07/02   4300 FT
CACHE CREEK CHP              0.01 IN   0653 AM 07/02   3622 FT

...KERN COUNTY MTNS...
BEAR VALLEY SKYLINE          0.03 IN   0648 AM 07/02   5147 FT

...KERN COUNTY MOUNTAINS...
PIUTES                       0.36 IN   0551 AM 07/02   6227 FT
BRECKENRIDGE MTN             0.22 IN   0551 AM 07/02   7485 FT
BOB RABBIT ALERT             0.20 IN   0630 AM 07/02   3850 FT
BURNING MOSCOW               0.16 IN   0630 AM 07/02   5520 FT
PACK SPRING                  0.16 IN   0630 AM 07/02   3170 FT
CLARAVILLE                   0.16 IN   0652 AM 07/02   6248 FT
PINON CREEK                  0.12 IN   0630 AM 07/02   4930 FT
WALKER PASS                  0.12 IN   0600 AM 07/02   5572 FT
WALKER PASS EAST             0.11 IN   0625 AM 07/02   5217 FT
MOUNTAIN MESA                0.08 IN   0618 AM 07/02   3141 FT
WOFFORD HEIGHTS              0.08 IN   0600 AM 07/02   3150 FT
TEHACHAPI MTN PARK           0.04 IN   0553 AM 07/02   5672 FT
DEMOCRAT RAWS                0.03 IN   0625 AM 07/02   2363 FT
RIVERKERN                    0.03 IN   0557 AM 07/02   3044 FT
TEHACHAPI N GOLDEN HILLS     0.02 IN   0653 AM 07/02   3956 FT
GRAPEVINE PEAK               0.02 IN   0513 AM 07/02   4647 FT
TEHACHAPI EAST KCF           0.02 IN   0553 AM 07/02   3882 FT
KEENE                        0.01 IN   0654 AM 07/02   2854 FT
TEHACHAPI-GOLDEN HILLS       0.01 IN   0638 AM 07/02   4027 FT
TEHACHAPI MTN VALLEY APT     0.01 IN   0645 AM 07/02   4219 FT
FRAZIER PARK FIRE            0.01 IN   0518 AM 07/02   4981 FT

...MARIPOSA, MADERA, AND FRESNO COUNTY FOOTHILLS...
TOLLHOUSE 6.2 SSE            0.05 IN   0545 AM 07/02   1397 FT
SQUAW VALLEY                 0.04 IN   0652 AM 07/02   1788 FT
MIAMI MOUNTAIN               0.04 IN   0559 AM 07/02   4267 FT
PINEHURST                    0.04 IN   0558 AM 07/02   4060 FT
TRIMMER SPRINGS              0.04 IN   0552 AM 07/02   1488 FT
NORTHFORK TEAFORD SADDLE     0.03 IN   0636 AM 07/02   3093 FT
COARSEGOLD                   0.03 IN   0646 AM 07/02   3313 FT
MARIPOSA USONA RIDGE         0.02 IN   0637 AM 07/02   2749 FT
NORTHFORK                    0.02 IN   0640 AM 07/02   3133 FT
SW OAKHURST                  0.02 IN   0637 AM 07/02   2322 FT
OAKHURST MIAMI HIGHLANDS     0.02 IN   0655 AM 07/02   2549 FT
METCALF GAP                  0.02 IN   0602 AM 07/02   3118 FT
OAKHURST SHERIFF STATION     0.01 IN   0653 AM 07/02   2382 FT
YOSEMITE LAKES PARK          0.01 IN   0651 AM 07/02   1266 FT
COARSEGOLD RANCHO RAMON      0.01 IN   0653 AM 07/02   1624 FT
NORTH FORK                   0.01 IN   0555 AM 07/02   2721 FT
HURLEY                       0.01 IN   0627 AM 07/02   1228 FT

...SIERRA NEVADA...
BEAR PEAK                    0.21 IN   0610 AM 07/02   8228 FT
CALIFORNIA HOT SPRINGS       0.01 IN   0643 AM 07/02   3930 FT

...SIERRA NEVADA FROM YOSEMITE TO KINGS CANYON...
CEDAR GROVE                  0.40 IN   0600 AM 07/02   4720 FT
WISHON DAM                   0.27 IN   0600 AM 07/02   6550 FT
DINKEY CREEK                 0.26 IN   0605 AM 07/02   5737 FT
HIGH SIERRA                  0.24 IN   0551 AM 07/02   7431 FT
MINARETS                     0.23 IN   0559 AM 07/02   5313 FT
MOUNT TOM                    0.14 IN   0552 AM 07/02   8982 FT
FENCE MEADOW                 0.10 IN   0600 AM 07/02   5266 FT
SHAVER LAKE                  0.07 IN   0556 AM 07/02   5632 FT
DEVILS POST PILE             0.05 IN   0614 AM 07/02   7560 FT
MOUNTAIN REST                0.05 IN   0552 AM 07/02   4110 FT
FISH CAMP                    0.04 IN   0631 AM 07/02   4980 FT
BALCH POWER HOUSE            0.04 IN   0600 AM 07/02   1720 FT
WHITE WOLF                   0.04 IN   0553 AM 07/02   8000 FT
WAWONA                       0.02 IN   0551 AM 07/02   4309 FT
BASS LAKE MARINA             0.01 IN   0649 AM 07/02   3425 FT
BATTERSON                    0.01 IN   0648 AM 07/02   3176 FT

...SOUTHEASTERN KERN COUNTY DESERT...
NORTHWEST MOJAVE             0.11 IN   0625 AM 07/02   2870 FT
OAK CREEK CANYON             0.03 IN   0641 AM 07/02   5705 FT
REDROCK CANYON               0.02 IN   0655 AM 07/02   2575 FT
NORTH EDWARDS                0.01 IN   0455 AM 07/02   2300 FT
ROSAMOND                     0.01 IN   0520 AM 07/02   2336 FT
WEST ROSAMOND                0.01 IN   0531 AM 07/02   2410 FT
SOUTH SLOPE TEHACHAPI MTNS   0.01 IN   0640 AM 07/02   4649 FT
MOJAVE NAT TEST PILOT        0.01 IN   0516 AM 07/02   2785 FT
JAWBONE STATION              0.01 IN   0650 AM 07/02   2158 FT
BORON                        0.01 IN   0617 AM 07/02   2450 FT
CALIFORNIA CITY              0.01 IN   0459 AM 07/02   2372 FT

...SOUTHEASTERN SAN JOAQUIN VALLEY...
VISALIA AIRPORT              0.02 IN   0455 AM 07/02   295 FT
BAKERSFIELD-ROSEDALE         0.01 IN   0617 AM 07/02   400 FT
3 NNE BAKERSFIELD            0.01 IN   0638 AM 07/02   586 FT
TULARE                       0.01 IN   0648 AM 07/02   298 FT

...SOUTHWESTERN SAN JOAQUIN VALLEY...
KETTLEMAN HILLS              0.03 IN   0550 AM 07/02   810 FT

...TULARE COUNTY FOOTHILLS...
CASE MOUNTAIN                0.19 IN   0635 AM 07/02   6450 FT
THREE RIVERS PUMPKIN HOLLOW  0.18 IN   0644 AM 07/02   1240 FT
SEQUOIA NP ASH MTN           0.08 IN   0604 AM 07/02   1730 FT
SHADEQUARTER                 0.07 IN   0555 AM 07/02   4340 FT

...TULARE COUNTY MOUNTAINS...
RATTLESNAKE                  0.62 IN   0611 AM 07/02   8600 FT
BALD MOUNTAIN                0.32 IN   0630 AM 07/02   8290 FT
BIG PINE MEADOW              0.32 IN   0630 AM 07/02   7340 FT
SUGARLOAF RAWS               0.27 IN   0611 AM 07/02   7970 FT
LODGEPOLE                    0.17 IN   0652 AM 07/02   6689 FT
CAMP NELSON                  0.15 IN   0626 AM 07/02   4465 FT
ATWELL CAMP                  0.10 IN   0615 AM 07/02   6400 FT
PARK RIDGE                   0.10 IN   0600 AM 07/02   7540 FT
PONDEROSA                    0.09 IN   0653 AM 07/02   7201 FT
OAK OPENING                  0.09 IN   0612 AM 07/02   3091 FT
WOLVERTON POINT              0.09 IN   0624 AM 07/02   5240 FT
GRANT GROVE                  0.08 IN   0650 AM 07/02   6578 FT
BUCK ROCK                    0.07 IN   0649 AM 07/02   8432 FT
PEPPERMINT                   0.05 IN   0558 AM 07/02   7385 FT
JOHNSONDALE                  0.03 IN   0555 AM 07/02   4684 FT
BEACH MEADOWS                0.02 IN   0600 AM 07/02   7650 FT
HOSSACK                      0.01 IN   0500 AM 07/02   7100 FT

...WEST-CENTRAL SAN JOAQUIN VALLEY...
SELMA                        0.02 IN   0645 AM 07/02   269 FT
SANTA RITA PEAK              0.02 IN   0557 AM 07/02   5000 FT

OBSERVATIONS ARE COLLECTED FROM A VARIETY OF SOURCES WITH VARYING
EQUIPMENT AND EXPOSURE. NOT ALL DATA LISTED ARE CONSIDERED OFFICIAL.

$$

NWS SAN JOAQUIN VALLEY
HANFORD CA



000
NOUS46 KHNX 021407
PNSHNX
CAZ089>099-030206-

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE HANFORD CA
706 AM PDT THU JUL 2 2015


...RAINFALL REPORTS PAST 24 HOURS ...

LOCATION                     AMOUNT    TIME/DATE       ELEVATION

...EAST-CENTRAL SAN JOAQUIN VALLEY...
OWENS CREEK DAM              0.25 IN   0400 AM 07/02   424 FT
MARIPOSA CK D                0.23 IN   0400 AM 07/02   459 FT
NORTHEAST MERCED             0.12 IN   0642 AM 07/02   177 FT
FRESNO AIR TERMINAL          0.06 IN   0453 AM 07/02   333 FT
3 NNE FOWLER                 0.05 IN   0642 AM 07/02   328 FT
CLOVIS 2.9 N                 0.04 IN   0600 AM 07/02   0 FT
FANCHER CREEK                0.04 IN   0600 AM 07/02   916 FT
FRIANT                       0.01 IN   0651 AM 07/02   662 FT

...FOOTHILLS...
PRATHER                      0.14 IN   0639 AM 07/02   2076 FT
THREE RIVERS HISTORICAL      0.11 IN   0635 AM 07/02   860 FT

...INDIAN WELLS VALLEY...
INDIAN WELLS CANYON          0.06 IN   0626 AM 07/02   4000 FT
LAURAL MOUNTAIN              0.03 IN   0626 AM 07/02   4390 FT
RIDGECREST 7SSW              0.02 IN   0637 AM 07/02   2464 FT

...KERN COUNTY DESERT...
RIDGECREST CITY HALL         0.03 IN   0642 AM 07/02   2315 FT

...KERN COUNTY MOUNTAINS...
BLUE MAX                     0.14 IN   0532 AM 07/02   5350 FT
BIRD SPRINGS PASS            0.12 IN   0627 AM 07/02   7466 FT
JAWBONE CANYON RAWS          0.08 IN   0614 AM 07/02   4300 FT
CACHE CREEK CHP              0.01 IN   0653 AM 07/02   3622 FT

...KERN COUNTY MTNS...
BEAR VALLEY SKYLINE          0.03 IN   0648 AM 07/02   5147 FT

...KERN COUNTY MOUNTAINS...
PIUTES                       0.36 IN   0551 AM 07/02   6227 FT
BRECKENRIDGE MTN             0.22 IN   0551 AM 07/02   7485 FT
BOB RABBIT ALERT             0.20 IN   0630 AM 07/02   3850 FT
BURNING MOSCOW               0.16 IN   0630 AM 07/02   5520 FT
PACK SPRING                  0.16 IN   0630 AM 07/02   3170 FT
CLARAVILLE                   0.16 IN   0652 AM 07/02   6248 FT
PINON CREEK                  0.12 IN   0630 AM 07/02   4930 FT
WALKER PASS                  0.12 IN   0600 AM 07/02   5572 FT
WALKER PASS EAST             0.11 IN   0625 AM 07/02   5217 FT
MOUNTAIN MESA                0.08 IN   0618 AM 07/02   3141 FT
WOFFORD HEIGHTS              0.08 IN   0600 AM 07/02   3150 FT
TEHACHAPI MTN PARK           0.04 IN   0553 AM 07/02   5672 FT
DEMOCRAT RAWS                0.03 IN   0625 AM 07/02   2363 FT
RIVERKERN                    0.03 IN   0557 AM 07/02   3044 FT
TEHACHAPI N GOLDEN HILLS     0.02 IN   0653 AM 07/02   3956 FT
GRAPEVINE PEAK               0.02 IN   0513 AM 07/02   4647 FT
TEHACHAPI EAST KCF           0.02 IN   0553 AM 07/02   3882 FT
KEENE                        0.01 IN   0654 AM 07/02   2854 FT
TEHACHAPI-GOLDEN HILLS       0.01 IN   0638 AM 07/02   4027 FT
TEHACHAPI MTN VALLEY APT     0.01 IN   0645 AM 07/02   4219 FT
FRAZIER PARK FIRE            0.01 IN   0518 AM 07/02   4981 FT

...MARIPOSA, MADERA, AND FRESNO COUNTY FOOTHILLS...
TOLLHOUSE 6.2 SSE            0.05 IN   0545 AM 07/02   1397 FT
SQUAW VALLEY                 0.04 IN   0652 AM 07/02   1788 FT
MIAMI MOUNTAIN               0.04 IN   0559 AM 07/02   4267 FT
PINEHURST                    0.04 IN   0558 AM 07/02   4060 FT
TRIMMER SPRINGS              0.04 IN   0552 AM 07/02   1488 FT
NORTHFORK TEAFORD SADDLE     0.03 IN   0636 AM 07/02   3093 FT
COARSEGOLD                   0.03 IN   0646 AM 07/02   3313 FT
MARIPOSA USONA RIDGE         0.02 IN   0637 AM 07/02   2749 FT
NORTHFORK                    0.02 IN   0640 AM 07/02   3133 FT
SW OAKHURST                  0.02 IN   0637 AM 07/02   2322 FT
OAKHURST MIAMI HIGHLANDS     0.02 IN   0655 AM 07/02   2549 FT
METCALF GAP                  0.02 IN   0602 AM 07/02   3118 FT
OAKHURST SHERIFF STATION     0.01 IN   0653 AM 07/02   2382 FT
YOSEMITE LAKES PARK          0.01 IN   0651 AM 07/02   1266 FT
COARSEGOLD RANCHO RAMON      0.01 IN   0653 AM 07/02   1624 FT
NORTH FORK                   0.01 IN   0555 AM 07/02   2721 FT
HURLEY                       0.01 IN   0627 AM 07/02   1228 FT

...SIERRA NEVADA...
BEAR PEAK                    0.21 IN   0610 AM 07/02   8228 FT
CALIFORNIA HOT SPRINGS       0.01 IN   0643 AM 07/02   3930 FT

...SIERRA NEVADA FROM YOSEMITE TO KINGS CANYON...
CEDAR GROVE                  0.40 IN   0600 AM 07/02   4720 FT
WISHON DAM                   0.27 IN   0600 AM 07/02   6550 FT
DINKEY CREEK                 0.26 IN   0605 AM 07/02   5737 FT
HIGH SIERRA                  0.24 IN   0551 AM 07/02   7431 FT
MINARETS                     0.23 IN   0559 AM 07/02   5313 FT
MOUNT TOM                    0.14 IN   0552 AM 07/02   8982 FT
FENCE MEADOW                 0.10 IN   0600 AM 07/02   5266 FT
SHAVER LAKE                  0.07 IN   0556 AM 07/02   5632 FT
DEVILS POST PILE             0.05 IN   0614 AM 07/02   7560 FT
MOUNTAIN REST                0.05 IN   0552 AM 07/02   4110 FT
FISH CAMP                    0.04 IN   0631 AM 07/02   4980 FT
BALCH POWER HOUSE            0.04 IN   0600 AM 07/02   1720 FT
WHITE WOLF                   0.04 IN   0553 AM 07/02   8000 FT
WAWONA                       0.02 IN   0551 AM 07/02   4309 FT
BASS LAKE MARINA             0.01 IN   0649 AM 07/02   3425 FT
BATTERSON                    0.01 IN   0648 AM 07/02   3176 FT

...SOUTHEASTERN KERN COUNTY DESERT...
NORTHWEST MOJAVE             0.11 IN   0625 AM 07/02   2870 FT
OAK CREEK CANYON             0.03 IN   0641 AM 07/02   5705 FT
REDROCK CANYON               0.02 IN   0655 AM 07/02   2575 FT
NORTH EDWARDS                0.01 IN   0455 AM 07/02   2300 FT
ROSAMOND                     0.01 IN   0520 AM 07/02   2336 FT
WEST ROSAMOND                0.01 IN   0531 AM 07/02   2410 FT
SOUTH SLOPE TEHACHAPI MTNS   0.01 IN   0640 AM 07/02   4649 FT
MOJAVE NAT TEST PILOT        0.01 IN   0516 AM 07/02   2785 FT
JAWBONE STATION              0.01 IN   0650 AM 07/02   2158 FT
BORON                        0.01 IN   0617 AM 07/02   2450 FT
CALIFORNIA CITY              0.01 IN   0459 AM 07/02   2372 FT

...SOUTHEASTERN SAN JOAQUIN VALLEY...
VISALIA AIRPORT              0.02 IN   0455 AM 07/02   295 FT
BAKERSFIELD-ROSEDALE         0.01 IN   0617 AM 07/02   400 FT
3 NNE BAKERSFIELD            0.01 IN   0638 AM 07/02   586 FT
TULARE                       0.01 IN   0648 AM 07/02   298 FT

...SOUTHWESTERN SAN JOAQUIN VALLEY...
KETTLEMAN HILLS              0.03 IN   0550 AM 07/02   810 FT

...TULARE COUNTY FOOTHILLS...
CASE MOUNTAIN                0.19 IN   0635 AM 07/02   6450 FT
THREE RIVERS PUMPKIN HOLLOW  0.18 IN   0644 AM 07/02   1240 FT
SEQUOIA NP ASH MTN           0.08 IN   0604 AM 07/02   1730 FT
SHADEQUARTER                 0.07 IN   0555 AM 07/02   4340 FT

...TULARE COUNTY MOUNTAINS...
RATTLESNAKE                  0.62 IN   0611 AM 07/02   8600 FT
BALD MOUNTAIN                0.32 IN   0630 AM 07/02   8290 FT
BIG PINE MEADOW              0.32 IN   0630 AM 07/02   7340 FT
SUGARLOAF RAWS               0.27 IN   0611 AM 07/02   7970 FT
LODGEPOLE                    0.17 IN   0652 AM 07/02   6689 FT
CAMP NELSON                  0.15 IN   0626 AM 07/02   4465 FT
ATWELL CAMP                  0.10 IN   0615 AM 07/02   6400 FT
PARK RIDGE                   0.10 IN   0600 AM 07/02   7540 FT
PONDEROSA                    0.09 IN   0653 AM 07/02   7201 FT
OAK OPENING                  0.09 IN   0612 AM 07/02   3091 FT
WOLVERTON POINT              0.09 IN   0624 AM 07/02   5240 FT
GRANT GROVE                  0.08 IN   0650 AM 07/02   6578 FT
BUCK ROCK                    0.07 IN   0649 AM 07/02   8432 FT
PEPPERMINT                   0.05 IN   0558 AM 07/02   7385 FT
JOHNSONDALE                  0.03 IN   0555 AM 07/02   4684 FT
BEACH MEADOWS                0.02 IN   0600 AM 07/02   7650 FT
HOSSACK                      0.01 IN   0500 AM 07/02   7100 FT

...WEST-CENTRAL SAN JOAQUIN VALLEY...
SELMA                        0.02 IN   0645 AM 07/02   269 FT
SANTA RITA PEAK              0.02 IN   0557 AM 07/02   5000 FT

OBSERVATIONS ARE COLLECTED FROM A VARIETY OF SOURCES WITH VARYING
EQUIPMENT AND EXPOSURE. NOT ALL DATA LISTED ARE CONSIDERED OFFICIAL.

$$

NWS SAN JOAQUIN VALLEY
HANFORD CA



000
NOUS46 KHNX 021407
PNSHNX
CAZ089>099-030206-

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE HANFORD CA
706 AM PDT THU JUL 2 2015


...RAINFALL REPORTS PAST 24 HOURS ...

LOCATION                     AMOUNT    TIME/DATE       ELEVATION

...EAST-CENTRAL SAN JOAQUIN VALLEY...
OWENS CREEK DAM              0.25 IN   0400 AM 07/02   424 FT
MARIPOSA CK D                0.23 IN   0400 AM 07/02   459 FT
NORTHEAST MERCED             0.12 IN   0642 AM 07/02   177 FT
FRESNO AIR TERMINAL          0.06 IN   0453 AM 07/02   333 FT
3 NNE FOWLER                 0.05 IN   0642 AM 07/02   328 FT
CLOVIS 2.9 N                 0.04 IN   0600 AM 07/02   0 FT
FANCHER CREEK                0.04 IN   0600 AM 07/02   916 FT
FRIANT                       0.01 IN   0651 AM 07/02   662 FT

...FOOTHILLS...
PRATHER                      0.14 IN   0639 AM 07/02   2076 FT
THREE RIVERS HISTORICAL      0.11 IN   0635 AM 07/02   860 FT

...INDIAN WELLS VALLEY...
INDIAN WELLS CANYON          0.06 IN   0626 AM 07/02   4000 FT
LAURAL MOUNTAIN              0.03 IN   0626 AM 07/02   4390 FT
RIDGECREST 7SSW              0.02 IN   0637 AM 07/02   2464 FT

...KERN COUNTY DESERT...
RIDGECREST CITY HALL         0.03 IN   0642 AM 07/02   2315 FT

...KERN COUNTY MOUNTAINS...
BLUE MAX                     0.14 IN   0532 AM 07/02   5350 FT
BIRD SPRINGS PASS            0.12 IN   0627 AM 07/02   7466 FT
JAWBONE CANYON RAWS          0.08 IN   0614 AM 07/02   4300 FT
CACHE CREEK CHP              0.01 IN   0653 AM 07/02   3622 FT

...KERN COUNTY MTNS...
BEAR VALLEY SKYLINE          0.03 IN   0648 AM 07/02   5147 FT

...KERN COUNTY MOUNTAINS...
PIUTES                       0.36 IN   0551 AM 07/02   6227 FT
BRECKENRIDGE MTN             0.22 IN   0551 AM 07/02   7485 FT
BOB RABBIT ALERT             0.20 IN   0630 AM 07/02   3850 FT
BURNING MOSCOW               0.16 IN   0630 AM 07/02   5520 FT
PACK SPRING                  0.16 IN   0630 AM 07/02   3170 FT
CLARAVILLE                   0.16 IN   0652 AM 07/02   6248 FT
PINON CREEK                  0.12 IN   0630 AM 07/02   4930 FT
WALKER PASS                  0.12 IN   0600 AM 07/02   5572 FT
WALKER PASS EAST             0.11 IN   0625 AM 07/02   5217 FT
MOUNTAIN MESA                0.08 IN   0618 AM 07/02   3141 FT
WOFFORD HEIGHTS              0.08 IN   0600 AM 07/02   3150 FT
TEHACHAPI MTN PARK           0.04 IN   0553 AM 07/02   5672 FT
DEMOCRAT RAWS                0.03 IN   0625 AM 07/02   2363 FT
RIVERKERN                    0.03 IN   0557 AM 07/02   3044 FT
TEHACHAPI N GOLDEN HILLS     0.02 IN   0653 AM 07/02   3956 FT
GRAPEVINE PEAK               0.02 IN   0513 AM 07/02   4647 FT
TEHACHAPI EAST KCF           0.02 IN   0553 AM 07/02   3882 FT
KEENE                        0.01 IN   0654 AM 07/02   2854 FT
TEHACHAPI-GOLDEN HILLS       0.01 IN   0638 AM 07/02   4027 FT
TEHACHAPI MTN VALLEY APT     0.01 IN   0645 AM 07/02   4219 FT
FRAZIER PARK FIRE            0.01 IN   0518 AM 07/02   4981 FT

...MARIPOSA, MADERA, AND FRESNO COUNTY FOOTHILLS...
TOLLHOUSE 6.2 SSE            0.05 IN   0545 AM 07/02   1397 FT
SQUAW VALLEY                 0.04 IN   0652 AM 07/02   1788 FT
MIAMI MOUNTAIN               0.04 IN   0559 AM 07/02   4267 FT
PINEHURST                    0.04 IN   0558 AM 07/02   4060 FT
TRIMMER SPRINGS              0.04 IN   0552 AM 07/02   1488 FT
NORTHFORK TEAFORD SADDLE     0.03 IN   0636 AM 07/02   3093 FT
COARSEGOLD                   0.03 IN   0646 AM 07/02   3313 FT
MARIPOSA USONA RIDGE         0.02 IN   0637 AM 07/02   2749 FT
NORTHFORK                    0.02 IN   0640 AM 07/02   3133 FT
SW OAKHURST                  0.02 IN   0637 AM 07/02   2322 FT
OAKHURST MIAMI HIGHLANDS     0.02 IN   0655 AM 07/02   2549 FT
METCALF GAP                  0.02 IN   0602 AM 07/02   3118 FT
OAKHURST SHERIFF STATION     0.01 IN   0653 AM 07/02   2382 FT
YOSEMITE LAKES PARK          0.01 IN   0651 AM 07/02   1266 FT
COARSEGOLD RANCHO RAMON      0.01 IN   0653 AM 07/02   1624 FT
NORTH FORK                   0.01 IN   0555 AM 07/02   2721 FT
HURLEY                       0.01 IN   0627 AM 07/02   1228 FT

...SIERRA NEVADA...
BEAR PEAK                    0.21 IN   0610 AM 07/02   8228 FT
CALIFORNIA HOT SPRINGS       0.01 IN   0643 AM 07/02   3930 FT

...SIERRA NEVADA FROM YOSEMITE TO KINGS CANYON...
CEDAR GROVE                  0.40 IN   0600 AM 07/02   4720 FT
WISHON DAM                   0.27 IN   0600 AM 07/02   6550 FT
DINKEY CREEK                 0.26 IN   0605 AM 07/02   5737 FT
HIGH SIERRA                  0.24 IN   0551 AM 07/02   7431 FT
MINARETS                     0.23 IN   0559 AM 07/02   5313 FT
MOUNT TOM                    0.14 IN   0552 AM 07/02   8982 FT
FENCE MEADOW                 0.10 IN   0600 AM 07/02   5266 FT
SHAVER LAKE                  0.07 IN   0556 AM 07/02   5632 FT
DEVILS POST PILE             0.05 IN   0614 AM 07/02   7560 FT
MOUNTAIN REST                0.05 IN   0552 AM 07/02   4110 FT
FISH CAMP                    0.04 IN   0631 AM 07/02   4980 FT
BALCH POWER HOUSE            0.04 IN   0600 AM 07/02   1720 FT
WHITE WOLF                   0.04 IN   0553 AM 07/02   8000 FT
WAWONA                       0.02 IN   0551 AM 07/02   4309 FT
BASS LAKE MARINA             0.01 IN   0649 AM 07/02   3425 FT
BATTERSON                    0.01 IN   0648 AM 07/02   3176 FT

...SOUTHEASTERN KERN COUNTY DESERT...
NORTHWEST MOJAVE             0.11 IN   0625 AM 07/02   2870 FT
OAK CREEK CANYON             0.03 IN   0641 AM 07/02   5705 FT
REDROCK CANYON               0.02 IN   0655 AM 07/02   2575 FT
NORTH EDWARDS                0.01 IN   0455 AM 07/02   2300 FT
ROSAMOND                     0.01 IN   0520 AM 07/02   2336 FT
WEST ROSAMOND                0.01 IN   0531 AM 07/02   2410 FT
SOUTH SLOPE TEHACHAPI MTNS   0.01 IN   0640 AM 07/02   4649 FT
MOJAVE NAT TEST PILOT        0.01 IN   0516 AM 07/02   2785 FT
JAWBONE STATION              0.01 IN   0650 AM 07/02   2158 FT
BORON                        0.01 IN   0617 AM 07/02   2450 FT
CALIFORNIA CITY              0.01 IN   0459 AM 07/02   2372 FT

...SOUTHEASTERN SAN JOAQUIN VALLEY...
VISALIA AIRPORT              0.02 IN   0455 AM 07/02   295 FT
BAKERSFIELD-ROSEDALE         0.01 IN   0617 AM 07/02   400 FT
3 NNE BAKERSFIELD            0.01 IN   0638 AM 07/02   586 FT
TULARE                       0.01 IN   0648 AM 07/02   298 FT

...SOUTHWESTERN SAN JOAQUIN VALLEY...
KETTLEMAN HILLS              0.03 IN   0550 AM 07/02   810 FT

...TULARE COUNTY FOOTHILLS...
CASE MOUNTAIN                0.19 IN   0635 AM 07/02   6450 FT
THREE RIVERS PUMPKIN HOLLOW  0.18 IN   0644 AM 07/02   1240 FT
SEQUOIA NP ASH MTN           0.08 IN   0604 AM 07/02   1730 FT
SHADEQUARTER                 0.07 IN   0555 AM 07/02   4340 FT

...TULARE COUNTY MOUNTAINS...
RATTLESNAKE                  0.62 IN   0611 AM 07/02   8600 FT
BALD MOUNTAIN                0.32 IN   0630 AM 07/02   8290 FT
BIG PINE MEADOW              0.32 IN   0630 AM 07/02   7340 FT
SUGARLOAF RAWS               0.27 IN   0611 AM 07/02   7970 FT
LODGEPOLE                    0.17 IN   0652 AM 07/02   6689 FT
CAMP NELSON                  0.15 IN   0626 AM 07/02   4465 FT
ATWELL CAMP                  0.10 IN   0615 AM 07/02   6400 FT
PARK RIDGE                   0.10 IN   0600 AM 07/02   7540 FT
PONDEROSA                    0.09 IN   0653 AM 07/02   7201 FT
OAK OPENING                  0.09 IN   0612 AM 07/02   3091 FT
WOLVERTON POINT              0.09 IN   0624 AM 07/02   5240 FT
GRANT GROVE                  0.08 IN   0650 AM 07/02   6578 FT
BUCK ROCK                    0.07 IN   0649 AM 07/02   8432 FT
PEPPERMINT                   0.05 IN   0558 AM 07/02   7385 FT
JOHNSONDALE                  0.03 IN   0555 AM 07/02   4684 FT
BEACH MEADOWS                0.02 IN   0600 AM 07/02   7650 FT
HOSSACK                      0.01 IN   0500 AM 07/02   7100 FT

...WEST-CENTRAL SAN JOAQUIN VALLEY...
SELMA                        0.02 IN   0645 AM 07/02   269 FT
SANTA RITA PEAK              0.02 IN   0557 AM 07/02   5000 FT

OBSERVATIONS ARE COLLECTED FROM A VARIETY OF SOURCES WITH VARYING
EQUIPMENT AND EXPOSURE. NOT ALL DATA LISTED ARE CONSIDERED OFFICIAL.

$$

NWS SAN JOAQUIN VALLEY
HANFORD CA



000
NOUS46 KHNX 021407
PNSHNX
CAZ089>099-030206-

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE HANFORD CA
706 AM PDT THU JUL 2 2015


...RAINFALL REPORTS PAST 24 HOURS ...

LOCATION                     AMOUNT    TIME/DATE       ELEVATION

...EAST-CENTRAL SAN JOAQUIN VALLEY...
OWENS CREEK DAM              0.25 IN   0400 AM 07/02   424 FT
MARIPOSA CK D                0.23 IN   0400 AM 07/02   459 FT
NORTHEAST MERCED             0.12 IN   0642 AM 07/02   177 FT
FRESNO AIR TERMINAL          0.06 IN   0453 AM 07/02   333 FT
3 NNE FOWLER                 0.05 IN   0642 AM 07/02   328 FT
CLOVIS 2.9 N                 0.04 IN   0600 AM 07/02   0 FT
FANCHER CREEK                0.04 IN   0600 AM 07/02   916 FT
FRIANT                       0.01 IN   0651 AM 07/02   662 FT

...FOOTHILLS...
PRATHER                      0.14 IN   0639 AM 07/02   2076 FT
THREE RIVERS HISTORICAL      0.11 IN   0635 AM 07/02   860 FT

...INDIAN WELLS VALLEY...
INDIAN WELLS CANYON          0.06 IN   0626 AM 07/02   4000 FT
LAURAL MOUNTAIN              0.03 IN   0626 AM 07/02   4390 FT
RIDGECREST 7SSW              0.02 IN   0637 AM 07/02   2464 FT

...KERN COUNTY DESERT...
RIDGECREST CITY HALL         0.03 IN   0642 AM 07/02   2315 FT

...KERN COUNTY MOUNTAINS...
BLUE MAX                     0.14 IN   0532 AM 07/02   5350 FT
BIRD SPRINGS PASS            0.12 IN   0627 AM 07/02   7466 FT
JAWBONE CANYON RAWS          0.08 IN   0614 AM 07/02   4300 FT
CACHE CREEK CHP              0.01 IN   0653 AM 07/02   3622 FT

...KERN COUNTY MTNS...
BEAR VALLEY SKYLINE          0.03 IN   0648 AM 07/02   5147 FT

...KERN COUNTY MOUNTAINS...
PIUTES                       0.36 IN   0551 AM 07/02   6227 FT
BRECKENRIDGE MTN             0.22 IN   0551 AM 07/02   7485 FT
BOB RABBIT ALERT             0.20 IN   0630 AM 07/02   3850 FT
BURNING MOSCOW               0.16 IN   0630 AM 07/02   5520 FT
PACK SPRING                  0.16 IN   0630 AM 07/02   3170 FT
CLARAVILLE                   0.16 IN   0652 AM 07/02   6248 FT
PINON CREEK                  0.12 IN   0630 AM 07/02   4930 FT
WALKER PASS                  0.12 IN   0600 AM 07/02   5572 FT
WALKER PASS EAST             0.11 IN   0625 AM 07/02   5217 FT
MOUNTAIN MESA                0.08 IN   0618 AM 07/02   3141 FT
WOFFORD HEIGHTS              0.08 IN   0600 AM 07/02   3150 FT
TEHACHAPI MTN PARK           0.04 IN   0553 AM 07/02   5672 FT
DEMOCRAT RAWS                0.03 IN   0625 AM 07/02   2363 FT
RIVERKERN                    0.03 IN   0557 AM 07/02   3044 FT
TEHACHAPI N GOLDEN HILLS     0.02 IN   0653 AM 07/02   3956 FT
GRAPEVINE PEAK               0.02 IN   0513 AM 07/02   4647 FT
TEHACHAPI EAST KCF           0.02 IN   0553 AM 07/02   3882 FT
KEENE                        0.01 IN   0654 AM 07/02   2854 FT
TEHACHAPI-GOLDEN HILLS       0.01 IN   0638 AM 07/02   4027 FT
TEHACHAPI MTN VALLEY APT     0.01 IN   0645 AM 07/02   4219 FT
FRAZIER PARK FIRE            0.01 IN   0518 AM 07/02   4981 FT

...MARIPOSA, MADERA, AND FRESNO COUNTY FOOTHILLS...
TOLLHOUSE 6.2 SSE            0.05 IN   0545 AM 07/02   1397 FT
SQUAW VALLEY                 0.04 IN   0652 AM 07/02   1788 FT
MIAMI MOUNTAIN               0.04 IN   0559 AM 07/02   4267 FT
PINEHURST                    0.04 IN   0558 AM 07/02   4060 FT
TRIMMER SPRINGS              0.04 IN   0552 AM 07/02   1488 FT
NORTHFORK TEAFORD SADDLE     0.03 IN   0636 AM 07/02   3093 FT
COARSEGOLD                   0.03 IN   0646 AM 07/02   3313 FT
MARIPOSA USONA RIDGE         0.02 IN   0637 AM 07/02   2749 FT
NORTHFORK                    0.02 IN   0640 AM 07/02   3133 FT
SW OAKHURST                  0.02 IN   0637 AM 07/02   2322 FT
OAKHURST MIAMI HIGHLANDS     0.02 IN   0655 AM 07/02   2549 FT
METCALF GAP                  0.02 IN   0602 AM 07/02   3118 FT
OAKHURST SHERIFF STATION     0.01 IN   0653 AM 07/02   2382 FT
YOSEMITE LAKES PARK          0.01 IN   0651 AM 07/02   1266 FT
COARSEGOLD RANCHO RAMON      0.01 IN   0653 AM 07/02   1624 FT
NORTH FORK                   0.01 IN   0555 AM 07/02   2721 FT
HURLEY                       0.01 IN   0627 AM 07/02   1228 FT

...SIERRA NEVADA...
BEAR PEAK                    0.21 IN   0610 AM 07/02   8228 FT
CALIFORNIA HOT SPRINGS       0.01 IN   0643 AM 07/02   3930 FT

...SIERRA NEVADA FROM YOSEMITE TO KINGS CANYON...
CEDAR GROVE                  0.40 IN   0600 AM 07/02   4720 FT
WISHON DAM                   0.27 IN   0600 AM 07/02   6550 FT
DINKEY CREEK                 0.26 IN   0605 AM 07/02   5737 FT
HIGH SIERRA                  0.24 IN   0551 AM 07/02   7431 FT
MINARETS                     0.23 IN   0559 AM 07/02   5313 FT
MOUNT TOM                    0.14 IN   0552 AM 07/02   8982 FT
FENCE MEADOW                 0.10 IN   0600 AM 07/02   5266 FT
SHAVER LAKE                  0.07 IN   0556 AM 07/02   5632 FT
DEVILS POST PILE             0.05 IN   0614 AM 07/02   7560 FT
MOUNTAIN REST                0.05 IN   0552 AM 07/02   4110 FT
FISH CAMP                    0.04 IN   0631 AM 07/02   4980 FT
BALCH POWER HOUSE            0.04 IN   0600 AM 07/02   1720 FT
WHITE WOLF                   0.04 IN   0553 AM 07/02   8000 FT
WAWONA                       0.02 IN   0551 AM 07/02   4309 FT
BASS LAKE MARINA             0.01 IN   0649 AM 07/02   3425 FT
BATTERSON                    0.01 IN   0648 AM 07/02   3176 FT

...SOUTHEASTERN KERN COUNTY DESERT...
NORTHWEST MOJAVE             0.11 IN   0625 AM 07/02   2870 FT
OAK CREEK CANYON             0.03 IN   0641 AM 07/02   5705 FT
REDROCK CANYON               0.02 IN   0655 AM 07/02   2575 FT
NORTH EDWARDS                0.01 IN   0455 AM 07/02   2300 FT
ROSAMOND                     0.01 IN   0520 AM 07/02   2336 FT
WEST ROSAMOND                0.01 IN   0531 AM 07/02   2410 FT
SOUTH SLOPE TEHACHAPI MTNS   0.01 IN   0640 AM 07/02   4649 FT
MOJAVE NAT TEST PILOT        0.01 IN   0516 AM 07/02   2785 FT
JAWBONE STATION              0.01 IN   0650 AM 07/02   2158 FT
BORON                        0.01 IN   0617 AM 07/02   2450 FT
CALIFORNIA CITY              0.01 IN   0459 AM 07/02   2372 FT

...SOUTHEASTERN SAN JOAQUIN VALLEY...
VISALIA AIRPORT              0.02 IN   0455 AM 07/02   295 FT
BAKERSFIELD-ROSEDALE         0.01 IN   0617 AM 07/02   400 FT
3 NNE BAKERSFIELD            0.01 IN   0638 AM 07/02   586 FT
TULARE                       0.01 IN   0648 AM 07/02   298 FT

...SOUTHWESTERN SAN JOAQUIN VALLEY...
KETTLEMAN HILLS              0.03 IN   0550 AM 07/02   810 FT

...TULARE COUNTY FOOTHILLS...
CASE MOUNTAIN                0.19 IN   0635 AM 07/02   6450 FT
THREE RIVERS PUMPKIN HOLLOW  0.18 IN   0644 AM 07/02   1240 FT
SEQUOIA NP ASH MTN           0.08 IN   0604 AM 07/02   1730 FT
SHADEQUARTER                 0.07 IN   0555 AM 07/02   4340 FT

...TULARE COUNTY MOUNTAINS...
RATTLESNAKE                  0.62 IN   0611 AM 07/02   8600 FT
BALD MOUNTAIN                0.32 IN   0630 AM 07/02   8290 FT
BIG PINE MEADOW              0.32 IN   0630 AM 07/02   7340 FT
SUGARLOAF RAWS               0.27 IN   0611 AM 07/02   7970 FT
LODGEPOLE                    0.17 IN   0652 AM 07/02   6689 FT
CAMP NELSON                  0.15 IN   0626 AM 07/02   4465 FT
ATWELL CAMP                  0.10 IN   0615 AM 07/02   6400 FT
PARK RIDGE                   0.10 IN   0600 AM 07/02   7540 FT
PONDEROSA                    0.09 IN   0653 AM 07/02   7201 FT
OAK OPENING                  0.09 IN   0612 AM 07/02   3091 FT
WOLVERTON POINT              0.09 IN   0624 AM 07/02   5240 FT
GRANT GROVE                  0.08 IN   0650 AM 07/02   6578 FT
BUCK ROCK                    0.07 IN   0649 AM 07/02   8432 FT
PEPPERMINT                   0.05 IN   0558 AM 07/02   7385 FT
JOHNSONDALE                  0.03 IN   0555 AM 07/02   4684 FT
BEACH MEADOWS                0.02 IN   0600 AM 07/02   7650 FT
HOSSACK                      0.01 IN   0500 AM 07/02   7100 FT

...WEST-CENTRAL SAN JOAQUIN VALLEY...
SELMA                        0.02 IN   0645 AM 07/02   269 FT
SANTA RITA PEAK              0.02 IN   0557 AM 07/02   5000 FT

OBSERVATIONS ARE COLLECTED FROM A VARIETY OF SOURCES WITH VARYING
EQUIPMENT AND EXPOSURE. NOT ALL DATA LISTED ARE CONSIDERED OFFICIAL.

$$

NWS SAN JOAQUIN VALLEY
HANFORD CA



000
NOUS42 KMFL 021356
PNSMFL

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE MIAMI FL
956 AM EDT THU JUL 2 2015

...HOMESTEAD NOAA WEATHER RADIO BROADCAST OFF THE AIR...

A TRANSMITTER ISSUE HAS CAUSED THE HOMESTEAD WEATHER RADIO BROADCAST
TO BE TEMPORARILY UNAVAILABLE. TECHNICIANS HAVE BEEN NOTIFIED BUT NO
ESTIMATED TIME TO REPAIR IS CURRENTLY AVAILABLE.


THE AFFECTED TRANSMITTER IS:

TRANSMITTER   STATION    FREQUENCY
===========   =======    ===========
HOMESTEAD     WNG663     162.425 MHZ


NEARBY TRANSMITTERS WITH OVERLAPPING COVERAGE ARE:

TRANSMITTER   STATION    FREQUENCY
===========   =======    ===========
MIAMI         KHB-34     162.550 MHZ
TEA TABLE     WWG-60     162.450 MHZ


REMEMBER THAT THE LATEST WEATHER INFORMATION IS ALSO AVAILABLE ON
OUR WEBSITE AT WWW.WEATHER.GOV/SOUTHFLORIDA

$$

ROSS


000
NOUS42 KMFL 021356
PNSMFL

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE MIAMI FL
956 AM EDT THU JUL 2 2015

...HOMESTEAD NOAA WEATHER RADIO BROADCAST OFF THE AIR...

A TRANSMITTER ISSUE HAS CAUSED THE HOMESTEAD WEATHER RADIO BROADCAST
TO BE TEMPORARILY UNAVAILABLE. TECHNICIANS HAVE BEEN NOTIFIED BUT NO
ESTIMATED TIME TO REPAIR IS CURRENTLY AVAILABLE.


THE AFFECTED TRANSMITTER IS:

TRANSMITTER   STATION    FREQUENCY
===========   =======    ===========
HOMESTEAD     WNG663     162.425 MHZ


NEARBY TRANSMITTERS WITH OVERLAPPING COVERAGE ARE:

TRANSMITTER   STATION    FREQUENCY
===========   =======    ===========
MIAMI         KHB-34     162.550 MHZ
TEA TABLE     WWG-60     162.450 MHZ


REMEMBER THAT THE LATEST WEATHER INFORMATION IS ALSO AVAILABLE ON
OUR WEBSITE AT WWW.WEATHER.GOV/SOUTHFLORIDA

$$

ROSS



000
NOUS43 KIWX 021315
PNSIWX
INZ006>009-MIZ079>081-OHZ001-002-004-005-041315-

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE NORTHERN INDIANA
915 AM EDT THU JUL 2 2015

...ROUTINE MAINTENANCE SCHEDULED FOR ANGOLA NOAA WEATHER RADIO...

ROUTINE MAINTENANCE WILL BE CONDUCTED ON THE NOAA WEATHER RADIO
STATION KXI-94 AT 162.425 MHZ FROM ANGOLA ON TUESDAY JULY 7TH.
THIS MAINTENANCE WILL BE PERFORMED FROM APPROXIMATELY NOON TO 8PM.
DURING THIS PERIOD...THE TRANSMITTER WILL BE BROADCASTING ON LOW
POWER. IF RECEPTION PROBLEMS ARE EXPERIENCED DURING THIS
TIME...ALTERNATIVE BROADCASTS CAN BE FOUND ON WNG-647 162.450 MHZ
FROM ADRIAN...WXK-81 162.4 MHZ FROM ONONDAGA...AND WXJ-58 162.55
FROM FORT WAYNE. WE APOLOGIZE FOR ANY INCONVENIENCE.

$$


000
NOUS43 KIWX 021315
PNSIWX
INZ006>009-MIZ079>081-OHZ001-002-004-005-041315-

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE NORTHERN INDIANA
915 AM EDT THU JUL 2 2015

...ROUTINE MAINTENANCE SCHEDULED FOR ANGOLA NOAA WEATHER RADIO...

ROUTINE MAINTENANCE WILL BE CONDUCTED ON THE NOAA WEATHER RADIO
STATION KXI-94 AT 162.425 MHZ FROM ANGOLA ON TUESDAY JULY 7TH.
THIS MAINTENANCE WILL BE PERFORMED FROM APPROXIMATELY NOON TO 8PM.
DURING THIS PERIOD...THE TRANSMITTER WILL BE BROADCASTING ON LOW
POWER. IF RECEPTION PROBLEMS ARE EXPERIENCED DURING THIS
TIME...ALTERNATIVE BROADCASTS CAN BE FOUND ON WNG-647 162.450 MHZ
FROM ADRIAN...WXK-81 162.4 MHZ FROM ONONDAGA...AND WXJ-58 162.55
FROM FORT WAYNE. WE APOLOGIZE FOR ANY INCONVENIENCE.

$$



000
NOUS43 KIWX 021315
PNSIWX
INZ006>009-MIZ079>081-OHZ001-002-004-005-041315-

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE NORTHERN INDIANA
915 AM EDT THU JUL 2 2015

...ROUTINE MAINTENANCE SCHEDULED FOR ANGOLA NOAA WEATHER RADIO...

ROUTINE MAINTENANCE WILL BE CONDUCTED ON THE NOAA WEATHER RADIO
STATION KXI-94 AT 162.425 MHZ FROM ANGOLA ON TUESDAY JULY 7TH.
THIS MAINTENANCE WILL BE PERFORMED FROM APPROXIMATELY NOON TO 8PM.
DURING THIS PERIOD...THE TRANSMITTER WILL BE BROADCASTING ON LOW
POWER. IF RECEPTION PROBLEMS ARE EXPERIENCED DURING THIS
TIME...ALTERNATIVE BROADCASTS CAN BE FOUND ON WNG-647 162.450 MHZ
FROM ADRIAN...WXK-81 162.4 MHZ FROM ONONDAGA...AND WXJ-58 162.55
FROM FORT WAYNE. WE APOLOGIZE FOR ANY INCONVENIENCE.

$$


000
NOUS43 KIWX 021315
PNSIWX
INZ006>009-MIZ079>081-OHZ001-002-004-005-041315-

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE NORTHERN INDIANA
915 AM EDT THU JUL 2 2015

...ROUTINE MAINTENANCE SCHEDULED FOR ANGOLA NOAA WEATHER RADIO...

ROUTINE MAINTENANCE WILL BE CONDUCTED ON THE NOAA WEATHER RADIO
STATION KXI-94 AT 162.425 MHZ FROM ANGOLA ON TUESDAY JULY 7TH.
THIS MAINTENANCE WILL BE PERFORMED FROM APPROXIMATELY NOON TO 8PM.
DURING THIS PERIOD...THE TRANSMITTER WILL BE BROADCASTING ON LOW
POWER. IF RECEPTION PROBLEMS ARE EXPERIENCED DURING THIS
TIME...ALTERNATIVE BROADCASTS CAN BE FOUND ON WNG-647 162.450 MHZ
FROM ADRIAN...WXK-81 162.4 MHZ FROM ONONDAGA...AND WXJ-58 162.55
FROM FORT WAYNE. WE APOLOGIZE FOR ANY INCONVENIENCE.

$$



000
NOUS44 KHGX 021224
PNSHGX
TXZ163-164-176>179-195>200-210>214-226-227-235>238-030030-

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE HOUSTON/GALVESTON TX
724 AM CDT THU JUL 2 2015

        ...RECORD RAINFALL ACROSS MUCH OF SOUTHEAST TEXAS
              DURING THE FIRST SIX MONTHS OF 2015...

THE FIRST SIX MONTHS OF 2015 HAVE BEEN VERY WET. THE YEAR STARTED OUT
NEAR NORMAL AND FEBRUARY WAS ACTUALLY VERY DRY WITH MOST LOCATIONS IN
SOUTHEAST TEXAS RECEIVING AN INCH OF RAIN OR LESS. RAIN RETURNED IN
MARCH AND THE RAINFALL TOTALS WERE ABOVE NORMAL BUT HARDLY EXCESSIVE.
BUT THE RAIN IN MARCH WAS JUST A PRECURSOR TO WHAT WAS TO COME IN MAY
AND JUNE. HEAVY TO EXCESSIVE RAIN PUMMELED LARGE PORTIONS OF SOUTHEAST
TEXAS BEGINNING ON MAY 11TH AND 12TH WITH BOUTS OF HEAVY RAIN THROUGH
THE END OF MAY AND AGAIN THROUGH MUCH OF JUNE. ON MAY 11TH AND 12TH...
PARTS OF HARRIS...BRAZORIA AND GALVESTON RECEIVED AN UNEXPECTED BLAST
OF HEAVY RAIN WITH 10 TO 12 INCHES FALLING IN WEBSTER...FRIENDSWOOD AND
CLEAR LAKE AREA WITH 8 TO 10 INCHES OF RAIN BETWEEN LAKE JACKSON AND
DANBURY. ANOTHER HEAVY RAIN EVENT OCCURRED ACROSS HARRIS AND FORT BEND COUNTIES
ON MEMORIAL DAY (MAY 25TH) WITH 10 TO 12 INCHES OF RAIN AFFECTING
MEYERLAND...HOUSTON WESTBURY AND MISSION BEND. TROPICAL STORM BILL
(JUNE 13TH-17TH) BROUGHT ADDITIONAL HEAVY RAIN TO PARTS OF JACKSON...
WHARTON...COLORADO...MATAGORDA AND AUSTIN COUNTIES WITH 10 TO 14 INCHES
OF RAIN REPORTED NEAR GANADO AND EL CAMPO. GETTING TEN INCHES OF RAIN
IN SOUTHEAST TEXAS IS UNUSUAL BUT NOT UNCOMMON BUT GETTING THREE SUCH
EPISODES IN A 30 DAY PERIOD IS VERY UNUSUAL.

THE FOLLOWING COMMUNITIES (CO-OP SITES) HAVE HAD THEIR WETTEST START
TO A YEAR:

BAYTOWN...BRENHAM...CALDWELL...CROCKETT...HUNTSVILLE...NWS HGX...
SUGAR LAND AND WASHINGTON STATE PARK.

A QUICK NOTE ABOUT BAYTOWN...THIS LOCATION HAS HAD THE MOST RAIN OUT
OF ALL OUR CO-OP SITES WITH OVER 64 INCHES OF RAIN THROUGH JUNE 30TH.
THIS LOCATION IS 35 INCHES ABOVE NORMAL FOR THE YEAR. THE DEPARTURE
FOR THE YEAR (35.46) IS GREATER THAN WHAT THE NORMAL RAINFALL (28.61)
FOR THE FIRST SIX MONTHS OF THE YEAR IS SUPPOSED TO BE. BAYTOWN HAS
MEASURED RAINFALL GREATER THAN 10 INCHES FOR FOUR CONSECUTIVE MONTHS.

THE FOLLOWING COMMUNITIES HAVE HAD THEIR SECOND WETTEST START TO A
YEAR:

BELLVILLE...EDNA AND LIBERTY.

THE FOLLOWING COMMUNITIES HAVE ALREADY RECEIVED MORE RAIN IN THE FIRST
SIX MONTHS OF THE YEAR THAN THEY TYPICALLY RECEIVE IN AN ENTIRE YEAR
(1981-2010 30 YEAR NORMALS):

SITE           2015 RAIN         1981-2010          CURRENT
                                 30 YEAR AVG       ANNUAL DEP

BAYTOWN         64.07              59.92             +4.15
BRENHAM         48.70              45.14             +3.56
CALDWELL        44.20              39.50             +4.70
WASH STATE PARK 45.92              41.68             +4.24

BELOW IS A TABLE WITH ADDITIONAL RAINFALL INFORMATION THAT WILL
INCLUDE YEAR TO DATE RAINFALL TOTALS FOR SOUTHEAST TEXAS
OBSERVATION SITES...WHERE 2015 RAINFALL RANKS HISTORICALLY AND THE
DEPARTURE FROM NORMAL THROUGH JUNE 30TH. THE 30 YEAR ANNUAL
AVERAGE RAINFALL WILL ALSO BE LISTED TO PROVIDE A FRAME OF
REFERENCE TO UNDERSTAND HOW TRULY WET THE FIRST HALF OF 2015 HAS
BEEN. THE SOGGY DETAILS ARE LISTED BELOW:

LOCATION        2015      RANK      NORMAL        DEP   1981-2010
                RAIN                THRU 6/30           ANNUAL AVG

ANAHUAC         33.69      14       26.37       + 7.32    56.47
BAY CITY        23.67      25       22.35       + 1.32    48.89
BAYTOWN         64.07       1       28.61       +35.46    59.92
BELLVILLE       40.67       2       21.30       +19.37    41.75
BUSH IAH        41.83       3       24.32       +17.51    49.77
BRENHAM         48.70       1       22.40       +26.30    45.14
CALDWELL        44.20       1       20.63       +23.57    39.50
CLEVELAND       34.08      12       26.51       + 7.57    54.24
COLLEGE STATION 32.98       7       20.70       +12.28    40.06
CONROE          32.00      12       23.68       + 8.32    48.77
CROCKETT        44.44       1       23.26       +21.18    45.18
CYPRESS         35.48       6        NA          NA        NA
DANEVANG        30.66      11       21.24       + 9.42    46.38
EDNA            35.82       2       20.65       +15.17    42.72
EL CAMPO        35.21      NA       21.50       +13.71    48.87
FREEPORT        27.41      19       21.00       + 6.41    49.57
GALVESTON       24.93      28       22.99       + 1.94    50.76
HOUSTON HOBBY   39.73       5       25.38       +14.35    54.65
HOU WESTBURY    40.42       4       24.61       +15.81    51.82
HUNTSVILLE      47.15       1       24.44       +22.71    49.08
KATY            32.30       4       21.31       +10.99    45.53
LIBERTY         46.82       2       29.31       +17.51    61.25
LIVINGSTON      33.53      10       25.87       + 7.66    51.53
MADISONVILLE    38.35       3       21.81       +16.54    45.12
MATAGORDA       26.97      17       20.86       + 6.11    44.58
MONTGOMERY      39.05       2        NA          NA        NA
NWS HGX         43.64       1       25.01       +18.63    56.81
RICHMOND        39.51       5       21.90       +17.61    49.08
SOMERVILLE      31.43       5       19.98       +11.45    38.67
SUGAR LAND      42.61       1       23.04       +19.57    49.48
TOMBALL         35.83       4       23.61       +12.22    48.99
WASH STATE PARK 45.92       1       21.35       +24.57    41.68
WHARTON         41.82       3       21.21       +21.21    47.21


$$



000
NOUS44 KHGX 021224
PNSHGX
TXZ163-164-176>179-195>200-210>214-226-227-235>238-030030-

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE HOUSTON/GALVESTON TX
724 AM CDT THU JUL 2 2015

        ...RECORD RAINFALL ACROSS MUCH OF SOUTHEAST TEXAS
              DURING THE FIRST SIX MONTHS OF 2015...

THE FIRST SIX MONTHS OF 2015 HAVE BEEN VERY WET. THE YEAR STARTED OUT
NEAR NORMAL AND FEBRUARY WAS ACTUALLY VERY DRY WITH MOST LOCATIONS IN
SOUTHEAST TEXAS RECEIVING AN INCH OF RAIN OR LESS. RAIN RETURNED IN
MARCH AND THE RAINFALL TOTALS WERE ABOVE NORMAL BUT HARDLY EXCESSIVE.
BUT THE RAIN IN MARCH WAS JUST A PRECURSOR TO WHAT WAS TO COME IN MAY
AND JUNE. HEAVY TO EXCESSIVE RAIN PUMMELED LARGE PORTIONS OF SOUTHEAST
TEXAS BEGINNING ON MAY 11TH AND 12TH WITH BOUTS OF HEAVY RAIN THROUGH
THE END OF MAY AND AGAIN THROUGH MUCH OF JUNE. ON MAY 11TH AND 12TH...
PARTS OF HARRIS...BRAZORIA AND GALVESTON RECEIVED AN UNEXPECTED BLAST
OF HEAVY RAIN WITH 10 TO 12 INCHES FALLING IN WEBSTER...FRIENDSWOOD AND
CLEAR LAKE AREA WITH 8 TO 10 INCHES OF RAIN BETWEEN LAKE JACKSON AND
DANBURY. ANOTHER HEAVY RAIN EVENT OCCURRED ACROSS HARRIS AND FORT BEND COUNTIES
ON MEMORIAL DAY (MAY 25TH) WITH 10 TO 12 INCHES OF RAIN AFFECTING
MEYERLAND...HOUSTON WESTBURY AND MISSION BEND. TROPICAL STORM BILL
(JUNE 13TH-17TH) BROUGHT ADDITIONAL HEAVY RAIN TO PARTS OF JACKSON...
WHARTON...COLORADO...MATAGORDA AND AUSTIN COUNTIES WITH 10 TO 14 INCHES
OF RAIN REPORTED NEAR GANADO AND EL CAMPO. GETTING TEN INCHES OF RAIN
IN SOUTHEAST TEXAS IS UNUSUAL BUT NOT UNCOMMON BUT GETTING THREE SUCH
EPISODES IN A 30 DAY PERIOD IS VERY UNUSUAL.

THE FOLLOWING COMMUNITIES (CO-OP SITES) HAVE HAD THEIR WETTEST START
TO A YEAR:

BAYTOWN...BRENHAM...CALDWELL...CROCKETT...HUNTSVILLE...NWS HGX...
SUGAR LAND AND WASHINGTON STATE PARK.

A QUICK NOTE ABOUT BAYTOWN...THIS LOCATION HAS HAD THE MOST RAIN OUT
OF ALL OUR CO-OP SITES WITH OVER 64 INCHES OF RAIN THROUGH JUNE 30TH.
THIS LOCATION IS 35 INCHES ABOVE NORMAL FOR THE YEAR. THE DEPARTURE
FOR THE YEAR (35.46) IS GREATER THAN WHAT THE NORMAL RAINFALL (28.61)
FOR THE FIRST SIX MONTHS OF THE YEAR IS SUPPOSED TO BE. BAYTOWN HAS
MEASURED RAINFALL GREATER THAN 10 INCHES FOR FOUR CONSECUTIVE MONTHS.

THE FOLLOWING COMMUNITIES HAVE HAD THEIR SECOND WETTEST START TO A
YEAR:

BELLVILLE...EDNA AND LIBERTY.

THE FOLLOWING COMMUNITIES HAVE ALREADY RECEIVED MORE RAIN IN THE FIRST
SIX MONTHS OF THE YEAR THAN THEY TYPICALLY RECEIVE IN AN ENTIRE YEAR
(1981-2010 30 YEAR NORMALS):

SITE           2015 RAIN         1981-2010          CURRENT
                                 30 YEAR AVG       ANNUAL DEP

BAYTOWN         64.07              59.92             +4.15
BRENHAM         48.70              45.14             +3.56
CALDWELL        44.20              39.50             +4.70
WASH STATE PARK 45.92              41.68             +4.24

BELOW IS A TABLE WITH ADDITIONAL RAINFALL INFORMATION THAT WILL
INCLUDE YEAR TO DATE RAINFALL TOTALS FOR SOUTHEAST TEXAS
OBSERVATION SITES...WHERE 2015 RAINFALL RANKS HISTORICALLY AND THE
DEPARTURE FROM NORMAL THROUGH JUNE 30TH. THE 30 YEAR ANNUAL
AVERAGE RAINFALL WILL ALSO BE LISTED TO PROVIDE A FRAME OF
REFERENCE TO UNDERSTAND HOW TRULY WET THE FIRST HALF OF 2015 HAS
BEEN. THE SOGGY DETAILS ARE LISTED BELOW:

LOCATION        2015      RANK      NORMAL        DEP   1981-2010
                RAIN                THRU 6/30           ANNUAL AVG

ANAHUAC         33.69      14       26.37       + 7.32    56.47
BAY CITY        23.67      25       22.35       + 1.32    48.89
BAYTOWN         64.07       1       28.61       +35.46    59.92
BELLVILLE       40.67       2       21.30       +19.37    41.75
BUSH IAH        41.83       3       24.32       +17.51    49.77
BRENHAM         48.70       1       22.40       +26.30    45.14
CALDWELL        44.20       1       20.63       +23.57    39.50
CLEVELAND       34.08      12       26.51       + 7.57    54.24
COLLEGE STATION 32.98       7       20.70       +12.28    40.06
CONROE          32.00      12       23.68       + 8.32    48.77
CROCKETT        44.44       1       23.26       +21.18    45.18
CYPRESS         35.48       6        NA          NA        NA
DANEVANG        30.66      11       21.24       + 9.42    46.38
EDNA            35.82       2       20.65       +15.17    42.72
EL CAMPO        35.21      NA       21.50       +13.71    48.87
FREEPORT        27.41      19       21.00       + 6.41    49.57
GALVESTON       24.93      28       22.99       + 1.94    50.76
HOUSTON HOBBY   39.73       5       25.38       +14.35    54.65
HOU WESTBURY    40.42       4       24.61       +15.81    51.82
HUNTSVILLE      47.15       1       24.44       +22.71    49.08
KATY            32.30       4       21.31       +10.99    45.53
LIBERTY         46.82       2       29.31       +17.51    61.25
LIVINGSTON      33.53      10       25.87       + 7.66    51.53
MADISONVILLE    38.35       3       21.81       +16.54    45.12
MATAGORDA       26.97      17       20.86       + 6.11    44.58
MONTGOMERY      39.05       2        NA          NA        NA
NWS HGX         43.64       1       25.01       +18.63    56.81
RICHMOND        39.51       5       21.90       +17.61    49.08
SOMERVILLE      31.43       5       19.98       +11.45    38.67
SUGAR LAND      42.61       1       23.04       +19.57    49.48
TOMBALL         35.83       4       23.61       +12.22    48.99
WASH STATE PARK 45.92       1       21.35       +24.57    41.68
WHARTON         41.82       3       21.21       +21.21    47.21


$$


000
NOUS44 KHGX 021224
PNSHGX
TXZ163-164-176>179-195>200-210>214-226-227-235>238-030030-

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE HOUSTON/GALVESTON TX
724 AM CDT THU JUL 2 2015

        ...RECORD RAINFALL ACROSS MUCH OF SOUTHEAST TEXAS
              DURING THE FIRST SIX MONTHS OF 2015...

THE FIRST SIX MONTHS OF 2015 HAVE BEEN VERY WET. THE YEAR STARTED OUT
NEAR NORMAL AND FEBRUARY WAS ACTUALLY VERY DRY WITH MOST LOCATIONS IN
SOUTHEAST TEXAS RECEIVING AN INCH OF RAIN OR LESS. RAIN RETURNED IN
MARCH AND THE RAINFALL TOTALS WERE ABOVE NORMAL BUT HARDLY EXCESSIVE.
BUT THE RAIN IN MARCH WAS JUST A PRECURSOR TO WHAT WAS TO COME IN MAY
AND JUNE. HEAVY TO EXCESSIVE RAIN PUMMELED LARGE PORTIONS OF SOUTHEAST
TEXAS BEGINNING ON MAY 11TH AND 12TH WITH BOUTS OF HEAVY RAIN THROUGH
THE END OF MAY AND AGAIN THROUGH MUCH OF JUNE. ON MAY 11TH AND 12TH...
PARTS OF HARRIS...BRAZORIA AND GALVESTON RECEIVED AN UNEXPECTED BLAST
OF HEAVY RAIN WITH 10 TO 12 INCHES FALLING IN WEBSTER...FRIENDSWOOD AND
CLEAR LAKE AREA WITH 8 TO 10 INCHES OF RAIN BETWEEN LAKE JACKSON AND
DANBURY. ANOTHER HEAVY RAIN EVENT OCCURRED ACROSS HARRIS AND FORT BEND COUNTIES
ON MEMORIAL DAY (MAY 25TH) WITH 10 TO 12 INCHES OF RAIN AFFECTING
MEYERLAND...HOUSTON WESTBURY AND MISSION BEND. TROPICAL STORM BILL
(JUNE 13TH-17TH) BROUGHT ADDITIONAL HEAVY RAIN TO PARTS OF JACKSON...
WHARTON...COLORADO...MATAGORDA AND AUSTIN COUNTIES WITH 10 TO 14 INCHES
OF RAIN REPORTED NEAR GANADO AND EL CAMPO. GETTING TEN INCHES OF RAIN
IN SOUTHEAST TEXAS IS UNUSUAL BUT NOT UNCOMMON BUT GETTING THREE SUCH
EPISODES IN A 30 DAY PERIOD IS VERY UNUSUAL.

THE FOLLOWING COMMUNITIES (CO-OP SITES) HAVE HAD THEIR WETTEST START
TO A YEAR:

BAYTOWN...BRENHAM...CALDWELL...CROCKETT...HUNTSVILLE...NWS HGX...
SUGAR LAND AND WASHINGTON STATE PARK.

A QUICK NOTE ABOUT BAYTOWN...THIS LOCATION HAS HAD THE MOST RAIN OUT
OF ALL OUR CO-OP SITES WITH OVER 64 INCHES OF RAIN THROUGH JUNE 30TH.
THIS LOCATION IS 35 INCHES ABOVE NORMAL FOR THE YEAR. THE DEPARTURE
FOR THE YEAR (35.46) IS GREATER THAN WHAT THE NORMAL RAINFALL (28.61)
FOR THE FIRST SIX MONTHS OF THE YEAR IS SUPPOSED TO BE. BAYTOWN HAS
MEASURED RAINFALL GREATER THAN 10 INCHES FOR FOUR CONSECUTIVE MONTHS.

THE FOLLOWING COMMUNITIES HAVE HAD THEIR SECOND WETTEST START TO A
YEAR:

BELLVILLE...EDNA AND LIBERTY.

THE FOLLOWING COMMUNITIES HAVE ALREADY RECEIVED MORE RAIN IN THE FIRST
SIX MONTHS OF THE YEAR THAN THEY TYPICALLY RECEIVE IN AN ENTIRE YEAR
(1981-2010 30 YEAR NORMALS):

SITE           2015 RAIN         1981-2010          CURRENT
                                 30 YEAR AVG       ANNUAL DEP

BAYTOWN         64.07              59.92             +4.15
BRENHAM         48.70              45.14             +3.56
CALDWELL        44.20              39.50             +4.70
WASH STATE PARK 45.92              41.68             +4.24

BELOW IS A TABLE WITH ADDITIONAL RAINFALL INFORMATION THAT WILL
INCLUDE YEAR TO DATE RAINFALL TOTALS FOR SOUTHEAST TEXAS
OBSERVATION SITES...WHERE 2015 RAINFALL RANKS HISTORICALLY AND THE
DEPARTURE FROM NORMAL THROUGH JUNE 30TH. THE 30 YEAR ANNUAL
AVERAGE RAINFALL WILL ALSO BE LISTED TO PROVIDE A FRAME OF
REFERENCE TO UNDERSTAND HOW TRULY WET THE FIRST HALF OF 2015 HAS
BEEN. THE SOGGY DETAILS ARE LISTED BELOW:

LOCATION        2015      RANK      NORMAL        DEP   1981-2010
                RAIN                THRU 6/30           ANNUAL AVG

ANAHUAC         33.69      14       26.37       + 7.32    56.47
BAY CITY        23.67      25       22.35       + 1.32    48.89
BAYTOWN         64.07       1       28.61       +35.46    59.92
BELLVILLE       40.67       2       21.30       +19.37    41.75
BUSH IAH        41.83       3       24.32       +17.51    49.77
BRENHAM         48.70       1       22.40       +26.30    45.14
CALDWELL        44.20       1       20.63       +23.57    39.50
CLEVELAND       34.08      12       26.51       + 7.57    54.24
COLLEGE STATION 32.98       7       20.70       +12.28    40.06
CONROE          32.00      12       23.68       + 8.32    48.77
CROCKETT        44.44       1       23.26       +21.18    45.18
CYPRESS         35.48       6        NA          NA        NA
DANEVANG        30.66      11       21.24       + 9.42    46.38
EDNA            35.82       2       20.65       +15.17    42.72
EL CAMPO        35.21      NA       21.50       +13.71    48.87
FREEPORT        27.41      19       21.00       + 6.41    49.57
GALVESTON       24.93      28       22.99       + 1.94    50.76
HOUSTON HOBBY   39.73       5       25.38       +14.35    54.65
HOU WESTBURY    40.42       4       24.61       +15.81    51.82
HUNTSVILLE      47.15       1       24.44       +22.71    49.08
KATY            32.30       4       21.31       +10.99    45.53
LIBERTY         46.82       2       29.31       +17.51    61.25
LIVINGSTON      33.53      10       25.87       + 7.66    51.53
MADISONVILLE    38.35       3       21.81       +16.54    45.12
MATAGORDA       26.97      17       20.86       + 6.11    44.58
MONTGOMERY      39.05       2        NA          NA        NA
NWS HGX         43.64       1       25.01       +18.63    56.81
RICHMOND        39.51       5       21.90       +17.61    49.08
SOMERVILLE      31.43       5       19.98       +11.45    38.67
SUGAR LAND      42.61       1       23.04       +19.57    49.48
TOMBALL         35.83       4       23.61       +12.22    48.99
WASH STATE PARK 45.92       1       21.35       +24.57    41.68
WHARTON         41.82       3       21.21       +21.21    47.21


$$



000
NOUS44 KHGX 021224
PNSHGX
TXZ163-164-176>179-195>200-210>214-226-227-235>238-030030-

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE HOUSTON/GALVESTON TX
724 AM CDT THU JUL 2 2015

        ...RECORD RAINFALL ACROSS MUCH OF SOUTHEAST TEXAS
              DURING THE FIRST SIX MONTHS OF 2015...

THE FIRST SIX MONTHS OF 2015 HAVE BEEN VERY WET. THE YEAR STARTED OUT
NEAR NORMAL AND FEBRUARY WAS ACTUALLY VERY DRY WITH MOST LOCATIONS IN
SOUTHEAST TEXAS RECEIVING AN INCH OF RAIN OR LESS. RAIN RETURNED IN
MARCH AND THE RAINFALL TOTALS WERE ABOVE NORMAL BUT HARDLY EXCESSIVE.
BUT THE RAIN IN MARCH WAS JUST A PRECURSOR TO WHAT WAS TO COME IN MAY
AND JUNE. HEAVY TO EXCESSIVE RAIN PUMMELED LARGE PORTIONS OF SOUTHEAST
TEXAS BEGINNING ON MAY 11TH AND 12TH WITH BOUTS OF HEAVY RAIN THROUGH
THE END OF MAY AND AGAIN THROUGH MUCH OF JUNE. ON MAY 11TH AND 12TH...
PARTS OF HARRIS...BRAZORIA AND GALVESTON RECEIVED AN UNEXPECTED BLAST
OF HEAVY RAIN WITH 10 TO 12 INCHES FALLING IN WEBSTER...FRIENDSWOOD AND
CLEAR LAKE AREA WITH 8 TO 10 INCHES OF RAIN BETWEEN LAKE JACKSON AND
DANBURY. ANOTHER HEAVY RAIN EVENT OCCURRED ACROSS HARRIS AND FORT BEND COUNTIES
ON MEMORIAL DAY (MAY 25TH) WITH 10 TO 12 INCHES OF RAIN AFFECTING
MEYERLAND...HOUSTON WESTBURY AND MISSION BEND. TROPICAL STORM BILL
(JUNE 13TH-17TH) BROUGHT ADDITIONAL HEAVY RAIN TO PARTS OF JACKSON...
WHARTON...COLORADO...MATAGORDA AND AUSTIN COUNTIES WITH 10 TO 14 INCHES
OF RAIN REPORTED NEAR GANADO AND EL CAMPO. GETTING TEN INCHES OF RAIN
IN SOUTHEAST TEXAS IS UNUSUAL BUT NOT UNCOMMON BUT GETTING THREE SUCH
EPISODES IN A 30 DAY PERIOD IS VERY UNUSUAL.

THE FOLLOWING COMMUNITIES (CO-OP SITES) HAVE HAD THEIR WETTEST START
TO A YEAR:

BAYTOWN...BRENHAM...CALDWELL...CROCKETT...HUNTSVILLE...NWS HGX...
SUGAR LAND AND WASHINGTON STATE PARK.

A QUICK NOTE ABOUT BAYTOWN...THIS LOCATION HAS HAD THE MOST RAIN OUT
OF ALL OUR CO-OP SITES WITH OVER 64 INCHES OF RAIN THROUGH JUNE 30TH.
THIS LOCATION IS 35 INCHES ABOVE NORMAL FOR THE YEAR. THE DEPARTURE
FOR THE YEAR (35.46) IS GREATER THAN WHAT THE NORMAL RAINFALL (28.61)
FOR THE FIRST SIX MONTHS OF THE YEAR IS SUPPOSED TO BE. BAYTOWN HAS
MEASURED RAINFALL GREATER THAN 10 INCHES FOR FOUR CONSECUTIVE MONTHS.

THE FOLLOWING COMMUNITIES HAVE HAD THEIR SECOND WETTEST START TO A
YEAR:

BELLVILLE...EDNA AND LIBERTY.

THE FOLLOWING COMMUNITIES HAVE ALREADY RECEIVED MORE RAIN IN THE FIRST
SIX MONTHS OF THE YEAR THAN THEY TYPICALLY RECEIVE IN AN ENTIRE YEAR
(1981-2010 30 YEAR NORMALS):

SITE           2015 RAIN         1981-2010          CURRENT
                                 30 YEAR AVG       ANNUAL DEP

BAYTOWN         64.07              59.92             +4.15
BRENHAM         48.70              45.14             +3.56
CALDWELL        44.20              39.50             +4.70
WASH STATE PARK 45.92              41.68             +4.24

BELOW IS A TABLE WITH ADDITIONAL RAINFALL INFORMATION THAT WILL
INCLUDE YEAR TO DATE RAINFALL TOTALS FOR SOUTHEAST TEXAS
OBSERVATION SITES...WHERE 2015 RAINFALL RANKS HISTORICALLY AND THE
DEPARTURE FROM NORMAL THROUGH JUNE 30TH. THE 30 YEAR ANNUAL
AVERAGE RAINFALL WILL ALSO BE LISTED TO PROVIDE A FRAME OF
REFERENCE TO UNDERSTAND HOW TRULY WET THE FIRST HALF OF 2015 HAS
BEEN. THE SOGGY DETAILS ARE LISTED BELOW:

LOCATION        2015      RANK      NORMAL        DEP   1981-2010
                RAIN                THRU 6/30           ANNUAL AVG

ANAHUAC         33.69      14       26.37       + 7.32    56.47
BAY CITY        23.67      25       22.35       + 1.32    48.89
BAYTOWN         64.07       1       28.61       +35.46    59.92
BELLVILLE       40.67       2       21.30       +19.37    41.75
BUSH IAH        41.83       3       24.32       +17.51    49.77
BRENHAM         48.70       1       22.40       +26.30    45.14
CALDWELL        44.20       1       20.63       +23.57    39.50
CLEVELAND       34.08      12       26.51       + 7.57    54.24
COLLEGE STATION 32.98       7       20.70       +12.28    40.06
CONROE          32.00      12       23.68       + 8.32    48.77
CROCKETT        44.44       1       23.26       +21.18    45.18
CYPRESS         35.48       6        NA          NA        NA
DANEVANG        30.66      11       21.24       + 9.42    46.38
EDNA            35.82       2       20.65       +15.17    42.72
EL CAMPO        35.21      NA       21.50       +13.71    48.87
FREEPORT        27.41      19       21.00       + 6.41    49.57
GALVESTON       24.93      28       22.99       + 1.94    50.76
HOUSTON HOBBY   39.73       5       25.38       +14.35    54.65
HOU WESTBURY    40.42       4       24.61       +15.81    51.82
HUNTSVILLE      47.15       1       24.44       +22.71    49.08
KATY            32.30       4       21.31       +10.99    45.53
LIBERTY         46.82       2       29.31       +17.51    61.25
LIVINGSTON      33.53      10       25.87       + 7.66    51.53
MADISONVILLE    38.35       3       21.81       +16.54    45.12
MATAGORDA       26.97      17       20.86       + 6.11    44.58
MONTGOMERY      39.05       2        NA          NA        NA
NWS HGX         43.64       1       25.01       +18.63    56.81
RICHMOND        39.51       5       21.90       +17.61    49.08
SOMERVILLE      31.43       5       19.98       +11.45    38.67
SUGAR LAND      42.61       1       23.04       +19.57    49.48
TOMBALL         35.83       4       23.61       +12.22    48.99
WASH STATE PARK 45.92       1       21.35       +24.57    41.68
WHARTON         41.82       3       21.21       +21.21    47.21


$$


000
NOUS43 KGLD 021201
PNSGLD

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE GOODLAND KS
600 AM MDT THU JUL 02 2015

...ON THIS DATE IN WEATHER HISTORY...

IN 2000, DROUGHT CONDITIONS WERE IN THE SEVERE CATEGORY TO NEAR
EXTREME CATEGORY FOR MOST OF THE MONTH. NON IRRIGATED CROPS
SUCCUMBED DUE TO THE DRY WEATHER AND LACK OF SUB SOIL MOISTURE.
RIVERS AND CREEKS WERE GENERALLY DRY ACROSS NORTHWEST KANSAS.

IN 2011, A LARGE CLUSTER OF SEVERE STORMS MOVED EAST ALONG THE
KANSAS-NEBRASKA STATE LINE. WIND GUSTS OF 70 TO 90 MPH WERE
REPORTED ACROSS DECATUR AND NORTON COUNTIES, DOWNING TREES,
BENDING FLAG POLES AND PUSHING OVER 20 HEADSTONES AT A LOCAL
CEMETARY. CAR PORTS AND STORE AWNINGS WERE ALSO DAMAGED.

$$


000
NOUS43 KGLD 021201
PNSGLD

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE GOODLAND KS
600 AM MDT THU JUL 02 2015

...ON THIS DATE IN WEATHER HISTORY...

IN 2000, DROUGHT CONDITIONS WERE IN THE SEVERE CATEGORY TO NEAR
EXTREME CATEGORY FOR MOST OF THE MONTH. NON IRRIGATED CROPS
SUCCUMBED DUE TO THE DRY WEATHER AND LACK OF SUB SOIL MOISTURE.
RIVERS AND CREEKS WERE GENERALLY DRY ACROSS NORTHWEST KANSAS.

IN 2011, A LARGE CLUSTER OF SEVERE STORMS MOVED EAST ALONG THE
KANSAS-NEBRASKA STATE LINE. WIND GUSTS OF 70 TO 90 MPH WERE
REPORTED ACROSS DECATUR AND NORTON COUNTIES, DOWNING TREES,
BENDING FLAG POLES AND PUSHING OVER 20 HEADSTONES AT A LOCAL
CEMETARY. CAR PORTS AND STORE AWNINGS WERE ALSO DAMAGED.

$$



000
NOUS43 KGLD 021201
PNSGLD

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE GOODLAND KS
600 AM MDT THU JUL 02 2015

...ON THIS DATE IN WEATHER HISTORY...

IN 2000, DROUGHT CONDITIONS WERE IN THE SEVERE CATEGORY TO NEAR
EXTREME CATEGORY FOR MOST OF THE MONTH. NON IRRIGATED CROPS
SUCCUMBED DUE TO THE DRY WEATHER AND LACK OF SUB SOIL MOISTURE.
RIVERS AND CREEKS WERE GENERALLY DRY ACROSS NORTHWEST KANSAS.

IN 2011, A LARGE CLUSTER OF SEVERE STORMS MOVED EAST ALONG THE
KANSAS-NEBRASKA STATE LINE. WIND GUSTS OF 70 TO 90 MPH WERE
REPORTED ACROSS DECATUR AND NORTON COUNTIES, DOWNING TREES,
BENDING FLAG POLES AND PUSHING OVER 20 HEADSTONES AT A LOCAL
CEMETARY. CAR PORTS AND STORE AWNINGS WERE ALSO DAMAGED.

$$


000
NOUS43 KGLD 021201
PNSGLD

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE GOODLAND KS
600 AM MDT THU JUL 02 2015

...ON THIS DATE IN WEATHER HISTORY...

IN 2000, DROUGHT CONDITIONS WERE IN THE SEVERE CATEGORY TO NEAR
EXTREME CATEGORY FOR MOST OF THE MONTH. NON IRRIGATED CROPS
SUCCUMBED DUE TO THE DRY WEATHER AND LACK OF SUB SOIL MOISTURE.
RIVERS AND CREEKS WERE GENERALLY DRY ACROSS NORTHWEST KANSAS.

IN 2011, A LARGE CLUSTER OF SEVERE STORMS MOVED EAST ALONG THE
KANSAS-NEBRASKA STATE LINE. WIND GUSTS OF 70 TO 90 MPH WERE
REPORTED ACROSS DECATUR AND NORTON COUNTIES, DOWNING TREES,
BENDING FLAG POLES AND PUSHING OVER 20 HEADSTONES AT A LOCAL
CEMETARY. CAR PORTS AND STORE AWNINGS WERE ALSO DAMAGED.

$$



000
NOUS44 KHGX 021150
PNSHGX
TXZ163-164-176>179-195>200-210>214-226-227-235>238-030000-

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE HOUSTON/GALVESTON TX
650 AM CDT THU JUL 2 2015

        ...RECORD RAINFALL ACROSS MUCH OF SOUTHEAST TEXAS
              DURING THE FIRST SIX MONTHS OF 2015...

THE FIRST SIX MONTHS OF 2015 HAVE BEEN VERY WET. THE YEAR STARTED OUT
NEAR NORMAL AND FEBRUARY WAS ACTUALLY VERY DRY WITH MOST LOCATIONS IN
SOUTHEAST TEXAS RECEIVING AN INCH OF RAIN OR LESS. RAIN RETURNED IN
MARCH AND THE RAINFALL TOTALS WERE ABOVE NORMAL BUT HARDLY EXCESSIVE.
BUT THE RAIN IN MARCH WAS JUST A PRECURSOR TO WHAT WAS TO COME IN MAY
AND JUNE. HEAVY TO EXCESSIVE RAIN PUMMELED LARGE PORTIONS OF SOUTHEAST
TEXAS BEGINNING ON MAY 11TH AND 12TH WITH BOUTS OF HEAVY RAIN THROUGH
THE END OF MAY AND AGAIN THROUGH MUCH OF JUNE. ON MAY 11TH AND 12TH...
PARTS OF HARRIS...BRAZORIA AND GALVESTON RECEIVED AN UNEXPECTED BLAST
OF HEAVY RAIN WITH 10 TO 12 INCHES FALLING IN WEBSTER...FRIENDSWOOD AND
CLEAR LAKE AREA WITH 8 TO 10 INCHES OF RAIN BETWEEN LAKE JACKSON AND
DANBURY. ANOTHER HEAVY RAIN EVENT OCCURRED ACROSS HARRIS AND FORT BEND COUNTIES
ON MEMORIAL DAY (MAY 25TH) WITH 10 TO 12 INCHES OF RAIN AFFECTING
MEYERLAND...HOUSTON WESTBURY AND MISSION BEND. TROPICAL STORM BILL
(JUNE 13TH-17TH) BROUGHT ADDITIONAL HEAVY RAIN TO PARTS OF JACKSON...
WHARTON...COLORADO...MATAGORDA AND AUSTIN COUNTIES WITH 10 TO 14 INCHES
OF RAIN REPORTED NEAR GANADO AND EL CAMPO. GETTING TEN INCHES OF RAIN
IN SOUTHEAST TEXAS IS UNUSUAL BUT NOT UNCOMMON BUT GETTING THREE SUCH
EPISODES IN A 30 DAY PERIOD IS VERY UNUSUAL.

THE FOLLOWING COMMUNITIES (CO-OP SITES) HAVE HAD THEIR WETTEST START
TO A YEAR:

BAYTOWN...BRENHAM...CALDWELL...CROCKETT...HUNTSVILLE...NWS HGX...
SUGAR LAND AND WASHINGTON STATE PARK.

A QUICK NOTE ABOUT BAYTOWN...THIS LOCATION HAS HAD THE MOST RAIN OUT
OF ALL OUR CO-OP SITES WITH OVER 64 INCHES OF RAIN THROUGH JUNE 30TH.
THIS LOCATION IS 35 INCHES ABOVE NORMAL FOR THE YEAR. THE DEPARTURE
FOR THE YEAR (35.46) IS GREATER THAN WHAT THE NORMAL RAINFALL (28.61)
FOR A YEAR IS SUPPOSED TO BE. BAYTOWN HAS MEASURED RAINFALL GREATER
THAN 10 INCHES FOR FOUR CONSECUTIVE MONTHS.

THE FOLLOWING COMMUNITIES HAVE HAD THEIR SECOND WETTEST START TO A
YEAR:

BELLVILLE...EDNA AND LIBERTY.

THE FOLLOWING COMMUNITIES HAVE ALREADY RECEIVED MORE RAIN IN THE FIRST
SIX MONTHS OF THE YEAR THAN THEY TYPICALLY RECEIVE IN AN ENTIRE YEAR
(1981-2010 30 YEAR NORMALS):

SITE           2015 RAIN         1981-2010          CURRENT
                                 30 YEAR AVG       ANNUAL DEP

BAYTOWN         64.07              59.92             +4.15
BRENHAM         48.70              45.14             +3.56
CALDWELL        44.20              39.50             +4.70
WASH STATE PARK 45.92              41.68             +4.24

BELOW IS A TABLE WITH ADDITIONAL RAINFALL INFORMATION THAT WILL
INCLUDE YEAR TO DATE RAINFALL TOTALS FOR SOUTHEAST TEXAS
OBSERVATION SITES...WHERE 2015 RAINFALL RANKS HISTORICALLY AND THE
DEPARTURE FROM NORMAL THROUGH JUNE 30TH. THE 30 YEAR ANNUAL
AVERAGE RAINFALL WILL ALSO BE LISTED TO PROVIDE A FRAME OF
REFERENCE TO UNDERSTAND HOW TRULY WET THE FIRST HALF OF 2015 HAS
BEEN. THE SOGGY DETAILS ARE LISTED BELOW:

LOCATION        2015      RANK      NORMAL        DEP   1981-2010
                RAIN                THRU 6/30           ANNUAL AVG

ANAHUAC         33.69      14       26.37       + 7.32    56.47
BAY CITY        23.67      25       22.35       + 1.32    48.89
BAYTOWN         64.07       1       28.61       +35.46    59.92
BELLVILLE       40.67       2       21.30       +19.37    41.75
BUSH IAH        41.83       3       24.32       +17.51    49.77
BRENHAM         48.70       1       22.40       +26.30    45.14
CALDWELL        44.20       1       20.63       +23.57    39.50
CLEVELAND       34.08      12       26.51       + 7.57    54.24
COLLEGE STATION 32.98       7       20.70       +12.28    40.06
CONROE          32.00      12       23.68       + 8.32    48.77
CROCKETT        44.44       1       23.26       +21.18    45.18
CYPRESS         35.48       6        NA          NA        NA
DANEVANG        30.66      11       21.24       + 9.42    46.38
EDNA            35.82       2       20.65       +15.17    42.72
EL CAMPO        35.21      NA       21.50       +13.71    48.87
FREEPORT        27.41      19       21.00       + 6.41    49.57
GALVESTON       24.93      28       22.99       + 1.94    50.76
HOUSTON HOBBY   39.73       5       25.38       +14.35    54.65
HOU WESTBURY    40.42       4       24.61       +15.81    51.82
HUNTSVILLE      47.15       1       24.44       +22.71    49.08
KATY            32.30       4       21.31       +10.99    45.53
LIBERTY         46.82       2       29.31       +17.51    61.25
LIVINGSTON      33.53      10       25.87       + 7.66    51.53
MADISONVILLE    38.35       3       21.81       +16.54    45.12
MATAGORDA       26.97      17       20.86       + 6.11    44.58
MONTGOMERY      39.05       2        NA          NA        NA
NWS HGX         43.64       1       25.01       +18.63    56.81
RICHMOND        39.51       5       21.90       +17.61    49.08
SOMERVILLE      31.43       5       19.98       +11.45    38.67
SUGAR LAND      42.61       1       23.04       +19.57    49.48
TOMBALL         35.83       4       23.61       +12.22    48.99
WASH STATE PARK 45.92       1       21.35       +24.57    41.68
WHARTON         41.82       3       21.21       +21.21    20.61


$$



000
NOUS45 KBYZ 021047
PNSBYZ
MTZ028>042-056>058-063>068-WYZ098-099-030030-

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE BILLINGS MT
447 AM MDT THU JUL 2 2015

...BILLINGS WEATHER RADAR DOWN DUE TO TECHNICAL DIFFICULTIES...

BILLINGS DOPPLER WEATHER RADAR...KBLX...IS DOWN DUE TO TECHNICAL
DIFFICULTIES. AT THIS TIME...IT IS NOT KNOWN WHEN THE RADAR WILL
BE RESTORED. A FOLLOW UP MESSAGE WILL BE TRANSMITTED WHEN MORE
INFORMATION IS AVAILABLE...OR WHEN THE RADAR IS BACK IN SERVICE.
WE APOLOGIZE FOR THE INCONVENIENCE.

$$



000
NOUS45 KBYZ 021047
PNSBYZ
MTZ028>042-056>058-063>068-WYZ098-099-030030-

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE BILLINGS MT
447 AM MDT THU JUL 2 2015

...BILLINGS WEATHER RADAR DOWN DUE TO TECHNICAL DIFFICULTIES...

BILLINGS DOPPLER WEATHER RADAR...KBLX...IS DOWN DUE TO TECHNICAL
DIFFICULTIES. AT THIS TIME...IT IS NOT KNOWN WHEN THE RADAR WILL
BE RESTORED. A FOLLOW UP MESSAGE WILL BE TRANSMITTED WHEN MORE
INFORMATION IS AVAILABLE...OR WHEN THE RADAR IS BACK IN SERVICE.
WE APOLOGIZE FOR THE INCONVENIENCE.

$$



000
NOUS45 KBYZ 021047
PNSBYZ
MTZ028>042-056>058-063>068-WYZ098-099-030030-

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE BILLINGS MT
447 AM MDT THU JUL 2 2015

...BILLINGS WEATHER RADAR DOWN DUE TO TECHNICAL DIFFICULTIES...

BILLINGS DOPPLER WEATHER RADAR...KBLX...IS DOWN DUE TO TECHNICAL
DIFFICULTIES. AT THIS TIME...IT IS NOT KNOWN WHEN THE RADAR WILL
BE RESTORED. A FOLLOW UP MESSAGE WILL BE TRANSMITTED WHEN MORE
INFORMATION IS AVAILABLE...OR WHEN THE RADAR IS BACK IN SERVICE.
WE APOLOGIZE FOR THE INCONVENIENCE.

$$



000
NOUS45 KBYZ 021047
PNSBYZ
MTZ028>042-056>058-063>068-WYZ098-099-030030-

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE BILLINGS MT
447 AM MDT THU JUL 2 2015

...BILLINGS WEATHER RADAR DOWN DUE TO TECHNICAL DIFFICULTIES...

BILLINGS DOPPLER WEATHER RADAR...KBLX...IS DOWN DUE TO TECHNICAL
DIFFICULTIES. AT THIS TIME...IT IS NOT KNOWN WHEN THE RADAR WILL
BE RESTORED. A FOLLOW UP MESSAGE WILL BE TRANSMITTED WHEN MORE
INFORMATION IS AVAILABLE...OR WHEN THE RADAR IS BACK IN SERVICE.
WE APOLOGIZE FOR THE INCONVENIENCE.

$$



000
NOUS45 KBYZ 021047
PNSBYZ
MTZ028>042-056>058-063>068-WYZ098-099-030030-

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE BILLINGS MT
447 AM MDT THU JUL 2 2015

...BILLINGS WEATHER RADAR DOWN DUE TO TECHNICAL DIFFICULTIES...

BILLINGS DOPPLER WEATHER RADAR...KBLX...IS DOWN DUE TO TECHNICAL
DIFFICULTIES. AT THIS TIME...IT IS NOT KNOWN WHEN THE RADAR WILL
BE RESTORED. A FOLLOW UP MESSAGE WILL BE TRANSMITTED WHEN MORE
INFORMATION IS AVAILABLE...OR WHEN THE RADAR IS BACK IN SERVICE.
WE APOLOGIZE FOR THE INCONVENIENCE.

$$



000
NOUS45 KBOU 020859
PNSBOU
COZ030>051-022300-

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE DENVER/BOULDER CO
259 AM MDT THU JUL 2 2015

...TODAY IN METRO DENVER WEATHER HISTORY...

29-2  IN 1990...ALMOST A YEAR TO DATE AFTER THE RECORD BREAKING HEAT
        IN EARLY JULY 1989...THE THIRD LONGEST HEAT WAVE IN DENVER
        HISTORY STARTED.  FROM JUNE 29TH THROUGH JULY 2ND THE
        TEMPERATURE REACHED 100 DEGREES OR MORE ON FOUR CONSECUTIVE
        DAYS.  THE HIGHEST READING OF 102 DEGREES OCCURRED ON THE
        29TH...30TH...AND 1ST.  COMBINED WITH THE 102 DEGREE READING
        ON JUNE 27TH THIS WOULD HAVE BEEN THE LONGEST HEAT WAVE ON
        RECORD...BUT THE TEMPERATURE CLIMBED TO ONLY 98 DEGREES ON
        JUNE 28TH.
29-15 IN 2000...THE 29TH MARKED THE BEGINNING OF A NEAR RECORD HOT
        STREAK FOR METRO DENVER.  THE HIGH TEMPERATURES...AS RECORDED
        AT DENVER INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT...EXCEEDED THE 90 DEGREE MARK
        FOR 17 CONSECUTIVE DAYS FROM JUNE 29TH THROUGH JULY 15TH.
        THE RECORD OF 24 CONSECUTIVE 90 DEGREE OR ABOVE DAYS WAS
        SET FROM JULY 13TH THROUGH AUGUST 5TH...2008.
1-18  IN 1874...A STREAK OF 18 CONSECUTIVE DAYS OF 90 DEGREES
        TIED FOR SECOND WITH ANOTHER STREAK THAT WAS LATER SET
        IN THE SUMMER OF 1901. THE RECORD OF 24 CONSECUTIVE DAYS
        WAS ESTABLISHED IN THE SUMMER OF 2008.
1-31  IN 2012...IT WAS THE HOTTEST JULY ON RECORD IN DENVER SINCE
        WEATHER RECORDS BEGAN IN 1872.  THE AVERAGE TEMPERATURE FOR
        THE MONTH WAS 78.9 DEGREES WHICH WAS 4.7 DEGREES ABOVE
        NORMAL. THERE WERE 27 DAYS IN WHICH THE HIGH TEMPERATURE
        EQUALED OR EXCEEDED 90 DEGREES...WHICH ESTABLISHED A NEW
        RECORD.  THERE WERE ALSO 7 DAYS IN WHICH THE TEMPERATURE
        EQUALED OR EXCEEDED 100 DEGREES WHICH TIED THE RECORD
        SET IN 2005.
2     IN 1879...A SEVERE HAIL STORM PRODUCED CONSIDERABLE DAMAGE
        IN THE VICINITY OF ARVADA.  SOME OF THE STONES WERE
        UNUSUALLY LARGE...MEASURING 6.5 INCHES IN CIRCUMFERENCE
        (2 INCHES IN DIAMETER) WITH AN AVERAGE WEIGHT OF 1 OUNCE.
        THE STONES WERE UNIFORMLY LARGE WITH ONE SIDE CONCAVE.
        THE GREATEST DAMAGE WAS TO EARLY WHEAT...CABBAGE...AND VINES.
        A TREE JUST TO THE SOUTH OF THE WEATHER STATION IN DOWNTOWN
        DENVER WAS STRUCK BY LIGHTNING.  RESIDENTS IN THE HOUSE
        15 FEET AWAY WERE AFFECTED BY THE STRIKE.
      IN 1885...THUNDERSTORM WINDS WERE SUSTAINED TO 50 MPH IN THE
        CITY.
      IN 1892...AN APPARENT COLD FRONT PRODUCED SUSTAINED NORTHEAST
        WINDS TO 40 MPH WITH GUSTS TO 45 MPH.
      IN 1955...A APPARENT MICROBURST WIND GUST TO 69 MPH WAS
        RECORDED AT STAPLETON AIRPORT WHERE THE BRIEF STRONG WIND
        REDUCED THE VISIBILITY TO ZERO IN BLOWING DUST.
      IN 1965...HAIL...UP TO 2 INCHES IN DIAMETER...STRUCK SOUTHWEST
        ADAMS AND NORTHEAST DENVER COUNTIES...DAMAGING CARS...WINDOWS...
        AND FOLIAGE.  HAIL ACCUMULATED UP TO A FOOT DEEP.  WIND
        GUSTS TO 48 MPH AND HAIL TO 1 INCH IN DIAMETER FELL AT
        STAPLETON INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT WHERE THE LARGE HAIL BROKE
        THREE STORM WINDOWS AND SHREDDED SHRUBS AT THE U.S. WEATHER
        BUREAU UPPER AIR BUILDING.
      IN 1968...A PILOT REPORTED A TORNADO 10 MILES SOUTHEAST OF
       PARKER.
      IN 1971...ONE INCH DIAMETER HAIL STONES WERE REPORTED IN ADAMS
        COUNTY ABOUT 30 MILES EAST OF DENVER.
      IN 1987...A LARGE TORNADO TOUCHED DOWN 10 MILES NORTHEAST OF
        STAPLETON INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT.  THE TORNADO WAS VERTICAL
        AND THICK AND KICKED UP A LARGE DUST AND DEBRIS CLOUD.
        LATER...IT DEVELOPED A SINUOUS ROPE-LIKE SHAPE AS IT SLOWLY
        DISSIPATED.  THE TORNADO WAS VISIBLE FOR 15 MINUTES.  THE
        TWISTER OCCURRED IN OPEN COUNTRY AND DID ONLY MINOR DAMAGE
        TO A METAL SHED...PORCH...AND MAILBOX.  A MAN WAS KILLED BY
        LIGHTNING IN SOUTHWEST AURORA.  HE WAS IN HIS BACKYARD AND
        HAD A SHOVEL IN HIS HAND AT THE TIME OF THE STRIKE.  A GROUP
        OF SOCCER PLAYERS WERE HIT BY LIGHTNING ON A FIELD IN
        BOULDER.  A 10-YEAR-OLD BOY WAS CRITICALLY INJURED AND
        HOSPITALIZED; FORTUNATELY HE RECOVERED.  SIX OTHER PEOPLE
        WERE KNOCKED TO THE GROUND BY THE STRIKE.  TWO OF THESE WERE
        SLIGHTLY INJURED.  GOLF BALL SIZE HAIL FELL JUST EAST OF
        LITTLETON AND AT HIGHLANDS RANCH.  HAIL AS LARGE AS 3/4 INCH
        IN DIAMETER WAS REPORTED IN AURORA AND PARKER AND NEAR HUDSON
        AND FRANKTOWN.
      IN 1988...A 45-YEAR-OLD MAN WAS INJURED BY LIGHTNING AT CHERRY
        CREEK RESERVOIR.  ADMINISTRATION OF CPR PROBABLY SAVED HIS
        LIFE.
      IN 1990...THE TEMPERATURE REACHED A HIGH OF 100 DEGREES AT
        STAPLETON INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT.
      IN 1993...THUNDERSTORM WINDS BLEW A ROOF OFF A BARN NEAR
        PARKER...CAUSING AN ESTIMATED 15 HUNDRED DOLLARS DAMAGE.
      IN 1994...THUNDERSTORM WINDS DOWNED POWER LINES IN BOULDER...
        CAUSING POWER OUTAGES.  WINDS GUSTED TO 66 MPH IN BOULDER...
        64 MPH IN ARVADA...AND 60 MPH IN GOLDEN.
      IN 1998...A SMALL TORNADO TOUCHED DOWN BRIEFLY NEAR BARR LAKE...
        BUT CAUSED NO DAMAGE.
      IN 2002...HAIL AS LARGE AS 1 3/4 INCHES IN DIAMETER FELL IN
        THE CITY OF DENVER AND IN ARAPAHOE COUNTY NEAR LITTLETON.
        THE LOW TEMPERATURE OF 69 DEGREES EQUALED THE RECORD HIGH
        MINIMUM FOR THE DATE.
      IN 2006...LIGHTNING STRUCK A TEENAGER IN CASTLE ROCK AS HE
        WAS MOWING HIS LAWN AND LISTENING TO AN IPOD.  THE TEEN
        SUFFERED BURNS TO HIS HANDS AND FEET...AND HAD BLOOD
        RUNNING FROM HIS EARS WHEN HE WAS FOUND.  THE VICTIM`S
        EARDRUMS WERE RUPTURED...WHICH DAMAGED HIS HEARING.
        LIGHTNING ALSO STRUCK A HOUSE IN CASTLE ROCK CAUSING
        EXTENSIVE DAMAGE TO THE ROOF AND SIDE OF THE HOME.
        HEAVY RAINS CAUSED FLASH FLOODING AT CASTLEWOOD CANYON
        STATE PARK NEAR FRANKTOWN.  THE FLOODWATERS DESTROYED
        FOUR FOOTBRIDGES ALONG THE HIGH TRAIL.  A CULVERT AND
        SEVERAL ROADS WERE WASHED OUT IN THE AREA.  IN ADDITION...
        TWO DRIVEWAYS CROSSING CHERRY CREEK WERE WASHED OUT NEAR
        PRAIRIE CANYON RANCH.  HEAVY RAINFALL ALSO CAUSED MINOR
        FLOODING ON MURPHY AND SAND CREEKS...JUST EAST OF BUCKLEY
        AFB.  GUN CLUB ROAD WAS CLOSED BETWEEN ALAMEDA AND
        MISSISSIPPI AVENUES...NORTH OF THE MURPHY CREEK GOLF
        COURSE...WHERE 3 FEET OF STANDING WATER REPORTEDLY COVERED
        THE ROAD.  A SEVERE THUNDERSTORM PRODUCED LARGE HAIL TO
        7/8 INCH IN DIAMETER IN SOUTH AURORA NEAR CHERRY CREEK.

$$



000
NOUS45 KBOU 020859
PNSBOU
COZ030>051-022300-

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE DENVER/BOULDER CO
259 AM MDT THU JUL 2 2015

...TODAY IN METRO DENVER WEATHER HISTORY...

29-2  IN 1990...ALMOST A YEAR TO DATE AFTER THE RECORD BREAKING HEAT
        IN EARLY JULY 1989...THE THIRD LONGEST HEAT WAVE IN DENVER
        HISTORY STARTED.  FROM JUNE 29TH THROUGH JULY 2ND THE
        TEMPERATURE REACHED 100 DEGREES OR MORE ON FOUR CONSECUTIVE
        DAYS.  THE HIGHEST READING OF 102 DEGREES OCCURRED ON THE
        29TH...30TH...AND 1ST.  COMBINED WITH THE 102 DEGREE READING
        ON JUNE 27TH THIS WOULD HAVE BEEN THE LONGEST HEAT WAVE ON
        RECORD...BUT THE TEMPERATURE CLIMBED TO ONLY 98 DEGREES ON
        JUNE 28TH.
29-15 IN 2000...THE 29TH MARKED THE BEGINNING OF A NEAR RECORD HOT
        STREAK FOR METRO DENVER.  THE HIGH TEMPERATURES...AS RECORDED
        AT DENVER INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT...EXCEEDED THE 90 DEGREE MARK
        FOR 17 CONSECUTIVE DAYS FROM JUNE 29TH THROUGH JULY 15TH.
        THE RECORD OF 24 CONSECUTIVE 90 DEGREE OR ABOVE DAYS WAS
        SET FROM JULY 13TH THROUGH AUGUST 5TH...2008.
1-18  IN 1874...A STREAK OF 18 CONSECUTIVE DAYS OF 90 DEGREES
        TIED FOR SECOND WITH ANOTHER STREAK THAT WAS LATER SET
        IN THE SUMMER OF 1901. THE RECORD OF 24 CONSECUTIVE DAYS
        WAS ESTABLISHED IN THE SUMMER OF 2008.
1-31  IN 2012...IT WAS THE HOTTEST JULY ON RECORD IN DENVER SINCE
        WEATHER RECORDS BEGAN IN 1872.  THE AVERAGE TEMPERATURE FOR
        THE MONTH WAS 78.9 DEGREES WHICH WAS 4.7 DEGREES ABOVE
        NORMAL. THERE WERE 27 DAYS IN WHICH THE HIGH TEMPERATURE
        EQUALED OR EXCEEDED 90 DEGREES...WHICH ESTABLISHED A NEW
        RECORD.  THERE WERE ALSO 7 DAYS IN WHICH THE TEMPERATURE
        EQUALED OR EXCEEDED 100 DEGREES WHICH TIED THE RECORD
        SET IN 2005.
2     IN 1879...A SEVERE HAIL STORM PRODUCED CONSIDERABLE DAMAGE
        IN THE VICINITY OF ARVADA.  SOME OF THE STONES WERE
        UNUSUALLY LARGE...MEASURING 6.5 INCHES IN CIRCUMFERENCE
        (2 INCHES IN DIAMETER) WITH AN AVERAGE WEIGHT OF 1 OUNCE.
        THE STONES WERE UNIFORMLY LARGE WITH ONE SIDE CONCAVE.
        THE GREATEST DAMAGE WAS TO EARLY WHEAT...CABBAGE...AND VINES.
        A TREE JUST TO THE SOUTH OF THE WEATHER STATION IN DOWNTOWN
        DENVER WAS STRUCK BY LIGHTNING.  RESIDENTS IN THE HOUSE
        15 FEET AWAY WERE AFFECTED BY THE STRIKE.
      IN 1885...THUNDERSTORM WINDS WERE SUSTAINED TO 50 MPH IN THE
        CITY.
      IN 1892...AN APPARENT COLD FRONT PRODUCED SUSTAINED NORTHEAST
        WINDS TO 40 MPH WITH GUSTS TO 45 MPH.
      IN 1955...A APPARENT MICROBURST WIND GUST TO 69 MPH WAS
        RECORDED AT STAPLETON AIRPORT WHERE THE BRIEF STRONG WIND
        REDUCED THE VISIBILITY TO ZERO IN BLOWING DUST.
      IN 1965...HAIL...UP TO 2 INCHES IN DIAMETER...STRUCK SOUTHWEST
        ADAMS AND NORTHEAST DENVER COUNTIES...DAMAGING CARS...WINDOWS...
        AND FOLIAGE.  HAIL ACCUMULATED UP TO A FOOT DEEP.  WIND
        GUSTS TO 48 MPH AND HAIL TO 1 INCH IN DIAMETER FELL AT
        STAPLETON INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT WHERE THE LARGE HAIL BROKE
        THREE STORM WINDOWS AND SHREDDED SHRUBS AT THE U.S. WEATHER
        BUREAU UPPER AIR BUILDING.
      IN 1968...A PILOT REPORTED A TORNADO 10 MILES SOUTHEAST OF
       PARKER.
      IN 1971...ONE INCH DIAMETER HAIL STONES WERE REPORTED IN ADAMS
        COUNTY ABOUT 30 MILES EAST OF DENVER.
      IN 1987...A LARGE TORNADO TOUCHED DOWN 10 MILES NORTHEAST OF
        STAPLETON INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT.  THE TORNADO WAS VERTICAL
        AND THICK AND KICKED UP A LARGE DUST AND DEBRIS CLOUD.
        LATER...IT DEVELOPED A SINUOUS ROPE-LIKE SHAPE AS IT SLOWLY
        DISSIPATED.  THE TORNADO WAS VISIBLE FOR 15 MINUTES.  THE
        TWISTER OCCURRED IN OPEN COUNTRY AND DID ONLY MINOR DAMAGE
        TO A METAL SHED...PORCH...AND MAILBOX.  A MAN WAS KILLED BY
        LIGHTNING IN SOUTHWEST AURORA.  HE WAS IN HIS BACKYARD AND
        HAD A SHOVEL IN HIS HAND AT THE TIME OF THE STRIKE.  A GROUP
        OF SOCCER PLAYERS WERE HIT BY LIGHTNING ON A FIELD IN
        BOULDER.  A 10-YEAR-OLD BOY WAS CRITICALLY INJURED AND
        HOSPITALIZED; FORTUNATELY HE RECOVERED.  SIX OTHER PEOPLE
        WERE KNOCKED TO THE GROUND BY THE STRIKE.  TWO OF THESE WERE
        SLIGHTLY INJURED.  GOLF BALL SIZE HAIL FELL JUST EAST OF
        LITTLETON AND AT HIGHLANDS RANCH.  HAIL AS LARGE AS 3/4 INCH
        IN DIAMETER WAS REPORTED IN AURORA AND PARKER AND NEAR HUDSON
        AND FRANKTOWN.
      IN 1988...A 45-YEAR-OLD MAN WAS INJURED BY LIGHTNING AT CHERRY
        CREEK RESERVOIR.  ADMINISTRATION OF CPR PROBABLY SAVED HIS
        LIFE.
      IN 1990...THE TEMPERATURE REACHED A HIGH OF 100 DEGREES AT
        STAPLETON INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT.
      IN 1993...THUNDERSTORM WINDS BLEW A ROOF OFF A BARN NEAR
        PARKER...CAUSING AN ESTIMATED 15 HUNDRED DOLLARS DAMAGE.
      IN 1994...THUNDERSTORM WINDS DOWNED POWER LINES IN BOULDER...
        CAUSING POWER OUTAGES.  WINDS GUSTED TO 66 MPH IN BOULDER...
        64 MPH IN ARVADA...AND 60 MPH IN GOLDEN.
      IN 1998...A SMALL TORNADO TOUCHED DOWN BRIEFLY NEAR BARR LAKE...
        BUT CAUSED NO DAMAGE.
      IN 2002...HAIL AS LARGE AS 1 3/4 INCHES IN DIAMETER FELL IN
        THE CITY OF DENVER AND IN ARAPAHOE COUNTY NEAR LITTLETON.
        THE LOW TEMPERATURE OF 69 DEGREES EQUALED THE RECORD HIGH
        MINIMUM FOR THE DATE.
      IN 2006...LIGHTNING STRUCK A TEENAGER IN CASTLE ROCK AS HE
        WAS MOWING HIS LAWN AND LISTENING TO AN IPOD.  THE TEEN
        SUFFERED BURNS TO HIS HANDS AND FEET...AND HAD BLOOD
        RUNNING FROM HIS EARS WHEN HE WAS FOUND.  THE VICTIM`S
        EARDRUMS WERE RUPTURED...WHICH DAMAGED HIS HEARING.
        LIGHTNING ALSO STRUCK A HOUSE IN CASTLE ROCK CAUSING
        EXTENSIVE DAMAGE TO THE ROOF AND SIDE OF THE HOME.
        HEAVY RAINS CAUSED FLASH FLOODING AT CASTLEWOOD CANYON
        STATE PARK NEAR FRANKTOWN.  THE FLOODWATERS DESTROYED
        FOUR FOOTBRIDGES ALONG THE HIGH TRAIL.  A CULVERT AND
        SEVERAL ROADS WERE WASHED OUT IN THE AREA.  IN ADDITION...
        TWO DRIVEWAYS CROSSING CHERRY CREEK WERE WASHED OUT NEAR
        PRAIRIE CANYON RANCH.  HEAVY RAINFALL ALSO CAUSED MINOR
        FLOODING ON MURPHY AND SAND CREEKS...JUST EAST OF BUCKLEY
        AFB.  GUN CLUB ROAD WAS CLOSED BETWEEN ALAMEDA AND
        MISSISSIPPI AVENUES...NORTH OF THE MURPHY CREEK GOLF
        COURSE...WHERE 3 FEET OF STANDING WATER REPORTEDLY COVERED
        THE ROAD.  A SEVERE THUNDERSTORM PRODUCED LARGE HAIL TO
        7/8 INCH IN DIAMETER IN SOUTH AURORA NEAR CHERRY CREEK.

$$


000
NOUS45 KBOU 020859
PNSBOU
COZ030>051-022300-

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE DENVER/BOULDER CO
259 AM MDT THU JUL 2 2015

...TODAY IN METRO DENVER WEATHER HISTORY...

29-2  IN 1990...ALMOST A YEAR TO DATE AFTER THE RECORD BREAKING HEAT
        IN EARLY JULY 1989...THE THIRD LONGEST HEAT WAVE IN DENVER
        HISTORY STARTED.  FROM JUNE 29TH THROUGH JULY 2ND THE
        TEMPERATURE REACHED 100 DEGREES OR MORE ON FOUR CONSECUTIVE
        DAYS.  THE HIGHEST READING OF 102 DEGREES OCCURRED ON THE
        29TH...30TH...AND 1ST.  COMBINED WITH THE 102 DEGREE READING
        ON JUNE 27TH THIS WOULD HAVE BEEN THE LONGEST HEAT WAVE ON
        RECORD...BUT THE TEMPERATURE CLIMBED TO ONLY 98 DEGREES ON
        JUNE 28TH.
29-15 IN 2000...THE 29TH MARKED THE BEGINNING OF A NEAR RECORD HOT
        STREAK FOR METRO DENVER.  THE HIGH TEMPERATURES...AS RECORDED
        AT DENVER INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT...EXCEEDED THE 90 DEGREE MARK
        FOR 17 CONSECUTIVE DAYS FROM JUNE 29TH THROUGH JULY 15TH.
        THE RECORD OF 24 CONSECUTIVE 90 DEGREE OR ABOVE DAYS WAS
        SET FROM JULY 13TH THROUGH AUGUST 5TH...2008.
1-18  IN 1874...A STREAK OF 18 CONSECUTIVE DAYS OF 90 DEGREES
        TIED FOR SECOND WITH ANOTHER STREAK THAT WAS LATER SET
        IN THE SUMMER OF 1901. THE RECORD OF 24 CONSECUTIVE DAYS
        WAS ESTABLISHED IN THE SUMMER OF 2008.
1-31  IN 2012...IT WAS THE HOTTEST JULY ON RECORD IN DENVER SINCE
        WEATHER RECORDS BEGAN IN 1872.  THE AVERAGE TEMPERATURE FOR
        THE MONTH WAS 78.9 DEGREES WHICH WAS 4.7 DEGREES ABOVE
        NORMAL. THERE WERE 27 DAYS IN WHICH THE HIGH TEMPERATURE
        EQUALED OR EXCEEDED 90 DEGREES...WHICH ESTABLISHED A NEW
        RECORD.  THERE WERE ALSO 7 DAYS IN WHICH THE TEMPERATURE
        EQUALED OR EXCEEDED 100 DEGREES WHICH TIED THE RECORD
        SET IN 2005.
2     IN 1879...A SEVERE HAIL STORM PRODUCED CONSIDERABLE DAMAGE
        IN THE VICINITY OF ARVADA.  SOME OF THE STONES WERE
        UNUSUALLY LARGE...MEASURING 6.5 INCHES IN CIRCUMFERENCE
        (2 INCHES IN DIAMETER) WITH AN AVERAGE WEIGHT OF 1 OUNCE.
        THE STONES WERE UNIFORMLY LARGE WITH ONE SIDE CONCAVE.
        THE GREATEST DAMAGE WAS TO EARLY WHEAT...CABBAGE...AND VINES.
        A TREE JUST TO THE SOUTH OF THE WEATHER STATION IN DOWNTOWN
        DENVER WAS STRUCK BY LIGHTNING.  RESIDENTS IN THE HOUSE
        15 FEET AWAY WERE AFFECTED BY THE STRIKE.
      IN 1885...THUNDERSTORM WINDS WERE SUSTAINED TO 50 MPH IN THE
        CITY.
      IN 1892...AN APPARENT COLD FRONT PRODUCED SUSTAINED NORTHEAST
        WINDS TO 40 MPH WITH GUSTS TO 45 MPH.
      IN 1955...A APPARENT MICROBURST WIND GUST TO 69 MPH WAS
        RECORDED AT STAPLETON AIRPORT WHERE THE BRIEF STRONG WIND
        REDUCED THE VISIBILITY TO ZERO IN BLOWING DUST.
      IN 1965...HAIL...UP TO 2 INCHES IN DIAMETER...STRUCK SOUTHWEST
        ADAMS AND NORTHEAST DENVER COUNTIES...DAMAGING CARS...WINDOWS...
        AND FOLIAGE.  HAIL ACCUMULATED UP TO A FOOT DEEP.  WIND
        GUSTS TO 48 MPH AND HAIL TO 1 INCH IN DIAMETER FELL AT
        STAPLETON INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT WHERE THE LARGE HAIL BROKE
        THREE STORM WINDOWS AND SHREDDED SHRUBS AT THE U.S. WEATHER
        BUREAU UPPER AIR BUILDING.
      IN 1968...A PILOT REPORTED A TORNADO 10 MILES SOUTHEAST OF
       PARKER.
      IN 1971...ONE INCH DIAMETER HAIL STONES WERE REPORTED IN ADAMS
        COUNTY ABOUT 30 MILES EAST OF DENVER.
      IN 1987...A LARGE TORNADO TOUCHED DOWN 10 MILES NORTHEAST OF
        STAPLETON INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT.  THE TORNADO WAS VERTICAL
        AND THICK AND KICKED UP A LARGE DUST AND DEBRIS CLOUD.
        LATER...IT DEVELOPED A SINUOUS ROPE-LIKE SHAPE AS IT SLOWLY
        DISSIPATED.  THE TORNADO WAS VISIBLE FOR 15 MINUTES.  THE
        TWISTER OCCURRED IN OPEN COUNTRY AND DID ONLY MINOR DAMAGE
        TO A METAL SHED...PORCH...AND MAILBOX.  A MAN WAS KILLED BY
        LIGHTNING IN SOUTHWEST AURORA.  HE WAS IN HIS BACKYARD AND
        HAD A SHOVEL IN HIS HAND AT THE TIME OF THE STRIKE.  A GROUP
        OF SOCCER PLAYERS WERE HIT BY LIGHTNING ON A FIELD IN
        BOULDER.  A 10-YEAR-OLD BOY WAS CRITICALLY INJURED AND
        HOSPITALIZED; FORTUNATELY HE RECOVERED.  SIX OTHER PEOPLE
        WERE KNOCKED TO THE GROUND BY THE STRIKE.  TWO OF THESE WERE
        SLIGHTLY INJURED.  GOLF BALL SIZE HAIL FELL JUST EAST OF
        LITTLETON AND AT HIGHLANDS RANCH.  HAIL AS LARGE AS 3/4 INCH
        IN DIAMETER WAS REPORTED IN AURORA AND PARKER AND NEAR HUDSON
        AND FRANKTOWN.
      IN 1988...A 45-YEAR-OLD MAN WAS INJURED BY LIGHTNING AT CHERRY
        CREEK RESERVOIR.  ADMINISTRATION OF CPR PROBABLY SAVED HIS
        LIFE.
      IN 1990...THE TEMPERATURE REACHED A HIGH OF 100 DEGREES AT
        STAPLETON INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT.
      IN 1993...THUNDERSTORM WINDS BLEW A ROOF OFF A BARN NEAR
        PARKER...CAUSING AN ESTIMATED 15 HUNDRED DOLLARS DAMAGE.
      IN 1994...THUNDERSTORM WINDS DOWNED POWER LINES IN BOULDER...
        CAUSING POWER OUTAGES.  WINDS GUSTED TO 66 MPH IN BOULDER...
        64 MPH IN ARVADA...AND 60 MPH IN GOLDEN.
      IN 1998...A SMALL TORNADO TOUCHED DOWN BRIEFLY NEAR BARR LAKE...
        BUT CAUSED NO DAMAGE.
      IN 2002...HAIL AS LARGE AS 1 3/4 INCHES IN DIAMETER FELL IN
        THE CITY OF DENVER AND IN ARAPAHOE COUNTY NEAR LITTLETON.
        THE LOW TEMPERATURE OF 69 DEGREES EQUALED THE RECORD HIGH
        MINIMUM FOR THE DATE.
      IN 2006...LIGHTNING STRUCK A TEENAGER IN CASTLE ROCK AS HE
        WAS MOWING HIS LAWN AND LISTENING TO AN IPOD.  THE TEEN
        SUFFERED BURNS TO HIS HANDS AND FEET...AND HAD BLOOD
        RUNNING FROM HIS EARS WHEN HE WAS FOUND.  THE VICTIM`S
        EARDRUMS WERE RUPTURED...WHICH DAMAGED HIS HEARING.
        LIGHTNING ALSO STRUCK A HOUSE IN CASTLE ROCK CAUSING
        EXTENSIVE DAMAGE TO THE ROOF AND SIDE OF THE HOME.
        HEAVY RAINS CAUSED FLASH FLOODING AT CASTLEWOOD CANYON
        STATE PARK NEAR FRANKTOWN.  THE FLOODWATERS DESTROYED
        FOUR FOOTBRIDGES ALONG THE HIGH TRAIL.  A CULVERT AND
        SEVERAL ROADS WERE WASHED OUT IN THE AREA.  IN ADDITION...
        TWO DRIVEWAYS CROSSING CHERRY CREEK WERE WASHED OUT NEAR
        PRAIRIE CANYON RANCH.  HEAVY RAINFALL ALSO CAUSED MINOR
        FLOODING ON MURPHY AND SAND CREEKS...JUST EAST OF BUCKLEY
        AFB.  GUN CLUB ROAD WAS CLOSED BETWEEN ALAMEDA AND
        MISSISSIPPI AVENUES...NORTH OF THE MURPHY CREEK GOLF
        COURSE...WHERE 3 FEET OF STANDING WATER REPORTEDLY COVERED
        THE ROAD.  A SEVERE THUNDERSTORM PRODUCED LARGE HAIL TO
        7/8 INCH IN DIAMETER IN SOUTH AURORA NEAR CHERRY CREEK.

$$



000
NOUS41 KILN 020237
PNSILN
INZ050-058-059-066-073>075-080-KYZ089>100-OHZ026-034-035-042>046-
051>056-060>065-070>074-077>082-088-031200-

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE WILMINGTON OH
1037 PM EDT WED JUL 1 2015

...TOP TEN WETTEST JUNE FOR ALL THREE CLIMATE SITES...

ALL THREE CLIMATE SITES SERVED BY THE NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE IN
WILMINGTON OHIO RECORDED A TOP TEN TOTAL RAINFALL FOR THE MONTH OF
JUNE. FULL TOP TEN LISTS FOR JUNE RAINFALL ARE BELOW...WITH AMOUNTS
LISTED IN INCHES OF RAINFALL.

   CINCINNATI (CVG)   |    COLUMBUS (CMH)    |     DAYTON (DAY)
  RANK  AMOUNT  YEAR  |  RANK  AMOUNT  YEAR  |  RANK  AMOUNT  YEAR
    1.    9.86  1880  |    1.   10.39  2008  |    1.   10.89  1958
    2.    9.61  1998  |    2.    9.75  1958  |    2.    9.54  1980
    3.    9.07  1928  |    3.    8.77  1973  |    3.    9.09  1903
    4.    8.89  2011  |    4.    8.52  1902  |    4.    7.88  2015
    5.    8.34  1997  |    5.    8.19  1969  |    5.    7.59  1924
    6.    7.82  1881  |    6.    7.75  1949  |    6.    7.32  1902
    7.    7.36  1977  |    7.    7.25  1946  |    7.    7.22  1932
   8T.    7.33  2015  |    8.    6.99  1998  |    8.    7.13  1928
   8T.    7.33  2009  |    9.    6.94  1928  |    9.    6.66  1986
   10.    7.26  1945  |   10.    6.72  2015  |   10.    6.63  2008

$$

CASSADY






000
NOUS41 KILN 020237
PNSILN
INZ050-058-059-066-073>075-080-KYZ089>100-OHZ026-034-035-042>046-
051>056-060>065-070>074-077>082-088-031200-

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE WILMINGTON OH
1037 PM EDT WED JUL 1 2015

...TOP TEN WETTEST JUNE FOR ALL THREE CLIMATE SITES...

ALL THREE CLIMATE SITES SERVED BY THE NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE IN
WILMINGTON OHIO RECORDED A TOP TEN TOTAL RAINFALL FOR THE MONTH OF
JUNE. FULL TOP TEN LISTS FOR JUNE RAINFALL ARE BELOW...WITH AMOUNTS
LISTED IN INCHES OF RAINFALL.

   CINCINNATI (CVG)   |    COLUMBUS (CMH)    |     DAYTON (DAY)
  RANK  AMOUNT  YEAR  |  RANK  AMOUNT  YEAR  |  RANK  AMOUNT  YEAR
    1.    9.86  1880  |    1.   10.39  2008  |    1.   10.89  1958
    2.    9.61  1998  |    2.    9.75  1958  |    2.    9.54  1980
    3.    9.07  1928  |    3.    8.77  1973  |    3.    9.09  1903
    4.    8.89  2011  |    4.    8.52  1902  |    4.    7.88  2015
    5.    8.34  1997  |    5.    8.19  1969  |    5.    7.59  1924
    6.    7.82  1881  |    6.    7.75  1949  |    6.    7.32  1902
    7.    7.36  1977  |    7.    7.25  1946  |    7.    7.22  1932
   8T.    7.33  2015  |    8.    6.99  1998  |    8.    7.13  1928
   8T.    7.33  2009  |    9.    6.94  1928  |    9.    6.66  1986
   10.    7.26  1945  |   10.    6.72  2015  |   10.    6.63  2008

$$

CASSADY






000
NOUS41 KILN 020237
PNSILN
INZ050-058-059-066-073>075-080-KYZ089>100-OHZ026-034-035-042>046-
051>056-060>065-070>074-077>082-088-031200-

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE WILMINGTON OH
1037 PM EDT WED JUL 1 2015

...TOP TEN WETTEST JUNE FOR ALL THREE CLIMATE SITES...

ALL THREE CLIMATE SITES SERVED BY THE NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE IN
WILMINGTON OHIO RECORDED A TOP TEN TOTAL RAINFALL FOR THE MONTH OF
JUNE. FULL TOP TEN LISTS FOR JUNE RAINFALL ARE BELOW...WITH AMOUNTS
LISTED IN INCHES OF RAINFALL.

   CINCINNATI (CVG)   |    COLUMBUS (CMH)    |     DAYTON (DAY)
  RANK  AMOUNT  YEAR  |  RANK  AMOUNT  YEAR  |  RANK  AMOUNT  YEAR
    1.    9.86  1880  |    1.   10.39  2008  |    1.   10.89  1958
    2.    9.61  1998  |    2.    9.75  1958  |    2.    9.54  1980
    3.    9.07  1928  |    3.    8.77  1973  |    3.    9.09  1903
    4.    8.89  2011  |    4.    8.52  1902  |    4.    7.88  2015
    5.    8.34  1997  |    5.    8.19  1969  |    5.    7.59  1924
    6.    7.82  1881  |    6.    7.75  1949  |    6.    7.32  1902
    7.    7.36  1977  |    7.    7.25  1946  |    7.    7.22  1932
   8T.    7.33  2015  |    8.    6.99  1998  |    8.    7.13  1928
   8T.    7.33  2009  |    9.    6.94  1928  |    9.    6.66  1986
   10.    7.26  1945  |   10.    6.72  2015  |   10.    6.63  2008

$$

CASSADY





000
NOUS41 KILN 020237
PNSILN
INZ050-058-059-066-073>075-080-KYZ089>100-OHZ026-034-035-042>046-
051>056-060>065-070>074-077>082-088-031200-

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE WILMINGTON OH
1037 PM EDT WED JUL 1 2015

...TOP TEN WETTEST JUNE FOR ALL THREE CLIMATE SITES...

ALL THREE CLIMATE SITES SERVED BY THE NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE IN
WILMINGTON OHIO RECORDED A TOP TEN TOTAL RAINFALL FOR THE MONTH OF
JUNE. FULL TOP TEN LISTS FOR JUNE RAINFALL ARE BELOW...WITH AMOUNTS
LISTED IN INCHES OF RAINFALL.

   CINCINNATI (CVG)   |    COLUMBUS (CMH)    |     DAYTON (DAY)
  RANK  AMOUNT  YEAR  |  RANK  AMOUNT  YEAR  |  RANK  AMOUNT  YEAR
    1.    9.86  1880  |    1.   10.39  2008  |    1.   10.89  1958
    2.    9.61  1998  |    2.    9.75  1958  |    2.    9.54  1980
    3.    9.07  1928  |    3.    8.77  1973  |    3.    9.09  1903
    4.    8.89  2011  |    4.    8.52  1902  |    4.    7.88  2015
    5.    8.34  1997  |    5.    8.19  1969  |    5.    7.59  1924
    6.    7.82  1881  |    6.    7.75  1949  |    6.    7.32  1902
    7.    7.36  1977  |    7.    7.25  1946  |    7.    7.22  1932
   8T.    7.33  2015  |    8.    6.99  1998  |    8.    7.13  1928
   8T.    7.33  2009  |    9.    6.94  1928  |    9.    6.66  1986
   10.    7.26  1945  |   10.    6.72  2015  |   10.    6.63  2008

$$

CASSADY





000
NOUS46 KSEW 012338 CCC
PNSSEW

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE SEATTLE WA
438 PM PDT WED JUL 1 2015

...RECORD WARM TEMPERATURES FOR JUNE IN WESTERN WASHINGTON...
...VERY DRY LATE SPRING AND EARLY SUMMER...

JUNE 2015 WILL GO DOWN AS THE WARMEST JUNE ON RECORD FOR MOST OF
WESTERN WASHINGTON. SEA-TAC AIRPORT AND BELLINGHAM WON THE TRIFECTA
BY SETTING THE WARMEST AVERAGE HIGH...AVERAGE LOW...AND OVERALL
AVERAGE TEMPERATURE RECORDS FOR THE MONTH OF JUNE. THE RANKINGS ARE
IN PARENTHESIS NEXT TO THEIR VALUES.

LOCATION            AVG JUNE HIGH   AVG JUNE LOW    AVG JUNE TEMP

SEA-TAC AIRPORT        78.9(1)         56.4(1)         67.7(1)
OLYMPIA                79.9(1)         50.2(4)         65.1(1)
QUILLAYUTE             69.4(1)         48.2(14)        58.8(3)
HOQUIAM                66.9(5)         52.1(10)        59.5(4)
BELLINGHAM             73.6(1)         54.5(1)         64.0(1)

THE TREND OF BELOW NORMAL PRECIPITATION CONTINUED FOR WESTERN
WASHINGTON INTO JUNE. JUNE 2015 WAS IN THE TOP 5 DRIEST FOR MANY
AREAS. WHEN LOOKING AT MAY AND JUNE 2015 COMBINED...IT WAS THE
DRIEST ON RECORD. IF YOU ALSO THROW APRIL INTO THE MIX...IT WAS IN
THE TOP 3 FOR DRIEST APRIL THROUGH JUNE ON RECORD. THE RANKINGS ARE
IN PARENTHESIS NEXT TO THEIR VALUES.

LOCATION                 JUNE           MAY&JUNE        APRIL-JUNE

SEA-TAC AIRPORT         0.23(4)          0.81(1)          2.84(3)
OLYMPIA                 0.14(2T)         0.81(1)          2.73(2)
QUILLAYUTE              0.20(1)          0.87(1)          7.06(1)
HOQUIAM                 0.38(2)          0.66(1)          3.88(1)
BELLINGHAM              0.26(2T)         0.93(1)          2.16(1)
T = TIED

ACCORDING TO THE CLIMATE PREDICTION CENTER...THE ABOVE NORMAL
TEMPERATURES AND BELOW NORMAL PRECIPITATION WILL CONTINUE INTO JULY.

START OF CLIMATE RECORDS
SEA-TAC AIRPORT  1945
OLYMPIA          1948
QUILLAYUTE       1966(AUGUST)
HOQUIAM          1953(MAY)
BELLINGHAM       1949

$$
FELTON/GRUB


000
NOUS46 KSEW 012338 CCC
PNSSEW

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE SEATTLE WA
438 PM PDT WED JUL 1 2015

...RECORD WARM TEMPERATURES FOR JUNE IN WESTERN WASHINGTON...
...VERY DRY LATE SPRING AND EARLY SUMMER...

JUNE 2015 WILL GO DOWN AS THE WARMEST JUNE ON RECORD FOR MOST OF
WESTERN WASHINGTON. SEA-TAC AIRPORT AND BELLINGHAM WON THE TRIFECTA
BY SETTING THE WARMEST AVERAGE HIGH...AVERAGE LOW...AND OVERALL
AVERAGE TEMPERATURE RECORDS FOR THE MONTH OF JUNE. THE RANKINGS ARE
IN PARENTHESIS NEXT TO THEIR VALUES.

LOCATION            AVG JUNE HIGH   AVG JUNE LOW    AVG JUNE TEMP

SEA-TAC AIRPORT        78.9(1)         56.4(1)         67.7(1)
OLYMPIA                79.9(1)         50.2(4)         65.1(1)
QUILLAYUTE             69.4(1)         48.2(14)        58.8(3)
HOQUIAM                66.9(5)         52.1(10)        59.5(4)
BELLINGHAM             73.6(1)         54.5(1)         64.0(1)

THE TREND OF BELOW NORMAL PRECIPITATION CONTINUED FOR WESTERN
WASHINGTON INTO JUNE. JUNE 2015 WAS IN THE TOP 5 DRIEST FOR MANY
AREAS. WHEN LOOKING AT MAY AND JUNE 2015 COMBINED...IT WAS THE
DRIEST ON RECORD. IF YOU ALSO THROW APRIL INTO THE MIX...IT WAS IN
THE TOP 3 FOR DRIEST APRIL THROUGH JUNE ON RECORD. THE RANKINGS ARE
IN PARENTHESIS NEXT TO THEIR VALUES.

LOCATION                 JUNE           MAY&JUNE        APRIL-JUNE

SEA-TAC AIRPORT         0.23(4)          0.81(1)          2.84(3)
OLYMPIA                 0.14(2T)         0.81(1)          2.73(2)
QUILLAYUTE              0.20(1)          0.87(1)          7.06(1)
HOQUIAM                 0.38(2)          0.66(1)          3.88(1)
BELLINGHAM              0.26(2T)         0.93(1)          2.16(1)
T = TIED

ACCORDING TO THE CLIMATE PREDICTION CENTER...THE ABOVE NORMAL
TEMPERATURES AND BELOW NORMAL PRECIPITATION WILL CONTINUE INTO JULY.

START OF CLIMATE RECORDS
SEA-TAC AIRPORT  1945
OLYMPIA          1948
QUILLAYUTE       1966(AUGUST)
HOQUIAM          1953(MAY)
BELLINGHAM       1949

$$
FELTON/GRUB



000
NOUS46 KSEW 012337 CCB
PNSSEW

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE SEATTLE WA
437 PM PDT WED JUL 1 2015

...RECORD WARM TEMPERATURES FOR JUNE IN WESTERN WASHINGTON...
...VERY DRY LATE SPRING AND EARLY SUMMER...

JUNE 2015 WILL GO DOWN AS THE WARMEST JUNE ON RECORD FOR MOST OF
WESTERN WASHINGTON. SEA-TAC AIRPORT AND BELLINGHAM WON THE TRIFECTA
BY SETTING THE WARMEST AVERAGE HIGH...AVERAGE LOW...AND OVERALL
AVERAGE TEMPERATURE RECORDS FOR THE MONTH OF JUNE. THE RANKINGS ARE
IN PARENTHESIS NEXT TO THEIR VALUES.

LOCATION            AVG JUNE HIGH   AVG JUNE LOW    AVG JUNE TEMP

SEA-TAC AIRPORT        78.9(1)         56.4(1)         67.7(1)
OLYMPIA                79.9(1)         50.2(4)         65.1(1)
QUILLAYUTE             69.4(1)         48.2(14)        58.8(3)
HOQUIAM                66.9(5)         52.1(10)        59.5(4)
BELLINGHAM             73.6(1)         54.5(1)         64.0(1)
( ) = RANKING

THE TREND OF BELOW NORMAL PRECIPITATION CONTINUED FOR WESTERN
WASHINGTON INTO JUNE. JUNE 2015 WAS IN THE TOP 5 DRIEST FOR MANY
AREAS. WHEN LOOKING AT MAY AND JUNE 2015 COMBINED...IT WAS THE
DRIEST ON RECORD. IF YOU ALSO THROW APRIL INTO THE MIX...IT WAS IN
THE TOP 3 FOR DRIEST APRIL THROUGH JUNE ON RECORD. THE RANKINGS ARE
IN PARENTHESIS NEXT TO THEIR VALUES.

LOCATION                 JUNE           MAY&JUNE        APRIL-JUNE

SEA-TAC AIRPORT         0.23(4)          0.81(1)          2.84(3)
OLYMPIA                 0.14(2T)         0.81(1)          2.73(2)
QUILLAYUTE              0.20(1)          0.87(1)          7.06(1)
HOQUIAM                 0.38(2)          0.66(1)          3.88(1)
BELLINGHAM              0.26(2T)         0.93(1)          2.16(1)
T = TIED

ACCORDING TO THE CLIMATE PREDICTION CENTER...THE ABOVE NORMAL
TEMPERATURES AND BELOW NORMAL PRECIPITATION WILL CONTINUE INTO JULY.

START OF CLIMATE RECORDS
SEA-TAC AIRPORT  1945
OLYMPIA          1948
QUILLAYUTE       1966(AUGUST)
HOQUIAM          1953(MAY)
BELLINGHAM       1949

$$
FELTON/GRUB



000
NOUS46 KSEW 012337 CCB
PNSSEW

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE SEATTLE WA
437 PM PDT WED JUL 1 2015

...RECORD WARM TEMPERATURES FOR JUNE IN WESTERN WASHINGTON...
...VERY DRY LATE SPRING AND EARLY SUMMER...

JUNE 2015 WILL GO DOWN AS THE WARMEST JUNE ON RECORD FOR MOST OF
WESTERN WASHINGTON. SEA-TAC AIRPORT AND BELLINGHAM WON THE TRIFECTA
BY SETTING THE WARMEST AVERAGE HIGH...AVERAGE LOW...AND OVERALL
AVERAGE TEMPERATURE RECORDS FOR THE MONTH OF JUNE. THE RANKINGS ARE
IN PARENTHESIS NEXT TO THEIR VALUES.

LOCATION            AVG JUNE HIGH   AVG JUNE LOW    AVG JUNE TEMP

SEA-TAC AIRPORT        78.9(1)         56.4(1)         67.7(1)
OLYMPIA                79.9(1)         50.2(4)         65.1(1)
QUILLAYUTE             69.4(1)         48.2(14)        58.8(3)
HOQUIAM                66.9(5)         52.1(10)        59.5(4)
BELLINGHAM             73.6(1)         54.5(1)         64.0(1)
( ) = RANKING

THE TREND OF BELOW NORMAL PRECIPITATION CONTINUED FOR WESTERN
WASHINGTON INTO JUNE. JUNE 2015 WAS IN THE TOP 5 DRIEST FOR MANY
AREAS. WHEN LOOKING AT MAY AND JUNE 2015 COMBINED...IT WAS THE
DRIEST ON RECORD. IF YOU ALSO THROW APRIL INTO THE MIX...IT WAS IN
THE TOP 3 FOR DRIEST APRIL THROUGH JUNE ON RECORD. THE RANKINGS ARE
IN PARENTHESIS NEXT TO THEIR VALUES.

LOCATION                 JUNE           MAY&JUNE        APRIL-JUNE

SEA-TAC AIRPORT         0.23(4)          0.81(1)          2.84(3)
OLYMPIA                 0.14(2T)         0.81(1)          2.73(2)
QUILLAYUTE              0.20(1)          0.87(1)          7.06(1)
HOQUIAM                 0.38(2)          0.66(1)          3.88(1)
BELLINGHAM              0.26(2T)         0.93(1)          2.16(1)
T = TIED

ACCORDING TO THE CLIMATE PREDICTION CENTER...THE ABOVE NORMAL
TEMPERATURES AND BELOW NORMAL PRECIPITATION WILL CONTINUE INTO JULY.

START OF CLIMATE RECORDS
SEA-TAC AIRPORT  1945
OLYMPIA          1948
QUILLAYUTE       1966(AUGUST)
HOQUIAM          1953(MAY)
BELLINGHAM       1949

$$
FELTON/GRUB


000
NOUS46 KSEW 012328 CCA
PNSSEW

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE SEATTLE WA
425 PM PDT WED JUL 1 2015

...RECORD WARM TEMPERATURES FOR JUNE IN WESTERN WASHINGTON...
...VERY DRY LATE SPRING AND EARLY SUMMER...

JUNE 2015 WILL GO DOWN AS THE WARMEST JUNE ON RECORD FOR MOST OF
WESTERN WASHINGTON. SEA-TAC AIRPORT AND BELLINGHAM WON THE TRIFECTA
BY SETTING THE WARMEST AVERAGE HIGH...AVERAGE LOW...AND OVERALL
AVERAGE TEMPERATURE RECORDS FOR THE MONTH OF JUNE. THE RANKINGS ARE
IN PARENTHESIS NEXT TO THEIR VALUES.

LOCATIONAVG JUNE HIGHAVG JUNE LOWAVG JUNE TEMP

SEA-TAC AIRPORT   78.9(1)   56.4(1)   67.7(1)
OLYMPIA    79.9(1)       50.2(4)   65.1(1)
QUILLAYUTE    69.4(1)   48.2(14)   58.8(3)
HOQUIAM    66.9(5)   52.1(10)   59.5(4)
BELLINGHAM   73.6(1)   54.5(1)   64.0(1)
( ) = RANKING

THE TREND OF BELOW NORMAL PRECIPITATION CONTINUED FOR WESTERN
WASHINGTON INTO JUNE. JUNE 2015 WAS IN THE TOP 5 DRIEST FOR MANY
AREAS. WHEN LOOKING AT MAY AND JUNE 2015 COMBINED...IT WAS THE
DRIEST ON RECORD. IF YOU ALSO THROW APRIL INTO THE MIX...IT WAS IN
THE TOP 3 FOR DRIEST APRIL THROUGH JUNE ON RECORD. THE RANKINGS ARE
IN PARENTHESIS NEXT TO THEIR VALUES.

LOCATION   JUNEMAY&JUNEAPRIL-JUNE

SEA-TAC AIRPORT         0.23(4) 0.81(1)          2.84(3)
OLYMPIA                 0.14(2T)         0.81(1)          2.73(2)
QUILLAYUTE              0.20(1)          0.87(1)          7.06(1)
HOQUIAM0.38(2)          0.66(1)          3.88(1)
BELLINGHAM0.26(2T)     0.93(1)          2.16(1)
T = TIED

ACCORDING TO THE CLIMATE PREDICTION CENTER...THE ABOVE NORMAL
TEMPERATURES AND BELOW NORMAL PRECIPITATION WILL CONTINUE INTO JULY.

START OF CLIMATE RECORDS
SEA-TAC AIRPORT 1945
OLYMPIA 1948
QUILLAYUTE      AUGUST 1966
HOQUIAM         MAY 1953
BELLINGHAM      1949

$$
FELTON/GRUB


000
NOUS46 KSEW 012328 CCA
PNSSEW

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE SEATTLE WA
425 PM PDT WED JUL 1 2015

...RECORD WARM TEMPERATURES FOR JUNE IN WESTERN WASHINGTON...
...VERY DRY LATE SPRING AND EARLY SUMMER...

JUNE 2015 WILL GO DOWN AS THE WARMEST JUNE ON RECORD FOR MOST OF
WESTERN WASHINGTON. SEA-TAC AIRPORT AND BELLINGHAM WON THE TRIFECTA
BY SETTING THE WARMEST AVERAGE HIGH...AVERAGE LOW...AND OVERALL
AVERAGE TEMPERATURE RECORDS FOR THE MONTH OF JUNE. THE RANKINGS ARE
IN PARENTHESIS NEXT TO THEIR VALUES.

LOCATIONAVG JUNE HIGHAVG JUNE LOWAVG JUNE TEMP

SEA-TAC AIRPORT   78.9(1)   56.4(1)   67.7(1)
OLYMPIA    79.9(1)       50.2(4)   65.1(1)
QUILLAYUTE    69.4(1)   48.2(14)   58.8(3)
HOQUIAM    66.9(5)   52.1(10)   59.5(4)
BELLINGHAM   73.6(1)   54.5(1)   64.0(1)
( ) = RANKING

THE TREND OF BELOW NORMAL PRECIPITATION CONTINUED FOR WESTERN
WASHINGTON INTO JUNE. JUNE 2015 WAS IN THE TOP 5 DRIEST FOR MANY
AREAS. WHEN LOOKING AT MAY AND JUNE 2015 COMBINED...IT WAS THE
DRIEST ON RECORD. IF YOU ALSO THROW APRIL INTO THE MIX...IT WAS IN
THE TOP 3 FOR DRIEST APRIL THROUGH JUNE ON RECORD. THE RANKINGS ARE
IN PARENTHESIS NEXT TO THEIR VALUES.

LOCATION   JUNEMAY&JUNEAPRIL-JUNE

SEA-TAC AIRPORT         0.23(4) 0.81(1)          2.84(3)
OLYMPIA                 0.14(2T)         0.81(1)          2.73(2)
QUILLAYUTE              0.20(1)          0.87(1)          7.06(1)
HOQUIAM0.38(2)          0.66(1)          3.88(1)
BELLINGHAM0.26(2T)     0.93(1)          2.16(1)
T = TIED

ACCORDING TO THE CLIMATE PREDICTION CENTER...THE ABOVE NORMAL
TEMPERATURES AND BELOW NORMAL PRECIPITATION WILL CONTINUE INTO JULY.

START OF CLIMATE RECORDS
SEA-TAC AIRPORT 1945
OLYMPIA 1948
QUILLAYUTE      AUGUST 1966
HOQUIAM         MAY 1953
BELLINGHAM      1949

$$
FELTON/GRUB


000
NOUS46 KSEW 012327
PNSSEW

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE SEATTLE WA
425 PM PDT WED JUL 1 2015

...RECORD WARM TEMPERATURES FOR JUNE IN WESTERN WASHINGTON...
...VERY DRY LATE SPRING AND EARLY SUMMER...

JUNE 2015 WILL GO DOWN AS THE WARMEST JUNE ON RECORD FOR MOST OF
WESTERN WASHINGTON. SEA-TAC AIRPORT AND BELLINGHAM WON THE TRIFECTA
BY SETTING THE WARMEST AVERAGE HIGH...AVERAGE LOW...AND OVERALL
AVERAGE TEMPERATURE RECORDS FOR THE MONTH OF JUNE. THE RANKINGS ARE
IN PARENTHESIS NEXT TO THEIR VALUES.

LOCATIONAVG JUNE HIGHAVG JUNE LOWAVG JUNE TEMP

SEA-TAC AIRPORT   78.9(1)   56.4(1)   67.7(1)
OLYMPIA    79.9(1)       50.2(4)   65.1(1)
QUILLAYUTE    69.4(1)   48.2(14)   58.8(3)
HOQUIAM    66.9(5)   52.1(10)   59.5(4)
BELLINGHAM   73.6(1)   54.5(1)   64.0(1)
( ) = RANKING

THE TREND OF BELOW NORMAL PRECIPITATION CONTINUED FOR WESTERN
WASHINGTON INTO JUNE. JUNE 2015 WAS IN THE TOP 5 DRIEST FOR MANY
AREAS. WHEN LOOKING AT MAY AND JUNE 2015 COMBINED...IT WAS THE
DRIEST ON RECORD. IF YOU ALSO THROW APRIL INTO THE MIX...IT WAS IN
THE TOP 3 FOR DRIEST APRIL THROUGH JUNE ON RECORD. THE RANKINGS ARE
IN PARENTHESIS NEXT TO THEIR VALUES.

LOCATION   JUNEMAY&JUNEAPRIL-JUNE

SEA-TAC AIRPORT         0.23(4) 0.81(1)          2.84(3)
OLYMPIA                 0.14(2T)         0.81(1)          2.73(2)
QUILLAYUTE              0.20(1)          0.87(1)          7.06(1)
HOQUIAM0.38(2)          0.66(1)          3.88(1)
BELLINGHAM0.26(2T)     0.93(1)          2.16(1)
T = TIED

ACCORDING TO THE CLIMATE PREDICTION CENTER...THE ABOVE NORMAL
TEMPERATURES AND BELOW NORMAL PRECIPITATION WILL CONTINUE INTO JULY.

START OF CLIMATE RECORDS
SEA-TAC AIRPORT 1945
OLYMPIA 1948
QUILLAYUTE      AUGUST 1966
HOQUIAM         MAY 1963
BELLINGHAM      1949

$$
FELTON/GRUB



000
NOUS46 KSEW 012327
PNSSEW

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE SEATTLE WA
425 PM PDT WED JUL 1 2015

...RECORD WARM TEMPERATURES FOR JUNE IN WESTERN WASHINGTON...
...VERY DRY LATE SPRING AND EARLY SUMMER...

JUNE 2015 WILL GO DOWN AS THE WARMEST JUNE ON RECORD FOR MOST OF
WESTERN WASHINGTON. SEA-TAC AIRPORT AND BELLINGHAM WON THE TRIFECTA
BY SETTING THE WARMEST AVERAGE HIGH...AVERAGE LOW...AND OVERALL
AVERAGE TEMPERATURE RECORDS FOR THE MONTH OF JUNE. THE RANKINGS ARE
IN PARENTHESIS NEXT TO THEIR VALUES.

LOCATIONAVG JUNE HIGHAVG JUNE LOWAVG JUNE TEMP

SEA-TAC AIRPORT   78.9(1)   56.4(1)   67.7(1)
OLYMPIA    79.9(1)       50.2(4)   65.1(1)
QUILLAYUTE    69.4(1)   48.2(14)   58.8(3)
HOQUIAM    66.9(5)   52.1(10)   59.5(4)
BELLINGHAM   73.6(1)   54.5(1)   64.0(1)
( ) = RANKING

THE TREND OF BELOW NORMAL PRECIPITATION CONTINUED FOR WESTERN
WASHINGTON INTO JUNE. JUNE 2015 WAS IN THE TOP 5 DRIEST FOR MANY
AREAS. WHEN LOOKING AT MAY AND JUNE 2015 COMBINED...IT WAS THE
DRIEST ON RECORD. IF YOU ALSO THROW APRIL INTO THE MIX...IT WAS IN
THE TOP 3 FOR DRIEST APRIL THROUGH JUNE ON RECORD. THE RANKINGS ARE
IN PARENTHESIS NEXT TO THEIR VALUES.

LOCATION   JUNEMAY&JUNEAPRIL-JUNE

SEA-TAC AIRPORT         0.23(4) 0.81(1)          2.84(3)
OLYMPIA                 0.14(2T)         0.81(1)          2.73(2)
QUILLAYUTE              0.20(1)          0.87(1)          7.06(1)
HOQUIAM0.38(2)          0.66(1)          3.88(1)
BELLINGHAM0.26(2T)     0.93(1)          2.16(1)
T = TIED

ACCORDING TO THE CLIMATE PREDICTION CENTER...THE ABOVE NORMAL
TEMPERATURES AND BELOW NORMAL PRECIPITATION WILL CONTINUE INTO JULY.

START OF CLIMATE RECORDS
SEA-TAC AIRPORT 1945
OLYMPIA 1948
QUILLAYUTE      AUGUST 1966
HOQUIAM         MAY 1963
BELLINGHAM      1949

$$
FELTON/GRUB


000
NOUS46 KSEW 012327
PNSSEW

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE SEATTLE WA
425 PM PDT WED JUL 1 2015

...RECORD WARM TEMPERATURES FOR JUNE IN WESTERN WASHINGTON...
...VERY DRY LATE SPRING AND EARLY SUMMER...

JUNE 2015 WILL GO DOWN AS THE WARMEST JUNE ON RECORD FOR MOST OF
WESTERN WASHINGTON. SEA-TAC AIRPORT AND BELLINGHAM WON THE TRIFECTA
BY SETTING THE WARMEST AVERAGE HIGH...AVERAGE LOW...AND OVERALL
AVERAGE TEMPERATURE RECORDS FOR THE MONTH OF JUNE. THE RANKINGS ARE
IN PARENTHESIS NEXT TO THEIR VALUES.

LOCATIONAVG JUNE HIGHAVG JUNE LOWAVG JUNE TEMP

SEA-TAC AIRPORT   78.9(1)   56.4(1)   67.7(1)
OLYMPIA    79.9(1)       50.2(4)   65.1(1)
QUILLAYUTE    69.4(1)   48.2(14)   58.8(3)
HOQUIAM    66.9(5)   52.1(10)   59.5(4)
BELLINGHAM   73.6(1)   54.5(1)   64.0(1)
( ) = RANKING

THE TREND OF BELOW NORMAL PRECIPITATION CONTINUED FOR WESTERN
WASHINGTON INTO JUNE. JUNE 2015 WAS IN THE TOP 5 DRIEST FOR MANY
AREAS. WHEN LOOKING AT MAY AND JUNE 2015 COMBINED...IT WAS THE
DRIEST ON RECORD. IF YOU ALSO THROW APRIL INTO THE MIX...IT WAS IN
THE TOP 3 FOR DRIEST APRIL THROUGH JUNE ON RECORD. THE RANKINGS ARE
IN PARENTHESIS NEXT TO THEIR VALUES.

LOCATION   JUNEMAY&JUNEAPRIL-JUNE

SEA-TAC AIRPORT         0.23(4) 0.81(1)          2.84(3)
OLYMPIA                 0.14(2T)         0.81(1)          2.73(2)
QUILLAYUTE              0.20(1)          0.87(1)          7.06(1)
HOQUIAM0.38(2)          0.66(1)          3.88(1)
BELLINGHAM0.26(2T)     0.93(1)          2.16(1)
T = TIED

ACCORDING TO THE CLIMATE PREDICTION CENTER...THE ABOVE NORMAL
TEMPERATURES AND BELOW NORMAL PRECIPITATION WILL CONTINUE INTO JULY.

START OF CLIMATE RECORDS
SEA-TAC AIRPORT 1945
OLYMPIA 1948
QUILLAYUTE      AUGUST 1966
HOQUIAM         MAY 1963
BELLINGHAM      1949

$$
FELTON/GRUB



000
NOUS43 KARX 012305
PNSARX
IAZ008>011-018-019-029-030-MNZ079-086>088-094>096-WIZ017-029-032>034-041>044-
053>055-061-241200-

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE LA CROSSE WI
605 PM CDT WED JUL 1 2015

...SEVENTH WETTEST JUNE IN AUSTIN MN...

DURING JUNE OF 2015...THE COOPERATIVE OBSERVER IN AUSTIN MINNESOTA
REPORTED 7.52 INCHES OF RAIN.  THIS MADE IT THEIR SEVENTH WETTEST
JUNE IN AUSTIN. NORMALLY...AUSTIN RECEIVES 4.55 INCHES IN A JUNE.

THE TABLE BELOW LISTS THE TEN WETTEST JUNES IN AUSTIN MN.

                  PRECIPITATION
       RANK           TOTAL           YEAR
       ----       -------------       ----
         1        11.07 INCHES        1954
         2         9.82 INCHES        1969
         3         9.05 INCHES        2014
         4         8.51 INCHES        2008
         5         8.12 INCHES        1993
         6         7.61 INCHES        1990
         7         7.52 INCHES        2015
         8         7.46 INCHES        1967
         9         7.43 INCHES        1953
        10         7.06 INCHES        1968

RAINFALL RECORDS FOR AUSTIN MINNESOTA DATE BACK TO 1938.

$$

BOYNE



000
NOUS43 KARX 012305
PNSARX
IAZ008>011-018-019-029-030-MNZ079-086>088-094>096-WIZ017-029-032>034-041>044-
053>055-061-241200-

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE LA CROSSE WI
605 PM CDT WED JUL 1 2015

...SEVENTH WETTEST JUNE IN AUSTIN MN...

DURING JUNE OF 2015...THE COOPERATIVE OBSERVER IN AUSTIN MINNESOTA
REPORTED 7.52 INCHES OF RAIN.  THIS MADE IT THEIR SEVENTH WETTEST
JUNE IN AUSTIN. NORMALLY...AUSTIN RECEIVES 4.55 INCHES IN A JUNE.

THE TABLE BELOW LISTS THE TEN WETTEST JUNES IN AUSTIN MN.

                  PRECIPITATION
       RANK           TOTAL           YEAR
       ----       -------------       ----
         1        11.07 INCHES        1954
         2         9.82 INCHES        1969
         3         9.05 INCHES        2014
         4         8.51 INCHES        2008
         5         8.12 INCHES        1993
         6         7.61 INCHES        1990
         7         7.52 INCHES        2015
         8         7.46 INCHES        1967
         9         7.43 INCHES        1953
        10         7.06 INCHES        1968

RAINFALL RECORDS FOR AUSTIN MINNESOTA DATE BACK TO 1938.

$$

BOYNE


000
NOUS43 KARX 012305
PNSARX
IAZ008>011-018-019-029-030-MNZ079-086>088-094>096-WIZ017-029-032>034-041>044-
053>055-061-241200-

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE LA CROSSE WI
605 PM CDT WED JUL 1 2015

...SEVENTH WETTEST JUNE IN AUSTIN MN...

DURING JUNE OF 2015...THE COOPERATIVE OBSERVER IN AUSTIN MINNESOTA
REPORTED 7.52 INCHES OF RAIN.  THIS MADE IT THEIR SEVENTH WETTEST
JUNE IN AUSTIN. NORMALLY...AUSTIN RECEIVES 4.55 INCHES IN A JUNE.

THE TABLE BELOW LISTS THE TEN WETTEST JUNES IN AUSTIN MN.

                  PRECIPITATION
       RANK           TOTAL           YEAR
       ----       -------------       ----
         1        11.07 INCHES        1954
         2         9.82 INCHES        1969
         3         9.05 INCHES        2014
         4         8.51 INCHES        2008
         5         8.12 INCHES        1993
         6         7.61 INCHES        1990
         7         7.52 INCHES        2015
         8         7.46 INCHES        1967
         9         7.43 INCHES        1953
        10         7.06 INCHES        1968

RAINFALL RECORDS FOR AUSTIN MINNESOTA DATE BACK TO 1938.

$$

BOYNE


000
NOUS43 KARX 012305
PNSARX
IAZ008>011-018-019-029-030-MNZ079-086>088-094>096-WIZ017-029-032>034-041>044-
053>055-061-241200-

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE LA CROSSE WI
605 PM CDT WED JUL 1 2015

...SEVENTH WETTEST JUNE IN AUSTIN MN...

DURING JUNE OF 2015...THE COOPERATIVE OBSERVER IN AUSTIN MINNESOTA
REPORTED 7.52 INCHES OF RAIN.  THIS MADE IT THEIR SEVENTH WETTEST
JUNE IN AUSTIN. NORMALLY...AUSTIN RECEIVES 4.55 INCHES IN A JUNE.

THE TABLE BELOW LISTS THE TEN WETTEST JUNES IN AUSTIN MN.

                  PRECIPITATION
       RANK           TOTAL           YEAR
       ----       -------------       ----
         1        11.07 INCHES        1954
         2         9.82 INCHES        1969
         3         9.05 INCHES        2014
         4         8.51 INCHES        2008
         5         8.12 INCHES        1993
         6         7.61 INCHES        1990
         7         7.52 INCHES        2015
         8         7.46 INCHES        1967
         9         7.43 INCHES        1953
        10         7.06 INCHES        1968

RAINFALL RECORDS FOR AUSTIN MINNESOTA DATE BACK TO 1938.

$$

BOYNE



000
NOUS45 KPUB 012259
PNSPUB

COZ070-085-086-012359

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE PUEBLO CO
459 PM MDT WED JUL 1 2015

PUEBLO              HIGH TODAY................. 98
                    LOW THIS MORNING........... 67
                    PCPN PAST 24 HRS........... 0

COLORADO SPRGS      HIGH TODAY................. 87
                    LOW THIS MORNING........... 62
                    PCPN PAST 24 HRS........... T

ALAMOSA             HIGH TODAY................. 87
                    LOW THIS MORNING........... 57
                    PCPN PAST 24 HRS........... 0


$$



000
NOUS45 KPUB 012259
PNSPUB

COZ070-085-086-012359

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE PUEBLO CO
459 PM MDT WED JUL 1 2015

PUEBLO              HIGH TODAY................. 98
                    LOW THIS MORNING........... 67
                    PCPN PAST 24 HRS........... 0

COLORADO SPRGS      HIGH TODAY................. 87
                    LOW THIS MORNING........... 62
                    PCPN PAST 24 HRS........... T

ALAMOSA             HIGH TODAY................. 87
                    LOW THIS MORNING........... 57
                    PCPN PAST 24 HRS........... 0


$$



000
NOUS45 KPUB 012259
PNSPUB

COZ070-085-086-012359

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE PUEBLO CO
459 PM MDT WED JUL 1 2015

PUEBLO              HIGH TODAY................. 98
                    LOW THIS MORNING........... 67
                    PCPN PAST 24 HRS........... 0

COLORADO SPRGS      HIGH TODAY................. 87
                    LOW THIS MORNING........... 62
                    PCPN PAST 24 HRS........... T

ALAMOSA             HIGH TODAY................. 87
                    LOW THIS MORNING........... 57
                    PCPN PAST 24 HRS........... 0


$$



000
NOUS45 KPUB 012259
PNSPUB

COZ070-085-086-012359

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE PUEBLO CO
459 PM MDT WED JUL 1 2015

PUEBLO              HIGH TODAY................. 98
                    LOW THIS MORNING........... 67
                    PCPN PAST 24 HRS........... 0

COLORADO SPRGS      HIGH TODAY................. 87
                    LOW THIS MORNING........... 62
                    PCPN PAST 24 HRS........... T

ALAMOSA             HIGH TODAY................. 87
                    LOW THIS MORNING........... 57
                    PCPN PAST 24 HRS........... 0


$$



000
NOUS45 KPUB 012259
PNSPUB

COZ070-085-086-012359

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE PUEBLO CO
459 PM MDT WED JUL 1 2015

PUEBLO              HIGH TODAY................. 98
                    LOW THIS MORNING........... 67
                    PCPN PAST 24 HRS........... 0

COLORADO SPRGS      HIGH TODAY................. 87
                    LOW THIS MORNING........... 62
                    PCPN PAST 24 HRS........... T

ALAMOSA             HIGH TODAY................. 87
                    LOW THIS MORNING........... 57
                    PCPN PAST 24 HRS........... 0


$$



000
NOUS45 KTWC 012214
PNSTWC

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE TUCSON AZ
310 PM MST WED JUL 1 2015

ONE HOUR RAINFALL REPORTS FROM THIS AFTERNOON

...SANTA CRUZ COUNTY...
3 SW RIO RICO         2.20   303 PM  7/01  TRAINED SPOTTER
4 NE PENA BLANCA LAK  1.76   302 PM  7/01  TRAINED SPOTTER


OBSERVATIONS ARE COLLECTED FROM A VARIETY OF SOURCES WITH VARYING
EQUIPMENT AND EXPOSURE. NOT ALL DATA LISTED ARE CONSIDERED OFFICIAL.

$$

NWS TUCSON AZ



000
NOUS45 KTWC 012214
PNSTWC

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE TUCSON AZ
310 PM MST WED JUL 1 2015

ONE HOUR RAINFALL REPORTS FROM THIS AFTERNOON

...SANTA CRUZ COUNTY...
3 SW RIO RICO         2.20   303 PM  7/01  TRAINED SPOTTER
4 NE PENA BLANCA LAK  1.76   302 PM  7/01  TRAINED SPOTTER


OBSERVATIONS ARE COLLECTED FROM A VARIETY OF SOURCES WITH VARYING
EQUIPMENT AND EXPOSURE. NOT ALL DATA LISTED ARE CONSIDERED OFFICIAL.

$$

NWS TUCSON AZ



000
NOUS45 KTWC 012214
PNSTWC

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE TUCSON AZ
310 PM MST WED JUL 1 2015

ONE HOUR RAINFALL REPORTS FROM THIS AFTERNOON

...SANTA CRUZ COUNTY...
3 SW RIO RICO         2.20   303 PM  7/01  TRAINED SPOTTER
4 NE PENA BLANCA LAK  1.76   302 PM  7/01  TRAINED SPOTTER


OBSERVATIONS ARE COLLECTED FROM A VARIETY OF SOURCES WITH VARYING
EQUIPMENT AND EXPOSURE. NOT ALL DATA LISTED ARE CONSIDERED OFFICIAL.

$$

NWS TUCSON AZ


000
NOUS45 KTWC 012214
PNSTWC

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE TUCSON AZ
310 PM MST WED JUL 1 2015

ONE HOUR RAINFALL REPORTS FROM THIS AFTERNOON

...SANTA CRUZ COUNTY...
3 SW RIO RICO         2.20   303 PM  7/01  TRAINED SPOTTER
4 NE PENA BLANCA LAK  1.76   302 PM  7/01  TRAINED SPOTTER


OBSERVATIONS ARE COLLECTED FROM A VARIETY OF SOURCES WITH VARYING
EQUIPMENT AND EXPOSURE. NOT ALL DATA LISTED ARE CONSIDERED OFFICIAL.

$$

NWS TUCSON AZ


000
NOUS43 KLBF 012045
PNSLBF
NEZ004>010-022>029-035>038-056>059-069>071-094-032399-

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE NORTH PLATTE NE
345 PM CDT WED JUL 1 2015

...JUNE TEMPERATURES WERE ABOVE NORMAL FOR NORTH PLATTE AND
VALENTINE...WHILE PRECIPITATION WAS BELOW NORMAL FOR BOTH NORTH
PLATTE AND VALENTINE...

ADEQUATE MOISTURE CONTINUED INTO JUNE ACROSS WESTERN AND NORTH
CENTRAL NEBRASKA AS THE ACTIVE PATTERN FROM MAY...CARRIED OVER INTO
JUNE. A PERSISTENT TROUGH OF LOW PRESSURE CONTINUED THROUGH THE
FIRST TWO TO THREE WEEKS OF JUNE ACROSS THE WESTERN HALF OF THE COUNTRY.
THIS PATTERN BROUGHT EPISODES OF RAINFALL TO WESTERN AND NORTH
CENTRAL NEBRASKA. DURING THE LAST 10 DAYS OF JUNE...A RIDGE OF HIGH
PRESSURE REPLACED THE TROUGH ACROSS THE WESTERN PART OF THE
COUNTRY...WHICH LED TO WARMER AND MUCH DRIER CONDITIONS.

FOR NORTH PLATTE...THE AVERAGE DAILY MEAN TEMPERATURE FOR
JUNE WAS 70.6 DEGREES WHICH WAS 2.7 DEGREES ABOVE THE NORMAL
OF 67.9 DEGREES. THE AVERAGE DAILY HIGH TEMPERATURE FOR JUNE
WAS 83.1 DEGREES...WHICH WAS 1.3 DEGREES ABOVE THE NORMAL OF 81.8
DEGREES. THE AVERAGE DAILY LOW TEMPERATURE WAS 58.0
DEGREES...WHICH WAS 4.0 DEGREES ABOVE THE NORMAL OF 54.0 DEGREES.
NO DAILY TEMPERATURE RECORDS WERE SET FOR JUNE 2015 IN NORTH PLATTE.

FOR VALENTINE...THE AVERAGE DAILY MEAN TEMPERATURE FOR THE MONTH
OF JUNE WAS 69.1 DEGREES...AND WAS 1.6 DEGREES ABOVE THE
NORMAL OF 67.5 DEGREES. THE AVERAGE DAILY HIGH TEMPERATURE FOR
THE MONTH WAS 81.1 DEGREES...WHICH WAS AT THE NORMAL
OF 81.1 DEGREES. THE AVERAGE DAILY LOW TEMPERATURE WAS 57.0
DEGREES...WHICH WAS 3.0 DEGREES ABOVE THE NORMAL OF 54.0 DEGREES. NO
DAILY TEMPERATURE RECORDS WERE SET DURING JUNE 2015 FOR VALENTINE.

AT LEE BIRD FIELD IN NORTH PLATTE...PRECIPITATION FOR JUNE
WAS 2.73 INCHES...AND WAS 0.69 INCHES BELOW THE NORMAL OF 3.42
INCHES. NO DAILY PRECIPITATION RECORDS WERE SET DURING THE MONTH
FOR NORTH PLATTE.

AT MILLER FIELD IN VALENTINE...PRECIPITATION FOR JUNE TOTALED
3.42 INCHES...WHICH WAS 0.14 INCHES BELOW THE NORMAL OF 3.56
INCHES. NO DAILY PRECIPITATION RECORDS WERE SET DURING THE MONTH FOR
VALENTINE.

           NORTH PLATTE SUMMARY           VALENTINE SUMMARY

         | JUN 15 | NORM |  DIFF |    | JUN 15 | NORM |  DIFF |
AVG TEMP |  70.6  | 67.9 |  +2.7 |    |  69.1  | 67.5 |  +1.6 |
AVG HIGH |  83.1  | 81.8 |  +1.3 |    |  81.1  | 81.1 |   0.0 |
AVG LOW  |  58.0  | 54.0 |  +4.0 |    |  57.0  | 54.0 |  +3.0 |
PRECIP   |  2.73  | 3.42 | -0.69 |    |  3.42  | 3.56 | -0.14 |


...NORTH PLATTE AND VALENTINE PRECIPITATION TOTALS FOR THE PAST 12
MONTHS...

                        PRECIPITATION             DEPARTURE

                        LBF       VTN           LBF       VTN

MONTH

JULY 2014               0.14      0.58         -2.93     -2.63
AUGUST 2014             5.10      2.62         +2.81     +0.44
SEPTEMBER 2014          1.39      0.74         -0.02     -0.90
OCTOBER 2014            0.73      0.56         -0.82     -0.69
NOVEMBER 2014           0.08      0.55         -0.56     -0.10
DECEMBER 2014           1.04      0.90         +0.63     +0.53

JANUARY 2015            0.28      0.31         -0.06     +0.05
FEBRUARY 2015           0.46      0.31         -0.04     -0.17
MARCH 2015              0.01      0.03         -1.04     -1.04
APRIL 2015              3.01      1.62         +0.74     -0.60
MAY 2015                4.34      7.12         +1.06     +3.99
JUNE 2015               2.73      3.42         -0.69     -0.14

TOTALS                 19.31     18.76         -0.92     -1.26

$$

BUTTLER





000
NOUS43 KLBF 012045
PNSLBF
NEZ004>010-022>029-035>038-056>059-069>071-094-032399-

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE NORTH PLATTE NE
345 PM CDT WED JUL 1 2015

...JUNE TEMPERATURES WERE ABOVE NORMAL FOR NORTH PLATTE AND
VALENTINE...WHILE PRECIPITATION WAS BELOW NORMAL FOR BOTH NORTH
PLATTE AND VALENTINE...

ADEQUATE MOISTURE CONTINUED INTO JUNE ACROSS WESTERN AND NORTH
CENTRAL NEBRASKA AS THE ACTIVE PATTERN FROM MAY...CARRIED OVER INTO
JUNE. A PERSISTENT TROUGH OF LOW PRESSURE CONTINUED THROUGH THE
FIRST TWO TO THREE WEEKS OF JUNE ACROSS THE WESTERN HALF OF THE COUNTRY.
THIS PATTERN BROUGHT EPISODES OF RAINFALL TO WESTERN AND NORTH
CENTRAL NEBRASKA. DURING THE LAST 10 DAYS OF JUNE...A RIDGE OF HIGH
PRESSURE REPLACED THE TROUGH ACROSS THE WESTERN PART OF THE
COUNTRY...WHICH LED TO WARMER AND MUCH DRIER CONDITIONS.

FOR NORTH PLATTE...THE AVERAGE DAILY MEAN TEMPERATURE FOR
JUNE WAS 70.6 DEGREES WHICH WAS 2.7 DEGREES ABOVE THE NORMAL
OF 67.9 DEGREES. THE AVERAGE DAILY HIGH TEMPERATURE FOR JUNE
WAS 83.1 DEGREES...WHICH WAS 1.3 DEGREES ABOVE THE NORMAL OF 81.8
DEGREES. THE AVERAGE DAILY LOW TEMPERATURE WAS 58.0
DEGREES...WHICH WAS 4.0 DEGREES ABOVE THE NORMAL OF 54.0 DEGREES.
NO DAILY TEMPERATURE RECORDS WERE SET FOR JUNE 2015 IN NORTH PLATTE.

FOR VALENTINE...THE AVERAGE DAILY MEAN TEMPERATURE FOR THE MONTH
OF JUNE WAS 69.1 DEGREES...AND WAS 1.6 DEGREES ABOVE THE
NORMAL OF 67.5 DEGREES. THE AVERAGE DAILY HIGH TEMPERATURE FOR
THE MONTH WAS 81.1 DEGREES...WHICH WAS AT THE NORMAL
OF 81.1 DEGREES. THE AVERAGE DAILY LOW TEMPERATURE WAS 57.0
DEGREES...WHICH WAS 3.0 DEGREES ABOVE THE NORMAL OF 54.0 DEGREES. NO
DAILY TEMPERATURE RECORDS WERE SET DURING JUNE 2015 FOR VALENTINE.

AT LEE BIRD FIELD IN NORTH PLATTE...PRECIPITATION FOR JUNE
WAS 2.73 INCHES...AND WAS 0.69 INCHES BELOW THE NORMAL OF 3.42
INCHES. NO DAILY PRECIPITATION RECORDS WERE SET DURING THE MONTH
FOR NORTH PLATTE.

AT MILLER FIELD IN VALENTINE...PRECIPITATION FOR JUNE TOTALED
3.42 INCHES...WHICH WAS 0.14 INCHES BELOW THE NORMAL OF 3.56
INCHES. NO DAILY PRECIPITATION RECORDS WERE SET DURING THE MONTH FOR
VALENTINE.

           NORTH PLATTE SUMMARY           VALENTINE SUMMARY

         | JUN 15 | NORM |  DIFF |    | JUN 15 | NORM |  DIFF |
AVG TEMP |  70.6  | 67.9 |  +2.7 |    |  69.1  | 67.5 |  +1.6 |
AVG HIGH |  83.1  | 81.8 |  +1.3 |    |  81.1  | 81.1 |   0.0 |
AVG LOW  |  58.0  | 54.0 |  +4.0 |    |  57.0  | 54.0 |  +3.0 |
PRECIP   |  2.73  | 3.42 | -0.69 |    |  3.42  | 3.56 | -0.14 |


...NORTH PLATTE AND VALENTINE PRECIPITATION TOTALS FOR THE PAST 12
MONTHS...

                        PRECIPITATION             DEPARTURE

                        LBF       VTN           LBF       VTN

MONTH

JULY 2014               0.14      0.58         -2.93     -2.63
AUGUST 2014             5.10      2.62         +2.81     +0.44
SEPTEMBER 2014          1.39      0.74         -0.02     -0.90
OCTOBER 2014            0.73      0.56         -0.82     -0.69
NOVEMBER 2014           0.08      0.55         -0.56     -0.10
DECEMBER 2014           1.04      0.90         +0.63     +0.53

JANUARY 2015            0.28      0.31         -0.06     +0.05
FEBRUARY 2015           0.46      0.31         -0.04     -0.17
MARCH 2015              0.01      0.03         -1.04     -1.04
APRIL 2015              3.01      1.62         +0.74     -0.60
MAY 2015                4.34      7.12         +1.06     +3.99
JUNE 2015               2.73      3.42         -0.69     -0.14

TOTALS                 19.31     18.76         -0.92     -1.26

$$

BUTTLER




000
NOUS45 KGJT 012016
PNSGJT

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
PRELIMINARY RECORD EVENT REPORT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE GRAND JUNCTION CO
216 PM MDT WED JULY 1 2015

...RECORD HIGH TEMPERATURES SET OR TIED YESTERDAY...

IN WESTERN COLORADO...

AT COLORADO NATIONAL MONUMENT, THE HIGH TEMPERATURE YESTERDAY WAS
102 DEGREES. THIS TIED THE RECORD HIGH FOR JUNE 30TH, LAST SET IN
2001.

AT CRESTED BUTTE, THE HIGH TEMPERATURE YESTERDAY WAS 87. THIS TIED
THE RECORD HIGH FOR JUNE 30TH, LAST SET IN 1963.

AT 6 MILES EAST-SOUTHEAST OF GRAND JUNCTION, THE HIGH TEMPERATURE
YESTERDAY WAS 102. THIS TIED THE RECORD HIGH FOR JUNE 30TH, LAST SET
IN 1990.

AT MASSADONA, THE HIGH TEMPERATURE YESTERDAY WAS 98. THIS SET A NEW
RECORD HIGH FOR JUNE 30TH, BREAKING THE PREVIOUS RECORD OF 96,
SET IN 2012.

AT OURAY, THE HIGH TEMPERATURE YESTERDAY WAS 89. THIS SET A NEW
RECORD HIGH FOR JUNE 30TH IN THE OURAY AREA, BREAKING THE PREVIOUS
RECORD OF 88, SET IN 1960.

AT 2 MILES NORTH OF PARADOX, THE HIGH TEMPERATURE YESTERDAY WAS 103.
THIS TIED THE RECORD HIGH FOR JUNE 30TH, LAST SET IN 2002.

AT RIDGWAY, THE HIGH TEMPERATURE YESTERDAY WAS 95. THIS SET A NEW
RECORD HIGH FOR JUNE 30TH, BREAKING THE PREVIOUS RECORD OF 92, SET
IN 2007.


IN EASTERN UTAH...

AT 1 MILE SOUTHEAST OF CASTLE VALLEY, THE HIGH TEMPERATURE YESTERDAY
WAS 104 DEGREES. THIS SET A NEW RECORD HIGH FOR JUNE 30TH IN THE
CASTLE VALLEY AREA, BREAKING THE PREVIOUS RECORD OF 103, SET IN 2002.

AT HOVENWEEP NATIONAL MONUMENT, THE HIGH TEMPERATURE YESTERDAY WAS
102. THIS TIED THE RECORD HIGH FOR JUNE 30TH, LAST SET IN 2014.

AT MONTICELLO, THE HIGH TEMPERATURE YESTERDAY WAS 93. THIS TIED THE
RECORD HIGH FOR JUNE 30TH IN THE MONTICELLO AREA, LAST SET IN 2001.

$$

MDA


000
NOUS45 KGJT 012016
PNSGJT

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
PRELIMINARY RECORD EVENT REPORT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE GRAND JUNCTION CO
216 PM MDT WED JULY 1 2015

...RECORD HIGH TEMPERATURES SET OR TIED YESTERDAY...

IN WESTERN COLORADO...

AT COLORADO NATIONAL MONUMENT, THE HIGH TEMPERATURE YESTERDAY WAS
102 DEGREES. THIS TIED THE RECORD HIGH FOR JUNE 30TH, LAST SET IN
2001.

AT CRESTED BUTTE, THE HIGH TEMPERATURE YESTERDAY WAS 87. THIS TIED
THE RECORD HIGH FOR JUNE 30TH, LAST SET IN 1963.

AT 6 MILES EAST-SOUTHEAST OF GRAND JUNCTION, THE HIGH TEMPERATURE
YESTERDAY WAS 102. THIS TIED THE RECORD HIGH FOR JUNE 30TH, LAST SET
IN 1990.

AT MASSADONA, THE HIGH TEMPERATURE YESTERDAY WAS 98. THIS SET A NEW
RECORD HIGH FOR JUNE 30TH, BREAKING THE PREVIOUS RECORD OF 96,
SET IN 2012.

AT OURAY, THE HIGH TEMPERATURE YESTERDAY WAS 89. THIS SET A NEW
RECORD HIGH FOR JUNE 30TH IN THE OURAY AREA, BREAKING THE PREVIOUS
RECORD OF 88, SET IN 1960.

AT 2 MILES NORTH OF PARADOX, THE HIGH TEMPERATURE YESTERDAY WAS 103.
THIS TIED THE RECORD HIGH FOR JUNE 30TH, LAST SET IN 2002.

AT RIDGWAY, THE HIGH TEMPERATURE YESTERDAY WAS 95. THIS SET A NEW
RECORD HIGH FOR JUNE 30TH, BREAKING THE PREVIOUS RECORD OF 92, SET
IN 2007.


IN EASTERN UTAH...

AT 1 MILE SOUTHEAST OF CASTLE VALLEY, THE HIGH TEMPERATURE YESTERDAY
WAS 104 DEGREES. THIS SET A NEW RECORD HIGH FOR JUNE 30TH IN THE
CASTLE VALLEY AREA, BREAKING THE PREVIOUS RECORD OF 103, SET IN 2002.

AT HOVENWEEP NATIONAL MONUMENT, THE HIGH TEMPERATURE YESTERDAY WAS
102. THIS TIED THE RECORD HIGH FOR JUNE 30TH, LAST SET IN 2014.

AT MONTICELLO, THE HIGH TEMPERATURE YESTERDAY WAS 93. THIS TIED THE
RECORD HIGH FOR JUNE 30TH IN THE MONTICELLO AREA, LAST SET IN 2001.

$$

MDA


000
NOUS45 KGJT 012016
PNSGJT

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
PRELIMINARY RECORD EVENT REPORT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE GRAND JUNCTION CO
216 PM MDT WED JULY 1 2015

...RECORD HIGH TEMPERATURES SET OR TIED YESTERDAY...

IN WESTERN COLORADO...

AT COLORADO NATIONAL MONUMENT, THE HIGH TEMPERATURE YESTERDAY WAS
102 DEGREES. THIS TIED THE RECORD HIGH FOR JUNE 30TH, LAST SET IN
2001.

AT CRESTED BUTTE, THE HIGH TEMPERATURE YESTERDAY WAS 87. THIS TIED
THE RECORD HIGH FOR JUNE 30TH, LAST SET IN 1963.

AT 6 MILES EAST-SOUTHEAST OF GRAND JUNCTION, THE HIGH TEMPERATURE
YESTERDAY WAS 102. THIS TIED THE RECORD HIGH FOR JUNE 30TH, LAST SET
IN 1990.

AT MASSADONA, THE HIGH TEMPERATURE YESTERDAY WAS 98. THIS SET A NEW
RECORD HIGH FOR JUNE 30TH, BREAKING THE PREVIOUS RECORD OF 96,
SET IN 2012.

AT OURAY, THE HIGH TEMPERATURE YESTERDAY WAS 89. THIS SET A NEW
RECORD HIGH FOR JUNE 30TH IN THE OURAY AREA, BREAKING THE PREVIOUS
RECORD OF 88, SET IN 1960.

AT 2 MILES NORTH OF PARADOX, THE HIGH TEMPERATURE YESTERDAY WAS 103.
THIS TIED THE RECORD HIGH FOR JUNE 30TH, LAST SET IN 2002.

AT RIDGWAY, THE HIGH TEMPERATURE YESTERDAY WAS 95. THIS SET A NEW
RECORD HIGH FOR JUNE 30TH, BREAKING THE PREVIOUS RECORD OF 92, SET
IN 2007.


IN EASTERN UTAH...

AT 1 MILE SOUTHEAST OF CASTLE VALLEY, THE HIGH TEMPERATURE YESTERDAY
WAS 104 DEGREES. THIS SET A NEW RECORD HIGH FOR JUNE 30TH IN THE
CASTLE VALLEY AREA, BREAKING THE PREVIOUS RECORD OF 103, SET IN 2002.

AT HOVENWEEP NATIONAL MONUMENT, THE HIGH TEMPERATURE YESTERDAY WAS
102. THIS TIED THE RECORD HIGH FOR JUNE 30TH, LAST SET IN 2014.

AT MONTICELLO, THE HIGH TEMPERATURE YESTERDAY WAS 93. THIS TIED THE
RECORD HIGH FOR JUNE 30TH IN THE MONTICELLO AREA, LAST SET IN 2001.

$$

MDA



000
NOUS45 KGJT 011916
PNSGJT
COZ001>014-017>023-UTZ022>025-027>029-031930-

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE GRAND JUNCTION CO
116 PM MDT WED JUL 1 2015


...HIGHER THAN NORMAL RIVER FLOWS FOR THE FOURTH OF JULY WEEKEND WILL
KEEP RIVERS RUNNING STRONG AND PRESENT HAZARDS NEAR WATERWAYS
ACROSS WESTERN COLORADO AND EASTERN UTAH...

MANY RIVERS AND CREEKS ACROSS WESTERN COLORADO AND EASTERN UTAH
WILL CONTINUE TO FLOW HIGHER THAN NORMAL FOR THIS TIME OF YEAR.

RIVER RAFTERS AND KAYAKERS SHOULD USE CAUTION ON RIVERS WITH THE
HIGHER THAN NORMAL FLOWS...STRONG CURRENTS...AND COLD WATER
TEMPERATURES. NOVICES SHOULD RIDE WITH EXPERIENCED GUIDES OR
COMMERCIAL OUTFITTERS. EVEN EXPERIENCED BOATERS SHOULD BE AWARE OF
THE HAZARDS A RIVER PRESENTS AT DIFFERING LEVELS AND RATES OF
FLOW.

REMEMBER AT HIGHER FLOWS...RIVER BANKS CAN BECOME SATURATED AND
UNSTABLE. CAUTION IS URGED AS THESE BANKS CAN ERODE OR COLLAPSE
UNEXPECTEDLY. EXPECT EXTRA DEBRIS TO BE SWEPT DOWNSTREAM. DO NOT
LET CHILDREN PLAY NEAR HIGH FLOWING RIVERS...CREEKS AND CANALS.

THE NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE IN GRAND JUNCTION IS URGING EVERYONE
IN WESTERN COLORADO AND EASTERN UTAH TO STAY SAFE AND USE EXTRA CAUTION
AROUND RIVERS...STREAMS...AND CREEKS DURING THIS HOLIDAY WEEKEND.

$$

AS


000
NOUS45 KGJT 011916
PNSGJT
COZ001>014-017>023-UTZ022>025-027>029-031930-

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE GRAND JUNCTION CO
116 PM MDT WED JUL 1 2015


...HIGHER THAN NORMAL RIVER FLOWS FOR THE FOURTH OF JULY WEEKEND WILL
KEEP RIVERS RUNNING STRONG AND PRESENT HAZARDS NEAR WATERWAYS
ACROSS WESTERN COLORADO AND EASTERN UTAH...

MANY RIVERS AND CREEKS ACROSS WESTERN COLORADO AND EASTERN UTAH
WILL CONTINUE TO FLOW HIGHER THAN NORMAL FOR THIS TIME OF YEAR.

RIVER RAFTERS AND KAYAKERS SHOULD USE CAUTION ON RIVERS WITH THE
HIGHER THAN NORMAL FLOWS...STRONG CURRENTS...AND COLD WATER
TEMPERATURES. NOVICES SHOULD RIDE WITH EXPERIENCED GUIDES OR
COMMERCIAL OUTFITTERS. EVEN EXPERIENCED BOATERS SHOULD BE AWARE OF
THE HAZARDS A RIVER PRESENTS AT DIFFERING LEVELS AND RATES OF
FLOW.

REMEMBER AT HIGHER FLOWS...RIVER BANKS CAN BECOME SATURATED AND
UNSTABLE. CAUTION IS URGED AS THESE BANKS CAN ERODE OR COLLAPSE
UNEXPECTEDLY. EXPECT EXTRA DEBRIS TO BE SWEPT DOWNSTREAM. DO NOT
LET CHILDREN PLAY NEAR HIGH FLOWING RIVERS...CREEKS AND CANALS.

THE NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE IN GRAND JUNCTION IS URGING EVERYONE
IN WESTERN COLORADO AND EASTERN UTAH TO STAY SAFE AND USE EXTRA CAUTION
AROUND RIVERS...STREAMS...AND CREEKS DURING THIS HOLIDAY WEEKEND.

$$

AS


000
NOUS45 KGJT 011916
PNSGJT
COZ001>014-017>023-UTZ022>025-027>029-031930-

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE GRAND JUNCTION CO
116 PM MDT WED JUL 1 2015


...HIGHER THAN NORMAL RIVER FLOWS FOR THE FOURTH OF JULY WEEKEND WILL
KEEP RIVERS RUNNING STRONG AND PRESENT HAZARDS NEAR WATERWAYS
ACROSS WESTERN COLORADO AND EASTERN UTAH...

MANY RIVERS AND CREEKS ACROSS WESTERN COLORADO AND EASTERN UTAH
WILL CONTINUE TO FLOW HIGHER THAN NORMAL FOR THIS TIME OF YEAR.

RIVER RAFTERS AND KAYAKERS SHOULD USE CAUTION ON RIVERS WITH THE
HIGHER THAN NORMAL FLOWS...STRONG CURRENTS...AND COLD WATER
TEMPERATURES. NOVICES SHOULD RIDE WITH EXPERIENCED GUIDES OR
COMMERCIAL OUTFITTERS. EVEN EXPERIENCED BOATERS SHOULD BE AWARE OF
THE HAZARDS A RIVER PRESENTS AT DIFFERING LEVELS AND RATES OF
FLOW.

REMEMBER AT HIGHER FLOWS...RIVER BANKS CAN BECOME SATURATED AND
UNSTABLE. CAUTION IS URGED AS THESE BANKS CAN ERODE OR COLLAPSE
UNEXPECTEDLY. EXPECT EXTRA DEBRIS TO BE SWEPT DOWNSTREAM. DO NOT
LET CHILDREN PLAY NEAR HIGH FLOWING RIVERS...CREEKS AND CANALS.

THE NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE IN GRAND JUNCTION IS URGING EVERYONE
IN WESTERN COLORADO AND EASTERN UTAH TO STAY SAFE AND USE EXTRA CAUTION
AROUND RIVERS...STREAMS...AND CREEKS DURING THIS HOLIDAY WEEKEND.

$$

AS


000
NOUS45 KGJT 011916
PNSGJT
COZ001>014-017>023-UTZ022>025-027>029-031930-

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE GRAND JUNCTION CO
116 PM MDT WED JUL 1 2015


...HIGHER THAN NORMAL RIVER FLOWS FOR THE FOURTH OF JULY WEEKEND WILL
KEEP RIVERS RUNNING STRONG AND PRESENT HAZARDS NEAR WATERWAYS
ACROSS WESTERN COLORADO AND EASTERN UTAH...

MANY RIVERS AND CREEKS ACROSS WESTERN COLORADO AND EASTERN UTAH
WILL CONTINUE TO FLOW HIGHER THAN NORMAL FOR THIS TIME OF YEAR.

RIVER RAFTERS AND KAYAKERS SHOULD USE CAUTION ON RIVERS WITH THE
HIGHER THAN NORMAL FLOWS...STRONG CURRENTS...AND COLD WATER
TEMPERATURES. NOVICES SHOULD RIDE WITH EXPERIENCED GUIDES OR
COMMERCIAL OUTFITTERS. EVEN EXPERIENCED BOATERS SHOULD BE AWARE OF
THE HAZARDS A RIVER PRESENTS AT DIFFERING LEVELS AND RATES OF
FLOW.

REMEMBER AT HIGHER FLOWS...RIVER BANKS CAN BECOME SATURATED AND
UNSTABLE. CAUTION IS URGED AS THESE BANKS CAN ERODE OR COLLAPSE
UNEXPECTEDLY. EXPECT EXTRA DEBRIS TO BE SWEPT DOWNSTREAM. DO NOT
LET CHILDREN PLAY NEAR HIGH FLOWING RIVERS...CREEKS AND CANALS.

THE NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE IN GRAND JUNCTION IS URGING EVERYONE
IN WESTERN COLORADO AND EASTERN UTAH TO STAY SAFE AND USE EXTRA CAUTION
AROUND RIVERS...STREAMS...AND CREEKS DURING THIS HOLIDAY WEEKEND.

$$

AS


000
NOUS42 KJAX 011808
PNSJAX

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE JACKSONVILLE FL
210 PM EDT WED JUL 1 2015

       ...JUNE 2015 CLIMATE SUMMARY FOR JACKSONVILLE...

                    ....WARMER THAN NORMAL JUNE...

AT JACKSONVILLE INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT...

TEMPERATURES...THE AVERAGE TEMPERATURE FOR JUNE WAS 80.7 DEGREES
WHICH WAS 0.8 DEGREES ABOVE NORMAL. THE AVERAGE DAILY HIGH WAS 91.3
DEGREES AND THE AVERAGE DAILY LOW WAS 70.1 DEGREES. THE MAXIMUM
TEMPERATURE FOR THE MONTH WAS 98 DEGREES ON THE 19TH AND THE MINIMUM
FOR THE MONTH WAS 64 DEGREES ON THE 2ND. NO RECORDS WERE SET THIS
MONTH AT JACKSONVILLE.

RAINFALL...THERE WERE 14 DAYS OF MEASURABLE RAINFALL IN JUNE AT
JACKSONVILLE INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT. MONTHLY RAINFALL TOTALED 6.32
INCHES...0.13 INCHES BELOW NORMAL. THE GREATEST 24 HOUR TOTAL WAS
1.86 INCHES BETWEEN THE 22ND AND 23RD. NO PRECIPITATION RECORDS WERE
SET IN THE MONTH OF JUNE.

WIND...THE AVERAGE WIND SPEED FOR JUNE WAS 5.7 MILES PER HOUR. THE
PEAK WIND GUST FOR THE MONTH WAS 66 MILES PER HOUR FROM THE SOUTH ON
THE 22ND.

FOR ENERGY CONSUMPTION PURPOSES...THERE WERE 0 HEATING DEGREE
DAYS...WHICH IS NORMAL. THERE WERE 479 COOLING DEGREE DAYS...WHICH
IS 30 ABOVE NORMAL.

JULY OUTLOOK...THE TEMPERATURE OUTLOOK IS FOR A GREATER CHANCE OF
ABOVE NORMAL TEMPERATURES. THE PRECIPITATION OUTLOOK SHOWS GREATER
CHANCES TO SEE ABOVE BELOW PRECIPITATION IN JULY. THE NORMAL MONTHLY
AVERAGE TEMPERATURE IS 82.3 DEGREES. THE AVERAGE MAX TEMPERATURE IS
92.0 DEGREES AND THE AVERAGE MIN TEMPERATURE IS 72.6 DEGREES.
AVERAGE JULY RAINFALL IS 6.55 INCHES.

&&

ADDITIONAL RAINFALL REPORTS FROM AROUND THE AREA...

JACKSONVILLE VICINITY...              NORTHEAST FLORIDA...

JACKSONVILLE BEACH.....  5.25          FERNANDINA BEACH.....  5.48
JACKSONVILLE NAS.......  5.35          GAINESVILLE.........   3.61
MAYPORT NS.............  3.51          GLEN ST MARY.........  2.71
BIG TALBOT ISLAND......  5.80          FEDERAL POINT........  7.09
LITTLE TALBOT ISLAND...  4.22          ST. AUGUSTINE LITEHS.  5.06
CRAIG FIELD............  3.31          ST. AUGUSTINE ARPT...
SOUTH PONTE VEDRA......  3.01          HASTINGS 4NE.........  8.00
GUANA RIVER ST PARK....  3.62          BEAUCLERC..............5.92

JASPER...............    6.39
WHITEHOUSE OLF.........  XXXX          BELL 4NW.............  5.29


                                       ORANGE SPRINGS 2SSW..  M
                                       PALM COAST NE........  4.84
                                       OCALA................  5.77
                                       STARKE...............  3.49
                                       CRESCENT CITY........  5.31
                                       PALM COAST 6NE.......  3.51
                                       WHITE SPRINGS 7N.....  6.34

                                       BUNNELL..............  5.34
                                       FLAGLER BEACH........  3.11
                                       MARINELAND...........  3.01
                                       LAKE CITY 2E.........  4.76
SOUTHEAST GEORGIA...

BAXLEY 5NNW............  5.42          WOODBINE.............  4.68
BRUNSWICK..............  4.77          ST SIMONS ISLAND.....  4.02
HOMERVILLE 5N..........  4.40          ALMA.................  5.41
PRIDGEN................  7.83          PATTERSON............  4.37
MANOR..................  7.26          HAZLEHURST...........  4.18
NAHUNTA 6NE............  5.90          FARGO 17NE............ 4.58

RAINFALL REPORTS ARE PRELIMINARY. CO-OP SITES REPORT A 24 HOUR TOTAL
NOT BASED ON A MIDNIGHT TO MIDNIGHT CALENDAR DAY.

***********

FOR ADDITIONAL RAINFALL REPORTS CHECK OUT COCORAHS...THE COMMUNITY
COLLABORATIVE RAIN...HAIL...AND SNOW NETWORK. THIS PUBLIC VOLUNTEER
RAIN GAUGE NETWORK IS OPEN TO ANYONE WILLING TO MEASURE AND REPORT
PRECIPITATION. GO TO THE COCORAHS WEBSITE FOR MORE INFORMATION AND
TO SIGN UP. HTTP://WWW.COCORAHS.ORG

$$


000
NOUS42 KJAX 011808
PNSJAX

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE JACKSONVILLE FL
210 PM EDT WED JUL 1 2015

       ...JUNE 2015 CLIMATE SUMMARY FOR JACKSONVILLE...

                    ....WARMER THAN NORMAL JUNE...

AT JACKSONVILLE INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT...

TEMPERATURES...THE AVERAGE TEMPERATURE FOR JUNE WAS 80.7 DEGREES
WHICH WAS 0.8 DEGREES ABOVE NORMAL. THE AVERAGE DAILY HIGH WAS 91.3
DEGREES AND THE AVERAGE DAILY LOW WAS 70.1 DEGREES. THE MAXIMUM
TEMPERATURE FOR THE MONTH WAS 98 DEGREES ON THE 19TH AND THE MINIMUM
FOR THE MONTH WAS 64 DEGREES ON THE 2ND. NO RECORDS WERE SET THIS
MONTH AT JACKSONVILLE.

RAINFALL...THERE WERE 14 DAYS OF MEASURABLE RAINFALL IN JUNE AT
JACKSONVILLE INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT. MONTHLY RAINFALL TOTALED 6.32
INCHES...0.13 INCHES BELOW NORMAL. THE GREATEST 24 HOUR TOTAL WAS
1.86 INCHES BETWEEN THE 22ND AND 23RD. NO PRECIPITATION RECORDS WERE
SET IN THE MONTH OF JUNE.

WIND...THE AVERAGE WIND SPEED FOR JUNE WAS 5.7 MILES PER HOUR. THE
PEAK WIND GUST FOR THE MONTH WAS 66 MILES PER HOUR FROM THE SOUTH ON
THE 22ND.

FOR ENERGY CONSUMPTION PURPOSES...THERE WERE 0 HEATING DEGREE
DAYS...WHICH IS NORMAL. THERE WERE 479 COOLING DEGREE DAYS...WHICH
IS 30 ABOVE NORMAL.

JULY OUTLOOK...THE TEMPERATURE OUTLOOK IS FOR A GREATER CHANCE OF
ABOVE NORMAL TEMPERATURES. THE PRECIPITATION OUTLOOK SHOWS GREATER
CHANCES TO SEE ABOVE BELOW PRECIPITATION IN JULY. THE NORMAL MONTHLY
AVERAGE TEMPERATURE IS 82.3 DEGREES. THE AVERAGE MAX TEMPERATURE IS
92.0 DEGREES AND THE AVERAGE MIN TEMPERATURE IS 72.6 DEGREES.
AVERAGE JULY RAINFALL IS 6.55 INCHES.

&&

ADDITIONAL RAINFALL REPORTS FROM AROUND THE AREA...

JACKSONVILLE VICINITY...              NORTHEAST FLORIDA...

JACKSONVILLE BEACH.....  5.25          FERNANDINA BEACH.....  5.48
JACKSONVILLE NAS.......  5.35          GAINESVILLE.........   3.61
MAYPORT NS.............  3.51          GLEN ST MARY.........  2.71
BIG TALBOT ISLAND......  5.80          FEDERAL POINT........  7.09
LITTLE TALBOT ISLAND...  4.22          ST. AUGUSTINE LITEHS.  5.06
CRAIG FIELD............  3.31          ST. AUGUSTINE ARPT...
SOUTH PONTE VEDRA......  3.01          HASTINGS 4NE.........  8.00
GUANA RIVER ST PARK....  3.62          BEAUCLERC..............5.92

JASPER...............    6.39
WHITEHOUSE OLF.........  XXXX          BELL 4NW.............  5.29


                                       ORANGE SPRINGS 2SSW..  M
                                       PALM COAST NE........  4.84
                                       OCALA................  5.77
                                       STARKE...............  3.49
                                       CRESCENT CITY........  5.31
                                       PALM COAST 6NE.......  3.51
                                       WHITE SPRINGS 7N.....  6.34

                                       BUNNELL..............  5.34
                                       FLAGLER BEACH........  3.11
                                       MARINELAND...........  3.01
                                       LAKE CITY 2E.........  4.76
SOUTHEAST GEORGIA...

BAXLEY 5NNW............  5.42          WOODBINE.............  4.68
BRUNSWICK..............  4.77          ST SIMONS ISLAND.....  4.02
HOMERVILLE 5N..........  4.40          ALMA.................  5.41
PRIDGEN................  7.83          PATTERSON............  4.37
MANOR..................  7.26          HAZLEHURST...........  4.18
NAHUNTA 6NE............  5.90          FARGO 17NE............ 4.58

RAINFALL REPORTS ARE PRELIMINARY. CO-OP SITES REPORT A 24 HOUR TOTAL
NOT BASED ON A MIDNIGHT TO MIDNIGHT CALENDAR DAY.

***********

FOR ADDITIONAL RAINFALL REPORTS CHECK OUT COCORAHS...THE COMMUNITY
COLLABORATIVE RAIN...HAIL...AND SNOW NETWORK. THIS PUBLIC VOLUNTEER
RAIN GAUGE NETWORK IS OPEN TO ANYONE WILLING TO MEASURE AND REPORT
PRECIPITATION. GO TO THE COCORAHS WEBSITE FOR MORE INFORMATION AND
TO SIGN UP. HTTP://WWW.COCORAHS.ORG

$$


000
NOUS42 KJAX 011808
PNSJAX

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE JACKSONVILLE FL
210 PM EDT WED JUL 1 2015

       ...JUNE 2015 CLIMATE SUMMARY FOR JACKSONVILLE...

                    ....WARMER THAN NORMAL JUNE...

AT JACKSONVILLE INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT...

TEMPERATURES...THE AVERAGE TEMPERATURE FOR JUNE WAS 80.7 DEGREES
WHICH WAS 0.8 DEGREES ABOVE NORMAL. THE AVERAGE DAILY HIGH WAS 91.3
DEGREES AND THE AVERAGE DAILY LOW WAS 70.1 DEGREES. THE MAXIMUM
TEMPERATURE FOR THE MONTH WAS 98 DEGREES ON THE 19TH AND THE MINIMUM
FOR THE MONTH WAS 64 DEGREES ON THE 2ND. NO RECORDS WERE SET THIS
MONTH AT JACKSONVILLE.

RAINFALL...THERE WERE 14 DAYS OF MEASURABLE RAINFALL IN JUNE AT
JACKSONVILLE INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT. MONTHLY RAINFALL TOTALED 6.32
INCHES...0.13 INCHES BELOW NORMAL. THE GREATEST 24 HOUR TOTAL WAS
1.86 INCHES BETWEEN THE 22ND AND 23RD. NO PRECIPITATION RECORDS WERE
SET IN THE MONTH OF JUNE.

WIND...THE AVERAGE WIND SPEED FOR JUNE WAS 5.7 MILES PER HOUR. THE
PEAK WIND GUST FOR THE MONTH WAS 66 MILES PER HOUR FROM THE SOUTH ON
THE 22ND.

FOR ENERGY CONSUMPTION PURPOSES...THERE WERE 0 HEATING DEGREE
DAYS...WHICH IS NORMAL. THERE WERE 479 COOLING DEGREE DAYS...WHICH
IS 30 ABOVE NORMAL.

JULY OUTLOOK...THE TEMPERATURE OUTLOOK IS FOR A GREATER CHANCE OF
ABOVE NORMAL TEMPERATURES. THE PRECIPITATION OUTLOOK SHOWS GREATER
CHANCES TO SEE ABOVE BELOW PRECIPITATION IN JULY. THE NORMAL MONTHLY
AVERAGE TEMPERATURE IS 82.3 DEGREES. THE AVERAGE MAX TEMPERATURE IS
92.0 DEGREES AND THE AVERAGE MIN TEMPERATURE IS 72.6 DEGREES.
AVERAGE JULY RAINFALL IS 6.55 INCHES.

&&

ADDITIONAL RAINFALL REPORTS FROM AROUND THE AREA...

JACKSONVILLE VICINITY...              NORTHEAST FLORIDA...

JACKSONVILLE BEACH.....  5.25          FERNANDINA BEACH.....  5.48
JACKSONVILLE NAS.......  5.35          GAINESVILLE.........   3.61
MAYPORT NS.............  3.51          GLEN ST MARY.........  2.71
BIG TALBOT ISLAND......  5.80          FEDERAL POINT........  7.09
LITTLE TALBOT ISLAND...  4.22          ST. AUGUSTINE LITEHS.  5.06
CRAIG FIELD............  3.31          ST. AUGUSTINE ARPT...
SOUTH PONTE VEDRA......  3.01          HASTINGS 4NE.........  8.00
GUANA RIVER ST PARK....  3.62          BEAUCLERC..............5.92

JASPER...............    6.39
WHITEHOUSE OLF.........  XXXX          BELL 4NW.............  5.29


                                       ORANGE SPRINGS 2SSW..  M
                                       PALM COAST NE........  4.84
                                       OCALA................  5.77
                                       STARKE...............  3.49
                                       CRESCENT CITY........  5.31
                                       PALM COAST 6NE.......  3.51
                                       WHITE SPRINGS 7N.....  6.34

                                       BUNNELL..............  5.34
                                       FLAGLER BEACH........  3.11
                                       MARINELAND...........  3.01
                                       LAKE CITY 2E.........  4.76
SOUTHEAST GEORGIA...

BAXLEY 5NNW............  5.42          WOODBINE.............  4.68
BRUNSWICK..............  4.77          ST SIMONS ISLAND.....  4.02
HOMERVILLE 5N..........  4.40          ALMA.................  5.41
PRIDGEN................  7.83          PATTERSON............  4.37
MANOR..................  7.26          HAZLEHURST...........  4.18
NAHUNTA 6NE............  5.90          FARGO 17NE............ 4.58

RAINFALL REPORTS ARE PRELIMINARY. CO-OP SITES REPORT A 24 HOUR TOTAL
NOT BASED ON A MIDNIGHT TO MIDNIGHT CALENDAR DAY.

***********

FOR ADDITIONAL RAINFALL REPORTS CHECK OUT COCORAHS...THE COMMUNITY
COLLABORATIVE RAIN...HAIL...AND SNOW NETWORK. THIS PUBLIC VOLUNTEER
RAIN GAUGE NETWORK IS OPEN TO ANYONE WILLING TO MEASURE AND REPORT
PRECIPITATION. GO TO THE COCORAHS WEBSITE FOR MORE INFORMATION AND
TO SIGN UP. HTTP://WWW.COCORAHS.ORG

$$



000
NOUS42 KJAX 011808
PNSJAX

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE JACKSONVILLE FL
210 PM EDT WED JUL 1 2015

       ...JUNE 2015 CLIMATE SUMMARY FOR JACKSONVILLE...

                    ....WARMER THAN NORMAL JUNE...

AT JACKSONVILLE INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT...

TEMPERATURES...THE AVERAGE TEMPERATURE FOR JUNE WAS 80.7 DEGREES
WHICH WAS 0.8 DEGREES ABOVE NORMAL. THE AVERAGE DAILY HIGH WAS 91.3
DEGREES AND THE AVERAGE DAILY LOW WAS 70.1 DEGREES. THE MAXIMUM
TEMPERATURE FOR THE MONTH WAS 98 DEGREES ON THE 19TH AND THE MINIMUM
FOR THE MONTH WAS 64 DEGREES ON THE 2ND. NO RECORDS WERE SET THIS
MONTH AT JACKSONVILLE.

RAINFALL...THERE WERE 14 DAYS OF MEASURABLE RAINFALL IN JUNE AT
JACKSONVILLE INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT. MONTHLY RAINFALL TOTALED 6.32
INCHES...0.13 INCHES BELOW NORMAL. THE GREATEST 24 HOUR TOTAL WAS
1.86 INCHES BETWEEN THE 22ND AND 23RD. NO PRECIPITATION RECORDS WERE
SET IN THE MONTH OF JUNE.

WIND...THE AVERAGE WIND SPEED FOR JUNE WAS 5.7 MILES PER HOUR. THE
PEAK WIND GUST FOR THE MONTH WAS 66 MILES PER HOUR FROM THE SOUTH ON
THE 22ND.

FOR ENERGY CONSUMPTION PURPOSES...THERE WERE 0 HEATING DEGREE
DAYS...WHICH IS NORMAL. THERE WERE 479 COOLING DEGREE DAYS...WHICH
IS 30 ABOVE NORMAL.

JULY OUTLOOK...THE TEMPERATURE OUTLOOK IS FOR A GREATER CHANCE OF
ABOVE NORMAL TEMPERATURES. THE PRECIPITATION OUTLOOK SHOWS GREATER
CHANCES TO SEE ABOVE BELOW PRECIPITATION IN JULY. THE NORMAL MONTHLY
AVERAGE TEMPERATURE IS 82.3 DEGREES. THE AVERAGE MAX TEMPERATURE IS
92.0 DEGREES AND THE AVERAGE MIN TEMPERATURE IS 72.6 DEGREES.
AVERAGE JULY RAINFALL IS 6.55 INCHES.

&&

ADDITIONAL RAINFALL REPORTS FROM AROUND THE AREA...

JACKSONVILLE VICINITY...              NORTHEAST FLORIDA...

JACKSONVILLE BEACH.....  5.25          FERNANDINA BEACH.....  5.48
JACKSONVILLE NAS.......  5.35          GAINESVILLE.........   3.61
MAYPORT NS.............  3.51          GLEN ST MARY.........  2.71
BIG TALBOT ISLAND......  5.80          FEDERAL POINT........  7.09
LITTLE TALBOT ISLAND...  4.22          ST. AUGUSTINE LITEHS.  5.06
CRAIG FIELD............  3.31          ST. AUGUSTINE ARPT...
SOUTH PONTE VEDRA......  3.01          HASTINGS 4NE.........  8.00
GUANA RIVER ST PARK....  3.62          BEAUCLERC..............5.92

JASPER...............    6.39
WHITEHOUSE OLF.........  XXXX          BELL 4NW.............  5.29


                                       ORANGE SPRINGS 2SSW..  M
                                       PALM COAST NE........  4.84
                                       OCALA................  5.77
                                       STARKE...............  3.49
                                       CRESCENT CITY........  5.31
                                       PALM COAST 6NE.......  3.51
                                       WHITE SPRINGS 7N.....  6.34

                                       BUNNELL..............  5.34
                                       FLAGLER BEACH........  3.11
                                       MARINELAND...........  3.01
                                       LAKE CITY 2E.........  4.76
SOUTHEAST GEORGIA...

BAXLEY 5NNW............  5.42          WOODBINE.............  4.68
BRUNSWICK..............  4.77          ST SIMONS ISLAND.....  4.02
HOMERVILLE 5N..........  4.40          ALMA.................  5.41
PRIDGEN................  7.83          PATTERSON............  4.37
MANOR..................  7.26          HAZLEHURST...........  4.18
NAHUNTA 6NE............  5.90          FARGO 17NE............ 4.58

RAINFALL REPORTS ARE PRELIMINARY. CO-OP SITES REPORT A 24 HOUR TOTAL
NOT BASED ON A MIDNIGHT TO MIDNIGHT CALENDAR DAY.

***********

FOR ADDITIONAL RAINFALL REPORTS CHECK OUT COCORAHS...THE COMMUNITY
COLLABORATIVE RAIN...HAIL...AND SNOW NETWORK. THIS PUBLIC VOLUNTEER
RAIN GAUGE NETWORK IS OPEN TO ANYONE WILLING TO MEASURE AND REPORT
PRECIPITATION. GO TO THE COCORAHS WEBSITE FOR MORE INFORMATION AND
TO SIGN UP. HTTP://WWW.COCORAHS.ORG

$$



000
NOUS44 KMOB 011752
PNSMOB

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE MOBILE AL
1252 PM CDT WED JULY 01 2015

...NOAA ALL HAZARDS WEATHER RADIO BROADCAST TRANSMITTING FROM
PENSACOLA FLORIDA HAS RETURNED TO SERVICE...

THE NOAA ALL HAZARDS RADIO TRANSMITTER LOCATED AT PENSACOLA FLORIDA
...STATION KEC-86 BROADCASTING ON A FREQUENCY OF 162.400
MEGAHERTZ...IS BACK IN SERVICE.

$$



000
NOUS44 KMOB 011752
PNSMOB

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE MOBILE AL
1252 PM CDT WED JULY 01 2015

...NOAA ALL HAZARDS WEATHER RADIO BROADCAST TRANSMITTING FROM
PENSACOLA FLORIDA HAS RETURNED TO SERVICE...

THE NOAA ALL HAZARDS RADIO TRANSMITTER LOCATED AT PENSACOLA FLORIDA
...STATION KEC-86 BROADCASTING ON A FREQUENCY OF 162.400
MEGAHERTZ...IS BACK IN SERVICE.

$$



000
NOUS44 KMOB 011752
PNSMOB

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE MOBILE AL
1252 PM CDT WED JULY 01 2015

...NOAA ALL HAZARDS WEATHER RADIO BROADCAST TRANSMITTING FROM
PENSACOLA FLORIDA HAS RETURNED TO SERVICE...

THE NOAA ALL HAZARDS RADIO TRANSMITTER LOCATED AT PENSACOLA FLORIDA
...STATION KEC-86 BROADCASTING ON A FREQUENCY OF 162.400
MEGAHERTZ...IS BACK IN SERVICE.

$$



000
NOUS44 KMOB 011752
PNSMOB

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE MOBILE AL
1252 PM CDT WED JULY 01 2015

...NOAA ALL HAZARDS WEATHER RADIO BROADCAST TRANSMITTING FROM
PENSACOLA FLORIDA HAS RETURNED TO SERVICE...

THE NOAA ALL HAZARDS RADIO TRANSMITTER LOCATED AT PENSACOLA FLORIDA
...STATION KEC-86 BROADCASTING ON A FREQUENCY OF 162.400
MEGAHERTZ...IS BACK IN SERVICE.

$$



000
NOUS44 KMOB 011752
PNSMOB

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE MOBILE AL
1252 PM CDT WED JULY 01 2015

...NOAA ALL HAZARDS WEATHER RADIO BROADCAST TRANSMITTING FROM
PENSACOLA FLORIDA HAS RETURNED TO SERVICE...

THE NOAA ALL HAZARDS RADIO TRANSMITTER LOCATED AT PENSACOLA FLORIDA
...STATION KEC-86 BROADCASTING ON A FREQUENCY OF 162.400
MEGAHERTZ...IS BACK IN SERVICE.

$$



000
NOUS44 KMOB 011752
PNSMOB

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE MOBILE AL
1252 PM CDT WED JULY 01 2015

...NOAA ALL HAZARDS WEATHER RADIO BROADCAST TRANSMITTING FROM
PENSACOLA FLORIDA HAS RETURNED TO SERVICE...

THE NOAA ALL HAZARDS RADIO TRANSMITTER LOCATED AT PENSACOLA FLORIDA
...STATION KEC-86 BROADCASTING ON A FREQUENCY OF 162.400
MEGAHERTZ...IS BACK IN SERVICE.

$$


000
NOUS45 KTFX 011719
PNSTFX
MTZ008>015-044>055-151800-

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE GREAT FALLS MT
1118 AM MDT WED JUL 1 2015

...JUNE 2015 AND OCTOBER-JUNE SEASONAL WEATHER SUMMARY FOR NORTH
CENTRAL AND SOUTHWEST MONTANA...

OVERALL, JUNE WAS WARM AND DRY ACROSS THE AREA. A HIGH PRESSURE RIDGE
SET UP OVER THE WESTERN US AND DOMINATED THE WEATHER PATTERN FOR THE
MONTH. AFTER A RELATIVELY WET MAY, RAINFALL LARGELY CUT OFF IN JUNE.
TEMPERATURES SOARED INTO THE LOWER 90S OVER PORTIONS OF THE AREA ON
THE 8TH AND 9TH. AFTER A BRIEF COOL PERIOD, WITH LOW TEMPERATURES IN
THE 30S FROM THE 13TH-15TH, TEMPERATURES RETURNED TO RECORD HIGH
LEVELS FOR THE LAST FEW DAYS OF THE MONTH. WISDSOM RECORDED THE
LOWEST AREA TEMPERATURE ON THE 14TH, DROPPING TO 27. MANY RECORD HIGH
TEMPERATURES WERE SET FROM THE 26TH-29TH, REACHING AS HIGH AS 104 AT
LOMA ON THE 28TH. HELENA SET AN ALL-TIME WARM READING FOR JUNE
REACHING 103 ON THE 27TH. THEY HAD 3-CONSECUTIVE DAYS OF 100 OR MORE
FROM THE 27TH-29TH. THE GREATEST POSITIVE DEPARTURE FROM NORMAL WAS
IN THE HELENA VALLEY, WHERE IT WAS 7.5 DEGREES ABOVE NORMAL FOR THE
MONTH. THE LOWEST POSITIVE DEPARTURES WERE ALONG THE INTERNATIONAL
BORDER NORTH OF HAVRE, WITH DEPARTURES AROUND 2 DEGREES. THE WARMEST
TEMPERATURE AVERAGE WAS 69.6 AT HELENA, WITH THE COOLEST 56.4 AT WEST
YELLOWSTONE. MOST OF THE AVERAGES WERE ABOUT 3 DEGREES COOLER THAN
THE NORMAL FOR JULY TEMPERATURES.

AT MANY LOCATIONS, THIS RANKED AS ONE OF THE FIVE OR SIX WARMEST
JUNES OF RECORD. AT HELENA, IT WAS THE WARMEST OF RECORD, EXCEEDING
THEIR OLD RECORD WARMEST JUNE SET IN 1934. AT MOST LOCATIONS, THIS
WAS THE WARMEST JUNE SINCE 1988.
FOR THE WATER-YEAR, IT WAS THE WARMEST OF RECORD AT DILLON, EXCEEDING
THEIR OLD RECORD LAST SET IN 1992. AGAIN, AT MOST LOCATIONS, THIS
WATER YEAR`S TEMPERATURE AVERAGES RANK AMONG THE FIVE WARMEST OF
RECORD.

FOR PRECIPITATION, JUNE PRODUCED A LITTLE PRECIPITATION IN MOST
AREAS. THIS WAS THE DRIEST SINCE 1985 AT MOST LOCATIONS, BUT AT GREAT
FALLS, THIS WAS THE DRIEST OF RECORD, EXCEEDING A RECORD LAST SET IN
1960. BOZEMAN HAD THEIR THIRD DRIEST JUNE OF RECORD, WHILE HAVRE HAD
THEIR FOURTH DRIEST OF RECORD. THE WATER YEAR IS ALSO DRIER THAN
NORMAL. BOZEMAN IS EXPERIENCING THEIR SIXTH DRIEST OF RECORD. AT
DILLON, ALTHOUGH THIS WATER YEAR IS THE 29TH DRIEST OF RECORD, IT IS
WETTER THAN ANY OF THE LAST FOUR YEARS. MOST PRECIPITATION FELL OVER
THE FIRST FEW DAYS OF THE MONTH. THE GREATEST AREA PRECIPITATION
AMOUNT WAS 5.70-INCHES AT CRYSTAL LAKE AND 3.57-INCHES AT A LOCATION
EAST OF LEWISTOWN. IN THE REGION, THE WETTEST AREA WAS OVER EASTERN
FERGUS COUNTY, BUT DRY OVER THE REST OF THE REGION. THE DRIEST AREA
WAS ACROSS NORTHERN HILL COUNTY.

WINDS CONTINUED LIGHTER THAN NORMAL IN JUNE. MOST AREAS RANKED AMONG
THE FIVE CALMEST JUNES OF RECORD. ON AVERAGE, THIS WAS THE CALMEST
JUNE SINCE 2009. FOR THE WATER-YEAR, THIS HAS BEEN THE CALMEST SUCH
PERIOD OF RECORD AT GREAT FALLS. CUT BANK HAD THE HIGHEST AVERAGE
WIND SPEEDS, BUT STILL THE FIFTH CALMEST OF RECORD. THE HIGHEST AREA
GUST WAS 64 MPH AT DILLON FROM A THUNDERSTORM ON THE 29TH.

SEVERE WEATHER OCCURRED ON TWO DAYS IN JUNE. THIS IS THE LOWEST
NUMBER OF DAYS IN JUNE SINCE 2009. WIND GUSTS REACHED 64 MPH AT
DILLON ON THE 29TH FROM THUNDERSTORMS.

AVERAGE TEMPERATURE...DEGREES FAHRENHEIT...
             JUN   NORM   RANK          OCT-JUN  NORM   RANK
BOZEMAN......64.7..59.1... 2ND WARMEST   38.8....36.1... 5TH WARMEST
CUT BANK.....62.5..57.8... 5TH WARMEST   38.0....35.8... 2ND WARMEST
DILLON.......64.6..58.1... 2ND WARMEST   40.7....36.4...     WARMEST
GREAT FALLS..65.2..59.7...15TH WARMEST   40.9....38.3...23RD WARMEST
HAVRE........66.5..62.2...15TH WARMEST   38.8....36.7...15TH WARMEST
HELENA.......69.6..62.1...     WARMEST   42.2....38.7... 2ND WARMEST
LEWISTOWN....64.4..58.1... 6TH WARMEST   40.4....36.7... 4TH WARMEST
W YELLOWSTON.56.4..51.8... 5TH WARMEST   31.7....27.6... 2ND WARMEST


PRECIPITATION...INCHES...
              JUN   NORM                OCT-JUN  NORM
BOZEMAN.......0.60..2.46... 3RD DRIEST   8.49...10.80... 6TH DRIEST
CUT BANK......1.20..2.55...20TH DRIEST   6.90....7.19...44TH DRIEST
DILLON........0.71..1.97...11TH DRIEST   6.26....7.35...29TH DRIEST
GREAT FALLS...0.44..2.53...     DRIEST   9.19...10.26...38TH DRIEST
HAVRE.........0.43..2.19... 4TH DRIEST   6.07....7.33...21ST DRIEST
HELENA........0.50..2.06...10TH DRIEST   6.84....7.73...29TH DRIEST
LEWISTOWN.....1.61..3.08...17TH DRIEST  10.61...11.84...37TH DRIEST
W YELLOWSTONE.1.80..2.17...36TH DRIEST  14.61...17.35...24TH DRIEST


AVERAGE WIND SPEED...MPH...
              JUN   NORM   RANK         OCT-JUN  NORM   RANK
BOZEMAN.......5.5....5.9... 3RD CALMEST   5.4.... 5.5... 8TH CALMEST
CUT BANK..... 9.5...11.6... 5TH CALMEST  12.7....13.4...17TH CALMEST
DILLON........7.1... 7.9... 2ND CALMEST   9.4.... 9.3...25TH CALMEST
GREAT FALLS.. 7.7...10.6... 3RD CALMEST  11.2....12.8...     CALMEST
HAVRE........ 9.0....9.7...61ST WINDIEST 10.4....10.2...26TH WINDIEST
HELENA....... 6.7....7.6... 5TH CALMEST   6.5.... 6.7...12TH CALMEST
LEWISTOWN.... 6.7... 8.5... 4TH CALMEST   9.2.... 9.7...14TH CALMEST
W YELLOWSTON. 6.0                           M

TEMPERATURE AND PRECIPITATION RECORDS FOR BOZEMAN BEGAN IN 1935, CUT
BANK BEGAN IN 1903, DILLON BEGAN IN 1939, GREAT FALLS BEGAN IN 1891,
HAVRE AND HELENA BEGAN IN 1880, LEWISTOWN BEGAN IN 1896, AND WEST
YELLOWSTONE BEGAN IN 1905. WIND RECORDS AT BOZEMAN AND DILLON BEGAN
IN 1948, CUT BANK AND LEWISTOWN IN 1938, GREAT FALLS IN 1939, HAVRE
IN 1889, HELENA IN 1880, AND WEST YELLOWSTONE IN 2010. THE NORMAL
PERIOD FOR ALL ELEMENTS IS 1981 TO 2010.

THESE DATA ARE PRELIMINARY AND HAVE NOT UNDERGONE FINAL QC BY NCDC.
THEREFORE THESE DATA ARE SUBJECT TO REVISION. FINAL AND CERTIFIED
CLIMATE DATA CAN BE ACCESSED AT THE NATIONAL CLIMATIC DATA CENTER AT
WWW.NCDC.NOAA.GOV

$$
&&

NNNN



000
NOUS45 KTFX 011719
PNSTFX
MTZ008>015-044>055-151800-

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE GREAT FALLS MT
1118 AM MDT WED JUL 1 2015

...JUNE 2015 AND OCTOBER-JUNE SEASONAL WEATHER SUMMARY FOR NORTH
CENTRAL AND SOUTHWEST MONTANA...

OVERALL, JUNE WAS WARM AND DRY ACROSS THE AREA. A HIGH PRESSURE RIDGE
SET UP OVER THE WESTERN US AND DOMINATED THE WEATHER PATTERN FOR THE
MONTH. AFTER A RELATIVELY WET MAY, RAINFALL LARGELY CUT OFF IN JUNE.
TEMPERATURES SOARED INTO THE LOWER 90S OVER PORTIONS OF THE AREA ON
THE 8TH AND 9TH. AFTER A BRIEF COOL PERIOD, WITH LOW TEMPERATURES IN
THE 30S FROM THE 13TH-15TH, TEMPERATURES RETURNED TO RECORD HIGH
LEVELS FOR THE LAST FEW DAYS OF THE MONTH. WISDSOM RECORDED THE
LOWEST AREA TEMPERATURE ON THE 14TH, DROPPING TO 27. MANY RECORD HIGH
TEMPERATURES WERE SET FROM THE 26TH-29TH, REACHING AS HIGH AS 104 AT
LOMA ON THE 28TH. HELENA SET AN ALL-TIME WARM READING FOR JUNE
REACHING 103 ON THE 27TH. THEY HAD 3-CONSECUTIVE DAYS OF 100 OR MORE
FROM THE 27TH-29TH. THE GREATEST POSITIVE DEPARTURE FROM NORMAL WAS
IN THE HELENA VALLEY, WHERE IT WAS 7.5 DEGREES ABOVE NORMAL FOR THE
MONTH. THE LOWEST POSITIVE DEPARTURES WERE ALONG THE INTERNATIONAL
BORDER NORTH OF HAVRE, WITH DEPARTURES AROUND 2 DEGREES. THE WARMEST
TEMPERATURE AVERAGE WAS 69.6 AT HELENA, WITH THE COOLEST 56.4 AT WEST
YELLOWSTONE. MOST OF THE AVERAGES WERE ABOUT 3 DEGREES COOLER THAN
THE NORMAL FOR JULY TEMPERATURES.

AT MANY LOCATIONS, THIS RANKED AS ONE OF THE FIVE OR SIX WARMEST
JUNES OF RECORD. AT HELENA, IT WAS THE WARMEST OF RECORD, EXCEEDING
THEIR OLD RECORD WARMEST JUNE SET IN 1934. AT MOST LOCATIONS, THIS
WAS THE WARMEST JUNE SINCE 1988.
FOR THE WATER-YEAR, IT WAS THE WARMEST OF RECORD AT DILLON, EXCEEDING
THEIR OLD RECORD LAST SET IN 1992. AGAIN, AT MOST LOCATIONS, THIS
WATER YEAR`S TEMPERATURE AVERAGES RANK AMONG THE FIVE WARMEST OF
RECORD.

FOR PRECIPITATION, JUNE PRODUCED A LITTLE PRECIPITATION IN MOST
AREAS. THIS WAS THE DRIEST SINCE 1985 AT MOST LOCATIONS, BUT AT GREAT
FALLS, THIS WAS THE DRIEST OF RECORD, EXCEEDING A RECORD LAST SET IN
1960. BOZEMAN HAD THEIR THIRD DRIEST JUNE OF RECORD, WHILE HAVRE HAD
THEIR FOURTH DRIEST OF RECORD. THE WATER YEAR IS ALSO DRIER THAN
NORMAL. BOZEMAN IS EXPERIENCING THEIR SIXTH DRIEST OF RECORD. AT
DILLON, ALTHOUGH THIS WATER YEAR IS THE 29TH DRIEST OF RECORD, IT IS
WETTER THAN ANY OF THE LAST FOUR YEARS. MOST PRECIPITATION FELL OVER
THE FIRST FEW DAYS OF THE MONTH. THE GREATEST AREA PRECIPITATION
AMOUNT WAS 5.70-INCHES AT CRYSTAL LAKE AND 3.57-INCHES AT A LOCATION
EAST OF LEWISTOWN. IN THE REGION, THE WETTEST AREA WAS OVER EASTERN
FERGUS COUNTY, BUT DRY OVER THE REST OF THE REGION. THE DRIEST AREA
WAS ACROSS NORTHERN HILL COUNTY.

WINDS CONTINUED LIGHTER THAN NORMAL IN JUNE. MOST AREAS RANKED AMONG
THE FIVE CALMEST JUNES OF RECORD. ON AVERAGE, THIS WAS THE CALMEST
JUNE SINCE 2009. FOR THE WATER-YEAR, THIS HAS BEEN THE CALMEST SUCH
PERIOD OF RECORD AT GREAT FALLS. CUT BANK HAD THE HIGHEST AVERAGE
WIND SPEEDS, BUT STILL THE FIFTH CALMEST OF RECORD. THE HIGHEST AREA
GUST WAS 64 MPH AT DILLON FROM A THUNDERSTORM ON THE 29TH.

SEVERE WEATHER OCCURRED ON TWO DAYS IN JUNE. THIS IS THE LOWEST
NUMBER OF DAYS IN JUNE SINCE 2009. WIND GUSTS REACHED 64 MPH AT
DILLON ON THE 29TH FROM THUNDERSTORMS.

AVERAGE TEMPERATURE...DEGREES FAHRENHEIT...
             JUN   NORM   RANK          OCT-JUN  NORM   RANK
BOZEMAN......64.7..59.1... 2ND WARMEST   38.8....36.1... 5TH WARMEST
CUT BANK.....62.5..57.8... 5TH WARMEST   38.0....35.8... 2ND WARMEST
DILLON.......64.6..58.1... 2ND WARMEST   40.7....36.4...     WARMEST
GREAT FALLS..65.2..59.7...15TH WARMEST   40.9....38.3...23RD WARMEST
HAVRE........66.5..62.2...15TH WARMEST   38.8....36.7...15TH WARMEST
HELENA.......69.6..62.1...     WARMEST   42.2....38.7... 2ND WARMEST
LEWISTOWN....64.4..58.1... 6TH WARMEST   40.4....36.7... 4TH WARMEST
W YELLOWSTON.56.4..51.8... 5TH WARMEST   31.7....27.6... 2ND WARMEST


PRECIPITATION...INCHES...
              JUN   NORM                OCT-JUN  NORM
BOZEMAN.......0.60..2.46... 3RD DRIEST   8.49...10.80... 6TH DRIEST
CUT BANK......1.20..2.55...20TH DRIEST   6.90....7.19...44TH DRIEST
DILLON........0.71..1.97...11TH DRIEST   6.26....7.35...29TH DRIEST
GREAT FALLS...0.44..2.53...     DRIEST   9.19...10.26...38TH DRIEST
HAVRE.........0.43..2.19... 4TH DRIEST   6.07....7.33...21ST DRIEST
HELENA........0.50..2.06...10TH DRIEST   6.84....7.73...29TH DRIEST
LEWISTOWN.....1.61..3.08...17TH DRIEST  10.61...11.84...37TH DRIEST
W YELLOWSTONE.1.80..2.17...36TH DRIEST  14.61...17.35...24TH DRIEST


AVERAGE WIND SPEED...MPH...
              JUN   NORM   RANK         OCT-JUN  NORM   RANK
BOZEMAN.......5.5....5.9... 3RD CALMEST   5.4.... 5.5... 8TH CALMEST
CUT BANK..... 9.5...11.6... 5TH CALMEST  12.7....13.4...17TH CALMEST
DILLON........7.1... 7.9... 2ND CALMEST   9.4.... 9.3...25TH CALMEST
GREAT FALLS.. 7.7...10.6... 3RD CALMEST  11.2....12.8...     CALMEST
HAVRE........ 9.0....9.7...61ST WINDIEST 10.4....10.2...26TH WINDIEST
HELENA....... 6.7....7.6... 5TH CALMEST   6.5.... 6.7...12TH CALMEST
LEWISTOWN.... 6.7... 8.5... 4TH CALMEST   9.2.... 9.7...14TH CALMEST
W YELLOWSTON. 6.0                           M

TEMPERATURE AND PRECIPITATION RECORDS FOR BOZEMAN BEGAN IN 1935, CUT
BANK BEGAN IN 1903, DILLON BEGAN IN 1939, GREAT FALLS BEGAN IN 1891,
HAVRE AND HELENA BEGAN IN 1880, LEWISTOWN BEGAN IN 1896, AND WEST
YELLOWSTONE BEGAN IN 1905. WIND RECORDS AT BOZEMAN AND DILLON BEGAN
IN 1948, CUT BANK AND LEWISTOWN IN 1938, GREAT FALLS IN 1939, HAVRE
IN 1889, HELENA IN 1880, AND WEST YELLOWSTONE IN 2010. THE NORMAL
PERIOD FOR ALL ELEMENTS IS 1981 TO 2010.

THESE DATA ARE PRELIMINARY AND HAVE NOT UNDERGONE FINAL QC BY NCDC.
THEREFORE THESE DATA ARE SUBJECT TO REVISION. FINAL AND CERTIFIED
CLIMATE DATA CAN BE ACCESSED AT THE NATIONAL CLIMATIC DATA CENTER AT
WWW.NCDC.NOAA.GOV

$$
&&

NNNN


000
NOUS45 KTFX 011719
PNSTFX
MTZ008>015-044>055-151800-

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE GREAT FALLS MT
1118 AM MDT WED JUL 1 2015

...JUNE 2015 AND OCTOBER-JUNE SEASONAL WEATHER SUMMARY FOR NORTH
CENTRAL AND SOUTHWEST MONTANA...

OVERALL, JUNE WAS WARM AND DRY ACROSS THE AREA. A HIGH PRESSURE RIDGE
SET UP OVER THE WESTERN US AND DOMINATED THE WEATHER PATTERN FOR THE
MONTH. AFTER A RELATIVELY WET MAY, RAINFALL LARGELY CUT OFF IN JUNE.
TEMPERATURES SOARED INTO THE LOWER 90S OVER PORTIONS OF THE AREA ON
THE 8TH AND 9TH. AFTER A BRIEF COOL PERIOD, WITH LOW TEMPERATURES IN
THE 30S FROM THE 13TH-15TH, TEMPERATURES RETURNED TO RECORD HIGH
LEVELS FOR THE LAST FEW DAYS OF THE MONTH. WISDSOM RECORDED THE
LOWEST AREA TEMPERATURE ON THE 14TH, DROPPING TO 27. MANY RECORD HIGH
TEMPERATURES WERE SET FROM THE 26TH-29TH, REACHING AS HIGH AS 104 AT
LOMA ON THE 28TH. HELENA SET AN ALL-TIME WARM READING FOR JUNE
REACHING 103 ON THE 27TH. THEY HAD 3-CONSECUTIVE DAYS OF 100 OR MORE
FROM THE 27TH-29TH. THE GREATEST POSITIVE DEPARTURE FROM NORMAL WAS
IN THE HELENA VALLEY, WHERE IT WAS 7.5 DEGREES ABOVE NORMAL FOR THE
MONTH. THE LOWEST POSITIVE DEPARTURES WERE ALONG THE INTERNATIONAL
BORDER NORTH OF HAVRE, WITH DEPARTURES AROUND 2 DEGREES. THE WARMEST
TEMPERATURE AVERAGE WAS 69.6 AT HELENA, WITH THE COOLEST 56.4 AT WEST
YELLOWSTONE. MOST OF THE AVERAGES WERE ABOUT 3 DEGREES COOLER THAN
THE NORMAL FOR JULY TEMPERATURES.

AT MANY LOCATIONS, THIS RANKED AS ONE OF THE FIVE OR SIX WARMEST
JUNES OF RECORD. AT HELENA, IT WAS THE WARMEST OF RECORD, EXCEEDING
THEIR OLD RECORD WARMEST JUNE SET IN 1934. AT MOST LOCATIONS, THIS
WAS THE WARMEST JUNE SINCE 1988.
FOR THE WATER-YEAR, IT WAS THE WARMEST OF RECORD AT DILLON, EXCEEDING
THEIR OLD RECORD LAST SET IN 1992. AGAIN, AT MOST LOCATIONS, THIS
WATER YEAR`S TEMPERATURE AVERAGES RANK AMONG THE FIVE WARMEST OF
RECORD.

FOR PRECIPITATION, JUNE PRODUCED A LITTLE PRECIPITATION IN MOST
AREAS. THIS WAS THE DRIEST SINCE 1985 AT MOST LOCATIONS, BUT AT GREAT
FALLS, THIS WAS THE DRIEST OF RECORD, EXCEEDING A RECORD LAST SET IN
1960. BOZEMAN HAD THEIR THIRD DRIEST JUNE OF RECORD, WHILE HAVRE HAD
THEIR FOURTH DRIEST OF RECORD. THE WATER YEAR IS ALSO DRIER THAN
NORMAL. BOZEMAN IS EXPERIENCING THEIR SIXTH DRIEST OF RECORD. AT
DILLON, ALTHOUGH THIS WATER YEAR IS THE 29TH DRIEST OF RECORD, IT IS
WETTER THAN ANY OF THE LAST FOUR YEARS. MOST PRECIPITATION FELL OVER
THE FIRST FEW DAYS OF THE MONTH. THE GREATEST AREA PRECIPITATION
AMOUNT WAS 5.70-INCHES AT CRYSTAL LAKE AND 3.57-INCHES AT A LOCATION
EAST OF LEWISTOWN. IN THE REGION, THE WETTEST AREA WAS OVER EASTERN
FERGUS COUNTY, BUT DRY OVER THE REST OF THE REGION. THE DRIEST AREA
WAS ACROSS NORTHERN HILL COUNTY.

WINDS CONTINUED LIGHTER THAN NORMAL IN JUNE. MOST AREAS RANKED AMONG
THE FIVE CALMEST JUNES OF RECORD. ON AVERAGE, THIS WAS THE CALMEST
JUNE SINCE 2009. FOR THE WATER-YEAR, THIS HAS BEEN THE CALMEST SUCH
PERIOD OF RECORD AT GREAT FALLS. CUT BANK HAD THE HIGHEST AVERAGE
WIND SPEEDS, BUT STILL THE FIFTH CALMEST OF RECORD. THE HIGHEST AREA
GUST WAS 64 MPH AT DILLON FROM A THUNDERSTORM ON THE 29TH.

SEVERE WEATHER OCCURRED ON TWO DAYS IN JUNE. THIS IS THE LOWEST
NUMBER OF DAYS IN JUNE SINCE 2009. WIND GUSTS REACHED 64 MPH AT
DILLON ON THE 29TH FROM THUNDERSTORMS.

AVERAGE TEMPERATURE...DEGREES FAHRENHEIT...
             JUN   NORM   RANK          OCT-JUN  NORM   RANK
BOZEMAN......64.7..59.1... 2ND WARMEST   38.8....36.1... 5TH WARMEST
CUT BANK.....62.5..57.8... 5TH WARMEST   38.0....35.8... 2ND WARMEST
DILLON.......64.6..58.1... 2ND WARMEST   40.7....36.4...     WARMEST
GREAT FALLS..65.2..59.7...15TH WARMEST   40.9....38.3...23RD WARMEST
HAVRE........66.5..62.2...15TH WARMEST   38.8....36.7...15TH WARMEST
HELENA.......69.6..62.1...     WARMEST   42.2....38.7... 2ND WARMEST
LEWISTOWN....64.4..58.1... 6TH WARMEST   40.4....36.7... 4TH WARMEST
W YELLOWSTON.56.4..51.8... 5TH WARMEST   31.7....27.6... 2ND WARMEST


PRECIPITATION...INCHES...
              JUN   NORM                OCT-JUN  NORM
BOZEMAN.......0.60..2.46... 3RD DRIEST   8.49...10.80... 6TH DRIEST
CUT BANK......1.20..2.55...20TH DRIEST   6.90....7.19...44TH DRIEST
DILLON........0.71..1.97...11TH DRIEST   6.26....7.35...29TH DRIEST
GREAT FALLS...0.44..2.53...     DRIEST   9.19...10.26...38TH DRIEST
HAVRE.........0.43..2.19... 4TH DRIEST   6.07....7.33...21ST DRIEST
HELENA........0.50..2.06...10TH DRIEST   6.84....7.73...29TH DRIEST
LEWISTOWN.....1.61..3.08...17TH DRIEST  10.61...11.84...37TH DRIEST
W YELLOWSTONE.1.80..2.17...36TH DRIEST  14.61...17.35...24TH DRIEST


AVERAGE WIND SPEED...MPH...
              JUN   NORM   RANK         OCT-JUN  NORM   RANK
BOZEMAN.......5.5....5.9... 3RD CALMEST   5.4.... 5.5... 8TH CALMEST
CUT BANK..... 9.5...11.6... 5TH CALMEST  12.7....13.4...17TH CALMEST
DILLON........7.1... 7.9... 2ND CALMEST   9.4.... 9.3...25TH CALMEST
GREAT FALLS.. 7.7...10.6... 3RD CALMEST  11.2....12.8...     CALMEST
HAVRE........ 9.0....9.7...61ST WINDIEST 10.4....10.2...26TH WINDIEST
HELENA....... 6.7....7.6... 5TH CALMEST   6.5.... 6.7...12TH CALMEST
LEWISTOWN.... 6.7... 8.5... 4TH CALMEST   9.2.... 9.7...14TH CALMEST
W YELLOWSTON. 6.0                           M

TEMPERATURE AND PRECIPITATION RECORDS FOR BOZEMAN BEGAN IN 1935, CUT
BANK BEGAN IN 1903, DILLON BEGAN IN 1939, GREAT FALLS BEGAN IN 1891,
HAVRE AND HELENA BEGAN IN 1880, LEWISTOWN BEGAN IN 1896, AND WEST
YELLOWSTONE BEGAN IN 1905. WIND RECORDS AT BOZEMAN AND DILLON BEGAN
IN 1948, CUT BANK AND LEWISTOWN IN 1938, GREAT FALLS IN 1939, HAVRE
IN 1889, HELENA IN 1880, AND WEST YELLOWSTONE IN 2010. THE NORMAL
PERIOD FOR ALL ELEMENTS IS 1981 TO 2010.

THESE DATA ARE PRELIMINARY AND HAVE NOT UNDERGONE FINAL QC BY NCDC.
THEREFORE THESE DATA ARE SUBJECT TO REVISION. FINAL AND CERTIFIED
CLIMATE DATA CAN BE ACCESSED AT THE NATIONAL CLIMATIC DATA CENTER AT
WWW.NCDC.NOAA.GOV

$$
&&

NNNN


000
NOUS41 KILN 011631
PNSILN
INZ050-058-059-066-073>075-080-KYZ089>100-OHZ026-034-035-042>046-
051>056-060>065-070>074-077>082-088-022300-

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE WILMINGTON OH
1231 PM EDT WED JUL 1 2015

THE UPPER AIR SYSTEM AT WILMINGTON OHIO WILL BE DOWN FOR
MAINTENANCE UNTIL FURTHER NOTICE. ATMOSPHERIC SOUNDINGS WILL
COMMENCE WHEN A PART IS ABLE TO BE REPLACED AND FURTHER
DIAGNOSTICS ARE ABLE TO BE PERFORMED. WE ARE HOPEFUL THAT THE
THURSDAY EVENING 0Z 7/3 SOUNDING MAY BE COMPLETED.

THIS EVENINGS SOUNDING AND THE THURSDAY MORNING SOUNDING WILL NOT
BE AVAILABLE.

WE APOLOGIZE FOR ANY INCONVENIENCE. THE LATEST WEATHER
INFORMATION IS AVAILABLE ON OUR WEBSITE AT WEATHER.GOV/ILN.

$$









000
NOUS41 KILN 011631
PNSILN
INZ050-058-059-066-073>075-080-KYZ089>100-OHZ026-034-035-042>046-
051>056-060>065-070>074-077>082-088-022300-

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE WILMINGTON OH
1231 PM EDT WED JUL 1 2015

THE UPPER AIR SYSTEM AT WILMINGTON OHIO WILL BE DOWN FOR
MAINTENANCE UNTIL FURTHER NOTICE. ATMOSPHERIC SOUNDINGS WILL
COMMENCE WHEN A PART IS ABLE TO BE REPLACED AND FURTHER
DIAGNOSTICS ARE ABLE TO BE PERFORMED. WE ARE HOPEFUL THAT THE
THURSDAY EVENING 0Z 7/3 SOUNDING MAY BE COMPLETED.

THIS EVENINGS SOUNDING AND THE THURSDAY MORNING SOUNDING WILL NOT
BE AVAILABLE.

WE APOLOGIZE FOR ANY INCONVENIENCE. THE LATEST WEATHER
INFORMATION IS AVAILABLE ON OUR WEBSITE AT WEATHER.GOV/ILN.

$$










000
NOUS41 KILN 011631
PNSILN
INZ050-058-059-066-073>075-080-KYZ089>100-OHZ026-034-035-042>046-
051>056-060>065-070>074-077>082-088-022300-

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE WILMINGTON OH
1231 PM EDT WED JUL 1 2015

THE UPPER AIR SYSTEM AT WILMINGTON OHIO WILL BE DOWN FOR
MAINTENANCE UNTIL FURTHER NOTICE. ATMOSPHERIC SOUNDINGS WILL
COMMENCE WHEN A PART IS ABLE TO BE REPLACED AND FURTHER
DIAGNOSTICS ARE ABLE TO BE PERFORMED. WE ARE HOPEFUL THAT THE
THURSDAY EVENING 0Z 7/3 SOUNDING MAY BE COMPLETED.

THIS EVENINGS SOUNDING AND THE THURSDAY MORNING SOUNDING WILL NOT
BE AVAILABLE.

WE APOLOGIZE FOR ANY INCONVENIENCE. THE LATEST WEATHER
INFORMATION IS AVAILABLE ON OUR WEBSITE AT WEATHER.GOV/ILN.

$$









000
NOUS41 KILN 011631
PNSILN
INZ050-058-059-066-073>075-080-KYZ089>100-OHZ026-034-035-042>046-
051>056-060>065-070>074-077>082-088-022300-

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE WILMINGTON OH
1231 PM EDT WED JUL 1 2015

THE UPPER AIR SYSTEM AT WILMINGTON OHIO WILL BE DOWN FOR
MAINTENANCE UNTIL FURTHER NOTICE. ATMOSPHERIC SOUNDINGS WILL
COMMENCE WHEN A PART IS ABLE TO BE REPLACED AND FURTHER
DIAGNOSTICS ARE ABLE TO BE PERFORMED. WE ARE HOPEFUL THAT THE
THURSDAY EVENING 0Z 7/3 SOUNDING MAY BE COMPLETED.

THIS EVENINGS SOUNDING AND THE THURSDAY MORNING SOUNDING WILL NOT
BE AVAILABLE.

WE APOLOGIZE FOR ANY INCONVENIENCE. THE LATEST WEATHER
INFORMATION IS AVAILABLE ON OUR WEBSITE AT WEATHER.GOV/ILN.

$$










000
NOUS44 KMOB 011618
PNSMOB

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE MOBILE AL
1120 AM CDT WED JULY 01 2015

...NOAA ALL HAZARDS WEATHER RADIO BROADCAST TRANSMITTING FROM
PENSACOLA FLORIDA IS DOWN DUE TO PHONE LINE PROBLEMS...

THE NOAA ALL HAZARDS RADIO TRANSMITTER LOCATED AT PENSACOLA FLORIDA
...STATION KEC-86 BROADCASTING ON A FREQUENCY OF 162.400
MEGAHERTZ...IS DOWN DUE TO PHONE LINE ISSUES. RETURN TO SERVICE IS
UNKNOWN AT THIS TIME.

$$


000
NOUS44 KMOB 011618
PNSMOB

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE MOBILE AL
1120 AM CDT WED JULY 01 2015

...NOAA ALL HAZARDS WEATHER RADIO BROADCAST TRANSMITTING FROM
PENSACOLA FLORIDA IS DOWN DUE TO PHONE LINE PROBLEMS...

THE NOAA ALL HAZARDS RADIO TRANSMITTER LOCATED AT PENSACOLA FLORIDA
...STATION KEC-86 BROADCASTING ON A FREQUENCY OF 162.400
MEGAHERTZ...IS DOWN DUE TO PHONE LINE ISSUES. RETURN TO SERVICE IS
UNKNOWN AT THIS TIME.

$$


000
NOUS44 KMOB 011618
PNSMOB

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE MOBILE AL
1120 AM CDT WED JULY 01 2015

...NOAA ALL HAZARDS WEATHER RADIO BROADCAST TRANSMITTING FROM
PENSACOLA FLORIDA IS DOWN DUE TO PHONE LINE PROBLEMS...

THE NOAA ALL HAZARDS RADIO TRANSMITTER LOCATED AT PENSACOLA FLORIDA
...STATION KEC-86 BROADCASTING ON A FREQUENCY OF 162.400
MEGAHERTZ...IS DOWN DUE TO PHONE LINE ISSUES. RETURN TO SERVICE IS
UNKNOWN AT THIS TIME.

$$


000
NOUS44 KMOB 011618
PNSMOB

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE MOBILE AL
1120 AM CDT WED JULY 01 2015

...NOAA ALL HAZARDS WEATHER RADIO BROADCAST TRANSMITTING FROM
PENSACOLA FLORIDA IS DOWN DUE TO PHONE LINE PROBLEMS...

THE NOAA ALL HAZARDS RADIO TRANSMITTER LOCATED AT PENSACOLA FLORIDA
...STATION KEC-86 BROADCASTING ON A FREQUENCY OF 162.400
MEGAHERTZ...IS DOWN DUE TO PHONE LINE ISSUES. RETURN TO SERVICE IS
UNKNOWN AT THIS TIME.

$$


000
NOUS43 KARX 011529
PNSARX

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE LA CROSSE WI
814 AM CDT MON JUL 1 2015

...JUNE IN LA CROSSE WISCONSIN WAS SLIGHTLY BELOW NORMAL
PRECIPITATION AND SLIGHTLY ABOVE NORMAL TEMPERATURES...

THE AVERAGE JUNE TEMPERATURE AT LA CROSSE WAS 69.9 DEGREES...WHICH
WAS SEVEN TENTHS OF A DEGREE ABOVE NORMAL. THE AVERAGE HIGH WAS 79.9
DEGREES AND THE AVERAGE LOW WAS 59.9 DEGREES. THE HIGHEST
TEMPERATURE FOR THE MONTH WAS 96 DEGREES...WHICH OCCURRED ON THE
9TH. THE COLDEST TEMPERATURE FOR THE MONTH WAS 42 DEGREES...WHICH
OCCURRED ON THE 1ST.

THE TOTAL PRECIPITATION FOR JUNE WAS 3.70 INCHES...WHICH WAS -0.64
INCHES BELOW NORMAL. THE GREATEST 24-HOUR PRECIPITATION AMOUNT WAS
1.48 INCHES...WHICH OCCURRED FROM THE 11TH TO THE 12TH.

...RECORDS...

AT 454 PM ON JUNE 9TH THE TEMPERATURE AT THE LA CROSSE AIRPORT
REACHED 96 DEGREES. THIS BREAKS THE OLD RECORD FOR THIS DATE SET WAY
BACK IN 1911.

...DISCUSSION...

IN THE MONTH OF JUNE...LA CROSSE WAS SLIGHTLY ABOVE NORMAL FOR
TEMPERATURE. THE COLDEST PERIOD OCCURRED FROM THE 26TH THROUGH THE
30TH...WHERE THE AVERAGE DAILY TEMPERATURE WAS 1 TO 4 DEGREES BELOW
NORMAL. THE WARMEST STRETCH OCCURRED FROM THE 3RD THROUGH THE
10TH...WHERE THE DAILY AVERAGE TEMPERATURE RANGED FROM 1 TO 13
DEGREES ABOVE NORMAL. THERE WAS 1 DAY THE TEMPERATURE CLIMBED AT OR
ABOVE 90 DEGREES. LAST YEAR...THERE WERE 4 DAYS THE TEMPERATURE ROSE
AT OR ABOVE 90 DEGREES.

LA CROSSE WAS SLIGHTLY DRYER THAN NORMAL DURING THE MONTH OF JUNE.
THE WETTEST PERIOD OCCURRED FROM THE 11TH THROUGH THE 13TH...WHERE
1.52 INCHES OF PRECIPITATION FELL. THERE WERE 11 DAYS OF MEASURABLE
PRECIPITATION DURING THE MONTH. OF THOSE 11 DAYS...THERE WAS 1 DAY
WHERE ONE INCH OR MORE OF PRECIPITATION FELL. THERE WERE 19 DAYS
DURING THE MONTH WHERE ZERO PRECIPITATION WAS OBSERVED.

LOOKING AT THIS PAST MONTH...THERE WERE TWO SIGNIFICANT DAYS WITH
SEVERE WEATHER. ON JUNE 22ND...A SYSTEM OF STRONG THUNDERSTORMS
MOVED THROUGH IN THE EARLY MORNING FROM THE WEST. THE AREAS WHERE
THE STORMS WERE MOST PREVALENT WERE ACROSS NORTHEAST IOWA AND INTO
SOUTHERN WISCONSIN. THE STORMS CAUSED STRAIGHT LINE WIND DAMAGE AND
THERE WERE 3 CONFIRMED TORNADOES. IN ADDITION...THERE WAS FLOODING
THAT OCCURRED WHEN 2 TO 5 INCHES OF RAIN FELL IN A SHORT PERIOD OF
TIME. THE LA CROSSE AIRPORT RECEIVED 0.71 INCHES OF RAIN.

THE NEXT EVENT WAS ON JUNE 29TH. A SYSTEM OF STORMS MOVED THROUGH IN
THE EARLY AFTERNOON INTO THE EVENING. AS THUNDERSTORMS MOVED
SOUTH...THE BIGGEST IMPACT WAS THE HAIL PRODUCED. THERE WERE GUSTY
WINDS ASSOCIATED WITH A FEW OF THE STORMS...REACHING 40 TO 45 MPH.
IN ADDITION...HEAVY RAIN LED TO LOCALIZED RURAL FLOODING. HAIL
REPORTS RANGED FROM 0.25 INCHES TO 1.75 INCHES IN DIAMETER. THE
HIGHEST RAINFALL AMOUNTS WERE A LITTLE OVER 2 INCHES IN SOUTHERN
WISCONSIN. THE LA CROSSE AIRPORT RECEIVED 0.49 INCHES OF RAIN.

...LOOKING AHEAD TO JULY...

THE AVERAGE TEMPERATURE FOR THE MONTH OF JULY IS 71.0 DEGREES. THE
AVERAGE HIGH TEMPERATURE IS 81.0 DEGREES AND THE AVERAGE LOW
TEMPERATURE IS 60.9 DEGREES. LA CROSSE NORMALLY RECEIVES 6 DAYS
WHERE THE TEMPERATURE RISES AT OR ABOVE 90 DEGREES. THE HIGHEST
TEMPERATURE IN THE MONTH OF JULY IS 108 DEGREES WHICH OCCURRED ON
THE 13TH IN 1995 AND ON THE 14TH IN 1936.

THE AVERAGE PRECIPITATION DURING THE MONTH OF JULY IS 5.00 INCHES
WITH 10 DAYS OF MEASURABLE PRECIPITATION. THERE ARE NORMALLY 7 DAYS
WITH THUNDERSTORMS DURING THE MONTH OF JULY IN LA CROSSE. THE
GREATEST ONE DAY PRECIPITATION TOTAL WAS 5.24 INCHES WHICH OCCURRED
ON THE 27TH IN 1987.

$$

JSY


000
NOUS43 KARX 011529
PNSARX

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE LA CROSSE WI
814 AM CDT MON JUL 1 2015

...JUNE IN LA CROSSE WISCONSIN WAS SLIGHTLY BELOW NORMAL
PRECIPITATION AND SLIGHTLY ABOVE NORMAL TEMPERATURES...

THE AVERAGE JUNE TEMPERATURE AT LA CROSSE WAS 69.9 DEGREES...WHICH
WAS SEVEN TENTHS OF A DEGREE ABOVE NORMAL. THE AVERAGE HIGH WAS 79.9
DEGREES AND THE AVERAGE LOW WAS 59.9 DEGREES. THE HIGHEST
TEMPERATURE FOR THE MONTH WAS 96 DEGREES...WHICH OCCURRED ON THE
9TH. THE COLDEST TEMPERATURE FOR THE MONTH WAS 42 DEGREES...WHICH
OCCURRED ON THE 1ST.

THE TOTAL PRECIPITATION FOR JUNE WAS 3.70 INCHES...WHICH WAS -0.64
INCHES BELOW NORMAL. THE GREATEST 24-HOUR PRECIPITATION AMOUNT WAS
1.48 INCHES...WHICH OCCURRED FROM THE 11TH TO THE 12TH.

...RECORDS...

AT 454 PM ON JUNE 9TH THE TEMPERATURE AT THE LA CROSSE AIRPORT
REACHED 96 DEGREES. THIS BREAKS THE OLD RECORD FOR THIS DATE SET WAY
BACK IN 1911.

...DISCUSSION...

IN THE MONTH OF JUNE...LA CROSSE WAS SLIGHTLY ABOVE NORMAL FOR
TEMPERATURE. THE COLDEST PERIOD OCCURRED FROM THE 26TH THROUGH THE
30TH...WHERE THE AVERAGE DAILY TEMPERATURE WAS 1 TO 4 DEGREES BELOW
NORMAL. THE WARMEST STRETCH OCCURRED FROM THE 3RD THROUGH THE
10TH...WHERE THE DAILY AVERAGE TEMPERATURE RANGED FROM 1 TO 13
DEGREES ABOVE NORMAL. THERE WAS 1 DAY THE TEMPERATURE CLIMBED AT OR
ABOVE 90 DEGREES. LAST YEAR...THERE WERE 4 DAYS THE TEMPERATURE ROSE
AT OR ABOVE 90 DEGREES.

LA CROSSE WAS SLIGHTLY DRYER THAN NORMAL DURING THE MONTH OF JUNE.
THE WETTEST PERIOD OCCURRED FROM THE 11TH THROUGH THE 13TH...WHERE
1.52 INCHES OF PRECIPITATION FELL. THERE WERE 11 DAYS OF MEASURABLE
PRECIPITATION DURING THE MONTH. OF THOSE 11 DAYS...THERE WAS 1 DAY
WHERE ONE INCH OR MORE OF PRECIPITATION FELL. THERE WERE 19 DAYS
DURING THE MONTH WHERE ZERO PRECIPITATION WAS OBSERVED.

LOOKING AT THIS PAST MONTH...THERE WERE TWO SIGNIFICANT DAYS WITH
SEVERE WEATHER. ON JUNE 22ND...A SYSTEM OF STRONG THUNDERSTORMS
MOVED THROUGH IN THE EARLY MORNING FROM THE WEST. THE AREAS WHERE
THE STORMS WERE MOST PREVALENT WERE ACROSS NORTHEAST IOWA AND INTO
SOUTHERN WISCONSIN. THE STORMS CAUSED STRAIGHT LINE WIND DAMAGE AND
THERE WERE 3 CONFIRMED TORNADOES. IN ADDITION...THERE WAS FLOODING
THAT OCCURRED WHEN 2 TO 5 INCHES OF RAIN FELL IN A SHORT PERIOD OF
TIME. THE LA CROSSE AIRPORT RECEIVED 0.71 INCHES OF RAIN.

THE NEXT EVENT WAS ON JUNE 29TH. A SYSTEM OF STORMS MOVED THROUGH IN
THE EARLY AFTERNOON INTO THE EVENING. AS THUNDERSTORMS MOVED
SOUTH...THE BIGGEST IMPACT WAS THE HAIL PRODUCED. THERE WERE GUSTY
WINDS ASSOCIATED WITH A FEW OF THE STORMS...REACHING 40 TO 45 MPH.
IN ADDITION...HEAVY RAIN LED TO LOCALIZED RURAL FLOODING. HAIL
REPORTS RANGED FROM 0.25 INCHES TO 1.75 INCHES IN DIAMETER. THE
HIGHEST RAINFALL AMOUNTS WERE A LITTLE OVER 2 INCHES IN SOUTHERN
WISCONSIN. THE LA CROSSE AIRPORT RECEIVED 0.49 INCHES OF RAIN.

...LOOKING AHEAD TO JULY...

THE AVERAGE TEMPERATURE FOR THE MONTH OF JULY IS 71.0 DEGREES. THE
AVERAGE HIGH TEMPERATURE IS 81.0 DEGREES AND THE AVERAGE LOW
TEMPERATURE IS 60.9 DEGREES. LA CROSSE NORMALLY RECEIVES 6 DAYS
WHERE THE TEMPERATURE RISES AT OR ABOVE 90 DEGREES. THE HIGHEST
TEMPERATURE IN THE MONTH OF JULY IS 108 DEGREES WHICH OCCURRED ON
THE 13TH IN 1995 AND ON THE 14TH IN 1936.

THE AVERAGE PRECIPITATION DURING THE MONTH OF JULY IS 5.00 INCHES
WITH 10 DAYS OF MEASURABLE PRECIPITATION. THERE ARE NORMALLY 7 DAYS
WITH THUNDERSTORMS DURING THE MONTH OF JULY IN LA CROSSE. THE
GREATEST ONE DAY PRECIPITATION TOTAL WAS 5.24 INCHES WHICH OCCURRED
ON THE 27TH IN 1987.

$$

JSY



000
NOUS43 KARX 011528
PNSARX

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE LA CROSSE WI
821 AM CDT MON JUL 1 2015

...JUNE IN ROCHESTER MINNESOTA WAS SLIGHTLY DRYER THAN NORMAL AND
HAD SLIGHTLY BELOW NORMAL TEMPERATURES...

THE AVERAGE JUNE TEMPERATURE AT ROCHESTER WAS 67.3 DEGREES...WHICH
WAS THREE TENTHS OF A DEGREE BELOW NORMAL. THE AVERAGE HIGH WAS 77.2
DEGREES AND THE AVERAGE LOW WAS 57.4 DEGREES. THE HIGHEST
TEMPERATURE FOR THE MONTH WAS 93 DEGREES...WHICH OCCURRED ON THE
9TH. THE COLDEST TEMPERATURE FOR THE MONTH WAS 43 DEGREES...WHICH
OCCURRED ON THE 1ST.

THE TOTAL PRECIPITATION FOR JUNE WAS 4.46 INCHES...WHICH WAS -0.22
INCHES BELOW NORMAL. THE GREATEST 24-HOUR PRECIPITATION AMOUNT WAS
1.39 INCHES...WHICH OCCURRED FROM THE 11TH TO THE 12TH.

...RECORDS...

AT 220 PM ON JUNE 9TH...THE TEMPERATURE AT THE ROCHETER AIRPORT
REACHED 93 DEGREES. THIS TIES THE RECORD HIGH FOR THE DATE...SET IN
1973.

...DISCUSSION...

IN THE MONTH OF JUNE...ROCHESTER WAS SLIGHTLY BELOW NORMAL FOR
TEMPERATURE. THE COLDEST PERIOD OCCURRED FROM THE 26TH THROUGH THE
30TH...WHERE THE AVERAGE DAILY TEMPERATURE WAS 1 TO 5 DEGREES BELOW
NORMAL. THE WARMEST STRETCH OCCURRED FROM THE 3RD THROUGH
10TH...WHERE THE DAILY AVERAGE TEMPERATURE RANGED FROM 1 TO 10
DEGREES ABOVE NORMAL. THERE WAS 1 DAY THE TEMPERATURE CLIMBED AT OR
ABOVE 90 DEGREES. TYPICALLY...THERE ARE 3 DAYS THE TEMPERATURE RISES
AT OR ABOVE 90 DEGREES.

ROCHESTER WAS SLIGHTLY DRYER THAN NORMAL DURING THE MONTH OF JUNE.
THE WETTEST PERIOD OCCURRED FROM THE 10TH THROUGH THE 13TH...WHERE
1.71 INCHES OF PRECIPITATION FELL. THERE WERE 12 DAYS OF MEASURABLE
PRECIPITATION DURING THE MONTH. OF THOSE 12 DAYS...THERE WAS 1 DAY
WHERE ONE INCH OR MORE OF PRECIPITATION FELL. THERE WERE 17 DAYS
DURING THE MONTH WHERE ZERO PRECIPITATION WAS OBSERVED.

LOOKING AT THIS PAST MONTH...THERE WERE TWO SIGNIFICANT DAYS WITH
SEVERE WEATHER. ON JUNE 22ND...A SYSTEM OF STRONG THUNDERSTORMS
MOVED THROUGH IN THE EARLY MORNING FROM THE WEST. THE AREAS WHERE
THE STORMS WERE MOST PREVALENT WERE ACROSS NORTHEAST IOWA AND INTO
SOUTHERN WISCONSIN. THE STORMS CAUSED STRAIGHT LINE WIND DAMAGE AND
THERE WERE 3 CONFIRMED TORNADOES. IN ADDITION...THERE WAS FLOODING
THAT OCCURRED WHEN 2 TO 5 INCHES OF RAIN FELL IN A SHORT PERIOD OF
TIME. THE ROCHESTER AIRPORT RECEIVED 0.71 INCHES OF RAIN.

THE NEXT EVENT WAS ON JUNE 29TH. A SYSTEM OF STORMS MOVED THROUGH IN
THE EARLY AFTERNOON INTO THE EVENING. AS THUNDERSTORMS MOVED
SOUTH...THE BIGGEST IMPACT WAS THE HAIL PRODUCED. THERE WERE GUSTY
WINDS ASSOCIATED WITH A FEW OF THE STORMS...REACHING 40 TO 45 MPH.
IN ADDITION...HEAVY RAIN LED TO LOCALIZED RURAL FLOODING. HAIL
REPORTS RANGED FROM 0.25 INCHES TO 1.75 INCHES IN DIAMETER. THE
HIGHEST RAINFALL AMOUNTS WERE A LITTLE OVER 2 INCHES IN SOUTHERN
WISCONSIN. THE ROCHESTER AIRPORT RECEIVED 0.24 INCHES OF RAIN.

...LOOKING AHEAD TO JULY...

THE AVERAGE TEMPERATURE FOR THE MONTH IS 67.6 DEGREES. THE AVERAGE
HIGH TEMPERATURE IS 76.9 DEGREES AND THE AVERAGE LOW TEMPERATURE IS
58.2 DEGREES. ROCHESTER NORMALLY RECEIVES 3 DAYS OF 90 DEGREES AT OR
ABOVE. THE HIGHEST TEMPERATURE IN THE MONTH WAS 108 DEGREES WHICH
OCCURRED ON THE 14TH IN 1936.

THE AVERAGE PRECIPITATION IN JULY IS 4.55 INCHES WITH TYPICALLY 11
DAYS OF MEASURABLE PRECIPITATION. THERE ARE NORMALLY 7 DAYS WITH
THUNDERSTORMS DURING JULY IN ROCHESTER. THE GREATEST ONE DAY
PRECIPITATION WAS 7.47 INCHES WHICH OCCURRED ON THE 11TH IN 1981.

$$

JSY


000
NOUS43 KARX 011528
PNSARX

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE LA CROSSE WI
821 AM CDT MON JUL 1 2015

...JUNE IN ROCHESTER MINNESOTA WAS SLIGHTLY DRYER THAN NORMAL AND
HAD SLIGHTLY BELOW NORMAL TEMPERATURES...

THE AVERAGE JUNE TEMPERATURE AT ROCHESTER WAS 67.3 DEGREES...WHICH
WAS THREE TENTHS OF A DEGREE BELOW NORMAL. THE AVERAGE HIGH WAS 77.2
DEGREES AND THE AVERAGE LOW WAS 57.4 DEGREES. THE HIGHEST
TEMPERATURE FOR THE MONTH WAS 93 DEGREES...WHICH OCCURRED ON THE
9TH. THE COLDEST TEMPERATURE FOR THE MONTH WAS 43 DEGREES...WHICH
OCCURRED ON THE 1ST.

THE TOTAL PRECIPITATION FOR JUNE WAS 4.46 INCHES...WHICH WAS -0.22
INCHES BELOW NORMAL. THE GREATEST 24-HOUR PRECIPITATION AMOUNT WAS
1.39 INCHES...WHICH OCCURRED FROM THE 11TH TO THE 12TH.

...RECORDS...

AT 220 PM ON JUNE 9TH...THE TEMPERATURE AT THE ROCHETER AIRPORT
REACHED 93 DEGREES. THIS TIES THE RECORD HIGH FOR THE DATE...SET IN
1973.

...DISCUSSION...

IN THE MONTH OF JUNE...ROCHESTER WAS SLIGHTLY BELOW NORMAL FOR
TEMPERATURE. THE COLDEST PERIOD OCCURRED FROM THE 26TH THROUGH THE
30TH...WHERE THE AVERAGE DAILY TEMPERATURE WAS 1 TO 5 DEGREES BELOW
NORMAL. THE WARMEST STRETCH OCCURRED FROM THE 3RD THROUGH
10TH...WHERE THE DAILY AVERAGE TEMPERATURE RANGED FROM 1 TO 10
DEGREES ABOVE NORMAL. THERE WAS 1 DAY THE TEMPERATURE CLIMBED AT OR
ABOVE 90 DEGREES. TYPICALLY...THERE ARE 3 DAYS THE TEMPERATURE RISES
AT OR ABOVE 90 DEGREES.

ROCHESTER WAS SLIGHTLY DRYER THAN NORMAL DURING THE MONTH OF JUNE.
THE WETTEST PERIOD OCCURRED FROM THE 10TH THROUGH THE 13TH...WHERE
1.71 INCHES OF PRECIPITATION FELL. THERE WERE 12 DAYS OF MEASURABLE
PRECIPITATION DURING THE MONTH. OF THOSE 12 DAYS...THERE WAS 1 DAY
WHERE ONE INCH OR MORE OF PRECIPITATION FELL. THERE WERE 17 DAYS
DURING THE MONTH WHERE ZERO PRECIPITATION WAS OBSERVED.

LOOKING AT THIS PAST MONTH...THERE WERE TWO SIGNIFICANT DAYS WITH
SEVERE WEATHER. ON JUNE 22ND...A SYSTEM OF STRONG THUNDERSTORMS
MOVED THROUGH IN THE EARLY MORNING FROM THE WEST. THE AREAS WHERE
THE STORMS WERE MOST PREVALENT WERE ACROSS NORTHEAST IOWA AND INTO
SOUTHERN WISCONSIN. THE STORMS CAUSED STRAIGHT LINE WIND DAMAGE AND
THERE WERE 3 CONFIRMED TORNADOES. IN ADDITION...THERE WAS FLOODING
THAT OCCURRED WHEN 2 TO 5 INCHES OF RAIN FELL IN A SHORT PERIOD OF
TIME. THE ROCHESTER AIRPORT RECEIVED 0.71 INCHES OF RAIN.

THE NEXT EVENT WAS ON JUNE 29TH. A SYSTEM OF STORMS MOVED THROUGH IN
THE EARLY AFTERNOON INTO THE EVENING. AS THUNDERSTORMS MOVED
SOUTH...THE BIGGEST IMPACT WAS THE HAIL PRODUCED. THERE WERE GUSTY
WINDS ASSOCIATED WITH A FEW OF THE STORMS...REACHING 40 TO 45 MPH.
IN ADDITION...HEAVY RAIN LED TO LOCALIZED RURAL FLOODING. HAIL
REPORTS RANGED FROM 0.25 INCHES TO 1.75 INCHES IN DIAMETER. THE
HIGHEST RAINFALL AMOUNTS WERE A LITTLE OVER 2 INCHES IN SOUTHERN
WISCONSIN. THE ROCHESTER AIRPORT RECEIVED 0.24 INCHES OF RAIN.

...LOOKING AHEAD TO JULY...

THE AVERAGE TEMPERATURE FOR THE MONTH IS 67.6 DEGREES. THE AVERAGE
HIGH TEMPERATURE IS 76.9 DEGREES AND THE AVERAGE LOW TEMPERATURE IS
58.2 DEGREES. ROCHESTER NORMALLY RECEIVES 3 DAYS OF 90 DEGREES AT OR
ABOVE. THE HIGHEST TEMPERATURE IN THE MONTH WAS 108 DEGREES WHICH
OCCURRED ON THE 14TH IN 1936.

THE AVERAGE PRECIPITATION IN JULY IS 4.55 INCHES WITH TYPICALLY 11
DAYS OF MEASURABLE PRECIPITATION. THERE ARE NORMALLY 7 DAYS WITH
THUNDERSTORMS DURING JULY IN ROCHESTER. THE GREATEST ONE DAY
PRECIPITATION WAS 7.47 INCHES WHICH OCCURRED ON THE 11TH IN 1981.

$$

JSY


000
NOUS43 KARX 011528
PNSARX

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE LA CROSSE WI
821 AM CDT MON JUL 1 2015

...JUNE IN ROCHESTER MINNESOTA WAS SLIGHTLY DRYER THAN NORMAL AND
HAD SLIGHTLY BELOW NORMAL TEMPERATURES...

THE AVERAGE JUNE TEMPERATURE AT ROCHESTER WAS 67.3 DEGREES...WHICH
WAS THREE TENTHS OF A DEGREE BELOW NORMAL. THE AVERAGE HIGH WAS 77.2
DEGREES AND THE AVERAGE LOW WAS 57.4 DEGREES. THE HIGHEST
TEMPERATURE FOR THE MONTH WAS 93 DEGREES...WHICH OCCURRED ON THE
9TH. THE COLDEST TEMPERATURE FOR THE MONTH WAS 43 DEGREES...WHICH
OCCURRED ON THE 1ST.

THE TOTAL PRECIPITATION FOR JUNE WAS 4.46 INCHES...WHICH WAS -0.22
INCHES BELOW NORMAL. THE GREATEST 24-HOUR PRECIPITATION AMOUNT WAS
1.39 INCHES...WHICH OCCURRED FROM THE 11TH TO THE 12TH.

...RECORDS...

AT 220 PM ON JUNE 9TH...THE TEMPERATURE AT THE ROCHETER AIRPORT
REACHED 93 DEGREES. THIS TIES THE RECORD HIGH FOR THE DATE...SET IN
1973.

...DISCUSSION...

IN THE MONTH OF JUNE...ROCHESTER WAS SLIGHTLY BELOW NORMAL FOR
TEMPERATURE. THE COLDEST PERIOD OCCURRED FROM THE 26TH THROUGH THE
30TH...WHERE THE AVERAGE DAILY TEMPERATURE WAS 1 TO 5 DEGREES BELOW
NORMAL. THE WARMEST STRETCH OCCURRED FROM THE 3RD THROUGH
10TH...WHERE THE DAILY AVERAGE TEMPERATURE RANGED FROM 1 TO 10
DEGREES ABOVE NORMAL. THERE WAS 1 DAY THE TEMPERATURE CLIMBED AT OR
ABOVE 90 DEGREES. TYPICALLY...THERE ARE 3 DAYS THE TEMPERATURE RISES
AT OR ABOVE 90 DEGREES.

ROCHESTER WAS SLIGHTLY DRYER THAN NORMAL DURING THE MONTH OF JUNE.
THE WETTEST PERIOD OCCURRED FROM THE 10TH THROUGH THE 13TH...WHERE
1.71 INCHES OF PRECIPITATION FELL. THERE WERE 12 DAYS OF MEASURABLE
PRECIPITATION DURING THE MONTH. OF THOSE 12 DAYS...THERE WAS 1 DAY
WHERE ONE INCH OR MORE OF PRECIPITATION FELL. THERE WERE 17 DAYS
DURING THE MONTH WHERE ZERO PRECIPITATION WAS OBSERVED.

LOOKING AT THIS PAST MONTH...THERE WERE TWO SIGNIFICANT DAYS WITH
SEVERE WEATHER. ON JUNE 22ND...A SYSTEM OF STRONG THUNDERSTORMS
MOVED THROUGH IN THE EARLY MORNING FROM THE WEST. THE AREAS WHERE
THE STORMS WERE MOST PREVALENT WERE ACROSS NORTHEAST IOWA AND INTO
SOUTHERN WISCONSIN. THE STORMS CAUSED STRAIGHT LINE WIND DAMAGE AND
THERE WERE 3 CONFIRMED TORNADOES. IN ADDITION...THERE WAS FLOODING
THAT OCCURRED WHEN 2 TO 5 INCHES OF RAIN FELL IN A SHORT PERIOD OF
TIME. THE ROCHESTER AIRPORT RECEIVED 0.71 INCHES OF RAIN.

THE NEXT EVENT WAS ON JUNE 29TH. A SYSTEM OF STORMS MOVED THROUGH IN
THE EARLY AFTERNOON INTO THE EVENING. AS THUNDERSTORMS MOVED
SOUTH...THE BIGGEST IMPACT WAS THE HAIL PRODUCED. THERE WERE GUSTY
WINDS ASSOCIATED WITH A FEW OF THE STORMS...REACHING 40 TO 45 MPH.
IN ADDITION...HEAVY RAIN LED TO LOCALIZED RURAL FLOODING. HAIL
REPORTS RANGED FROM 0.25 INCHES TO 1.75 INCHES IN DIAMETER. THE
HIGHEST RAINFALL AMOUNTS WERE A LITTLE OVER 2 INCHES IN SOUTHERN
WISCONSIN. THE ROCHESTER AIRPORT RECEIVED 0.24 INCHES OF RAIN.

...LOOKING AHEAD TO JULY...

THE AVERAGE TEMPERATURE FOR THE MONTH IS 67.6 DEGREES. THE AVERAGE
HIGH TEMPERATURE IS 76.9 DEGREES AND THE AVERAGE LOW TEMPERATURE IS
58.2 DEGREES. ROCHESTER NORMALLY RECEIVES 3 DAYS OF 90 DEGREES AT OR
ABOVE. THE HIGHEST TEMPERATURE IN THE MONTH WAS 108 DEGREES WHICH
OCCURRED ON THE 14TH IN 1936.

THE AVERAGE PRECIPITATION IN JULY IS 4.55 INCHES WITH TYPICALLY 11
DAYS OF MEASURABLE PRECIPITATION. THERE ARE NORMALLY 7 DAYS WITH
THUNDERSTORMS DURING JULY IN ROCHESTER. THE GREATEST ONE DAY
PRECIPITATION WAS 7.47 INCHES WHICH OCCURRED ON THE 11TH IN 1981.

$$

JSY


000
NOUS43 KARX 011528
PNSARX

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE LA CROSSE WI
821 AM CDT MON JUL 1 2015

...JUNE IN ROCHESTER MINNESOTA WAS SLIGHTLY DRYER THAN NORMAL AND
HAD SLIGHTLY BELOW NORMAL TEMPERATURES...

THE AVERAGE JUNE TEMPERATURE AT ROCHESTER WAS 67.3 DEGREES...WHICH
WAS THREE TENTHS OF A DEGREE BELOW NORMAL. THE AVERAGE HIGH WAS 77.2
DEGREES AND THE AVERAGE LOW WAS 57.4 DEGREES. THE HIGHEST
TEMPERATURE FOR THE MONTH WAS 93 DEGREES...WHICH OCCURRED ON THE
9TH. THE COLDEST TEMPERATURE FOR THE MONTH WAS 43 DEGREES...WHICH
OCCURRED ON THE 1ST.

THE TOTAL PRECIPITATION FOR JUNE WAS 4.46 INCHES...WHICH WAS -0.22
INCHES BELOW NORMAL. THE GREATEST 24-HOUR PRECIPITATION AMOUNT WAS
1.39 INCHES...WHICH OCCURRED FROM THE 11TH TO THE 12TH.

...RECORDS...

AT 220 PM ON JUNE 9TH...THE TEMPERATURE AT THE ROCHETER AIRPORT
REACHED 93 DEGREES. THIS TIES THE RECORD HIGH FOR THE DATE...SET IN
1973.

...DISCUSSION...

IN THE MONTH OF JUNE...ROCHESTER WAS SLIGHTLY BELOW NORMAL FOR
TEMPERATURE. THE COLDEST PERIOD OCCURRED FROM THE 26TH THROUGH THE
30TH...WHERE THE AVERAGE DAILY TEMPERATURE WAS 1 TO 5 DEGREES BELOW
NORMAL. THE WARMEST STRETCH OCCURRED FROM THE 3RD THROUGH
10TH...WHERE THE DAILY AVERAGE TEMPERATURE RANGED FROM 1 TO 10
DEGREES ABOVE NORMAL. THERE WAS 1 DAY THE TEMPERATURE CLIMBED AT OR
ABOVE 90 DEGREES. TYPICALLY...THERE ARE 3 DAYS THE TEMPERATURE RISES
AT OR ABOVE 90 DEGREES.

ROCHESTER WAS SLIGHTLY DRYER THAN NORMAL DURING THE MONTH OF JUNE.
THE WETTEST PERIOD OCCURRED FROM THE 10TH THROUGH THE 13TH...WHERE
1.71 INCHES OF PRECIPITATION FELL. THERE WERE 12 DAYS OF MEASURABLE
PRECIPITATION DURING THE MONTH. OF THOSE 12 DAYS...THERE WAS 1 DAY
WHERE ONE INCH OR MORE OF PRECIPITATION FELL. THERE WERE 17 DAYS
DURING THE MONTH WHERE ZERO PRECIPITATION WAS OBSERVED.

LOOKING AT THIS PAST MONTH...THERE WERE TWO SIGNIFICANT DAYS WITH
SEVERE WEATHER. ON JUNE 22ND...A SYSTEM OF STRONG THUNDERSTORMS
MOVED THROUGH IN THE EARLY MORNING FROM THE WEST. THE AREAS WHERE
THE STORMS WERE MOST PREVALENT WERE ACROSS NORTHEAST IOWA AND INTO
SOUTHERN WISCONSIN. THE STORMS CAUSED STRAIGHT LINE WIND DAMAGE AND
THERE WERE 3 CONFIRMED TORNADOES. IN ADDITION...THERE WAS FLOODING
THAT OCCURRED WHEN 2 TO 5 INCHES OF RAIN FELL IN A SHORT PERIOD OF
TIME. THE ROCHESTER AIRPORT RECEIVED 0.71 INCHES OF RAIN.

THE NEXT EVENT WAS ON JUNE 29TH. A SYSTEM OF STORMS MOVED THROUGH IN
THE EARLY AFTERNOON INTO THE EVENING. AS THUNDERSTORMS MOVED
SOUTH...THE BIGGEST IMPACT WAS THE HAIL PRODUCED. THERE WERE GUSTY
WINDS ASSOCIATED WITH A FEW OF THE STORMS...REACHING 40 TO 45 MPH.
IN ADDITION...HEAVY RAIN LED TO LOCALIZED RURAL FLOODING. HAIL
REPORTS RANGED FROM 0.25 INCHES TO 1.75 INCHES IN DIAMETER. THE
HIGHEST RAINFALL AMOUNTS WERE A LITTLE OVER 2 INCHES IN SOUTHERN
WISCONSIN. THE ROCHESTER AIRPORT RECEIVED 0.24 INCHES OF RAIN.

...LOOKING AHEAD TO JULY...

THE AVERAGE TEMPERATURE FOR THE MONTH IS 67.6 DEGREES. THE AVERAGE
HIGH TEMPERATURE IS 76.9 DEGREES AND THE AVERAGE LOW TEMPERATURE IS
58.2 DEGREES. ROCHESTER NORMALLY RECEIVES 3 DAYS OF 90 DEGREES AT OR
ABOVE. THE HIGHEST TEMPERATURE IN THE MONTH WAS 108 DEGREES WHICH
OCCURRED ON THE 14TH IN 1936.

THE AVERAGE PRECIPITATION IN JULY IS 4.55 INCHES WITH TYPICALLY 11
DAYS OF MEASURABLE PRECIPITATION. THERE ARE NORMALLY 7 DAYS WITH
THUNDERSTORMS DURING JULY IN ROCHESTER. THE GREATEST ONE DAY
PRECIPITATION WAS 7.47 INCHES WHICH OCCURRED ON THE 11TH IN 1981.

$$

JSY


000
NOUS41 KCLE 011522
PNSCLE

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE CLEVELAND OH
1122 AM EDT WED JUL 01 2015

...TOP 10 JUNE RAINFALL TOTALS ACROSS NORTHERN OHIO...

JUNE WAS AN ACTIVE MONTH ACROSS MUCH OF NORTHERN OHIO AND NORTHWEST
PENNSYLVANIA AS SEVERAL WEATHER SYSTEMS IMPACTED THE REGION WITH
HEAVY RAINFALL. SEVERAL CLIMATE SITES RECEIVED RAINFALL ON AN ALMOST
DAILY BASIS WITH AKRON-CANTON AND YOUNGSTOWN RECEIVING AT LEAST A
TRACE OF RAIN ON 12 CONSECUTIVE DAYS AND MANSFIELD RECEIVING AT
LEAST A TRACE OF RAIN ON 10 CONSECUTIVE DAYS IN THE MIDDLE OF JUNE.
RECORDED BELOW ARE THE JUNE MONTHLY RAINFALL TOTALS FOR ALL OF
CLIMATE SITES WITHIN THE NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE CLEVELAND AREA OF
RESPONSIBILITY. FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION REGARDING THE CLIMATE
SUMMARY FOR THE MONTH OF JUNE...PLEASE CHECK OUR WEBSITE AT
WWW.WEATHER.GOV/CLEVELAND AND LOOK FOR THE CLIMATE AND PAST WEATHER
TAB.


***JUNE 2015 RAINFALL IN AKRON-CANTON OHIO***

AKRON-CANTON REGIONAL AIRPORT (CAK) RECEIVED A TOTAL OF 8.31 INCHES
OF RAIN IN THE MONTH OF JUNE. THIS MAKES JUNE 2015 THE 4TH WETTEST
JUNE AT CAK. THE AVERAGE JUNE RAINFALL AT CAK IS 3.83 INCHES. ONLY 6
DAYS DID NOT RECORD AT LEAST A TRACE OF PRECIPITATION AT CAK.

TOP TEN JUNE MONTHLY RAINFALL TOTALS AT CAK:

YEAR   JUNE PRECIPITATION
1924        11.12"
2014         9.28"
1989         8.42"
2015         8.31"
1920         8.09"
1896         7.79"
2008         7.76"
1902         7.23"
1970         7.06"
1996         6.63"


***JUNE 2015 RAINFALL IN CLEVELAND OHIO***

CLEVELAND HOPKINS INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT (CLE) RECEIVED A TOTAL OF
8.52 INCHES OF RAIN IN THE MONTH OF JUNE. THIS MAKES JUNE 2015 THE
3RD WETTEST JUNE AT CLE. THE AVERAGE JUNE RAINFALL AT CLE IS 3.43
INCHES. ONLY 9 DAYS DID NOT RECORD AT LEAST A TRACE OF PRECIPITATION
AT CLE.

TOP TEN JUNE MONTHLY RAINFALL TOTALS AT CLE:

YEAR   JUNE PRECIPITATION
1902         9.77"
1972         9.06"
2015         8.52"
1881         8.07"
1987         7.94"
2013         7.90"
1885         7.22"
1973         6.72"
1937         6.64"
2014         6.26"


***JUNE 2015 RAINFALL IN MANSFIELD OHIO***

MANSFIELD LAHM REGIONAL AIRPORT (MFD) RECEIVED A TOTAL OF 7.44
INCHES OF RAIN IN THE MONTH OF JUNE. THIS MAKES JUNE 2015 THE 8TH
WETTEST JUNE AT MFD. THE AVERAGE JUNE RAINFALL AT MFD IS 4.75
INCHES.ONLY 9 DAYS DID NOT RECORD AT LEAST A TRACE OF PRECIPITATION
AT MFD.

TOP TEN JUNE MONTHLY RAINFALL TOTALS AT MFD:

YEAR   JUNE PRECIPITATION
1947        10.27"
1981        10.00"
2010         8.88"
1987         8.87"
1940         8.79"
1937         8.59"
1957         7.57"
2015         7.44"
1998         7.29"
1973         7.07"


***JUNE 2015 RAINFALL IN TOLEDO OHIO***

TOLEDO EXPRESS AIRPORT (TOL) RECEIVED A TOTAL OF 7.22 INCHES OF RAIN
IN THE MONTH OF JUNE. THIS MAKES JUNE 2015 THE 4TH WETTEST JUNE AT
TOL. THE AVERAGE JUNE RAINFALL AT TOL IS 3.57 INCHES.

TOP TEN JUNE MONTHLY RAINFALL TOTALS AT TOL:

YEAR   JUNE PRECIPITATION
1981         8.48"
1911         7.86"
1881         7.36"
2015         7.22"
1989         6.74"
1937         6.67"
1892         6.58"
1973         6.51"
2013         6.35"
1902         6.19"


***JUNE 2015 RAINFALL IN YOUNGSTOWN OHIO***

YOUNGSTOWN-WARREN REGIONAL AIRPORT (YNG) RECEIVED A TOTAL OF 9.02
INCHES OF RAIN IN THE MONTH OF JUNE. THIS MAKES JUNE 2015 THE 3RD
WETTEST JUNE AT YNG. THE AVERAGE JUNE RAINFALL AT YNG IS 3.79
INCHES. ONLY 6 DAYS DID NOT RECORD AT LEAST A TRACE OF PRECIPITATION
AT YNG.

TOP TEN JUNE MONTHLY RAINFALL TOTALS AT YNG:

YEAR   JUNE PRECIPITATION
1986        10.66"
1989        10.09"
2015         9.02"
1957         6.97"
1987         6.57"
1928         6.12"
1917         6.07"
2006         5.97"
1920         5.92"
1977         5.75"


***JUNE 2015 RAINFALL IN ERIE PENNSYLVANIA***

ERIE INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT (ERI) RECEIVED A TOTAL OF 5.28 INCHES OF
RAIN IN THE MONTH OF JUNE. THIS MAKES JUNE 2015 THE 23RD WETTEST
JUNE AT ERI. THE AVERAGE JUNE RAINFALL AT ERI IS 3.76 INCHES.

TOP TEN JUNE MONTHLY RAINFALL TOTALS AT ERI:

YEAR   JUNE PRECIPITATION
1996         8.35"
1957         7.74"
1986         7.71"
1972         7.50"
2013         7.28"
1885         6.84"
1937         6.64"
1892         6.48"
1881         6.37"
1917         6.35"

$$

NWS CLEVELAND



000
NOUS41 KCLE 011522
PNSCLE

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE CLEVELAND OH
1122 AM EDT WED JUL 01 2015

...TOP 10 JUNE RAINFALL TOTALS ACROSS NORTHERN OHIO...

JUNE WAS AN ACTIVE MONTH ACROSS MUCH OF NORTHERN OHIO AND NORTHWEST
PENNSYLVANIA AS SEVERAL WEATHER SYSTEMS IMPACTED THE REGION WITH
HEAVY RAINFALL. SEVERAL CLIMATE SITES RECEIVED RAINFALL ON AN ALMOST
DAILY BASIS WITH AKRON-CANTON AND YOUNGSTOWN RECEIVING AT LEAST A
TRACE OF RAIN ON 12 CONSECUTIVE DAYS AND MANSFIELD RECEIVING AT
LEAST A TRACE OF RAIN ON 10 CONSECUTIVE DAYS IN THE MIDDLE OF JUNE.
RECORDED BELOW ARE THE JUNE MONTHLY RAINFALL TOTALS FOR ALL OF
CLIMATE SITES WITHIN THE NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE CLEVELAND AREA OF
RESPONSIBILITY. FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION REGARDING THE CLIMATE
SUMMARY FOR THE MONTH OF JUNE...PLEASE CHECK OUR WEBSITE AT
WWW.WEATHER.GOV/CLEVELAND AND LOOK FOR THE CLIMATE AND PAST WEATHER
TAB.


***JUNE 2015 RAINFALL IN AKRON-CANTON OHIO***

AKRON-CANTON REGIONAL AIRPORT (CAK) RECEIVED A TOTAL OF 8.31 INCHES
OF RAIN IN THE MONTH OF JUNE. THIS MAKES JUNE 2015 THE 4TH WETTEST
JUNE AT CAK. THE AVERAGE JUNE RAINFALL AT CAK IS 3.83 INCHES. ONLY 6
DAYS DID NOT RECORD AT LEAST A TRACE OF PRECIPITATION AT CAK.

TOP TEN JUNE MONTHLY RAINFALL TOTALS AT CAK:

YEAR   JUNE PRECIPITATION
1924        11.12"
2014         9.28"
1989         8.42"
2015         8.31"
1920         8.09"
1896         7.79"
2008         7.76"
1902         7.23"
1970         7.06"
1996         6.63"


***JUNE 2015 RAINFALL IN CLEVELAND OHIO***

CLEVELAND HOPKINS INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT (CLE) RECEIVED A TOTAL OF
8.52 INCHES OF RAIN IN THE MONTH OF JUNE. THIS MAKES JUNE 2015 THE
3RD WETTEST JUNE AT CLE. THE AVERAGE JUNE RAINFALL AT CLE IS 3.43
INCHES. ONLY 9 DAYS DID NOT RECORD AT LEAST A TRACE OF PRECIPITATION
AT CLE.

TOP TEN JUNE MONTHLY RAINFALL TOTALS AT CLE:

YEAR   JUNE PRECIPITATION
1902         9.77"
1972         9.06"
2015         8.52"
1881         8.07"
1987         7.94"
2013         7.90"
1885         7.22"
1973         6.72"
1937         6.64"
2014         6.26"


***JUNE 2015 RAINFALL IN MANSFIELD OHIO***

MANSFIELD LAHM REGIONAL AIRPORT (MFD) RECEIVED A TOTAL OF 7.44
INCHES OF RAIN IN THE MONTH OF JUNE. THIS MAKES JUNE 2015 THE 8TH
WETTEST JUNE AT MFD. THE AVERAGE JUNE RAINFALL AT MFD IS 4.75
INCHES.ONLY 9 DAYS DID NOT RECORD AT LEAST A TRACE OF PRECIPITATION
AT MFD.

TOP TEN JUNE MONTHLY RAINFALL TOTALS AT MFD:

YEAR   JUNE PRECIPITATION
1947        10.27"
1981        10.00"
2010         8.88"
1987         8.87"
1940         8.79"
1937         8.59"
1957         7.57"
2015         7.44"
1998         7.29"
1973         7.07"


***JUNE 2015 RAINFALL IN TOLEDO OHIO***

TOLEDO EXPRESS AIRPORT (TOL) RECEIVED A TOTAL OF 7.22 INCHES OF RAIN
IN THE MONTH OF JUNE. THIS MAKES JUNE 2015 THE 4TH WETTEST JUNE AT
TOL. THE AVERAGE JUNE RAINFALL AT TOL IS 3.57 INCHES.

TOP TEN JUNE MONTHLY RAINFALL TOTALS AT TOL:

YEAR   JUNE PRECIPITATION
1981         8.48"
1911         7.86"
1881         7.36"
2015         7.22"
1989         6.74"
1937         6.67"
1892         6.58"
1973         6.51"
2013         6.35"
1902         6.19"


***JUNE 2015 RAINFALL IN YOUNGSTOWN OHIO***

YOUNGSTOWN-WARREN REGIONAL AIRPORT (YNG) RECEIVED A TOTAL OF 9.02
INCHES OF RAIN IN THE MONTH OF JUNE. THIS MAKES JUNE 2015 THE 3RD
WETTEST JUNE AT YNG. THE AVERAGE JUNE RAINFALL AT YNG IS 3.79
INCHES. ONLY 6 DAYS DID NOT RECORD AT LEAST A TRACE OF PRECIPITATION
AT YNG.

TOP TEN JUNE MONTHLY RAINFALL TOTALS AT YNG:

YEAR   JUNE PRECIPITATION
1986        10.66"
1989        10.09"
2015         9.02"
1957         6.97"
1987         6.57"
1928         6.12"
1917         6.07"
2006         5.97"
1920         5.92"
1977         5.75"


***JUNE 2015 RAINFALL IN ERIE PENNSYLVANIA***

ERIE INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT (ERI) RECEIVED A TOTAL OF 5.28 INCHES OF
RAIN IN THE MONTH OF JUNE. THIS MAKES JUNE 2015 THE 23RD WETTEST
JUNE AT ERI. THE AVERAGE JUNE RAINFALL AT ERI IS 3.76 INCHES.

TOP TEN JUNE MONTHLY RAINFALL TOTALS AT ERI:

YEAR   JUNE PRECIPITATION
1996         8.35"
1957         7.74"
1986         7.71"
1972         7.50"
2013         7.28"
1885         6.84"
1937         6.64"
1892         6.48"
1881         6.37"
1917         6.35"

$$

NWS CLEVELAND


000
NOUS41 KCLE 011522
PNSCLE

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE CLEVELAND OH
1122 AM EDT WED JUL 01 2015

...TOP 10 JUNE RAINFALL TOTALS ACROSS NORTHERN OHIO...

JUNE WAS AN ACTIVE MONTH ACROSS MUCH OF NORTHERN OHIO AND NORTHWEST
PENNSYLVANIA AS SEVERAL WEATHER SYSTEMS IMPACTED THE REGION WITH
HEAVY RAINFALL. SEVERAL CLIMATE SITES RECEIVED RAINFALL ON AN ALMOST
DAILY BASIS WITH AKRON-CANTON AND YOUNGSTOWN RECEIVING AT LEAST A
TRACE OF RAIN ON 12 CONSECUTIVE DAYS AND MANSFIELD RECEIVING AT
LEAST A TRACE OF RAIN ON 10 CONSECUTIVE DAYS IN THE MIDDLE OF JUNE.
RECORDED BELOW ARE THE JUNE MONTHLY RAINFALL TOTALS FOR ALL OF
CLIMATE SITES WITHIN THE NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE CLEVELAND AREA OF
RESPONSIBILITY. FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION REGARDING THE CLIMATE
SUMMARY FOR THE MONTH OF JUNE...PLEASE CHECK OUR WEBSITE AT
WWW.WEATHER.GOV/CLEVELAND AND LOOK FOR THE CLIMATE AND PAST WEATHER
TAB.


***JUNE 2015 RAINFALL IN AKRON-CANTON OHIO***

AKRON-CANTON REGIONAL AIRPORT (CAK) RECEIVED A TOTAL OF 8.31 INCHES
OF RAIN IN THE MONTH OF JUNE. THIS MAKES JUNE 2015 THE 4TH WETTEST
JUNE AT CAK. THE AVERAGE JUNE RAINFALL AT CAK IS 3.83 INCHES. ONLY 6
DAYS DID NOT RECORD AT LEAST A TRACE OF PRECIPITATION AT CAK.

TOP TEN JUNE MONTHLY RAINFALL TOTALS AT CAK:

YEAR   JUNE PRECIPITATION
1924        11.12"
2014         9.28"
1989         8.42"
2015         8.31"
1920         8.09"
1896         7.79"
2008         7.76"
1902         7.23"
1970         7.06"
1996         6.63"


***JUNE 2015 RAINFALL IN CLEVELAND OHIO***

CLEVELAND HOPKINS INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT (CLE) RECEIVED A TOTAL OF
8.52 INCHES OF RAIN IN THE MONTH OF JUNE. THIS MAKES JUNE 2015 THE
3RD WETTEST JUNE AT CLE. THE AVERAGE JUNE RAINFALL AT CLE IS 3.43
INCHES. ONLY 9 DAYS DID NOT RECORD AT LEAST A TRACE OF PRECIPITATION
AT CLE.

TOP TEN JUNE MONTHLY RAINFALL TOTALS AT CLE:

YEAR   JUNE PRECIPITATION
1902         9.77"
1972         9.06"
2015         8.52"
1881         8.07"
1987         7.94"
2013         7.90"
1885         7.22"
1973         6.72"
1937         6.64"
2014         6.26"


***JUNE 2015 RAINFALL IN MANSFIELD OHIO***

MANSFIELD LAHM REGIONAL AIRPORT (MFD) RECEIVED A TOTAL OF 7.44
INCHES OF RAIN IN THE MONTH OF JUNE. THIS MAKES JUNE 2015 THE 8TH
WETTEST JUNE AT MFD. THE AVERAGE JUNE RAINFALL AT MFD IS 4.75
INCHES.ONLY 9 DAYS DID NOT RECORD AT LEAST A TRACE OF PRECIPITATION
AT MFD.

TOP TEN JUNE MONTHLY RAINFALL TOTALS AT MFD:

YEAR   JUNE PRECIPITATION
1947        10.27"
1981        10.00"
2010         8.88"
1987         8.87"
1940         8.79"
1937         8.59"
1957         7.57"
2015         7.44"
1998         7.29"
1973         7.07"


***JUNE 2015 RAINFALL IN TOLEDO OHIO***

TOLEDO EXPRESS AIRPORT (TOL) RECEIVED A TOTAL OF 7.22 INCHES OF RAIN
IN THE MONTH OF JUNE. THIS MAKES JUNE 2015 THE 4TH WETTEST JUNE AT
TOL. THE AVERAGE JUNE RAINFALL AT TOL IS 3.57 INCHES.

TOP TEN JUNE MONTHLY RAINFALL TOTALS AT TOL:

YEAR   JUNE PRECIPITATION
1981         8.48"
1911         7.86"
1881         7.36"
2015         7.22"
1989         6.74"
1937         6.67"
1892         6.58"
1973         6.51"
2013         6.35"
1902         6.19"


***JUNE 2015 RAINFALL IN YOUNGSTOWN OHIO***

YOUNGSTOWN-WARREN REGIONAL AIRPORT (YNG) RECEIVED A TOTAL OF 9.02
INCHES OF RAIN IN THE MONTH OF JUNE. THIS MAKES JUNE 2015 THE 3RD
WETTEST JUNE AT YNG. THE AVERAGE JUNE RAINFALL AT YNG IS 3.79
INCHES. ONLY 6 DAYS DID NOT RECORD AT LEAST A TRACE OF PRECIPITATION
AT YNG.

TOP TEN JUNE MONTHLY RAINFALL TOTALS AT YNG:

YEAR   JUNE PRECIPITATION
1986        10.66"
1989        10.09"
2015         9.02"
1957         6.97"
1987         6.57"
1928         6.12"
1917         6.07"
2006         5.97"
1920         5.92"
1977         5.75"


***JUNE 2015 RAINFALL IN ERIE PENNSYLVANIA***

ERIE INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT (ERI) RECEIVED A TOTAL OF 5.28 INCHES OF
RAIN IN THE MONTH OF JUNE. THIS MAKES JUNE 2015 THE 23RD WETTEST
JUNE AT ERI. THE AVERAGE JUNE RAINFALL AT ERI IS 3.76 INCHES.

TOP TEN JUNE MONTHLY RAINFALL TOTALS AT ERI:

YEAR   JUNE PRECIPITATION
1996         8.35"
1957         7.74"
1986         7.71"
1972         7.50"
2013         7.28"
1885         6.84"
1937         6.64"
1892         6.48"
1881         6.37"
1917         6.35"

$$

NWS CLEVELAND


000
NOUS41 KCLE 011522
PNSCLE

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE CLEVELAND OH
1122 AM EDT WED JUL 01 2015

...TOP 10 JUNE RAINFALL TOTALS ACROSS NORTHERN OHIO...

JUNE WAS AN ACTIVE MONTH ACROSS MUCH OF NORTHERN OHIO AND NORTHWEST
PENNSYLVANIA AS SEVERAL WEATHER SYSTEMS IMPACTED THE REGION WITH
HEAVY RAINFALL. SEVERAL CLIMATE SITES RECEIVED RAINFALL ON AN ALMOST
DAILY BASIS WITH AKRON-CANTON AND YOUNGSTOWN RECEIVING AT LEAST A
TRACE OF RAIN ON 12 CONSECUTIVE DAYS AND MANSFIELD RECEIVING AT
LEAST A TRACE OF RAIN ON 10 CONSECUTIVE DAYS IN THE MIDDLE OF JUNE.
RECORDED BELOW ARE THE JUNE MONTHLY RAINFALL TOTALS FOR ALL OF
CLIMATE SITES WITHIN THE NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE CLEVELAND AREA OF
RESPONSIBILITY. FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION REGARDING THE CLIMATE
SUMMARY FOR THE MONTH OF JUNE...PLEASE CHECK OUR WEBSITE AT
WWW.WEATHER.GOV/CLEVELAND AND LOOK FOR THE CLIMATE AND PAST WEATHER
TAB.


***JUNE 2015 RAINFALL IN AKRON-CANTON OHIO***

AKRON-CANTON REGIONAL AIRPORT (CAK) RECEIVED A TOTAL OF 8.31 INCHES
OF RAIN IN THE MONTH OF JUNE. THIS MAKES JUNE 2015 THE 4TH WETTEST
JUNE AT CAK. THE AVERAGE JUNE RAINFALL AT CAK IS 3.83 INCHES. ONLY 6
DAYS DID NOT RECORD AT LEAST A TRACE OF PRECIPITATION AT CAK.

TOP TEN JUNE MONTHLY RAINFALL TOTALS AT CAK:

YEAR   JUNE PRECIPITATION
1924        11.12"
2014         9.28"
1989         8.42"
2015         8.31"
1920         8.09"
1896         7.79"
2008         7.76"
1902         7.23"
1970         7.06"
1996         6.63"


***JUNE 2015 RAINFALL IN CLEVELAND OHIO***

CLEVELAND HOPKINS INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT (CLE) RECEIVED A TOTAL OF
8.52 INCHES OF RAIN IN THE MONTH OF JUNE. THIS MAKES JUNE 2015 THE
3RD WETTEST JUNE AT CLE. THE AVERAGE JUNE RAINFALL AT CLE IS 3.43
INCHES. ONLY 9 DAYS DID NOT RECORD AT LEAST A TRACE OF PRECIPITATION
AT CLE.

TOP TEN JUNE MONTHLY RAINFALL TOTALS AT CLE:

YEAR   JUNE PRECIPITATION
1902         9.77"
1972         9.06"
2015         8.52"
1881         8.07"
1987         7.94"
2013         7.90"
1885         7.22"
1973         6.72"
1937         6.64"
2014         6.26"


***JUNE 2015 RAINFALL IN MANSFIELD OHIO***

MANSFIELD LAHM REGIONAL AIRPORT (MFD) RECEIVED A TOTAL OF 7.44
INCHES OF RAIN IN THE MONTH OF JUNE. THIS MAKES JUNE 2015 THE 8TH
WETTEST JUNE AT MFD. THE AVERAGE JUNE RAINFALL AT MFD IS 4.75
INCHES.ONLY 9 DAYS DID NOT RECORD AT LEAST A TRACE OF PRECIPITATION
AT MFD.

TOP TEN JUNE MONTHLY RAINFALL TOTALS AT MFD:

YEAR   JUNE PRECIPITATION
1947        10.27"
1981        10.00"
2010         8.88"
1987         8.87"
1940         8.79"
1937         8.59"
1957         7.57"
2015         7.44"
1998         7.29"
1973         7.07"


***JUNE 2015 RAINFALL IN TOLEDO OHIO***

TOLEDO EXPRESS AIRPORT (TOL) RECEIVED A TOTAL OF 7.22 INCHES OF RAIN
IN THE MONTH OF JUNE. THIS MAKES JUNE 2015 THE 4TH WETTEST JUNE AT
TOL. THE AVERAGE JUNE RAINFALL AT TOL IS 3.57 INCHES.

TOP TEN JUNE MONTHLY RAINFALL TOTALS AT TOL:

YEAR   JUNE PRECIPITATION
1981         8.48"
1911         7.86"
1881         7.36"
2015         7.22"
1989         6.74"
1937         6.67"
1892         6.58"
1973         6.51"
2013         6.35"
1902         6.19"


***JUNE 2015 RAINFALL IN YOUNGSTOWN OHIO***

YOUNGSTOWN-WARREN REGIONAL AIRPORT (YNG) RECEIVED A TOTAL OF 9.02
INCHES OF RAIN IN THE MONTH OF JUNE. THIS MAKES JUNE 2015 THE 3RD
WETTEST JUNE AT YNG. THE AVERAGE JUNE RAINFALL AT YNG IS 3.79
INCHES. ONLY 6 DAYS DID NOT RECORD AT LEAST A TRACE OF PRECIPITATION
AT YNG.

TOP TEN JUNE MONTHLY RAINFALL TOTALS AT YNG:

YEAR   JUNE PRECIPITATION
1986        10.66"
1989        10.09"
2015         9.02"
1957         6.97"
1987         6.57"
1928         6.12"
1917         6.07"
2006         5.97"
1920         5.92"
1977         5.75"


***JUNE 2015 RAINFALL IN ERIE PENNSYLVANIA***

ERIE INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT (ERI) RECEIVED A TOTAL OF 5.28 INCHES OF
RAIN IN THE MONTH OF JUNE. THIS MAKES JUNE 2015 THE 23RD WETTEST
JUNE AT ERI. THE AVERAGE JUNE RAINFALL AT ERI IS 3.76 INCHES.

TOP TEN JUNE MONTHLY RAINFALL TOTALS AT ERI:

YEAR   JUNE PRECIPITATION
1996         8.35"
1957         7.74"
1986         7.71"
1972         7.50"
2013         7.28"
1885         6.84"
1937         6.64"
1892         6.48"
1881         6.37"
1917         6.35"

$$

NWS CLEVELAND



000
NOUS43 KARX 011440
PNSARX

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE LA CROSSE WI
821 AM CDT MON JUL 1 2013

...JUNE IN ROCHESTER MINNESOTA WAS SLIGHTLY DRYER THAN NORMAL AND
HAD SLIGHTLY BELOW NORMAL TEMPERATURES...

THE AVERAGE JUNE TEMPERATURE AT ROCHESTER WAS 67.3 DEGREES...WHICH
WAS THREE TENTHS OF A DEGREE BELOW NORMAL. THE AVERAGE HIGH WAS 77.2
DEGREES AND THE AVERAGE LOW WAS 57.4 DEGREES. THE HIGHEST
TEMPERATURE FOR THE MONTH WAS 93 DEGREES...WHICH OCCURRED ON THE
9TH. THE COLDEST TEMPERATURE FOR THE MONTH WAS 43 DEGREES...WHICH
OCCURRED ON THE 1ST.

THE TOTAL PRECIPITATION FOR JUNE WAS 4.46 INCHES...WHICH WAS -0.22
INCHES BELOW NORMAL. THE GREATEST 24-HOUR PRECIPITATION AMOUNT WAS
1.39 INCHES...WHICH OCCURRED FROM THE 11TH TO THE 12TH.

...RECORDS...

AT 220 PM ON JUNE 9TH...THE TEMPERATURE AT THE ROCHETER AIRPORT
REACHED 93 DEGREES. THIS TIES THE RECORD HIGH FOR THE DATE...SET IN
1973.

...DISCUSSION...

IN THE MONTH OF JUNE...ROCHESTER WAS SLIGHTLY BELOW NORMAL FOR
TEMPERATURE. THE COLDEST PERIOD OCCURRED FROM THE 26TH THROUGH THE
30TH...WHERE THE AVERAGE DAILY TEMPERATURE WAS 1 TO 5 DEGREES BELOW
NORMAL. THE WARMEST STRETCH OCCURRED FROM THE 3RD THROUGH
10TH...WHERE THE DAILY AVERAGE TEMPERATURE RANGED FROM 1 TO 10
DEGREES ABOVE NORMAL. THERE WAS 1 DAY THE TEMPERATURE CLIMBED AT OR
ABOVE 90 DEGREES. TYPICALLY...THERE ARE 3 DAYS THE TEMPERATURE RISES
AT OR ABOVE 90 DEGREES.

ROCHESTER WAS SLIGHTLY DRYER THAN NORMAL DURING THE MONTH OF JUNE.
THE WETTEST PERIOD OCCURRED FROM THE 10TH THROUGH THE 13TH...WHERE
1.71 INCHES OF PRECIPITATION FELL. THERE WERE 12 DAYS OF MEASURABLE
PRECIPITATION DURING THE MONTH. OF THOSE 12 DAYS...THERE WAS 1 DAY
WHERE ONE INCH OR MORE OF PRECIPITATION FELL. THERE WERE 17 DAYS
DURING THE MONTH WHERE ZERO PRECIPITATION WAS OBSERVED.

LOOKING AT THIS PAST MONTH...THERE WERE TWO SIGNIFICANT DAYS WITH
SEVERE WEATHER. ON JUNE 22ND...A SYSTEM OF STRONG THUNDERSTORMS
MOVED THROUGH IN THE EARLY MORNING FROM THE WEST. THE AREAS WHERE
THE STORMS WERE MOST PREVALENT WERE ACROSS NORTHEAST IOWA AND INTO
SOUTHERN WISCONSIN. THE STORMS CAUSED STRAIGHT LINE WIND DAMAGE AND
THERE WERE 3 CONFIRMED TORNADOES. IN ADDITION...THERE WAS FLOODING
THAT OCCURRED WHEN 2 TO 5 INCHES OF RAIN FELL IN A SHORT PERIOD OF
TIME. THE ROCHESTER AIRPORT RECEIVED 0.71 INCHES OF RAIN.

THE NEXT EVENT WAS ON JUNE 29TH. A SYSTEM OF STORMS MOVED THROUGH IN
THE EARLY AFTERNOON INTO THE EVENING. AS THUNDERSTORMS MOVED
SOUTH...THE BIGGEST IMPACT WAS THE HAIL PRODUCED. THERE WERE GUSTY
WINDS ASSOCIATED WITH A FEW OF THE STORMS...REACHING 40 TO 45 MPH.
IN ADDITION...HEAVY RAIN LED TO LOCALIZED RURAL FLOODING. HAIL
REPORTS RANGED FROM 0.25 INCHES TO 1.75 INCHES IN DIAMETER. THE
HIGHEST RAINFALL AMOUNTS WERE A LITTLE OVER 2 INCHES IN SOUTHERN
WISCONSIN. THE ROCHESTER AIRPORT RECEIVED 0.24 INCHES OF RAIN.

...LOOKING AHEAD TO JULY...

THE AVERAGE TEMPERATURE FOR THE MONTH IS 67.6 DEGREES. THE AVERAGE
HIGH TEMPERATURE IS 76.9 DEGREES AND THE AVERAGE LOW TEMPERATURE IS
58.2 DEGREES. ROCHESTER NORMALLY RECEIVES 3 DAYS OF 90 DEGREES AT OR
ABOVE. THE HIGHEST TEMPERATURE IN THE MONTH WAS 108 DEGREES WHICH
OCCURRED ON THE 14TH IN 1936.

THE AVERAGE PRECIPITATION IN JULY IS 4.55 INCHES WITH TYPICALLY 11
DAYS OF MEASURABLE PRECIPITATION. THERE ARE NORMALLY 7 DAYS WITH
THUNDERSTORMS DURING JULY IN ROCHESTER. THE GREATEST ONE DAY
PRECIPITATION WAS 7.47 INCHES WHICH OCCURRED ON THE 11TH IN 1981.

$$

JSY



000
NOUS43 KARX 011440
PNSARX

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE LA CROSSE WI
821 AM CDT MON JUL 1 2013

...JUNE IN ROCHESTER MINNESOTA WAS SLIGHTLY DRYER THAN NORMAL AND
HAD SLIGHTLY BELOW NORMAL TEMPERATURES...

THE AVERAGE JUNE TEMPERATURE AT ROCHESTER WAS 67.3 DEGREES...WHICH
WAS THREE TENTHS OF A DEGREE BELOW NORMAL. THE AVERAGE HIGH WAS 77.2
DEGREES AND THE AVERAGE LOW WAS 57.4 DEGREES. THE HIGHEST
TEMPERATURE FOR THE MONTH WAS 93 DEGREES...WHICH OCCURRED ON THE
9TH. THE COLDEST TEMPERATURE FOR THE MONTH WAS 43 DEGREES...WHICH
OCCURRED ON THE 1ST.

THE TOTAL PRECIPITATION FOR JUNE WAS 4.46 INCHES...WHICH WAS -0.22
INCHES BELOW NORMAL. THE GREATEST 24-HOUR PRECIPITATION AMOUNT WAS
1.39 INCHES...WHICH OCCURRED FROM THE 11TH TO THE 12TH.

...RECORDS...

AT 220 PM ON JUNE 9TH...THE TEMPERATURE AT THE ROCHETER AIRPORT
REACHED 93 DEGREES. THIS TIES THE RECORD HIGH FOR THE DATE...SET IN
1973.

...DISCUSSION...

IN THE MONTH OF JUNE...ROCHESTER WAS SLIGHTLY BELOW NORMAL FOR
TEMPERATURE. THE COLDEST PERIOD OCCURRED FROM THE 26TH THROUGH THE
30TH...WHERE THE AVERAGE DAILY TEMPERATURE WAS 1 TO 5 DEGREES BELOW
NORMAL. THE WARMEST STRETCH OCCURRED FROM THE 3RD THROUGH
10TH...WHERE THE DAILY AVERAGE TEMPERATURE RANGED FROM 1 TO 10
DEGREES ABOVE NORMAL. THERE WAS 1 DAY THE TEMPERATURE CLIMBED AT OR
ABOVE 90 DEGREES. TYPICALLY...THERE ARE 3 DAYS THE TEMPERATURE RISES
AT OR ABOVE 90 DEGREES.

ROCHESTER WAS SLIGHTLY DRYER THAN NORMAL DURING THE MONTH OF JUNE.
THE WETTEST PERIOD OCCURRED FROM THE 10TH THROUGH THE 13TH...WHERE
1.71 INCHES OF PRECIPITATION FELL. THERE WERE 12 DAYS OF MEASURABLE
PRECIPITATION DURING THE MONTH. OF THOSE 12 DAYS...THERE WAS 1 DAY
WHERE ONE INCH OR MORE OF PRECIPITATION FELL. THERE WERE 17 DAYS
DURING THE MONTH WHERE ZERO PRECIPITATION WAS OBSERVED.

LOOKING AT THIS PAST MONTH...THERE WERE TWO SIGNIFICANT DAYS WITH
SEVERE WEATHER. ON JUNE 22ND...A SYSTEM OF STRONG THUNDERSTORMS
MOVED THROUGH IN THE EARLY MORNING FROM THE WEST. THE AREAS WHERE
THE STORMS WERE MOST PREVALENT WERE ACROSS NORTHEAST IOWA AND INTO
SOUTHERN WISCONSIN. THE STORMS CAUSED STRAIGHT LINE WIND DAMAGE AND
THERE WERE 3 CONFIRMED TORNADOES. IN ADDITION...THERE WAS FLOODING
THAT OCCURRED WHEN 2 TO 5 INCHES OF RAIN FELL IN A SHORT PERIOD OF
TIME. THE ROCHESTER AIRPORT RECEIVED 0.71 INCHES OF RAIN.

THE NEXT EVENT WAS ON JUNE 29TH. A SYSTEM OF STORMS MOVED THROUGH IN
THE EARLY AFTERNOON INTO THE EVENING. AS THUNDERSTORMS MOVED
SOUTH...THE BIGGEST IMPACT WAS THE HAIL PRODUCED. THERE WERE GUSTY
WINDS ASSOCIATED WITH A FEW OF THE STORMS...REACHING 40 TO 45 MPH.
IN ADDITION...HEAVY RAIN LED TO LOCALIZED RURAL FLOODING. HAIL
REPORTS RANGED FROM 0.25 INCHES TO 1.75 INCHES IN DIAMETER. THE
HIGHEST RAINFALL AMOUNTS WERE A LITTLE OVER 2 INCHES IN SOUTHERN
WISCONSIN. THE ROCHESTER AIRPORT RECEIVED 0.24 INCHES OF RAIN.

...LOOKING AHEAD TO JULY...

THE AVERAGE TEMPERATURE FOR THE MONTH IS 67.6 DEGREES. THE AVERAGE
HIGH TEMPERATURE IS 76.9 DEGREES AND THE AVERAGE LOW TEMPERATURE IS
58.2 DEGREES. ROCHESTER NORMALLY RECEIVES 3 DAYS OF 90 DEGREES AT OR
ABOVE. THE HIGHEST TEMPERATURE IN THE MONTH WAS 108 DEGREES WHICH
OCCURRED ON THE 14TH IN 1936.

THE AVERAGE PRECIPITATION IN JULY IS 4.55 INCHES WITH TYPICALLY 11
DAYS OF MEASURABLE PRECIPITATION. THERE ARE NORMALLY 7 DAYS WITH
THUNDERSTORMS DURING JULY IN ROCHESTER. THE GREATEST ONE DAY
PRECIPITATION WAS 7.47 INCHES WHICH OCCURRED ON THE 11TH IN 1981.

$$

JSY


000
NOUS46 KPDT 011420
PNSPDT

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE PENDLETON OREGON
713 AM PDT WED JUL 01 2015

...MONTHLY CLIMATE STATISTICS FOR NORTHEAST OREGON AND SOUTHEAST
WASHINGTON FOR THE MONTH OF JUNE...

LOCATION      AVG DEP  AVG DEP  AVG DEP  PCPN  DEP   MAX DAY MAX DAY MIN DAY
                       HI       LO                   WND     TMP     TMP

PENDLETON AP  73  +7.9 89  +11. 56  +4.8 0.06 -0.92  48  28  109 27  44  14
BEND          66  +8.7 82  +10. 49  +7.4 0.00 -0.70  26  10  97  9   38  4
KENNEWICK     77  +8.6 92  +10. 63  +7.1 0.00 -0.51  47  28  109 28  49  15
LA GRANDE     69  +7.5 85  +10. 54  +5.1 0.70 -0.84  43  28  100 27  41  14
DALLES AP     76  +8.6 90  +9.5 62  +7.8 0.00 -0.43  41  1   108 26  54  13
WALLA WALLA   77  +10. 90  +11. 63  +8.6 0.07 -1.21  46  28  113 28  51  13
YAKIMA AP     75  +11. 92  +13. 57  +8.9 0.01 -0.61  60  10  108 27  42  13
CONDON        68  +8.6 84  +10. 52  +6.8 0.05 -1.02  23  27  99  28  41  4
REDMOND AP    66  +7.3 85  +8.9 47  +5.7 0.11 -0.53  47  26  101 26  33  13
HEPPNER       71  +7.8 86  +9.6 55  +6.0 0.01 -1.37  35  28  104 28  44  4
MITCHELL 2 E  65  +6.7 81  +8.3 50  +5.2 0.94 -0.60  28  26  98  28  40  4
MORO          70  +8.5 84  +10. 55  +6.5 0.02 -0.64  31  12  105 28  43  3
DAYTON 1WSW   71  +8.2 86  +11. 56  +5.4 0.08 -1.19  31  28  109 29  41  13
BICKLETON     67  +9.1 80  +8.8 55  +9.3 0.00 -0.72  28  12  108 28  43  13
ELLENSBURG    71  +8.5 87  +11. 54  +5.3 0.06 -0.53  44  12  105 28  40  13
SISTERS       65  +8.2 85  +9.9 46  +6.4 0.03 -0.83  36  18  100 9   32  15
MADRAS        65  +5.9 85  +8.7 46  +3.1 0.00 -0.68  33  26  100 27  23  14
PRINEVILLE    68  +7.2 85  +9.1 50  +5.4 0.35 -0.57  29  26  100 27  37  13
SUNRIVER      61  +6.0 80  +8.2 42  +3.9 0.65 -0.76  13  22  95  28  29  25
CLE ELUM      68  +8.7 83  +11. 53  +5.9 0.10 -0.79  35  10  99  28  39  13
HERMISTON AP  75  +8.3 92  +12. 58  +4.3 0.02 -0.57  40  1   111 27  45  14
GOLDENDALE    68  +8.1 86  +10. 51  +5.2 0.00 -0.47  32  1   106 28  38  13
BAKER CITY    64  +5.0 83  +8.4 45  +1.7 0.32 -0.86  44  28  99  27  33  14
TRI CITIES AP 75  +7.7 93  +9.8 58  +5.6 0.00 -0.68  47  28  111 27  45  14
PROSSER       76  +8.3 90  +8.2 62  +8.4 0.00 -0.73  NA  NA  107 28  52  12
NN$$N
AVG=AVERAGE OF ALL HIGH AND LOW TEMPERATURES
DEP=DEPARTURE FROM NORMAL
AVG HI= AVERAGE HIGH TEMPERATURE
AVG LO=AVERAGE LOW TEMPERATURE
PCPN=TOTAL PRECIPITATION
MAXWND=PEAK WIND GUST IN MILES PER HOUR
DAY=DAY REPORTED
NA=ELEMENT NOT REPORTED
MAX TEMP=HIGHEST TEMPERATURE REPORTED
MIN TEMP=LOWEST TEMPERATURE REPORTED



000
NOUS46 KPDT 011420
PNSPDT

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE PENDLETON OREGON
713 AM PDT WED JUL 01 2015

...MONTHLY CLIMATE STATISTICS FOR NORTHEAST OREGON AND SOUTHEAST
WASHINGTON FOR THE MONTH OF JUNE...

LOCATION      AVG DEP  AVG DEP  AVG DEP  PCPN  DEP   MAX DAY MAX DAY MIN DAY
                       HI       LO                   WND     TMP     TMP

PENDLETON AP  73  +7.9 89  +11. 56  +4.8 0.06 -0.92  48  28  109 27  44  14
BEND          66  +8.7 82  +10. 49  +7.4 0.00 -0.70  26  10  97  9   38  4
KENNEWICK     77  +8.6 92  +10. 63  +7.1 0.00 -0.51  47  28  109 28  49  15
LA GRANDE     69  +7.5 85  +10. 54  +5.1 0.70 -0.84  43  28  100 27  41  14
DALLES AP     76  +8.6 90  +9.5 62  +7.8 0.00 -0.43  41  1   108 26  54  13
WALLA WALLA   77  +10. 90  +11. 63  +8.6 0.07 -1.21  46  28  113 28  51  13
YAKIMA AP     75  +11. 92  +13. 57  +8.9 0.01 -0.61  60  10  108 27  42  13
CONDON        68  +8.6 84  +10. 52  +6.8 0.05 -1.02  23  27  99  28  41  4
REDMOND AP    66  +7.3 85  +8.9 47  +5.7 0.11 -0.53  47  26  101 26  33  13
HEPPNER       71  +7.8 86  +9.6 55  +6.0 0.01 -1.37  35  28  104 28  44  4
MITCHELL 2 E  65  +6.7 81  +8.3 50  +5.2 0.94 -0.60  28  26  98  28  40  4
MORO          70  +8.5 84  +10. 55  +6.5 0.02 -0.64  31  12  105 28  43  3
DAYTON 1WSW   71  +8.2 86  +11. 56  +5.4 0.08 -1.19  31  28  109 29  41  13
BICKLETON     67  +9.1 80  +8.8 55  +9.3 0.00 -0.72  28  12  108 28  43  13
ELLENSBURG    71  +8.5 87  +11. 54  +5.3 0.06 -0.53  44  12  105 28  40  13
SISTERS       65  +8.2 85  +9.9 46  +6.4 0.03 -0.83  36  18  100 9   32  15
MADRAS        65  +5.9 85  +8.7 46  +3.1 0.00 -0.68  33  26  100 27  23  14
PRINEVILLE    68  +7.2 85  +9.1 50  +5.4 0.35 -0.57  29  26  100 27  37  13
SUNRIVER      61  +6.0 80  +8.2 42  +3.9 0.65 -0.76  13  22  95  28  29  25
CLE ELUM      68  +8.7 83  +11. 53  +5.9 0.10 -0.79  35  10  99  28  39  13
HERMISTON AP  75  +8.3 92  +12. 58  +4.3 0.02 -0.57  40  1   111 27  45  14
GOLDENDALE    68  +8.1 86  +10. 51  +5.2 0.00 -0.47  32  1   106 28  38  13
BAKER CITY    64  +5.0 83  +8.4 45  +1.7 0.32 -0.86  44  28  99  27  33  14
TRI CITIES AP 75  +7.7 93  +9.8 58  +5.6 0.00 -0.68  47  28  111 27  45  14
PROSSER       76  +8.3 90  +8.2 62  +8.4 0.00 -0.73  NA  NA  107 28  52  12
NN$$N
AVG=AVERAGE OF ALL HIGH AND LOW TEMPERATURES
DEP=DEPARTURE FROM NORMAL
AVG HI= AVERAGE HIGH TEMPERATURE
AVG LO=AVERAGE LOW TEMPERATURE
PCPN=TOTAL PRECIPITATION
MAXWND=PEAK WIND GUST IN MILES PER HOUR
DAY=DAY REPORTED
NA=ELEMENT NOT REPORTED
MAX TEMP=HIGHEST TEMPERATURE REPORTED
MIN TEMP=LOWEST TEMPERATURE REPORTED



000
NOUS43 KARX 011331
PNSARX

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE LA CROSSE WI
814 AM CDT MON JUL 1 2013

...JUNE IN LA CROSSE WISCONSIN WAS SLIGHTLY BELOW NORMAL
PRECIPITATION AND SLIGHTLY ABOVE NORMAL TEMPERATURES...

THE AVERAGE JUNE TEMPERATURE AT LA CROSSE WAS 69.9 DEGREES...WHICH
WAS SEVEN TENTHS OF A DEGREE ABOVE NORMAL. THE AVERAGE HIGH WAS 79.9
DEGREES AND THE AVERAGE LOW WAS 59.9 DEGREES. THE HIGHEST
TEMPERATURE FOR THE MONTH WAS 96 DEGREES...WHICH OCCURRED ON THE
9TH. THE COLDEST TEMPERATURE FOR THE MONTH WAS 42 DEGREES...WHICH
OCCURRED ON THE 1ST.

THE TOTAL PRECIPITATION FOR JUNE WAS 3.70 INCHES...WHICH WAS -0.64
INCHES BELOW NORMAL. THE GREATEST 24-HOUR PRECIPITATION AMOUNT WAS
1.48 INCHES...WHICH OCCURRED FROM THE 11TH TO THE 12TH.

...RECORDS...

AT 454 PM ON JUNE 9TH THE TEMPERATURE AT THE LA CROSSE AIRPORT
REACHED 96 DEGREES. THIS BREAKS THE OLD RECORD FOR THIS DATE SET WAY
BACK IN 1911.

...DISCUSSION...

IN THE MONTH OF JUNE...LA CROSSE WAS SLIGHTLY ABOVE NORMAL FOR
TEMPERATURE. THE COLDEST PERIOD OCCURRED FROM THE 26TH THROUGH THE
30TH...WHERE THE AVERAGE DAILY TEMPERATURE WAS 1 TO 4 DEGREES BELOW
NORMAL. THE WARMEST STRETCH OCCURRED FROM THE 3RD THROUGH THE
10TH...WHERE THE DAILY AVERAGE TEMPERATURE RANGED FROM 1 TO 13
DEGREES ABOVE NORMAL. THERE WAS 1 DAY THE TEMPERATURE CLIMBED AT OR
ABOVE 90 DEGREES. LAST YEAR...THERE WERE 4 DAYS THE TEMPERATURE ROSE
AT OR ABOVE 90 DEGREES.

LA CROSSE WAS SLIGHTLY DRYER THAN NORMAL DURING THE MONTH OF JUNE.
THE WETTEST PERIOD OCCURRED FROM THE 11TH THROUGH THE 13TH...WHERE
1.52 INCHES OF PRECIPITATION FELL. THERE WERE 11 DAYS OF MEASURABLE
PRECIPITATION DURING THE MONTH. OF THOSE 11 DAYS...THERE WAS 1 DAY
WHERE ONE INCH OR MORE OF PRECIPITATION FELL. THERE WERE 19 DAYS
DURING THE MONTH WHERE ZERO PRECIPITATION WAS OBSERVED.

LOOKING AT THIS PAST MONTH...THERE WERE TWO SIGNIFICANT DAYS WITH
SEVERE WEATHER. ON JUNE 22ND...A SYSTEM OF STRONG THUNDERSTORMS
MOVED THROUGH IN THE EARLY MORNING FROM THE WEST. THE AREAS WHERE
THE STORMS WERE MOST PREVALENT WERE ACROSS NORTHEAST IOWA AND INTO
SOUTHERN WISCONSIN. THE STORMS CAUSED STRAIGHT LINE WIND DAMAGE AND
THERE WERE 3 CONFIRMED TORNADOES. IN ADDITION...THERE WAS FLOODING
THAT OCCURRED WHEN 2 TO 5 INCHES OF RAIN FELL IN A SHORT PERIOD OF
TIME. THE LA CROSSE AIRPORT RECEIVED 0.71 INCHES OF RAIN.

THE NEXT EVENT WAS ON JUNE 29TH. A SYSTEM OF STORMS MOVED THROUGH IN
THE EARLY AFTERNOON INTO THE EVENING. AS THUNDERSTORMS MOVED
SOUTH...THE BIGGEST IMPACT WAS THE HAIL PRODUCED. THERE WERE GUSTY
WINDS ASSOCIATED WITH A FEW OF THE STORMS...REACHING 40 TO 45 MPH.
IN ADDITION...HEAVY RAIN LED TO LOCALIZED RURAL FLOODING. HAIL
REPORTS RANGED FROM 0.25 INCHES TO 1.75 INCHES IN DIAMETER. THE
HIGHEST RAINFALL AMOUNTS WERE A LITTLE OVER 2 INCHES IN SOUTHERN
WISCONSIN. THE LA CROSSE AIRPORT RECEIVED 0.49 INCHES OF RAIN.

...LOOKING AHEAD TO JULY...

THE AVERAGE TEMPERATURE FOR THE MONTH OF JULY IS 71.0 DEGREES. THE
AVERAGE HIGH TEMPERATURE IS 81.0 DEGREES AND THE AVERAGE LOW
TEMPERATURE IS 60.9 DEGREES. LA CROSSE NORMALLY RECEIVES 6 DAYS
WHERE THE TEMPERATURE RISES AT OR ABOVE 90 DEGREES. THE HIGHEST
TEMPERATURE IN THE MONTH OF JULY IS 108 DEGREES WHICH OCCURRED ON
THE 13TH IN 1995 AND ON THE 14TH IN 1936.

THE AVERAGE PRECIPITATION DURING THE MONTH OF JULY IS 5.00 INCHES
WITH 10 DAYS OF MEASURABLE PRECIPITATION. THERE ARE NORMALLY 7 DAYS
WITH THUNDERSTORMS DURING THE MONTH OF JULY IN LA CROSSE. THE
GREATEST ONE DAY PRECIPITATION TOTAL WAS 5.24 INCHES WHICH OCCURRED
ON THE 27TH IN 1987.

$$

JSY


000
NOUS43 KARX 011331
PNSARX

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE LA CROSSE WI
814 AM CDT MON JUL 1 2013

...JUNE IN LA CROSSE WISCONSIN WAS SLIGHTLY BELOW NORMAL
PRECIPITATION AND SLIGHTLY ABOVE NORMAL TEMPERATURES...

THE AVERAGE JUNE TEMPERATURE AT LA CROSSE WAS 69.9 DEGREES...WHICH
WAS SEVEN TENTHS OF A DEGREE ABOVE NORMAL. THE AVERAGE HIGH WAS 79.9
DEGREES AND THE AVERAGE LOW WAS 59.9 DEGREES. THE HIGHEST
TEMPERATURE FOR THE MONTH WAS 96 DEGREES...WHICH OCCURRED ON THE
9TH. THE COLDEST TEMPERATURE FOR THE MONTH WAS 42 DEGREES...WHICH
OCCURRED ON THE 1ST.

THE TOTAL PRECIPITATION FOR JUNE WAS 3.70 INCHES...WHICH WAS -0.64
INCHES BELOW NORMAL. THE GREATEST 24-HOUR PRECIPITATION AMOUNT WAS
1.48 INCHES...WHICH OCCURRED FROM THE 11TH TO THE 12TH.

...RECORDS...

AT 454 PM ON JUNE 9TH THE TEMPERATURE AT THE LA CROSSE AIRPORT
REACHED 96 DEGREES. THIS BREAKS THE OLD RECORD FOR THIS DATE SET WAY
BACK IN 1911.

...DISCUSSION...

IN THE MONTH OF JUNE...LA CROSSE WAS SLIGHTLY ABOVE NORMAL FOR
TEMPERATURE. THE COLDEST PERIOD OCCURRED FROM THE 26TH THROUGH THE
30TH...WHERE THE AVERAGE DAILY TEMPERATURE WAS 1 TO 4 DEGREES BELOW
NORMAL. THE WARMEST STRETCH OCCURRED FROM THE 3RD THROUGH THE
10TH...WHERE THE DAILY AVERAGE TEMPERATURE RANGED FROM 1 TO 13
DEGREES ABOVE NORMAL. THERE WAS 1 DAY THE TEMPERATURE CLIMBED AT OR
ABOVE 90 DEGREES. LAST YEAR...THERE WERE 4 DAYS THE TEMPERATURE ROSE
AT OR ABOVE 90 DEGREES.

LA CROSSE WAS SLIGHTLY DRYER THAN NORMAL DURING THE MONTH OF JUNE.
THE WETTEST PERIOD OCCURRED FROM THE 11TH THROUGH THE 13TH...WHERE
1.52 INCHES OF PRECIPITATION FELL. THERE WERE 11 DAYS OF MEASURABLE
PRECIPITATION DURING THE MONTH. OF THOSE 11 DAYS...THERE WAS 1 DAY
WHERE ONE INCH OR MORE OF PRECIPITATION FELL. THERE WERE 19 DAYS
DURING THE MONTH WHERE ZERO PRECIPITATION WAS OBSERVED.

LOOKING AT THIS PAST MONTH...THERE WERE TWO SIGNIFICANT DAYS WITH
SEVERE WEATHER. ON JUNE 22ND...A SYSTEM OF STRONG THUNDERSTORMS
MOVED THROUGH IN THE EARLY MORNING FROM THE WEST. THE AREAS WHERE
THE STORMS WERE MOST PREVALENT WERE ACROSS NORTHEAST IOWA AND INTO
SOUTHERN WISCONSIN. THE STORMS CAUSED STRAIGHT LINE WIND DAMAGE AND
THERE WERE 3 CONFIRMED TORNADOES. IN ADDITION...THERE WAS FLOODING
THAT OCCURRED WHEN 2 TO 5 INCHES OF RAIN FELL IN A SHORT PERIOD OF
TIME. THE LA CROSSE AIRPORT RECEIVED 0.71 INCHES OF RAIN.

THE NEXT EVENT WAS ON JUNE 29TH. A SYSTEM OF STORMS MOVED THROUGH IN
THE EARLY AFTERNOON INTO THE EVENING. AS THUNDERSTORMS MOVED
SOUTH...THE BIGGEST IMPACT WAS THE HAIL PRODUCED. THERE WERE GUSTY
WINDS ASSOCIATED WITH A FEW OF THE STORMS...REACHING 40 TO 45 MPH.
IN ADDITION...HEAVY RAIN LED TO LOCALIZED RURAL FLOODING. HAIL
REPORTS RANGED FROM 0.25 INCHES TO 1.75 INCHES IN DIAMETER. THE
HIGHEST RAINFALL AMOUNTS WERE A LITTLE OVER 2 INCHES IN SOUTHERN
WISCONSIN. THE LA CROSSE AIRPORT RECEIVED 0.49 INCHES OF RAIN.

...LOOKING AHEAD TO JULY...

THE AVERAGE TEMPERATURE FOR THE MONTH OF JULY IS 71.0 DEGREES. THE
AVERAGE HIGH TEMPERATURE IS 81.0 DEGREES AND THE AVERAGE LOW
TEMPERATURE IS 60.9 DEGREES. LA CROSSE NORMALLY RECEIVES 6 DAYS
WHERE THE TEMPERATURE RISES AT OR ABOVE 90 DEGREES. THE HIGHEST
TEMPERATURE IN THE MONTH OF JULY IS 108 DEGREES WHICH OCCURRED ON
THE 13TH IN 1995 AND ON THE 14TH IN 1936.

THE AVERAGE PRECIPITATION DURING THE MONTH OF JULY IS 5.00 INCHES
WITH 10 DAYS OF MEASURABLE PRECIPITATION. THERE ARE NORMALLY 7 DAYS
WITH THUNDERSTORMS DURING THE MONTH OF JULY IN LA CROSSE. THE
GREATEST ONE DAY PRECIPITATION TOTAL WAS 5.24 INCHES WHICH OCCURRED
ON THE 27TH IN 1987.

$$

JSY


000
NOUS43 KARX 011331
PNSARX

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE LA CROSSE WI
814 AM CDT MON JUL 1 2013

...JUNE IN LA CROSSE WISCONSIN WAS SLIGHTLY BELOW NORMAL
PRECIPITATION AND SLIGHTLY ABOVE NORMAL TEMPERATURES...

THE AVERAGE JUNE TEMPERATURE AT LA CROSSE WAS 69.9 DEGREES...WHICH
WAS SEVEN TENTHS OF A DEGREE ABOVE NORMAL. THE AVERAGE HIGH WAS 79.9
DEGREES AND THE AVERAGE LOW WAS 59.9 DEGREES. THE HIGHEST
TEMPERATURE FOR THE MONTH WAS 96 DEGREES...WHICH OCCURRED ON THE
9TH. THE COLDEST TEMPERATURE FOR THE MONTH WAS 42 DEGREES...WHICH
OCCURRED ON THE 1ST.

THE TOTAL PRECIPITATION FOR JUNE WAS 3.70 INCHES...WHICH WAS -0.64
INCHES BELOW NORMAL. THE GREATEST 24-HOUR PRECIPITATION AMOUNT WAS
1.48 INCHES...WHICH OCCURRED FROM THE 11TH TO THE 12TH.

...RECORDS...

AT 454 PM ON JUNE 9TH THE TEMPERATURE AT THE LA CROSSE AIRPORT
REACHED 96 DEGREES. THIS BREAKS THE OLD RECORD FOR THIS DATE SET WAY
BACK IN 1911.

...DISCUSSION...

IN THE MONTH OF JUNE...LA CROSSE WAS SLIGHTLY ABOVE NORMAL FOR
TEMPERATURE. THE COLDEST PERIOD OCCURRED FROM THE 26TH THROUGH THE
30TH...WHERE THE AVERAGE DAILY TEMPERATURE WAS 1 TO 4 DEGREES BELOW
NORMAL. THE WARMEST STRETCH OCCURRED FROM THE 3RD THROUGH THE
10TH...WHERE THE DAILY AVERAGE TEMPERATURE RANGED FROM 1 TO 13
DEGREES ABOVE NORMAL. THERE WAS 1 DAY THE TEMPERATURE CLIMBED AT OR
ABOVE 90 DEGREES. LAST YEAR...THERE WERE 4 DAYS THE TEMPERATURE ROSE
AT OR ABOVE 90 DEGREES.

LA CROSSE WAS SLIGHTLY DRYER THAN NORMAL DURING THE MONTH OF JUNE.
THE WETTEST PERIOD OCCURRED FROM THE 11TH THROUGH THE 13TH...WHERE
1.52 INCHES OF PRECIPITATION FELL. THERE WERE 11 DAYS OF MEASURABLE
PRECIPITATION DURING THE MONTH. OF THOSE 11 DAYS...THERE WAS 1 DAY
WHERE ONE INCH OR MORE OF PRECIPITATION FELL. THERE WERE 19 DAYS
DURING THE MONTH WHERE ZERO PRECIPITATION WAS OBSERVED.

LOOKING AT THIS PAST MONTH...THERE WERE TWO SIGNIFICANT DAYS WITH
SEVERE WEATHER. ON JUNE 22ND...A SYSTEM OF STRONG THUNDERSTORMS
MOVED THROUGH IN THE EARLY MORNING FROM THE WEST. THE AREAS WHERE
THE STORMS WERE MOST PREVALENT WERE ACROSS NORTHEAST IOWA AND INTO
SOUTHERN WISCONSIN. THE STORMS CAUSED STRAIGHT LINE WIND DAMAGE AND
THERE WERE 3 CONFIRMED TORNADOES. IN ADDITION...THERE WAS FLOODING
THAT OCCURRED WHEN 2 TO 5 INCHES OF RAIN FELL IN A SHORT PERIOD OF
TIME. THE LA CROSSE AIRPORT RECEIVED 0.71 INCHES OF RAIN.

THE NEXT EVENT WAS ON JUNE 29TH. A SYSTEM OF STORMS MOVED THROUGH IN
THE EARLY AFTERNOON INTO THE EVENING. AS THUNDERSTORMS MOVED
SOUTH...THE BIGGEST IMPACT WAS THE HAIL PRODUCED. THERE WERE GUSTY
WINDS ASSOCIATED WITH A FEW OF THE STORMS...REACHING 40 TO 45 MPH.
IN ADDITION...HEAVY RAIN LED TO LOCALIZED RURAL FLOODING. HAIL
REPORTS RANGED FROM 0.25 INCHES TO 1.75 INCHES IN DIAMETER. THE
HIGHEST RAINFALL AMOUNTS WERE A LITTLE OVER 2 INCHES IN SOUTHERN
WISCONSIN. THE LA CROSSE AIRPORT RECEIVED 0.49 INCHES OF RAIN.

...LOOKING AHEAD TO JULY...

THE AVERAGE TEMPERATURE FOR THE MONTH OF JULY IS 71.0 DEGREES. THE
AVERAGE HIGH TEMPERATURE IS 81.0 DEGREES AND THE AVERAGE LOW
TEMPERATURE IS 60.9 DEGREES. LA CROSSE NORMALLY RECEIVES 6 DAYS
WHERE THE TEMPERATURE RISES AT OR ABOVE 90 DEGREES. THE HIGHEST
TEMPERATURE IN THE MONTH OF JULY IS 108 DEGREES WHICH OCCURRED ON
THE 13TH IN 1995 AND ON THE 14TH IN 1936.

THE AVERAGE PRECIPITATION DURING THE MONTH OF JULY IS 5.00 INCHES
WITH 10 DAYS OF MEASURABLE PRECIPITATION. THERE ARE NORMALLY 7 DAYS
WITH THUNDERSTORMS DURING THE MONTH OF JULY IN LA CROSSE. THE
GREATEST ONE DAY PRECIPITATION TOTAL WAS 5.24 INCHES WHICH OCCURRED
ON THE 27TH IN 1987.

$$

JSY


000
NOUS43 KARX 011331
PNSARX

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE LA CROSSE WI
814 AM CDT MON JUL 1 2013

...JUNE IN LA CROSSE WISCONSIN WAS SLIGHTLY BELOW NORMAL
PRECIPITATION AND SLIGHTLY ABOVE NORMAL TEMPERATURES...

THE AVERAGE JUNE TEMPERATURE AT LA CROSSE WAS 69.9 DEGREES...WHICH
WAS SEVEN TENTHS OF A DEGREE ABOVE NORMAL. THE AVERAGE HIGH WAS 79.9
DEGREES AND THE AVERAGE LOW WAS 59.9 DEGREES. THE HIGHEST
TEMPERATURE FOR THE MONTH WAS 96 DEGREES...WHICH OCCURRED ON THE
9TH. THE COLDEST TEMPERATURE FOR THE MONTH WAS 42 DEGREES...WHICH
OCCURRED ON THE 1ST.

THE TOTAL PRECIPITATION FOR JUNE WAS 3.70 INCHES...WHICH WAS -0.64
INCHES BELOW NORMAL. THE GREATEST 24-HOUR PRECIPITATION AMOUNT WAS
1.48 INCHES...WHICH OCCURRED FROM THE 11TH TO THE 12TH.

...RECORDS...

AT 454 PM ON JUNE 9TH THE TEMPERATURE AT THE LA CROSSE AIRPORT
REACHED 96 DEGREES. THIS BREAKS THE OLD RECORD FOR THIS DATE SET WAY
BACK IN 1911.

...DISCUSSION...

IN THE MONTH OF JUNE...LA CROSSE WAS SLIGHTLY ABOVE NORMAL FOR
TEMPERATURE. THE COLDEST PERIOD OCCURRED FROM THE 26TH THROUGH THE
30TH...WHERE THE AVERAGE DAILY TEMPERATURE WAS 1 TO 4 DEGREES BELOW
NORMAL. THE WARMEST STRETCH OCCURRED FROM THE 3RD THROUGH THE
10TH...WHERE THE DAILY AVERAGE TEMPERATURE RANGED FROM 1 TO 13
DEGREES ABOVE NORMAL. THERE WAS 1 DAY THE TEMPERATURE CLIMBED AT OR
ABOVE 90 DEGREES. LAST YEAR...THERE WERE 4 DAYS THE TEMPERATURE ROSE
AT OR ABOVE 90 DEGREES.

LA CROSSE WAS SLIGHTLY DRYER THAN NORMAL DURING THE MONTH OF JUNE.
THE WETTEST PERIOD OCCURRED FROM THE 11TH THROUGH THE 13TH...WHERE
1.52 INCHES OF PRECIPITATION FELL. THERE WERE 11 DAYS OF MEASURABLE
PRECIPITATION DURING THE MONTH. OF THOSE 11 DAYS...THERE WAS 1 DAY
WHERE ONE INCH OR MORE OF PRECIPITATION FELL. THERE WERE 19 DAYS
DURING THE MONTH WHERE ZERO PRECIPITATION WAS OBSERVED.

LOOKING AT THIS PAST MONTH...THERE WERE TWO SIGNIFICANT DAYS WITH
SEVERE WEATHER. ON JUNE 22ND...A SYSTEM OF STRONG THUNDERSTORMS
MOVED THROUGH IN THE EARLY MORNING FROM THE WEST. THE AREAS WHERE
THE STORMS WERE MOST PREVALENT WERE ACROSS NORTHEAST IOWA AND INTO
SOUTHERN WISCONSIN. THE STORMS CAUSED STRAIGHT LINE WIND DAMAGE AND
THERE WERE 3 CONFIRMED TORNADOES. IN ADDITION...THERE WAS FLOODING
THAT OCCURRED WHEN 2 TO 5 INCHES OF RAIN FELL IN A SHORT PERIOD OF
TIME. THE LA CROSSE AIRPORT RECEIVED 0.71 INCHES OF RAIN.

THE NEXT EVENT WAS ON JUNE 29TH. A SYSTEM OF STORMS MOVED THROUGH IN
THE EARLY AFTERNOON INTO THE EVENING. AS THUNDERSTORMS MOVED
SOUTH...THE BIGGEST IMPACT WAS THE HAIL PRODUCED. THERE WERE GUSTY
WINDS ASSOCIATED WITH A FEW OF THE STORMS...REACHING 40 TO 45 MPH.
IN ADDITION...HEAVY RAIN LED TO LOCALIZED RURAL FLOODING. HAIL
REPORTS RANGED FROM 0.25 INCHES TO 1.75 INCHES IN DIAMETER. THE
HIGHEST RAINFALL AMOUNTS WERE A LITTLE OVER 2 INCHES IN SOUTHERN
WISCONSIN. THE LA CROSSE AIRPORT RECEIVED 0.49 INCHES OF RAIN.

...LOOKING AHEAD TO JULY...

THE AVERAGE TEMPERATURE FOR THE MONTH OF JULY IS 71.0 DEGREES. THE
AVERAGE HIGH TEMPERATURE IS 81.0 DEGREES AND THE AVERAGE LOW
TEMPERATURE IS 60.9 DEGREES. LA CROSSE NORMALLY RECEIVES 6 DAYS
WHERE THE TEMPERATURE RISES AT OR ABOVE 90 DEGREES. THE HIGHEST
TEMPERATURE IN THE MONTH OF JULY IS 108 DEGREES WHICH OCCURRED ON
THE 13TH IN 1995 AND ON THE 14TH IN 1936.

THE AVERAGE PRECIPITATION DURING THE MONTH OF JULY IS 5.00 INCHES
WITH 10 DAYS OF MEASURABLE PRECIPITATION. THERE ARE NORMALLY 7 DAYS
WITH THUNDERSTORMS DURING THE MONTH OF JULY IN LA CROSSE. THE
GREATEST ONE DAY PRECIPITATION TOTAL WAS 5.24 INCHES WHICH OCCURRED
ON THE 27TH IN 1987.

$$

JSY


000
NOUS43 KLOT 011328
PNSLOT

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE CHICAGO/ROMEOVILLE IL
828 AM CDT MON JULY 1 2015

...A LOOK BACK AT THE CLIMATE FOR THE MONTH OF JUNE 2015 FOR CHICAGO
AND ROCKFORD...

AT CHICAGO...THE AVERAGE HIGH TEMPERATURE WAS 76.9 DEGREES WHICH IS
2.8 DEGREES BELOW NORMAL. THE AVERAGE LOW TEMPERATURE WAS 57.8 DEGREES
WHICH IS 0.3 DEGREES BELOW NORMAL. THE AVERAGE TEMPERATURE FOR THE MONTH
WAS 67.4 DEGREES WHICH IS 1.5 DEGREES BELOW NORMAL. DURING THE MONTH OF
JUNE...7.12 INCHES OF PRECIPITATION WAS RECORDED WHICH IS 3.67 INCHES
ABOVE NORMAL. A TRACE OF SNOW WAS RECORDED DURING THE MONTH IN THE FORM
OF HAIL.

RECORDS FOR CHICAGO FOR THE MONTH OF JUNE 2015...
DAILY RECORDS
JUNE 15TH...SET RECORD FOR DAILY MAXIMUM RAINFALL OF 2.56 INCHES.
            PREVIOUS RECORD WAS 0.96 INCHES SET IN 1982.

MONTHLY RECORDS
JUNE 2015 WILL GO DOWN AS 9TH WETTEST JUNE ON RECORD SINCE 1871.


AT ROCKFORD...THE AVERAGE HIGH TEMPERATURE WAS 79.2 DEGREES WHICH
IS 1.9 DEGREES BELOW NORMAL. THE AVERAGE LOW TEMPERATURE WAS 59.3
DEGREES WHICH IS 0.8 DEGREES ABOVE NORMAL. THE AVERAGE TEMPERATURE
FOR THE MONTH WAS 69.3 DEGREES WHICH IS 0.5 DEGREES BELOW NORMAL.
DURING THE MONTH OF JUNE...4.64 INCHES OF PRECIPITATION WAS
RECORDED WHICH IS 0.01 INCHES BELOW NORMAL.

NO RECORDS FOR ROCKFORD WERE SET DURING JUNE 2015

$$



000
NOUS41 KWBC 011325
PNSWSH

Service Change Notice 15-38
National Weather Service Headquarters Washington DC
925 AM EST Wed Jul 1 2015

TO:      Subscribers:
         -Family of Services
         -NOAA Weather Wire Service
         -Emergency Managers Weather Information Network
         -NOAAPORT
         Other NWS Partners and NWS employees

FROM:    David Novak
         Acting Director, Weather Prediction Center

SUBJECT: REMINDER: Change in the Display of the National Centers for
         Environmental Prediction (NCEP) Weather Prediction
         Center (WPC) Short-Range Weather Charts and
         Termination of Associated Redbook Graphics
         effective September 1, 2015

REMINDER: Effective Tuesday, September 1, 2015, at 1200 Coordinated
Universal Time (UTC), the NCEP WPC will ONLY display the latest
National Digital Forecast Database (NDFD) weather forecast for
the weather portion of the short-range weather charts. This
change improves the detail of the product as well as consistency
between the NDFD and WPC information. NWS previously solicited
partner and user comments regarding this change:

http://www.nws.noaa.gov/os/notification/pns14wpc_short-range
_charts.htm

Currently, the weather portion of the short-term weather charts
allows partners and users to select either Color, Black and
White, Terrain Background or NDFD alternate displays:

Color:
http://www.wpc.ncep.noaa.gov/basicwx/basicwx_wbg.php

Black and White:
http://www.wpc.ncep.noaa.gov/basicwx/basicwx_bw.php

Terrain Background:
http://www.wpc.ncep.noaa.gov/basicwx/basicwx_ter.php

NDFD:
http://www.wpc.ncep.noaa.gov/basicwx/basicwx_ndfd.php

On and after September 1, 2015, the weather portion of the short-
term weather charts will only display the NDFD graphic. The other
display formats and selection buttons (Color, Black and White and
Terrain Background) will not be available.

Additionally, NWS will discontinue the legacy AWIPS Redbook
Graphic format of the short range weather product and show the
NDFD web display. NWS will terminate the following products:

PEIC61 KWBC
PEIE62 KWBC
PEIG63 KWBC
PEII64 KWBC

NDFD GRIB data serves as an alternative:

ftp://tgftp.nws.noaa.gov

The NDFD Day 1-3 weather element forecast is online at:

ftp://tgftp.nws.noaa.gov/SL.us008001/ST.opnl/DF.gr2/DC.ndfd/
AR.conus/VP.001-003

under the file name ds.wx.bin. The key to the weather type
information is provided in Section 2 of the GRIB2 message of
this file.

For more information, please contact:

David.Novak@noaa.gov
301-683-1484

National Service Change Notices are online at:

http://www.weather.gov/os/notif.htm

$$



000
NOUS41 KWBC 011325
PNSWSH

Service Change Notice 15-38
National Weather Service Headquarters Washington DC
925 AM EST Wed Jul 1 2015

TO:      Subscribers:
         -Family of Services
         -NOAA Weather Wire Service
         -Emergency Managers Weather Information Network
         -NOAAPORT
         Other NWS Partners and NWS employees

FROM:    David Novak
         Acting Director, Weather Prediction Center

SUBJECT: REMINDER: Change in the Display of the National Centers for
         Environmental Prediction (NCEP) Weather Prediction
         Center (WPC) Short-Range Weather Charts and
         Termination of Associated Redbook Graphics
         effective September 1, 2015

REMINDER: Effective Tuesday, September 1, 2015, at 1200 Coordinated
Universal Time (UTC), the NCEP WPC will ONLY display the latest
National Digital Forecast Database (NDFD) weather forecast for
the weather portion of the short-range weather charts. This
change improves the detail of the product as well as consistency
between the NDFD and WPC information. NWS previously solicited
partner and user comments regarding this change:

http://www.nws.noaa.gov/os/notification/pns14wpc_short-range
_charts.htm

Currently, the weather portion of the short-term weather charts
allows partners and users to select either Color, Black and
White, Terrain Background or NDFD alternate displays:

Color:
http://www.wpc.ncep.noaa.gov/basicwx/basicwx_wbg.php

Black and White:
http://www.wpc.ncep.noaa.gov/basicwx/basicwx_bw.php

Terrain Background:
http://www.wpc.ncep.noaa.gov/basicwx/basicwx_ter.php

NDFD:
http://www.wpc.ncep.noaa.gov/basicwx/basicwx_ndfd.php

On and after September 1, 2015, the weather portion of the short-
term weather charts will only display the NDFD graphic. The other
display formats and selection buttons (Color, Black and White and
Terrain Background) will not be available.

Additionally, NWS will discontinue the legacy AWIPS Redbook
Graphic format of the short range weather product and show the
NDFD web display. NWS will terminate the following products:

PEIC61 KWBC
PEIE62 KWBC
PEIG63 KWBC
PEII64 KWBC

NDFD GRIB data serves as an alternative:

ftp://tgftp.nws.noaa.gov

The NDFD Day 1-3 weather element forecast is online at:

ftp://tgftp.nws.noaa.gov/SL.us008001/ST.opnl/DF.gr2/DC.ndfd/
AR.conus/VP.001-003

under the file name ds.wx.bin. The key to the weather type
information is provided in Section 2 of the GRIB2 message of
this file.

For more information, please contact:

David.Novak@noaa.gov
301-683-1484

National Service Change Notices are online at:

http://www.weather.gov/os/notif.htm

$$


000
NOUS46 KHNX 011300
PNSHNX
CAZ089>092-031300-

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE HANFORD CA
600 AM PDT WED JUL 1 2015

...JUNE 2015 CLIMATOLOGICAL SUMMARY FOR BAKERSFIELD AND FRESNO...
...RAINFALL DEPARTURES...
...2014-2015 RAIN SEASON...
...FRESNO HAS ITS THIRTEENTH DRIEST RAIN SEASON ON RECORD...
...FRESNO HAS ITS THIRD WARMEST JUNE ON RECORD...
...BAKERSFIELD HAS ITS FOURTH WARMEST JUNE ON RECORD...
...THE 15 DRIEST RAIN SEASONS ON RECORD...
...ASTRONOMICAL EVENTS FOR THE REST OF 2015...

   NOTE...DATA ARE PROVISIONAL AND SUBJECT TO REVISION BY THE
          NATIONAL CLIMATIC DATA CENTER

........................BAKERSFIELD...........FRESNO

RAINFALL
MONTH
JUNE 2015...............TRACE.................0.01 INCH
 NORMAL JUNE............0.08 INCH.............0.21 INCH
 DEPARTURE FROM NORMAL.-0.08 INCH............-0.20 INCH
 PERCENT OF NORMAL.......0.....................4.8
RAIN SEASON /JULY 1 TO JUNE 30/
 THROUGH JUNE 2015......5.30 INCHES...........6.61 INCHES
 NORMAL THROUGH JUNE....6.47 INCHES..........11.50 INCHES
 DEPARTURE FROM NORMAL.-1.17 INCH............-4.89 INCHES
 PERCENT OF NORMAL......81.9..................57.5
WATER YEAR /OCTOBER 1 TO SEPTEMBER 30/
 THROUGH JUNE 2015......5.29 INCHES...........6.42 INCHES
 NORMAL THROUGH JUNE....6.35 INCHES..........11.31 INCHES
 DEPARTURE FROM NRML...-1.06 INCH............-4.89 INCHES
 PERCENT OF NORMAL......83.3..................56.8


TEMPERATURE
AVERAGE HIGH
 JUNE 2015..............97.4..................96.8
 NORMAL JUNE............90.9..................92.0
 DEPARTURE...............6.5...................4.8
 HIGHEST.................106...................107
 DATE....................8TH...26TH...........26TH
                     ...30TH
AVERAGE LOW
 JUNE 2015..............69.1..................67.1
 NORMAL JUNE............64.2..................62.4
 DEPARTURE...............4.9...................4.7
 LOWEST...................58....................56
 DATE....................1ST...................1ST...4TH
AVERAGE TEMPERATURE
 JUNE 2015..............83.2..................81.9
 NORMAL JUNE............77.5..................77.2
 DEPARTURE...............5.7...................4.7

&&

RECORDS TIED OR BROKEN IN JUNE

BAKERSFIELD

13TH...TIED THE RECORD HIGH MINIMUM TEMPERATURE FOR THE DATE OF
       76 DEGREES...LAST SET IN 1975.

27TH...TIED THE RECORD RAINFALL FOR THE DATE OF A TRACE...LAST
       SET IN 1922.

FRESNO

 9TH...RECORD HIGH MINIMUM TEMPERATURE FOR THE DATE OF 77 DEGREES.
       THE OLD RECORD WAS 74 DEGREES...SET IN 2014.

12TH...TIED THE RECORD HIGH MINIMUM TEMPERATURE FOR THE DATE OF
       73 DEGREES...LAST SET IN 1985.

13TH...RECORD HIGH MINIMUM TEMPERATURE FOR THE DATE OF 75 DEGREES.
       THE OLD RECORD WAS 71 DEGREES...SET IN 1985.

21ST...REMAINS THE ONLY DAY IT HAS NEVER OFFICIALLY RAINED
       AT FRESNO SINCE DAILY RECORDS BEGAN IN 1881. THE STRETCH
       NOW STANDS AT 135 YEARS AND COUNTING.

&&

RAINFALL DEPARTURES

                                   BAKERSFIELD       FRESNO

LAST MONTH.......ACTUAL.............TRACE.............0.01 INCH
                 NORMAL.............0.08 INCH.........0.21 INCH
                 DEPARTURE.........-0.08 INCH........-0.20 INCH
                 PCT OF NORMAL.......0.................4.8

LAST 3 MONTHS....ACTUAL.............0.76 INCH.........1.83 INCH
                 NORMAL.............0.78 INCH.........1.59 INCH
                 DEPARTURE.........-0.02 INCH.........0.24 INCH
                 PCT OF NORMAL......97.4.............115.1

LAST 6 MONTHS....ACTUAL.............2.62 INCHES.......3.23 INCHES
                 NORMAL.............4.39 INCHES.......7.84 INCHES
                 DEPARTURE.........-1.77 INCH........-4.61 INCHES
                 PCT OF NORMAL......59.7..............41.2

LAST 12 MONTHS...ACTUAL.............5.30 INCHES.......6.61 INCHES
                 NORMAL.............6.47 INCHES......11.50 INCHES
                 DEPARTURE.........-1.17 INCH........-4.89 INCHES
                 PCT OF NORMAL......81.9..............57.5

SINCE JAN 1ST....ACTUAL.............2.62 INCHES.......3.23 INCHES
                 NORMAL.............4.39 INCHES.......7.84 INCHES
                 DEPARTURE.........-1.77 INCH........-4.61 INCHES
                 PCT OF NORMAL......59.7..............41.2

&&

THE 15 DRIEST RAIN SEASONS ON RECORD
/AVERAGE RAINFALL IN DEGREES INCHES/

                 BAKERSFIELD             FRESNO

 1.              2.26....1933-34         4.43....1933-34
 2.              2.38....2007-08         4.81....2013-14
 3.              2.41....2013-14         4.87....1878-79
 4.              2.45....1958-59         4.96....1897-98
 5.              2.77....1893-94         5.24....1923-24
 6.              2.80....1898-99         5.34....1971-72
 7.              3.00....1971-72         5.67....2012-13
 8.              3.06....2006-07         5.82....1932-33
 9.              3.15....2012-13         6.03....2006-07
10.              3.20....1897-98         6.14....1965-66
11.              3.30....1989-90         6.29....1912-13
12.              3.32....1907-08         6.42....1929-30
13.              3.35....1969-70        *6.61....2014-15*
14.              3.59....2001-02         6.65....1884-85
15.              3.68....1923-24         6.66....1948-49

59.             *5.30....2014-15*        8.43....1879-80

&&

THE 10 WARMEST JUNES ON RECORD
/AVERAGE TEMPERATURE IN DEGREES FAHRENHEIT/

                 BAKERSFIELD             FRESNO

 1.              84.4...1981             82.8...1981
 2.              83.9...1977             82.5...1918
 3.              83.7...1960            *81.9...2015*
 4.             *83.2...2015*            81.8...1985
 5.              82.9...1940             80.9...2014
 6.              82.4...1973             80.9...2013
 7.              82.3...1918             80.7...2006
 8.              82.0...1961             80.4...1926
 9.              81.9...1926             80.4...1940
10.              81.6...1974             80.0...1960

&&

2014-2015 RAIN SEASON SUMMARY

BAKERSFIELD

MONTHLY RAINFALL

                  MONTH         NORMAL         DEP FM       PERCENT
MONTH             PRECIP        PRECIP         NORMAL       NORMAL

JULY..............TRACE.........TRACE..........0............100.0
AUGUST............TRACE.........0.04 INCH.....-0.04 INCH......0
SEPTEMBER.........0.01 INCH.....0.08 INCH.....-0.07 INCH.....12.5
OCTOBER...........0.64 INCH.....0.30 INCH......0.34 INCH....213.3
NOVEMBER..........0.01 INCH.....0.64 INCH.....-0.63 INCH......1.6
DECEMBER..........2.02 INCH.....1.02 INCH......1.00 INCH....198.0
JANUARY...........0.69 INCH.....1.16 INCH.....-0.47 INCH.....59.5
FEBRUARY..........0.90 INCH.....1.24 INCH.....-0.34 INCH.....72.6
MARCH.............0.27 INCH.....1.21 INCH.....-0.94 INCH.....22.3
APRIL.............0.08 INCH.....0.52 INCH.....-0.44 INCH.....15.4
MAY...............0.68 INCH.....0.18 INCH......0.50 INCH....177.8
JUNE..............TRACE.........0.08 INCH.....-0.08 INCH......0

CUMULATIVE RAINFALL

                  MONTH         NORMAL         DEP FM       PERCENT
MONTH             PRECIP        PRECIP         NORMAL       NORMAL

JULY..............TRACE.........TRACE..........0............100.0
AUGUST............TRACE.........0.04 INCH.....-0.04 INCH......0
SEPTEMBER.........0.01 INCH.....0.12 INCH.....-0.11 INCH......8.3
OCTOBER...........0.65 INCH.....0.42 INCH......0.23 INCH....154.8
NOVEMBER..........0.66 INCH.....1.06 INCH.....-0.40 INCH.....62.3
DECEMBER..........2.68 INCHES...2.08 INCHES....0.60 INCH....128.8
JANUARY...........3.37 INCHES...3.24 INCHES....0.13 INCH....104.0
FEBRUARY..........4.27 INCHES...4.48 INCHES...-0.21 INCH.....95.3
MARCH.............4.54 INCHES...5.69 INCHES...-1.15 INCH.....79.8
APRIL.............4.62 INCHES...6.21 INCHES...-1.59 INCH.....74.4
MAY...............5.30 INCHES...6.39 INCHES...-1.09 INCH.....82.9
JUNE..............5.30 INCHES...6.47 INCHES...-1.17 INCH.....81.9

FRESNO

RAINFALL

                  MONTH         NORMAL         DEP FM        PERCENT
MONTH             PRECIP        PRECIP         NORMAL        NORMAL

JULY..............0.01 INCH.....0.01 INCH.......0............100.0
AUGUST............TRACE.........0.01 INCH......-0.01 INCH......0
SEPTEMBER.........0.18 INCH.....0.17 INCH.......0.01 INCH....105.9
OCTOBER...........0.50 INCH.....0.63 INCH......-0.13 INCH.....79.4
NOVEMBER..........0.40 INCH.....1.07 INCH......-0.67 INCH.....37.4
DECEMBER..........2.29 INCHES...1.77 INCH.......0.52 INCH....129.4
JANUARY...........0.21 INCH.....2.19 INCHES....-1.98 INCH......9.6
FEBRUARY..........1.13 INCH.....2.03 INCHES....-0.90 INCH.....55.7
MARCH.............0.06 INCH.....2.03 INCHES....-1.97 INCH......3.0
APRIL.............1.25 INCH.....0.95 INCH.......0.30 INCH....131.6
MAY...............0.57 INCH.....0.43 INCH.......0.14 INCH....132.6
JUNE..............0.01 INCH.....0.21 INCH......-0.20 INCH......4.8

CUMULATIVE RAINFALL

                  MONTH         NORMAL         DEP FM        PERCENT
MONTH             PRECIP        PRECIP         NORMAL        NORMAL

JULY..............0.01 INCH.....0.01 INCH......0.............100.0
AUGUST............0.01 INCH.....0.02 INCH.....-0.01 INCH......50.0
SEPTEMBER.........0.19 INCH.....0.19 INCH......0.............100.0
OCTOBER...........0.69 INCH.....0.82 INCH.....-0.13 INCH......84.1
NOVEMBER..........1.09 INCH.....1.89 INCH.....-0.80 INCH......57.7
DECEMBER..........3.38 INCHES...3.66 INCHES...-0.28 INCH......92.4
JANUARY...........3.59 INCHES...5.85 INCHES...-2.26 INCHES....61.4
FEBRUARY..........4.72 INCHES...7.88 INCHES...-3.16 INCHES....59.9
MARCH.............4.78 INCHES...9.91 INCHES...-5.13 INCHES....48.2
APRIL.............6.03 INCHES..10.86 INCHES...-4.83 INCHES....55.5
MAY...............6.60 INCHES..11.29 INCHES...-4.69 INCHES....58.5
JUNE..............6.61 INCHES..11.50 INCHES...-4.89 INCHES....57.5

&&

ASTRONOMICAL PHENOMENA FOR REST OF 2014

JUL 06TH 1300 PDT /JUL 06RD 2000Z/.....EARTH AT APHELION
                                       DISTANCE FROM SUN...
                                       94.507 MILLION MILES
                                       /152.061 MILLION KM/

SEP 23RD 0121 PDT /SEP 23RD 0821Z/.....AUTUMNAL EQUINOX

NOV 01ST 0900Z /0200 PDT...0100 PST/...DAYLIGHT SAVINGS TIME
                                       ENDS

DEC 21ST 2048 PST /DEC 22ND 0448Z/.....WINTER SOLSTICE

&&

$$

SANGER/OCHS

WEATHER.GOV/HANFORD



000
NOUS46 KHNX 011300
PNSHNX
CAZ089>092-031300-

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE HANFORD CA
600 AM PDT WED JUL 1 2015

...JUNE 2015 CLIMATOLOGICAL SUMMARY FOR BAKERSFIELD AND FRESNO...
...RAINFALL DEPARTURES...
...2014-2015 RAIN SEASON...
...FRESNO HAS ITS THIRTEENTH DRIEST RAIN SEASON ON RECORD...
...FRESNO HAS ITS THIRD WARMEST JUNE ON RECORD...
...BAKERSFIELD HAS ITS FOURTH WARMEST JUNE ON RECORD...
...THE 15 DRIEST RAIN SEASONS ON RECORD...
...ASTRONOMICAL EVENTS FOR THE REST OF 2015...

   NOTE...DATA ARE PROVISIONAL AND SUBJECT TO REVISION BY THE
          NATIONAL CLIMATIC DATA CENTER

........................BAKERSFIELD...........FRESNO

RAINFALL
MONTH
JUNE 2015...............TRACE.................0.01 INCH
 NORMAL JUNE............0.08 INCH.............0.21 INCH
 DEPARTURE FROM NORMAL.-0.08 INCH............-0.20 INCH
 PERCENT OF NORMAL.......0.....................4.8
RAIN SEASON /JULY 1 TO JUNE 30/
 THROUGH JUNE 2015......5.30 INCHES...........6.61 INCHES
 NORMAL THROUGH JUNE....6.47 INCHES..........11.50 INCHES
 DEPARTURE FROM NORMAL.-1.17 INCH............-4.89 INCHES
 PERCENT OF NORMAL......81.9..................57.5
WATER YEAR /OCTOBER 1 TO SEPTEMBER 30/
 THROUGH JUNE 2015......5.29 INCHES...........6.42 INCHES
 NORMAL THROUGH JUNE....6.35 INCHES..........11.31 INCHES
 DEPARTURE FROM NRML...-1.06 INCH............-4.89 INCHES
 PERCENT OF NORMAL......83.3..................56.8


TEMPERATURE
AVERAGE HIGH
 JUNE 2015..............97.4..................96.8
 NORMAL JUNE............90.9..................92.0
 DEPARTURE...............6.5...................4.8
 HIGHEST.................106...................107
 DATE....................8TH...26TH...........26TH
                     ...30TH
AVERAGE LOW
 JUNE 2015..............69.1..................67.1
 NORMAL JUNE............64.2..................62.4
 DEPARTURE...............4.9...................4.7
 LOWEST...................58....................56
 DATE....................1ST...................1ST...4TH
AVERAGE TEMPERATURE
 JUNE 2015..............83.2..................81.9
 NORMAL JUNE............77.5..................77.2
 DEPARTURE...............5.7...................4.7

&&

RECORDS TIED OR BROKEN IN JUNE

BAKERSFIELD

13TH...TIED THE RECORD HIGH MINIMUM TEMPERATURE FOR THE DATE OF
       76 DEGREES...LAST SET IN 1975.

27TH...TIED THE RECORD RAINFALL FOR THE DATE OF A TRACE...LAST
       SET IN 1922.

FRESNO

 9TH...RECORD HIGH MINIMUM TEMPERATURE FOR THE DATE OF 77 DEGREES.
       THE OLD RECORD WAS 74 DEGREES...SET IN 2014.

12TH...TIED THE RECORD HIGH MINIMUM TEMPERATURE FOR THE DATE OF
       73 DEGREES...LAST SET IN 1985.

13TH...RECORD HIGH MINIMUM TEMPERATURE FOR THE DATE OF 75 DEGREES.
       THE OLD RECORD WAS 71 DEGREES...SET IN 1985.

21ST...REMAINS THE ONLY DAY IT HAS NEVER OFFICIALLY RAINED
       AT FRESNO SINCE DAILY RECORDS BEGAN IN 1881. THE STRETCH
       NOW STANDS AT 135 YEARS AND COUNTING.

&&

RAINFALL DEPARTURES

                                   BAKERSFIELD       FRESNO

LAST MONTH.......ACTUAL.............TRACE.............0.01 INCH
                 NORMAL.............0.08 INCH.........0.21 INCH
                 DEPARTURE.........-0.08 INCH........-0.20 INCH
                 PCT OF NORMAL.......0.................4.8

LAST 3 MONTHS....ACTUAL.............0.76 INCH.........1.83 INCH
                 NORMAL.............0.78 INCH.........1.59 INCH
                 DEPARTURE.........-0.02 INCH.........0.24 INCH
                 PCT OF NORMAL......97.4.............115.1

LAST 6 MONTHS....ACTUAL.............2.62 INCHES.......3.23 INCHES
                 NORMAL.............4.39 INCHES.......7.84 INCHES
                 DEPARTURE.........-1.77 INCH........-4.61 INCHES
                 PCT OF NORMAL......59.7..............41.2

LAST 12 MONTHS...ACTUAL.............5.30 INCHES.......6.61 INCHES
                 NORMAL.............6.47 INCHES......11.50 INCHES
                 DEPARTURE.........-1.17 INCH........-4.89 INCHES
                 PCT OF NORMAL......81.9..............57.5

SINCE JAN 1ST....ACTUAL.............2.62 INCHES.......3.23 INCHES
                 NORMAL.............4.39 INCHES.......7.84 INCHES
                 DEPARTURE.........-1.77 INCH........-4.61 INCHES
                 PCT OF NORMAL......59.7..............41.2

&&

THE 15 DRIEST RAIN SEASONS ON RECORD
/AVERAGE RAINFALL IN DEGREES INCHES/

                 BAKERSFIELD             FRESNO

 1.              2.26....1933-34         4.43....1933-34
 2.              2.38....2007-08         4.81....2013-14
 3.              2.41....2013-14         4.87....1878-79
 4.              2.45....1958-59         4.96....1897-98
 5.              2.77....1893-94         5.24....1923-24
 6.              2.80....1898-99         5.34....1971-72
 7.              3.00....1971-72         5.67....2012-13
 8.              3.06....2006-07         5.82....1932-33
 9.              3.15....2012-13         6.03....2006-07
10.              3.20....1897-98         6.14....1965-66
11.              3.30....1989-90         6.29....1912-13
12.              3.32....1907-08         6.42....1929-30
13.              3.35....1969-70        *6.61....2014-15*
14.              3.59....2001-02         6.65....1884-85
15.              3.68....1923-24         6.66....1948-49

59.             *5.30....2014-15*        8.43....1879-80

&&

THE 10 WARMEST JUNES ON RECORD
/AVERAGE TEMPERATURE IN DEGREES FAHRENHEIT/

                 BAKERSFIELD             FRESNO

 1.              84.4...1981             82.8...1981
 2.              83.9...1977             82.5...1918
 3.              83.7...1960            *81.9...2015*
 4.             *83.2...2015*            81.8...1985
 5.              82.9...1940             80.9...2014
 6.              82.4...1973             80.9...2013
 7.              82.3...1918             80.7...2006
 8.              82.0...1961             80.4...1926
 9.              81.9...1926             80.4...1940
10.              81.6...1974             80.0...1960

&&

2014-2015 RAIN SEASON SUMMARY

BAKERSFIELD

MONTHLY RAINFALL

                  MONTH         NORMAL         DEP FM       PERCENT
MONTH             PRECIP        PRECIP         NORMAL       NORMAL

JULY..............TRACE.........TRACE..........0............100.0
AUGUST............TRACE.........0.04 INCH.....-0.04 INCH......0
SEPTEMBER.........0.01 INCH.....0.08 INCH.....-0.07 INCH.....12.5
OCTOBER...........0.64 INCH.....0.30 INCH......0.34 INCH....213.3
NOVEMBER..........0.01 INCH.....0.64 INCH.....-0.63 INCH......1.6
DECEMBER..........2.02 INCH.....1.02 INCH......1.00 INCH....198.0
JANUARY...........0.69 INCH.....1.16 INCH.....-0.47 INCH.....59.5
FEBRUARY..........0.90 INCH.....1.24 INCH.....-0.34 INCH.....72.6
MARCH.............0.27 INCH.....1.21 INCH.....-0.94 INCH.....22.3
APRIL.............0.08 INCH.....0.52 INCH.....-0.44 INCH.....15.4
MAY...............0.68 INCH.....0.18 INCH......0.50 INCH....177.8
JUNE..............TRACE.........0.08 INCH.....-0.08 INCH......0

CUMULATIVE RAINFALL

                  MONTH         NORMAL         DEP FM       PERCENT
MONTH             PRECIP        PRECIP         NORMAL       NORMAL

JULY..............TRACE.........TRACE..........0............100.0
AUGUST............TRACE.........0.04 INCH.....-0.04 INCH......0
SEPTEMBER.........0.01 INCH.....0.12 INCH.....-0.11 INCH......8.3
OCTOBER...........0.65 INCH.....0.42 INCH......0.23 INCH....154.8
NOVEMBER..........0.66 INCH.....1.06 INCH.....-0.40 INCH.....62.3
DECEMBER..........2.68 INCHES...2.08 INCHES....0.60 INCH....128.8
JANUARY...........3.37 INCHES...3.24 INCHES....0.13 INCH....104.0
FEBRUARY..........4.27 INCHES...4.48 INCHES...-0.21 INCH.....95.3
MARCH.............4.54 INCHES...5.69 INCHES...-1.15 INCH.....79.8
APRIL.............4.62 INCHES...6.21 INCHES...-1.59 INCH.....74.4
MAY...............5.30 INCHES...6.39 INCHES...-1.09 INCH.....82.9
JUNE..............5.30 INCHES...6.47 INCHES...-1.17 INCH.....81.9

FRESNO

RAINFALL

                  MONTH         NORMAL         DEP FM        PERCENT
MONTH             PRECIP        PRECIP         NORMAL        NORMAL

JULY..............0.01 INCH.....0.01 INCH.......0............100.0
AUGUST............TRACE.........0.01 INCH......-0.01 INCH......0
SEPTEMBER.........0.18 INCH.....0.17 INCH.......0.01 INCH....105.9
OCTOBER...........0.50 INCH.....0.63 INCH......-0.13 INCH.....79.4
NOVEMBER..........0.40 INCH.....1.07 INCH......-0.67 INCH.....37.4
DECEMBER..........2.29 INCHES...1.77 INCH.......0.52 INCH....129.4
JANUARY...........0.21 INCH.....2.19 INCHES....-1.98 INCH......9.6
FEBRUARY..........1.13 INCH.....2.03 INCHES....-0.90 INCH.....55.7
MARCH.............0.06 INCH.....2.03 INCHES....-1.97 INCH......3.0
APRIL.............1.25 INCH.....0.95 INCH.......0.30 INCH....131.6
MAY...............0.57 INCH.....0.43 INCH.......0.14 INCH....132.6
JUNE..............0.01 INCH.....0.21 INCH......-0.20 INCH......4.8

CUMULATIVE RAINFALL

                  MONTH         NORMAL         DEP FM        PERCENT
MONTH             PRECIP        PRECIP         NORMAL        NORMAL

JULY..............0.01 INCH.....0.01 INCH......0.............100.0
AUGUST............0.01 INCH.....0.02 INCH.....-0.01 INCH......50.0
SEPTEMBER.........0.19 INCH.....0.19 INCH......0.............100.0
OCTOBER...........0.69 INCH.....0.82 INCH.....-0.13 INCH......84.1
NOVEMBER..........1.09 INCH.....1.89 INCH.....-0.80 INCH......57.7
DECEMBER..........3.38 INCHES...3.66 INCHES...-0.28 INCH......92.4
JANUARY...........3.59 INCHES...5.85 INCHES...-2.26 INCHES....61.4
FEBRUARY..........4.72 INCHES...7.88 INCHES...-3.16 INCHES....59.9
MARCH.............4.78 INCHES...9.91 INCHES...-5.13 INCHES....48.2
APRIL.............6.03 INCHES..10.86 INCHES...-4.83 INCHES....55.5
MAY...............6.60 INCHES..11.29 INCHES...-4.69 INCHES....58.5
JUNE..............6.61 INCHES..11.50 INCHES...-4.89 INCHES....57.5

&&

ASTRONOMICAL PHENOMENA FOR REST OF 2014

JUL 06TH 1300 PDT /JUL 06RD 2000Z/.....EARTH AT APHELION
                                       DISTANCE FROM SUN...
                                       94.507 MILLION MILES
                                       /152.061 MILLION KM/

SEP 23RD 0121 PDT /SEP 23RD 0821Z/.....AUTUMNAL EQUINOX

NOV 01ST 0900Z /0200 PDT...0100 PST/...DAYLIGHT SAVINGS TIME
                                       ENDS

DEC 21ST 2048 PST /DEC 22ND 0448Z/.....WINTER SOLSTICE

&&

$$

SANGER/OCHS

WEATHER.GOV/HANFORD


000
NOUS46 KHNX 011300
PNSHNX
CAZ089>092-031300-

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE HANFORD CA
600 AM PDT WED JUL 1 2015

...JUNE 2015 CLIMATOLOGICAL SUMMARY FOR BAKERSFIELD AND FRESNO...
...RAINFALL DEPARTURES...
...2014-2015 RAIN SEASON...
...FRESNO HAS ITS THIRTEENTH DRIEST RAIN SEASON ON RECORD...
...FRESNO HAS ITS THIRD WARMEST JUNE ON RECORD...
...BAKERSFIELD HAS ITS FOURTH WARMEST JUNE ON RECORD...
...THE 15 DRIEST RAIN SEASONS ON RECORD...
...ASTRONOMICAL EVENTS FOR THE REST OF 2015...

   NOTE...DATA ARE PROVISIONAL AND SUBJECT TO REVISION BY THE
          NATIONAL CLIMATIC DATA CENTER

........................BAKERSFIELD...........FRESNO

RAINFALL
MONTH
JUNE 2015...............TRACE.................0.01 INCH
 NORMAL JUNE............0.08 INCH.............0.21 INCH
 DEPARTURE FROM NORMAL.-0.08 INCH............-0.20 INCH
 PERCENT OF NORMAL.......0.....................4.8
RAIN SEASON /JULY 1 TO JUNE 30/
 THROUGH JUNE 2015......5.30 INCHES...........6.61 INCHES
 NORMAL THROUGH JUNE....6.47 INCHES..........11.50 INCHES
 DEPARTURE FROM NORMAL.-1.17 INCH............-4.89 INCHES
 PERCENT OF NORMAL......81.9..................57.5
WATER YEAR /OCTOBER 1 TO SEPTEMBER 30/
 THROUGH JUNE 2015......5.29 INCHES...........6.42 INCHES
 NORMAL THROUGH JUNE....6.35 INCHES..........11.31 INCHES
 DEPARTURE FROM NRML...-1.06 INCH............-4.89 INCHES
 PERCENT OF NORMAL......83.3..................56.8


TEMPERATURE
AVERAGE HIGH
 JUNE 2015..............97.4..................96.8
 NORMAL JUNE............90.9..................92.0
 DEPARTURE...............6.5...................4.8
 HIGHEST.................106...................107
 DATE....................8TH...26TH...........26TH
                     ...30TH
AVERAGE LOW
 JUNE 2015..............69.1..................67.1
 NORMAL JUNE............64.2..................62.4
 DEPARTURE...............4.9...................4.7
 LOWEST...................58....................56
 DATE....................1ST...................1ST...4TH
AVERAGE TEMPERATURE
 JUNE 2015..............83.2..................81.9
 NORMAL JUNE............77.5..................77.2
 DEPARTURE...............5.7...................4.7

&&

RECORDS TIED OR BROKEN IN JUNE

BAKERSFIELD

13TH...TIED THE RECORD HIGH MINIMUM TEMPERATURE FOR THE DATE OF
       76 DEGREES...LAST SET IN 1975.

27TH...TIED THE RECORD RAINFALL FOR THE DATE OF A TRACE...LAST
       SET IN 1922.

FRESNO

 9TH...RECORD HIGH MINIMUM TEMPERATURE FOR THE DATE OF 77 DEGREES.
       THE OLD RECORD WAS 74 DEGREES...SET IN 2014.

12TH...TIED THE RECORD HIGH MINIMUM TEMPERATURE FOR THE DATE OF
       73 DEGREES...LAST SET IN 1985.

13TH...RECORD HIGH MINIMUM TEMPERATURE FOR THE DATE OF 75 DEGREES.
       THE OLD RECORD WAS 71 DEGREES...SET IN 1985.

21ST...REMAINS THE ONLY DAY IT HAS NEVER OFFICIALLY RAINED
       AT FRESNO SINCE DAILY RECORDS BEGAN IN 1881. THE STRETCH
       NOW STANDS AT 135 YEARS AND COUNTING.

&&

RAINFALL DEPARTURES

                                   BAKERSFIELD       FRESNO

LAST MONTH.......ACTUAL.............TRACE.............0.01 INCH
                 NORMAL.............0.08 INCH.........0.21 INCH
                 DEPARTURE.........-0.08 INCH........-0.20 INCH
                 PCT OF NORMAL.......0.................4.8

LAST 3 MONTHS....ACTUAL.............0.76 INCH.........1.83 INCH
                 NORMAL.............0.78 INCH.........1.59 INCH
                 DEPARTURE.........-0.02 INCH.........0.24 INCH
                 PCT OF NORMAL......97.4.............115.1

LAST 6 MONTHS....ACTUAL.............2.62 INCHES.......3.23 INCHES
                 NORMAL.............4.39 INCHES.......7.84 INCHES
                 DEPARTURE.........-1.77 INCH........-4.61 INCHES
                 PCT OF NORMAL......59.7..............41.2

LAST 12 MONTHS...ACTUAL.............5.30 INCHES.......6.61 INCHES
                 NORMAL.............6.47 INCHES......11.50 INCHES
                 DEPARTURE.........-1.17 INCH........-4.89 INCHES
                 PCT OF NORMAL......81.9..............57.5

SINCE JAN 1ST....ACTUAL.............2.62 INCHES.......3.23 INCHES
                 NORMAL.............4.39 INCHES.......7.84 INCHES
                 DEPARTURE.........-1.77 INCH........-4.61 INCHES
                 PCT OF NORMAL......59.7..............41.2

&&

THE 15 DRIEST RAIN SEASONS ON RECORD
/AVERAGE RAINFALL IN DEGREES INCHES/

                 BAKERSFIELD             FRESNO

 1.              2.26....1933-34         4.43....1933-34
 2.              2.38....2007-08         4.81....2013-14
 3.              2.41....2013-14         4.87....1878-79
 4.              2.45....1958-59         4.96....1897-98
 5.              2.77....1893-94         5.24....1923-24
 6.              2.80....1898-99         5.34....1971-72
 7.              3.00....1971-72         5.67....2012-13
 8.              3.06....2006-07         5.82....1932-33
 9.              3.15....2012-13         6.03....2006-07
10.              3.20....1897-98         6.14....1965-66
11.              3.30....1989-90         6.29....1912-13
12.              3.32....1907-08         6.42....1929-30
13.              3.35....1969-70        *6.61....2014-15*
14.              3.59....2001-02         6.65....1884-85
15.              3.68....1923-24         6.66....1948-49

59.             *5.30....2014-15*        8.43....1879-80

&&

THE 10 WARMEST JUNES ON RECORD
/AVERAGE TEMPERATURE IN DEGREES FAHRENHEIT/

                 BAKERSFIELD             FRESNO

 1.              84.4...1981             82.8...1981
 2.              83.9...1977             82.5...1918
 3.              83.7...1960            *81.9...2015*
 4.             *83.2...2015*            81.8...1985
 5.              82.9...1940             80.9...2014
 6.              82.4...1973             80.9...2013
 7.              82.3...1918             80.7...2006
 8.              82.0...1961             80.4...1926
 9.              81.9...1926             80.4...1940
10.              81.6...1974             80.0...1960

&&

2014-2015 RAIN SEASON SUMMARY

BAKERSFIELD

MONTHLY RAINFALL

                  MONTH         NORMAL         DEP FM       PERCENT
MONTH             PRECIP        PRECIP         NORMAL       NORMAL

JULY..............TRACE.........TRACE..........0............100.0
AUGUST............TRACE.........0.04 INCH.....-0.04 INCH......0
SEPTEMBER.........0.01 INCH.....0.08 INCH.....-0.07 INCH.....12.5
OCTOBER...........0.64 INCH.....0.30 INCH......0.34 INCH....213.3
NOVEMBER..........0.01 INCH.....0.64 INCH.....-0.63 INCH......1.6
DECEMBER..........2.02 INCH.....1.02 INCH......1.00 INCH....198.0
JANUARY...........0.69 INCH.....1.16 INCH.....-0.47 INCH.....59.5
FEBRUARY..........0.90 INCH.....1.24 INCH.....-0.34 INCH.....72.6
MARCH.............0.27 INCH.....1.21 INCH.....-0.94 INCH.....22.3
APRIL.............0.08 INCH.....0.52 INCH.....-0.44 INCH.....15.4
MAY...............0.68 INCH.....0.18 INCH......0.50 INCH....177.8
JUNE..............TRACE.........0.08 INCH.....-0.08 INCH......0

CUMULATIVE RAINFALL

                  MONTH         NORMAL         DEP FM       PERCENT
MONTH             PRECIP        PRECIP         NORMAL       NORMAL

JULY..............TRACE.........TRACE..........0............100.0
AUGUST............TRACE.........0.04 INCH.....-0.04 INCH......0
SEPTEMBER.........0.01 INCH.....0.12 INCH.....-0.11 INCH......8.3
OCTOBER...........0.65 INCH.....0.42 INCH......0.23 INCH....154.8
NOVEMBER..........0.66 INCH.....1.06 INCH.....-0.40 INCH.....62.3
DECEMBER..........2.68 INCHES...2.08 INCHES....0.60 INCH....128.8
JANUARY...........3.37 INCHES...3.24 INCHES....0.13 INCH....104.0
FEBRUARY..........4.27 INCHES...4.48 INCHES...-0.21 INCH.....95.3
MARCH.............4.54 INCHES...5.69 INCHES...-1.15 INCH.....79.8
APRIL.............4.62 INCHES...6.21 INCHES...-1.59 INCH.....74.4
MAY...............5.30 INCHES...6.39 INCHES...-1.09 INCH.....82.9
JUNE..............5.30 INCHES...6.47 INCHES...-1.17 INCH.....81.9

FRESNO

RAINFALL

                  MONTH         NORMAL         DEP FM        PERCENT
MONTH             PRECIP        PRECIP         NORMAL        NORMAL

JULY..............0.01 INCH.....0.01 INCH.......0............100.0
AUGUST............TRACE.........0.01 INCH......-0.01 INCH......0
SEPTEMBER.........0.18 INCH.....0.17 INCH.......0.01 INCH....105.9
OCTOBER...........0.50 INCH.....0.63 INCH......-0.13 INCH.....79.4
NOVEMBER..........0.40 INCH.....1.07 INCH......-0.67 INCH.....37.4
DECEMBER..........2.29 INCHES...1.77 INCH.......0.52 INCH....129.4
JANUARY...........0.21 INCH.....2.19 INCHES....-1.98 INCH......9.6
FEBRUARY..........1.13 INCH.....2.03 INCHES....-0.90 INCH.....55.7
MARCH.............0.06 INCH.....2.03 INCHES....-1.97 INCH......3.0
APRIL.............1.25 INCH.....0.95 INCH.......0.30 INCH....131.6
MAY...............0.57 INCH.....0.43 INCH.......0.14 INCH....132.6
JUNE..............0.01 INCH.....0.21 INCH......-0.20 INCH......4.8

CUMULATIVE RAINFALL

                  MONTH         NORMAL         DEP FM        PERCENT
MONTH             PRECIP        PRECIP         NORMAL        NORMAL

JULY..............0.01 INCH.....0.01 INCH......0.............100.0
AUGUST............0.01 INCH.....0.02 INCH.....-0.01 INCH......50.0
SEPTEMBER.........0.19 INCH.....0.19 INCH......0.............100.0
OCTOBER...........0.69 INCH.....0.82 INCH.....-0.13 INCH......84.1
NOVEMBER..........1.09 INCH.....1.89 INCH.....-0.80 INCH......57.7
DECEMBER..........3.38 INCHES...3.66 INCHES...-0.28 INCH......92.4
JANUARY...........3.59 INCHES...5.85 INCHES...-2.26 INCHES....61.4
FEBRUARY..........4.72 INCHES...7.88 INCHES...-3.16 INCHES....59.9
MARCH.............4.78 INCHES...9.91 INCHES...-5.13 INCHES....48.2
APRIL.............6.03 INCHES..10.86 INCHES...-4.83 INCHES....55.5
MAY...............6.60 INCHES..11.29 INCHES...-4.69 INCHES....58.5
JUNE..............6.61 INCHES..11.50 INCHES...-4.89 INCHES....57.5

&&

ASTRONOMICAL PHENOMENA FOR REST OF 2014

JUL 06TH 1300 PDT /JUL 06RD 2000Z/.....EARTH AT APHELION
                                       DISTANCE FROM SUN...
                                       94.507 MILLION MILES
                                       /152.061 MILLION KM/

SEP 23RD 0121 PDT /SEP 23RD 0821Z/.....AUTUMNAL EQUINOX

NOV 01ST 0900Z /0200 PDT...0100 PST/...DAYLIGHT SAVINGS TIME
                                       ENDS

DEC 21ST 2048 PST /DEC 22ND 0448Z/.....WINTER SOLSTICE

&&

$$

SANGER/OCHS

WEATHER.GOV/HANFORD


000
NOUS46 KHNX 011300
PNSHNX
CAZ089>092-031300-

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE HANFORD CA
600 AM PDT WED JUL 1 2015

...JUNE 2015 CLIMATOLOGICAL SUMMARY FOR BAKERSFIELD AND FRESNO...
...RAINFALL DEPARTURES...
...2014-2015 RAIN SEASON...
...FRESNO HAS ITS THIRTEENTH DRIEST RAIN SEASON ON RECORD...
...FRESNO HAS ITS THIRD WARMEST JUNE ON RECORD...
...BAKERSFIELD HAS ITS FOURTH WARMEST JUNE ON RECORD...
...THE 15 DRIEST RAIN SEASONS ON RECORD...
...ASTRONOMICAL EVENTS FOR THE REST OF 2015...

   NOTE...DATA ARE PROVISIONAL AND SUBJECT TO REVISION BY THE
          NATIONAL CLIMATIC DATA CENTER

........................BAKERSFIELD...........FRESNO

RAINFALL
MONTH
JUNE 2015...............TRACE.................0.01 INCH
 NORMAL JUNE............0.08 INCH.............0.21 INCH
 DEPARTURE FROM NORMAL.-0.08 INCH............-0.20 INCH
 PERCENT OF NORMAL.......0.....................4.8
RAIN SEASON /JULY 1 TO JUNE 30/
 THROUGH JUNE 2015......5.30 INCHES...........6.61 INCHES
 NORMAL THROUGH JUNE....6.47 INCHES..........11.50 INCHES
 DEPARTURE FROM NORMAL.-1.17 INCH............-4.89 INCHES
 PERCENT OF NORMAL......81.9..................57.5
WATER YEAR /OCTOBER 1 TO SEPTEMBER 30/
 THROUGH JUNE 2015......5.29 INCHES...........6.42 INCHES
 NORMAL THROUGH JUNE....6.35 INCHES..........11.31 INCHES
 DEPARTURE FROM NRML...-1.06 INCH............-4.89 INCHES
 PERCENT OF NORMAL......83.3..................56.8


TEMPERATURE
AVERAGE HIGH
 JUNE 2015..............97.4..................96.8
 NORMAL JUNE............90.9..................92.0
 DEPARTURE...............6.5...................4.8
 HIGHEST.................106...................107
 DATE....................8TH...26TH...........26TH
                     ...30TH
AVERAGE LOW
 JUNE 2015..............69.1..................67.1
 NORMAL JUNE............64.2..................62.4
 DEPARTURE...............4.9...................4.7
 LOWEST...................58....................56
 DATE....................1ST...................1ST...4TH
AVERAGE TEMPERATURE
 JUNE 2015..............83.2..................81.9
 NORMAL JUNE............77.5..................77.2
 DEPARTURE...............5.7...................4.7

&&

RECORDS TIED OR BROKEN IN JUNE

BAKERSFIELD

13TH...TIED THE RECORD HIGH MINIMUM TEMPERATURE FOR THE DATE OF
       76 DEGREES...LAST SET IN 1975.

27TH...TIED THE RECORD RAINFALL FOR THE DATE OF A TRACE...LAST
       SET IN 1922.

FRESNO

 9TH...RECORD HIGH MINIMUM TEMPERATURE FOR THE DATE OF 77 DEGREES.
       THE OLD RECORD WAS 74 DEGREES...SET IN 2014.

12TH...TIED THE RECORD HIGH MINIMUM TEMPERATURE FOR THE DATE OF
       73 DEGREES...LAST SET IN 1985.

13TH...RECORD HIGH MINIMUM TEMPERATURE FOR THE DATE OF 75 DEGREES.
       THE OLD RECORD WAS 71 DEGREES...SET IN 1985.

21ST...REMAINS THE ONLY DAY IT HAS NEVER OFFICIALLY RAINED
       AT FRESNO SINCE DAILY RECORDS BEGAN IN 1881. THE STRETCH
       NOW STANDS AT 135 YEARS AND COUNTING.

&&

RAINFALL DEPARTURES

                                   BAKERSFIELD       FRESNO

LAST MONTH.......ACTUAL.............TRACE.............0.01 INCH
                 NORMAL.............0.08 INCH.........0.21 INCH
                 DEPARTURE.........-0.08 INCH........-0.20 INCH
                 PCT OF NORMAL.......0.................4.8

LAST 3 MONTHS....ACTUAL.............0.76 INCH.........1.83 INCH
                 NORMAL.............0.78 INCH.........1.59 INCH
                 DEPARTURE.........-0.02 INCH.........0.24 INCH
                 PCT OF NORMAL......97.4.............115.1

LAST 6 MONTHS....ACTUAL.............2.62 INCHES.......3.23 INCHES
                 NORMAL.............4.39 INCHES.......7.84 INCHES
                 DEPARTURE.........-1.77 INCH........-4.61 INCHES
                 PCT OF NORMAL......59.7..............41.2

LAST 12 MONTHS...ACTUAL.............5.30 INCHES.......6.61 INCHES
                 NORMAL.............6.47 INCHES......11.50 INCHES
                 DEPARTURE.........-1.17 INCH........-4.89 INCHES
                 PCT OF NORMAL......81.9..............57.5

SINCE JAN 1ST....ACTUAL.............2.62 INCHES.......3.23 INCHES
                 NORMAL.............4.39 INCHES.......7.84 INCHES
                 DEPARTURE.........-1.77 INCH........-4.61 INCHES
                 PCT OF NORMAL......59.7..............41.2

&&

THE 15 DRIEST RAIN SEASONS ON RECORD
/AVERAGE RAINFALL IN DEGREES INCHES/

                 BAKERSFIELD             FRESNO

 1.              2.26....1933-34         4.43....1933-34
 2.              2.38....2007-08         4.81....2013-14
 3.              2.41....2013-14         4.87....1878-79
 4.              2.45....1958-59         4.96....1897-98
 5.              2.77....1893-94         5.24....1923-24
 6.              2.80....1898-99         5.34....1971-72
 7.              3.00....1971-72         5.67....2012-13
 8.              3.06....2006-07         5.82....1932-33
 9.              3.15....2012-13         6.03....2006-07
10.              3.20....1897-98         6.14....1965-66
11.              3.30....1989-90         6.29....1912-13
12.              3.32....1907-08         6.42....1929-30
13.              3.35....1969-70        *6.61....2014-15*
14.              3.59....2001-02         6.65....1884-85
15.              3.68....1923-24         6.66....1948-49

59.             *5.30....2014-15*        8.43....1879-80

&&

THE 10 WARMEST JUNES ON RECORD
/AVERAGE TEMPERATURE IN DEGREES FAHRENHEIT/

                 BAKERSFIELD             FRESNO

 1.              84.4...1981             82.8...1981
 2.              83.9...1977             82.5...1918
 3.              83.7...1960            *81.9...2015*
 4.             *83.2...2015*            81.8...1985
 5.              82.9...1940             80.9...2014
 6.              82.4...1973             80.9...2013
 7.              82.3...1918             80.7...2006
 8.              82.0...1961             80.4...1926
 9.              81.9...1926             80.4...1940
10.              81.6...1974             80.0...1960

&&

2014-2015 RAIN SEASON SUMMARY

BAKERSFIELD

MONTHLY RAINFALL

                  MONTH         NORMAL         DEP FM       PERCENT
MONTH             PRECIP        PRECIP         NORMAL       NORMAL

JULY..............TRACE.........TRACE..........0............100.0
AUGUST............TRACE.........0.04 INCH.....-0.04 INCH......0
SEPTEMBER.........0.01 INCH.....0.08 INCH.....-0.07 INCH.....12.5
OCTOBER...........0.64 INCH.....0.30 INCH......0.34 INCH....213.3
NOVEMBER..........0.01 INCH.....0.64 INCH.....-0.63 INCH......1.6
DECEMBER..........2.02 INCH.....1.02 INCH......1.00 INCH....198.0
JANUARY...........0.69 INCH.....1.16 INCH.....-0.47 INCH.....59.5
FEBRUARY..........0.90 INCH.....1.24 INCH.....-0.34 INCH.....72.6
MARCH.............0.27 INCH.....1.21 INCH.....-0.94 INCH.....22.3
APRIL.............0.08 INCH.....0.52 INCH.....-0.44 INCH.....15.4
MAY...............0.68 INCH.....0.18 INCH......0.50 INCH....177.8
JUNE..............TRACE.........0.08 INCH.....-0.08 INCH......0

CUMULATIVE RAINFALL

                  MONTH         NORMAL         DEP FM       PERCENT
MONTH             PRECIP        PRECIP         NORMAL       NORMAL

JULY..............TRACE.........TRACE..........0............100.0
AUGUST............TRACE.........0.04 INCH.....-0.04 INCH......0
SEPTEMBER.........0.01 INCH.....0.12 INCH.....-0.11 INCH......8.3
OCTOBER...........0.65 INCH.....0.42 INCH......0.23 INCH....154.8
NOVEMBER..........0.66 INCH.....1.06 INCH.....-0.40 INCH.....62.3
DECEMBER..........2.68 INCHES...2.08 INCHES....0.60 INCH....128.8
JANUARY...........3.37 INCHES...3.24 INCHES....0.13 INCH....104.0
FEBRUARY..........4.27 INCHES...4.48 INCHES...-0.21 INCH.....95.3
MARCH.............4.54 INCHES...5.69 INCHES...-1.15 INCH.....79.8
APRIL.............4.62 INCHES...6.21 INCHES...-1.59 INCH.....74.4
MAY...............5.30 INCHES...6.39 INCHES...-1.09 INCH.....82.9
JUNE..............5.30 INCHES...6.47 INCHES...-1.17 INCH.....81.9

FRESNO

RAINFALL

                  MONTH         NORMAL         DEP FM        PERCENT
MONTH             PRECIP        PRECIP         NORMAL        NORMAL

JULY..............0.01 INCH.....0.01 INCH.......0............100.0
AUGUST............TRACE.........0.01 INCH......-0.01 INCH......0
SEPTEMBER.........0.18 INCH.....0.17 INCH.......0.01 INCH....105.9
OCTOBER...........0.50 INCH.....0.63 INCH......-0.13 INCH.....79.4
NOVEMBER..........0.40 INCH.....1.07 INCH......-0.67 INCH.....37.4
DECEMBER..........2.29 INCHES...1.77 INCH.......0.52 INCH....129.4
JANUARY...........0.21 INCH.....2.19 INCHES....-1.98 INCH......9.6
FEBRUARY..........1.13 INCH.....2.03 INCHES....-0.90 INCH.....55.7
MARCH.............0.06 INCH.....2.03 INCHES....-1.97 INCH......3.0
APRIL.............1.25 INCH.....0.95 INCH.......0.30 INCH....131.6
MAY...............0.57 INCH.....0.43 INCH.......0.14 INCH....132.6
JUNE..............0.01 INCH.....0.21 INCH......-0.20 INCH......4.8

CUMULATIVE RAINFALL

                  MONTH         NORMAL         DEP FM        PERCENT
MONTH             PRECIP        PRECIP         NORMAL        NORMAL

JULY..............0.01 INCH.....0.01 INCH......0.............100.0
AUGUST............0.01 INCH.....0.02 INCH.....-0.01 INCH......50.0
SEPTEMBER.........0.19 INCH.....0.19 INCH......0.............100.0
OCTOBER...........0.69 INCH.....0.82 INCH.....-0.13 INCH......84.1
NOVEMBER..........1.09 INCH.....1.89 INCH.....-0.80 INCH......57.7
DECEMBER..........3.38 INCHES...3.66 INCHES...-0.28 INCH......92.4
JANUARY...........3.59 INCHES...5.85 INCHES...-2.26 INCHES....61.4
FEBRUARY..........4.72 INCHES...7.88 INCHES...-3.16 INCHES....59.9
MARCH.............4.78 INCHES...9.91 INCHES...-5.13 INCHES....48.2
APRIL.............6.03 INCHES..10.86 INCHES...-4.83 INCHES....55.5
MAY...............6.60 INCHES..11.29 INCHES...-4.69 INCHES....58.5
JUNE..............6.61 INCHES..11.50 INCHES...-4.89 INCHES....57.5

&&

ASTRONOMICAL PHENOMENA FOR REST OF 2014

JUL 06TH 1300 PDT /JUL 06RD 2000Z/.....EARTH AT APHELION
                                       DISTANCE FROM SUN...
                                       94.507 MILLION MILES
                                       /152.061 MILLION KM/

SEP 23RD 0121 PDT /SEP 23RD 0821Z/.....AUTUMNAL EQUINOX

NOV 01ST 0900Z /0200 PDT...0100 PST/...DAYLIGHT SAVINGS TIME
                                       ENDS

DEC 21ST 2048 PST /DEC 22ND 0448Z/.....WINTER SOLSTICE

&&

$$

SANGER/OCHS

WEATHER.GOV/HANFORD



000
NOUS46 KMFR 011206 CCA
PNSMFR

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE MEDFORD OR
445 AM PDT MON JUN 1 2015

...MEDFORD OREGON WEATHER REVIEW: JUNE 2015...

JUNE 2015 HAD A VERY WET START IN MEDFORD AS NEARLY ALL OF OUR MONTHLY
RAINFALL OCCURRED ON THE FIRST DAY. ANOTHER WEAK DISTURBANCE MOVED
THROUGH ON THE 8TH AND 9TH PROVIDING MUCH OF THE ROGUE VALLEY
AND SURROUNDING AREAS WITH ANOTHER COUPLE OF DAYS OF SHOWERS AND
THUNDERSTORMS. BEYOND THAT, MEDFORD REMAINED EITHER SUNNY OR MOSTLY
SUNNY WITH NO MEASURABLE RAINFALL. THIS ALLOWED FOR TEMPERATURES TO
SOAR ACROSS SOUTHERN OREGON AND NORTHERN CALIFORNIA. THESE CONDITIONS
RESULTED IN THE HOTTEST MONTH OF JUNE MEDFORD HAS SEEN SINCE RECORDS
BEGAN BACK IN 1911. THE RECORDS FOR HOTTEST JUNE INCLUDE THE AVERAGE
MAXIMUM TEMPERATURE, THE AVERAGE MINIMUM TEMPERATURE, AND THE AVERAGE
TEMPERATURE ITSELF WHICH IS THE AVERAGE OF THE AVERAGE MAX AND MIN
TEMPERATURES. THERE WERE 21 DAYS WHICH REACHED AT LEAST 90 DEGREES AND
5 DAYS WITH TEMPERATURES SOARING OVER 100 DEGREES...WITH OUR FIRST 100
DEGREE DAY OCCURRING ON THE 7TH. WE EVEN BROKE DAILY MAXIMUM
TEMPERATURE RECORDS 6 TIMES THIS MONTH. ADDITIONALLY, WE ALSO HAD MILD
TO WARM MINIMUM TEMPERATURES ALL MONTH. IN FACT, MEDFORD BROKE THE ALL
TIME RECORD WARMEST MINIMUM TEMPERATURE ON THE 28TH WITH A LOW
TEMPERATURE OF 76 DEGREES. ALTHOUGH A FEW SHOWERS AND STORMS OCCURRED
THROUGHOUT JUNE, RAINFALL VALUES ACROSS SOUTHERN OREGON AND NORTHERN
CALIFORNIA ARE STILL MUCH BELOW NORMAL FOR THE MONTH OF JUNE AS WELL AS
FOR THE WATER AND CALENDAR YEAR. THIS HAS ALLOWED FOR OUR DROUGHT
CONDITIONS TO CONTINUE DRYING OUT FUELS. CONSEQUENTLY, THE
THUNDERSTORMS WHICH HAVE OCCURRED THIS MONTH HAVE PRODUCED NUMEROUS
WILDFIRES ACROSS OUR FORECAST AREA.

THE AVERAGE TEMPERATURE FOR JUNE WAS 74.8 DEGREES, WHICH IS 8.0
DEGREES ABOVE NORMAL. THE AVERAGE MAXIMUM TEMPERATURE WAS 91.3
DEGREES, WHICH IS 9.7 DEGREES ABOVE NORMAL. THE AVERAGE MINIMUM
TEMPERATURE WAS 58.3 DEGREES, WHICH IS 6.3 DEGREES ABOVE NORMAL. THE
HIGHEST TEMPERATURE FOR THE MONTH WAS 107 DEGREES ON THE 26TH. THE
LOWEST TEMPERATURE OF THE MONTH WAS 50 DEGREES ON THE 3RD AND 14TH.

THERE WERE 25 CLEAR DAYS, 3 PARTLY CLOUDY DAYS, AND 2 CLOUDY DAYS.

TOTAL PRECIPITATION WAS 0.31 INCHES WHICH IS 0.31 INCHES BELOW NORMAL.
THE GREATEST 24 HOUR TOTAL WAS 0.27 INCHES THAT FELL FROM MAY 31ST TO
JUNE 1ST. THE WATER YEAR PRECIPITATION BEGAN OCTOBER 1ST AND IS
CURRENTLY 13.99 INCHES WHICH IS 3.11 INCHES BELOW NORMAL. CALENDAR YEAR
PRECIPITATION IS 7.14 INCHES WHICH IS 2.32 INCHES BELOW NORMAL.

THE AVERAGE WIND FOR THE MONTH WAS 4.7 MPH. THE FASTEST RECORDED TWO-
MINUTE WIND WAS 20 MPH FROM THE WEST-NORTHWEST ON THE 18TH. THE PEAK
WIND WAS 27 MPH FROM THE WEST ALSO ON THE 18TH.

THE HIGHEST PRESSURE FOR THE MONTH WAS 30.11 INCHES ON THE 23RD. THE
LOWEST PRESSURE FOR THE MONTH WAS 29.72 INCHES ON THE 14TH.

SCHAAF


000
NOUS46 KMFR 011206 CCA
PNSMFR

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE MEDFORD OR
445 AM PDT MON JUN 1 2015

...MEDFORD OREGON WEATHER REVIEW: JUNE 2015...

JUNE 2015 HAD A VERY WET START IN MEDFORD AS NEARLY ALL OF OUR MONTHLY
RAINFALL OCCURRED ON THE FIRST DAY. ANOTHER WEAK DISTURBANCE MOVED
THROUGH ON THE 8TH AND 9TH PROVIDING MUCH OF THE ROGUE VALLEY
AND SURROUNDING AREAS WITH ANOTHER COUPLE OF DAYS OF SHOWERS AND
THUNDERSTORMS. BEYOND THAT, MEDFORD REMAINED EITHER SUNNY OR MOSTLY
SUNNY WITH NO MEASURABLE RAINFALL. THIS ALLOWED FOR TEMPERATURES TO
SOAR ACROSS SOUTHERN OREGON AND NORTHERN CALIFORNIA. THESE CONDITIONS
RESULTED IN THE HOTTEST MONTH OF JUNE MEDFORD HAS SEEN SINCE RECORDS
BEGAN BACK IN 1911. THE RECORDS FOR HOTTEST JUNE INCLUDE THE AVERAGE
MAXIMUM TEMPERATURE, THE AVERAGE MINIMUM TEMPERATURE, AND THE AVERAGE
TEMPERATURE ITSELF WHICH IS THE AVERAGE OF THE AVERAGE MAX AND MIN
TEMPERATURES. THERE WERE 21 DAYS WHICH REACHED AT LEAST 90 DEGREES AND
5 DAYS WITH TEMPERATURES SOARING OVER 100 DEGREES...WITH OUR FIRST 100
DEGREE DAY OCCURRING ON THE 7TH. WE EVEN BROKE DAILY MAXIMUM
TEMPERATURE RECORDS 6 TIMES THIS MONTH. ADDITIONALLY, WE ALSO HAD MILD
TO WARM MINIMUM TEMPERATURES ALL MONTH. IN FACT, MEDFORD BROKE THE ALL
TIME RECORD WARMEST MINIMUM TEMPERATURE ON THE 28TH WITH A LOW
TEMPERATURE OF 76 DEGREES. ALTHOUGH A FEW SHOWERS AND STORMS OCCURRED
THROUGHOUT JUNE, RAINFALL VALUES ACROSS SOUTHERN OREGON AND NORTHERN
CALIFORNIA ARE STILL MUCH BELOW NORMAL FOR THE MONTH OF JUNE AS WELL AS
FOR THE WATER AND CALENDAR YEAR. THIS HAS ALLOWED FOR OUR DROUGHT
CONDITIONS TO CONTINUE DRYING OUT FUELS. CONSEQUENTLY, THE
THUNDERSTORMS WHICH HAVE OCCURRED THIS MONTH HAVE PRODUCED NUMEROUS
WILDFIRES ACROSS OUR FORECAST AREA.

THE AVERAGE TEMPERATURE FOR JUNE WAS 74.8 DEGREES, WHICH IS 8.0
DEGREES ABOVE NORMAL. THE AVERAGE MAXIMUM TEMPERATURE WAS 91.3
DEGREES, WHICH IS 9.7 DEGREES ABOVE NORMAL. THE AVERAGE MINIMUM
TEMPERATURE WAS 58.3 DEGREES, WHICH IS 6.3 DEGREES ABOVE NORMAL. THE
HIGHEST TEMPERATURE FOR THE MONTH WAS 107 DEGREES ON THE 26TH. THE
LOWEST TEMPERATURE OF THE MONTH WAS 50 DEGREES ON THE 3RD AND 14TH.

THERE WERE 25 CLEAR DAYS, 3 PARTLY CLOUDY DAYS, AND 2 CLOUDY DAYS.

TOTAL PRECIPITATION WAS 0.31 INCHES WHICH IS 0.31 INCHES BELOW NORMAL.
THE GREATEST 24 HOUR TOTAL WAS 0.27 INCHES THAT FELL FROM MAY 31ST TO
JUNE 1ST. THE WATER YEAR PRECIPITATION BEGAN OCTOBER 1ST AND IS
CURRENTLY 13.99 INCHES WHICH IS 3.11 INCHES BELOW NORMAL. CALENDAR YEAR
PRECIPITATION IS 7.14 INCHES WHICH IS 2.32 INCHES BELOW NORMAL.

THE AVERAGE WIND FOR THE MONTH WAS 4.7 MPH. THE FASTEST RECORDED TWO-
MINUTE WIND WAS 20 MPH FROM THE WEST-NORTHWEST ON THE 18TH. THE PEAK
WIND WAS 27 MPH FROM THE WEST ALSO ON THE 18TH.

THE HIGHEST PRESSURE FOR THE MONTH WAS 30.11 INCHES ON THE 23RD. THE
LOWEST PRESSURE FOR THE MONTH WAS 29.72 INCHES ON THE 14TH.

SCHAAF



000
NOUS46 KMFR 011206 CCA
PNSMFR

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE MEDFORD OR
445 AM PDT MON JUN 1 2015

...MEDFORD OREGON WEATHER REVIEW: JUNE 2015...

JUNE 2015 HAD A VERY WET START IN MEDFORD AS NEARLY ALL OF OUR MONTHLY
RAINFALL OCCURRED ON THE FIRST DAY. ANOTHER WEAK DISTURBANCE MOVED
THROUGH ON THE 8TH AND 9TH PROVIDING MUCH OF THE ROGUE VALLEY
AND SURROUNDING AREAS WITH ANOTHER COUPLE OF DAYS OF SHOWERS AND
THUNDERSTORMS. BEYOND THAT, MEDFORD REMAINED EITHER SUNNY OR MOSTLY
SUNNY WITH NO MEASURABLE RAINFALL. THIS ALLOWED FOR TEMPERATURES TO
SOAR ACROSS SOUTHERN OREGON AND NORTHERN CALIFORNIA. THESE CONDITIONS
RESULTED IN THE HOTTEST MONTH OF JUNE MEDFORD HAS SEEN SINCE RECORDS
BEGAN BACK IN 1911. THE RECORDS FOR HOTTEST JUNE INCLUDE THE AVERAGE
MAXIMUM TEMPERATURE, THE AVERAGE MINIMUM TEMPERATURE, AND THE AVERAGE
TEMPERATURE ITSELF WHICH IS THE AVERAGE OF THE AVERAGE MAX AND MIN
TEMPERATURES. THERE WERE 21 DAYS WHICH REACHED AT LEAST 90 DEGREES AND
5 DAYS WITH TEMPERATURES SOARING OVER 100 DEGREES...WITH OUR FIRST 100
DEGREE DAY OCCURRING ON THE 7TH. WE EVEN BROKE DAILY MAXIMUM
TEMPERATURE RECORDS 6 TIMES THIS MONTH. ADDITIONALLY, WE ALSO HAD MILD
TO WARM MINIMUM TEMPERATURES ALL MONTH. IN FACT, MEDFORD BROKE THE ALL
TIME RECORD WARMEST MINIMUM TEMPERATURE ON THE 28TH WITH A LOW
TEMPERATURE OF 76 DEGREES. ALTHOUGH A FEW SHOWERS AND STORMS OCCURRED
THROUGHOUT JUNE, RAINFALL VALUES ACROSS SOUTHERN OREGON AND NORTHERN
CALIFORNIA ARE STILL MUCH BELOW NORMAL FOR THE MONTH OF JUNE AS WELL AS
FOR THE WATER AND CALENDAR YEAR. THIS HAS ALLOWED FOR OUR DROUGHT
CONDITIONS TO CONTINUE DRYING OUT FUELS. CONSEQUENTLY, THE
THUNDERSTORMS WHICH HAVE OCCURRED THIS MONTH HAVE PRODUCED NUMEROUS
WILDFIRES ACROSS OUR FORECAST AREA.

THE AVERAGE TEMPERATURE FOR JUNE WAS 74.8 DEGREES, WHICH IS 8.0
DEGREES ABOVE NORMAL. THE AVERAGE MAXIMUM TEMPERATURE WAS 91.3
DEGREES, WHICH IS 9.7 DEGREES ABOVE NORMAL. THE AVERAGE MINIMUM
TEMPERATURE WAS 58.3 DEGREES, WHICH IS 6.3 DEGREES ABOVE NORMAL. THE
HIGHEST TEMPERATURE FOR THE MONTH WAS 107 DEGREES ON THE 26TH. THE
LOWEST TEMPERATURE OF THE MONTH WAS 50 DEGREES ON THE 3RD AND 14TH.

THERE WERE 25 CLEAR DAYS, 3 PARTLY CLOUDY DAYS, AND 2 CLOUDY DAYS.

TOTAL PRECIPITATION WAS 0.31 INCHES WHICH IS 0.31 INCHES BELOW NORMAL.
THE GREATEST 24 HOUR TOTAL WAS 0.27 INCHES THAT FELL FROM MAY 31ST TO
JUNE 1ST. THE WATER YEAR PRECIPITATION BEGAN OCTOBER 1ST AND IS
CURRENTLY 13.99 INCHES WHICH IS 3.11 INCHES BELOW NORMAL. CALENDAR YEAR
PRECIPITATION IS 7.14 INCHES WHICH IS 2.32 INCHES BELOW NORMAL.

THE AVERAGE WIND FOR THE MONTH WAS 4.7 MPH. THE FASTEST RECORDED TWO-
MINUTE WIND WAS 20 MPH FROM THE WEST-NORTHWEST ON THE 18TH. THE PEAK
WIND WAS 27 MPH FROM THE WEST ALSO ON THE 18TH.

THE HIGHEST PRESSURE FOR THE MONTH WAS 30.11 INCHES ON THE 23RD. THE
LOWEST PRESSURE FOR THE MONTH WAS 29.72 INCHES ON THE 14TH.

SCHAAF


000
NOUS43 KJKL 011202
PNSJKL
KYZ044-050>052-058>060-068-069-079-080-083>088-104-106>120-041600-

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE JACKSON KY
802 AM EDT WED JUL 1 2015

...CLIMATE NORMALS...MEANS AND EXTREMES FOR JULY...

...JACKSON KENTUCKY (JKL)...

TEMPERATURE DATA...

AVERAGE MAXIMUM........... 84.6
AVERAGE MINIMUM........... 66.1
AVERAGE MONTHLY........... 75.4
HIGHEST................... 101 ON THE  8TH IN 1988
LOWEST....................  52 ON THE  7TH IN 1983
LOW MAXIMUM..............   67 ON THE  2ND IN 2009
HIGH MINIMUM..............  76 ON THE 22ND IN 1983
NORMAL DAYS WITH HIGH 90 OR ABOVE.....  4.8
NORMAL DAYS WITH HIGH 32 OR BELOW.....  0.0
NORMAL DAYS WITH  LOW 32 OR BELOW.....  0.0
NORMAL DAYS WITH  LOW  0 OR BELOW.....  0.0

DEGREE DAYS (BASE 65)..... HEATING             COOLING

MONTHLY AVERAGE...........    0                 321
GREATEST MONTHLY..........    9 IN 2009         440 IN 1993
LEAST MONTHLY.............    0 IN MANY YEARS   192 IN 2009

PRECIPITATION DATA...

MONTHLY AVERAGE...........  4.65 INCHES
WETTEST...................  9.74 INCHES IN 1985
DRIEST....................  1.77 INCHES IN 1995
GREATEST 24 HOUR..........  2.99 INCHES ON THE 25TH-26TH IN 2004
AVERAGE DAYS OF THUNDER...  10.0
AVERAGE DAYS OF DENSE FOG.   8.5
AVERAGE SNOWFALL..........     0 INCHES
GREATEST SNOWFALL.........     0 INCHES
GREATEST 24 HOUR SNOWFALL.     0 INCHES
GREATEST SNOW DEPTH.......     0 INCHES

...LONDON KENTUCKY (LOZ)...

TEMPERATURE DATA...

AVERAGE MAXIMUM........... 86.4
AVERAGE MINIMUM........... 66.2
AVERAGE MONTHLY........... 76.3
HIGHEST................... 101 ON THE  9TH IN 1988/30TH & 31ST IN 1999
LOWEST....................  45 ON THE 10TH IN 1961
LOW MAXIMUM...............  67 ON THE  3RD IN 1976
HIGH MINIMUM..............  76 ON THE 25TH IN 1978
NORMAL DAYS WITH HIGH 90 OR ABOVE.....  7.9
NORMAL DAYS WITH HIGH 32 OR BELOW.....  0.0
NORMAL DAYS WITH  LOW 32 OR BELOW.....  0.0
NORMAL DAYS WITH  LOW  0 OR BELOW.....  0.0

DEGREE DAYS (BASE 65)..... HEATING             COOLING

MONTHLY AVERAGE...........    0                 350
GREATEST MONTHLY..........   13 IN 1967         470 IN 1993
LEAST MONTHLY.............    0 IN MANY YEARS   174 IN 1967

PRECIPITATION DATA...

MONTHLY AVERAGE...........  4.04 INCHES
WETTEST................... 10.14 INCHES IN 1972
DRIEST....................  1.12 INCHES IN 1974
GREATEST DAILY RAIN.......  2.95 INCHES ON THE 6TH IN 1967
AVERAGE SNOWFALL..........     0 INCHES
GREATEST SNOWFALL.........     0 INCHES
GREATEST DAILY SNOWFALL...     0 INCHES

***SNOWFALL RECORDS FOR LONDON WERE KEPT BETWEEN 1954 AND 1996***

THE LATEST CLIMATE OUTLOOK FOR JUNE INDICATES THAT EASTERN KENTUCKY
WILL BE IN A WEATHER PATTERN MORE CONDUCIVE TO NEAR NORMAL TEMPERATURES
AND ABOVE NORMAL PRECIPITATION.

FOR MORE INFORMATION ON CLIMATE OUTLOOKS TRY THIS INTERNET ADDRESS:
HTTP://WWW.CPC.NCEP.NOAA.GOV

CLIMATE WEATHER RECORDS AT THE JULIAN CARROLL AIRPORT NEAR JACKSON
KENTUCKY (JKL) DATE BACK TO JANUARY 1ST 1981.

CLIMATE WEATHER RECORDS AT THE LONDON-CORBIN MAGEE FIELD AIRPORT (LOZ)
DATE BACK TO NOVEMBER 11TH 1954.

$$

CARICO



000
NOUS43 KJKL 011202
PNSJKL
KYZ044-050>052-058>060-068-069-079-080-083>088-104-106>120-041600-

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE JACKSON KY
802 AM EDT WED JUL 1 2015

...CLIMATE NORMALS...MEANS AND EXTREMES FOR JULY...

...JACKSON KENTUCKY (JKL)...

TEMPERATURE DATA...

AVERAGE MAXIMUM........... 84.6
AVERAGE MINIMUM........... 66.1
AVERAGE MONTHLY........... 75.4
HIGHEST................... 101 ON THE  8TH IN 1988
LOWEST....................  52 ON THE  7TH IN 1983
LOW MAXIMUM..............   67 ON THE  2ND IN 2009
HIGH MINIMUM..............  76 ON THE 22ND IN 1983
NORMAL DAYS WITH HIGH 90 OR ABOVE.....  4.8
NORMAL DAYS WITH HIGH 32 OR BELOW.....  0.0
NORMAL DAYS WITH  LOW 32 OR BELOW.....  0.0
NORMAL DAYS WITH  LOW  0 OR BELOW.....  0.0

DEGREE DAYS (BASE 65)..... HEATING             COOLING

MONTHLY AVERAGE...........    0                 321
GREATEST MONTHLY..........    9 IN 2009         440 IN 1993
LEAST MONTHLY.............    0 IN MANY YEARS   192 IN 2009

PRECIPITATION DATA...

MONTHLY AVERAGE...........  4.65 INCHES
WETTEST...................  9.74 INCHES IN 1985
DRIEST....................  1.77 INCHES IN 1995
GREATEST 24 HOUR..........  2.99 INCHES ON THE 25TH-26TH IN 2004
AVERAGE DAYS OF THUNDER...  10.0
AVERAGE DAYS OF DENSE FOG.   8.5
AVERAGE SNOWFALL..........     0 INCHES
GREATEST SNOWFALL.........     0 INCHES
GREATEST 24 HOUR SNOWFALL.     0 INCHES
GREATEST SNOW DEPTH.......     0 INCHES

...LONDON KENTUCKY (LOZ)...

TEMPERATURE DATA...

AVERAGE MAXIMUM........... 86.4
AVERAGE MINIMUM........... 66.2
AVERAGE MONTHLY........... 76.3
HIGHEST................... 101 ON THE  9TH IN 1988/30TH & 31ST IN 1999
LOWEST....................  45 ON THE 10TH IN 1961
LOW MAXIMUM...............  67 ON THE  3RD IN 1976
HIGH MINIMUM..............  76 ON THE 25TH IN 1978
NORMAL DAYS WITH HIGH 90 OR ABOVE.....  7.9
NORMAL DAYS WITH HIGH 32 OR BELOW.....  0.0
NORMAL DAYS WITH  LOW 32 OR BELOW.....  0.0
NORMAL DAYS WITH  LOW  0 OR BELOW.....  0.0

DEGREE DAYS (BASE 65)..... HEATING             COOLING

MONTHLY AVERAGE...........    0                 350
GREATEST MONTHLY..........   13 IN 1967         470 IN 1993
LEAST MONTHLY.............    0 IN MANY YEARS   174 IN 1967

PRECIPITATION DATA...

MONTHLY AVERAGE...........  4.04 INCHES
WETTEST................... 10.14 INCHES IN 1972
DRIEST....................  1.12 INCHES IN 1974
GREATEST DAILY RAIN.......  2.95 INCHES ON THE 6TH IN 1967
AVERAGE SNOWFALL..........     0 INCHES
GREATEST SNOWFALL.........     0 INCHES
GREATEST DAILY SNOWFALL...     0 INCHES

***SNOWFALL RECORDS FOR LONDON WERE KEPT BETWEEN 1954 AND 1996***

THE LATEST CLIMATE OUTLOOK FOR JUNE INDICATES THAT EASTERN KENTUCKY
WILL BE IN A WEATHER PATTERN MORE CONDUCIVE TO NEAR NORMAL TEMPERATURES
AND ABOVE NORMAL PRECIPITATION.

FOR MORE INFORMATION ON CLIMATE OUTLOOKS TRY THIS INTERNET ADDRESS:
HTTP://WWW.CPC.NCEP.NOAA.GOV

CLIMATE WEATHER RECORDS AT THE JULIAN CARROLL AIRPORT NEAR JACKSON
KENTUCKY (JKL) DATE BACK TO JANUARY 1ST 1981.

CLIMATE WEATHER RECORDS AT THE LONDON-CORBIN MAGEE FIELD AIRPORT (LOZ)
DATE BACK TO NOVEMBER 11TH 1954.

$$

CARICO


000
NOUS43 KGLD 011200
PNSGLD

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE GOODLAND KS
600 AM MDT WED JUL 01 2015

...ON THIS DATE IN WEATHER HISTORY...

IN 1994, A STRONG THUNDERSTORM COMPLEX SWEPT THROUGH NORTHWEST KANSAS
AND SOUTHWEST NEBRASKA PRODUCING HAIL AND SEVERE WINDS UP TO 90 MPH.
A BUSINESS IN RED WILLOW COUNTY SUSTAINED SIGNIFICANT DAMAGE, WHILE AN
11 YEAR OLD BOY WAS THROWN 40 YARDS SUFFERING MINOR CUTS AND BRUISES.
THE STORM CONTINUED TO PRODUCE EXTREMELY STRONG WINDS ACROSS NORTHERN
KANSAS AND SOUTHERN NEBRASKA AS IT PROGRESSED EASTWARD. NUMEROUS
BUILDINGS WERE DAMAGED AND LARGE TREES WERE UPROOTED ACROSS MANY COUNTIES.

$$



000
NOUS43 KGLD 011200
PNSGLD

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE GOODLAND KS
600 AM MDT WED JUL 01 2015

...ON THIS DATE IN WEATHER HISTORY...

IN 1994, A STRONG THUNDERSTORM COMPLEX SWEPT THROUGH NORTHWEST KANSAS
AND SOUTHWEST NEBRASKA PRODUCING HAIL AND SEVERE WINDS UP TO 90 MPH.
A BUSINESS IN RED WILLOW COUNTY SUSTAINED SIGNIFICANT DAMAGE, WHILE AN
11 YEAR OLD BOY WAS THROWN 40 YARDS SUFFERING MINOR CUTS AND BRUISES.
THE STORM CONTINUED TO PRODUCE EXTREMELY STRONG WINDS ACROSS NORTHERN
KANSAS AND SOUTHERN NEBRASKA AS IT PROGRESSED EASTWARD. NUMEROUS
BUILDINGS WERE DAMAGED AND LARGE TREES WERE UPROOTED ACROSS MANY COUNTIES.

$$


000
NOUS46 KMFR 011145 CCA
PNSMFR

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE MEDFORD OR
445 AM PDT MON JUN 1 2015

...MEDFORD OREGON WEATHER REVIEW: JUNE 2015...

JUNE 2015 HAD A VERY WET START IN MEDFORD AS NEARLY ALL OF OUR MONTHLY
RAINFALL OCCURRED ON THE FIRST DAY. ANOTHER WEAK DISTURBANCE MOVED
THROUGH ON THE 8TH AND 9TH PROVIDING MUCH OF THE ROGUE VALLEY
AND SURREOUNDING AREAS WITH ANOTHER COUPLE OF DAYS OF SHOWERS AND
THUNDERSTORMS. BEYOND THAT, MEDFORD REMAINED EITHER SUNNY OR MOSTLY
SUNNY WITH NO MEASURABLE RAINFALL. THIS ALLOWED FOR TEMPERATURES TO
SOAR ACROSS SOUTHERN OREGON AND NORTHERN CALIFORNIA. THESE CONDITIONS
RESULTED IN THE HOTTEST MONTH OF JUNE MEDFORD HAS SEEN SINCE RECORDS
BEGAN BACK IN 1911. THE RECORDS FOR HOTTEST JUNE INCLUDE THE AVERAGE
MAXIMUM TEMPERATURE, THE AVERAGE MINIMUM TEMPERATURE, AND THE AVERAGE
TEMPERATURE ITSELF WHICH IS THE AVERAGE OF THE AVERAGE MAX AND MIN
TEMPERATURES. THERE WERE 21 DAYS WHICH REACEHD AT LEAST 90 DEGREES AND
5 DAYS WITH TEMPERATURES SOARING OVER 100 DEGREES...WITH OUR FIRST 100
DEGREE DAY OCCURRING ON THE 7TH. WE EVEN BROKE DAILY MAXIMUM
TEMPERATURE RECORDS 6 TIMES THIS MONTH. ADDITIONALLY, WE ALSO HAD MILD
TO WARM MINIMUM TEMPERATURES ALL MONTH. IN FACT, MEDFORD BROKE THE ALL
TIME RECORD WARMEST MINIMUM TEMPERATURE ON THE 28TH WITH A LOW
TEMPERATURE OF 76 DEGREES. ALTHOUGH A FEW SHOWERS AND STORMS OCCURRED
THROUGHOUT JUNE, RAINFALL VALUES ACROSS SOUTHERN OREGON AND NORTHERN
CALIFORNIA ARE STILL MUCH BELOW NORMAL FOR THE MONTH OF JUNE AS WELL AS
FOR THE WATER AND CALENDAR YEAR. THIS HAS ALLOWED FOR OUR DROUGHT
CONDITIONS TO CONTINUE DRYING OUT FUELS. CONSEQUENTLY, THE
THUNDERSTORMS WHICH HAVE OCCURRED THIS MONTH HAVE PRODUCED NUMEROUS
WILDFIRES ACROSS OUR FORECAST AREA.

THE AVERAGE TEMPERATURE FOR JUNE WAS 74.8 DEGREES, WHICH IS 8.0
DEGREES ABOVE NORMAL. THE AVERAGE MAXIMUM TEMPERATURE WAS 91.3
DEGREES, WHICH IS 9.7 DEGREES ABOVE NORMAL. THE AVERAGE MINIMUM
TEMPERATURE WAS 58.3 DEGREES, WHICH IS 6.3 DEGREES ABOVE NORMAL. THE
HIGHEST TEMPERATURE FOR THE MONTH WAS 107 DEGREES ON THE 26TH. THE
LOWEST TEMPERATURE OF THE MONTH WAS 50 DEGREES ON THE 3RD AND 14TH.

THERE WERE 25 CLEAR DAYS, 3 PARTLY CLOUDY DAYS, AND 2 CLOUDY DAYS.

TOTAL PRECIPITATION WAS 0.31 INCHES WHICH IS 0.31 INCHES BELOW NORMAL.
THE GREATEST 24 HOUR TOTAL WAS 0.27 INCHES THAT FELL FROM MAY 31ST TO
JUNE 1ST. THE WATER YEAR PRECIPITATION BEGAN OCTOBER 1ST AND IS
CURRENTLY 13.99 INCHES WHICH IS 3.11 INCHES BELOW NORMAL. CALENDAR YEAR
PRECIPITATION IS 7.14 INCHES WHICH IS 2.32 INCHES BELOW NORMAL.

THE AVERAGE WIND FOR THE MONTH WAS 4.7 MPH. THE FASTEST RECORDED TWO-
MINUTE WIND WAS 20 MPH FROM THE WEST-NORTHWEST ON THE 18TH. THE PEAK
WIND WAS 27 MPH FROM THE WEST ALSO ON THE 18TH.

THE HIGHEST PRESSURE FOR THE MONTH WAS 30.11 INCHES ON THE 23RD. THE
LOWEST PRESSURE FOR THE MONTH WAS 29.72 INCHES ON THE 14TH.

SCHAAF


000
NOUS46 KMFR 011145 CCA
PNSMFR

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE MEDFORD OR
445 AM PDT MON JUN 1 2015

...MEDFORD OREGON WEATHER REVIEW: JUNE 2015...

JUNE 2015 HAD A VERY WET START IN MEDFORD AS NEARLY ALL OF OUR MONTHLY
RAINFALL OCCURRED ON THE FIRST DAY. ANOTHER WEAK DISTURBANCE MOVED
THROUGH ON THE 8TH AND 9TH PROVIDING MUCH OF THE ROGUE VALLEY
AND SURREOUNDING AREAS WITH ANOTHER COUPLE OF DAYS OF SHOWERS AND
THUNDERSTORMS. BEYOND THAT, MEDFORD REMAINED EITHER SUNNY OR MOSTLY
SUNNY WITH NO MEASURABLE RAINFALL. THIS ALLOWED FOR TEMPERATURES TO
SOAR ACROSS SOUTHERN OREGON AND NORTHERN CALIFORNIA. THESE CONDITIONS
RESULTED IN THE HOTTEST MONTH OF JUNE MEDFORD HAS SEEN SINCE RECORDS
BEGAN BACK IN 1911. THE RECORDS FOR HOTTEST JUNE INCLUDE THE AVERAGE
MAXIMUM TEMPERATURE, THE AVERAGE MINIMUM TEMPERATURE, AND THE AVERAGE
TEMPERATURE ITSELF WHICH IS THE AVERAGE OF THE AVERAGE MAX AND MIN
TEMPERATURES. THERE WERE 21 DAYS WHICH REACEHD AT LEAST 90 DEGREES AND
5 DAYS WITH TEMPERATURES SOARING OVER 100 DEGREES...WITH OUR FIRST 100
DEGREE DAY OCCURRING ON THE 7TH. WE EVEN BROKE DAILY MAXIMUM
TEMPERATURE RECORDS 6 TIMES THIS MONTH. ADDITIONALLY, WE ALSO HAD MILD
TO WARM MINIMUM TEMPERATURES ALL MONTH. IN FACT, MEDFORD BROKE THE ALL
TIME RECORD WARMEST MINIMUM TEMPERATURE ON THE 28TH WITH A LOW
TEMPERATURE OF 76 DEGREES. ALTHOUGH A FEW SHOWERS AND STORMS OCCURRED
THROUGHOUT JUNE, RAINFALL VALUES ACROSS SOUTHERN OREGON AND NORTHERN
CALIFORNIA ARE STILL MUCH BELOW NORMAL FOR THE MONTH OF JUNE AS WELL AS
FOR THE WATER AND CALENDAR YEAR. THIS HAS ALLOWED FOR OUR DROUGHT
CONDITIONS TO CONTINUE DRYING OUT FUELS. CONSEQUENTLY, THE
THUNDERSTORMS WHICH HAVE OCCURRED THIS MONTH HAVE PRODUCED NUMEROUS
WILDFIRES ACROSS OUR FORECAST AREA.

THE AVERAGE TEMPERATURE FOR JUNE WAS 74.8 DEGREES, WHICH IS 8.0
DEGREES ABOVE NORMAL. THE AVERAGE MAXIMUM TEMPERATURE WAS 91.3
DEGREES, WHICH IS 9.7 DEGREES ABOVE NORMAL. THE AVERAGE MINIMUM
TEMPERATURE WAS 58.3 DEGREES, WHICH IS 6.3 DEGREES ABOVE NORMAL. THE
HIGHEST TEMPERATURE FOR THE MONTH WAS 107 DEGREES ON THE 26TH. THE
LOWEST TEMPERATURE OF THE MONTH WAS 50 DEGREES ON THE 3RD AND 14TH.

THERE WERE 25 CLEAR DAYS, 3 PARTLY CLOUDY DAYS, AND 2 CLOUDY DAYS.

TOTAL PRECIPITATION WAS 0.31 INCHES WHICH IS 0.31 INCHES BELOW NORMAL.
THE GREATEST 24 HOUR TOTAL WAS 0.27 INCHES THAT FELL FROM MAY 31ST TO
JUNE 1ST. THE WATER YEAR PRECIPITATION BEGAN OCTOBER 1ST AND IS
CURRENTLY 13.99 INCHES WHICH IS 3.11 INCHES BELOW NORMAL. CALENDAR YEAR
PRECIPITATION IS 7.14 INCHES WHICH IS 2.32 INCHES BELOW NORMAL.

THE AVERAGE WIND FOR THE MONTH WAS 4.7 MPH. THE FASTEST RECORDED TWO-
MINUTE WIND WAS 20 MPH FROM THE WEST-NORTHWEST ON THE 18TH. THE PEAK
WIND WAS 27 MPH FROM THE WEST ALSO ON THE 18TH.

THE HIGHEST PRESSURE FOR THE MONTH WAS 30.11 INCHES ON THE 23RD. THE
LOWEST PRESSURE FOR THE MONTH WAS 29.72 INCHES ON THE 14TH.

SCHAAF



000
NOUS46 KLOX 010512
PNSLOX

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE LOS ANGELES/OXNARD CA
1010 PM PDT TUE JUN 30 2015

...DRIEST FOUR CONSECUTIVE RAIN SEASONS EVER RECORDED IN DOWNTOWN LOS
ANGELES...

RAINFALL FOR THE 2014-2015 RAIN SEASON IN DOWNTOWN LOS ANGELES
TOTALED 8.52 INCHES...OR 57 PERCENT OF THE NORMAL RAINFALL OF 14.93
INCHES. THE RAINFALL TOTAL FOR THE PAST FOUR CONSECUTIVE RAIN
SEASONS BEGINNING WITH THE 2011-2012 SEASON WAS 29.14 INCHES. THAT WAS
THE LOWEST RAINFALL TOTAL FOR 4 CONSECUTIVE SEASONS SINCE RECORDS
BEGAN IN 1877. THE PREVIOUS RECORD WAS 34.02 INCHES FOR THE 4 SEASONS
FROM 1947-1951.

RAINFALL FOR THE PAST 4 CONSECUTIVE SEASONS COMBINED IN DOWNTOWN LOS
ANGELES WAS MORE THAN 30 INCHES...OR TWO AND A HALF FEET...BELOW THE
NORMAL FOR THAT PERIOD...WHICH WOULD BE 59.72 INCHES. RAINFALL HAS
AVERAGED JUST 49 PERCENT OF NORMAL DURING THIS EXTENDED TIME.

THIS IS THE FIRST TIME SINCE RECORDS BEGAN IN DOWNTOWN LOS ANGELES
IN 1877 IN WHICH LESS THAN 10 INCHES OF RAIN HAS BEEN RECORDED IN
FOUR CONSECUTIVE RAIN SEASONS.

RAINFALL HAS TOTALLED LESS THAN 10 INCHES IN THREE CONSECUTIVE
SEASONS JUST 5 TIMES...JULY 1ST 1897 TO JUNE 30TH 1900... JULY 1ST
1922 TO JUNE 30TH 1925...JULY 1ST 1958 THROUGH JUNE 30TH 1961...JULY
1ST 2011 TO JUNE 30TH 2014...AND JULY 1ST 2012 TO JUNE 30TH 2015.

THIS WAS ALSO THE 8TH SEASON SINCE THE 2001-2002 SEASON IN WHICH LESS
THAN 10 INCHES OF RAIN WAS RECORED.

SINCE 2001...FOUR OF THE SEVEN DRIEST RAINY SEASONS HAVE BEEN
RECORDED IN DOWNTOWN LOS ANGELES...INCLUDING THE DRIEST (2006-2007)
DURING WHICH A PALTRY 3.21 INCHES OF RAIN WAS MEASURED...THE 2ND
DRIEST (2001-2002) WHEN 4.42 INCHES OF RAIN WAS MEASURED...THE 6TH
DRIEST (2012-2013) WITH 5.85 INCHES...AND THE 7TH DRIEST (2013-
2014)...DURING WHICH 6.08 INCHES OF RAIN FELL.

IT SHOULD BE NOTED THAT THE OFFICIAL WATER YEAR IS FROM OCTOBER 1ST
THROUGH SEPTEMBER 30TH...BUT RAIN SEASON RECORDS IN DOWNTOWN LOS
ANGELES SINCE 1877 HAVE TRADITIONALLY BEEN FROM JULY 1ST THROUGH
JUNE 30TH.

THE FOLLOWING ARE THE DRIEST 4 CONSECUTIVE RAIN SEASONS
(TRADITIONALLY JUL 1-JUN 30) IN DOWNTOWN LOS ANGELES SINCE RECORDS
BEGAN IN 1877...THE TOTAL RAIN DURING THOSE FOUR SEASONS (IN
INCHES)...THE RAINFALL DEFICIT DURING THAT PERIOD...AND THE
PERCENTAGE OF NORMAL RAINFALL FOR A FOUR YEAR PERIOD (BASED ON 1981-
2010 NORMALS). NORMAL RAINFALL FOR FOUR SEASONS IS 59.72 INCHES.

                                          4 SEASON
                                TOTAL     RAINFALL    % OF NORMAL
                                RAIN      DEFICIT      RAIN FOR
      RANK        SEASONS     (INCHES)    (INCHES)     4 SEASONS
      ----       ---------    --------    --------    -----------

       1.        2011-2015      29.14      30.58          49%

       2.        1947-1951      34.02      25.70          57%

       3.        1986-1990      35.57      24.15          60%

       4.        1897-1901      36.85      22.87          62%

       5.        1958-1962      37.40      22.32          63%

       6.        1896-1900      37.42      22.30          63%

       7.        1895-1899      38.02      21.70          64%

       8.        1946-1950      38.42      21.30          64%

       9.        2005-2009      39.01      20.71          65%

      10.        1987-1991      39.38      20.34          66%
--------------------------------------------------------------------------

THE FOLLOWING IS A TABLE OF TOTAL RAINFALL FOR THE RAIN SEASON FROM
JULY 1ST 2014 THROUGH JUNE 30TH 2015...NORMAL RAINFALL FOR THE
SEASON (USING THE 1981-2010 NORMAL PERIOD)...AND PERCENT OF NORMAL
SEASONAL RAIN FOR SOME SELECTED LOCATIONS IN SOUTHWESTERN CALIFORNIA

                       TOTAL RAIN      NORMAL RAIN   PERCENT OF
                     7/1/14-6/30/15     7/1-6/30       NORMAL
                     ---------------   -----------   ----------

L.A. DOWNTOWN             8.52           14.93          57%
L.A. AIRPORT              7.45           12.82          58%
LONG BEACH                8.05           12.26          66%
UCLA                      9.17           18.63          49%
BURBANK AP                7.65           17.31          44%
WOODLAND HILLS            8.22           17.53          47%
SANDBERG                  7.56           12.33          61%
LANCASTER AP              4.68            7.38          63%
PALMDALE AP+              4.67            8.30          56%

CAMARILLO AP+             8.46           15.22          56%
OXNARD NWS+               9.19           15.33          60%

SANTA BARBARA AP          9.63           17.76          54%
SANTA MARIA AP            7.64           13.95          55%

SAN LUIS OBISPO AP+       8.67           19.01          46%
PASO ROBLES AP            8.81           12.78          69%

+ DUE TO INSUFFICIENT DATA DURING THE 1981-2010 PERIOD...NORMALS ARE
UNOFFICIAL AND ARE PROJECTED BASED ON AVAILABLE DATA

--------------------------------------------------------------------------

THE FOLLOWING IS A TABLE OF TOTAL RAINFALL FOR THE PAST 4 RAIN
SEASONS (IN INCHES) FROM JULY 1ST 2011 THROUGH JUNE 30TH 2015...NORMAL
RAINFALL FOR THE 4 SEASON PERIOD (USING THE 1981-2010 NORMAL PERIOD)...
RAINFALL DEFICIT...AND PERCENT OF NORMAL RAIN FOR THE PAST 4
SEASONS FOR SOME SELECTED LOCATIONS IN SOUTHWESTERN CALIFORNIA

ACROSS SOUTHWESTERN CALIFORNIA...RAINFALL HAS GENERALLY AVERAGED
45 TO 55 PERCENT OF NORMAL DURING THIS 4 YEAR PERIOD FROM
JULY 1ST 2011 THROUGH JUNE 30TH 2015.

                       TOTAL RAIN    NORMAL RAIN   TOTAL RAIN   % NORM
                        7/1/11 TO     7/1/11 TO     DEFICIT     RAIN
                        6/30/15        6/30/15       SINCE      SINCE
                                                    7/1/11      7/1/11
                       ----------    -----------   ----------   -------

L.A. DOWNTOWN            29.14          59.72         30.58       49%
L.A. AIRPORT             26.40          51.28         24.88       51%
LONG BEACH               26.79          49.04         22.25       55%
UCLA                     33.67          74.52         40.85       45%
BURBANK AP               27.16          69.24         42.07       39%
WOODLAND HILLS           30.75          70.12         38.89       44%
SANDBERG                 23.06          49.32         26.26       47%
LANCASTER AP             12.92          29.52         16.60       44%
PALMDALE AP+             14.66          33.20         18.55       44%

CAMARILLO AP+            27.04          60.88         33.84       44%
OXNARD NWS+              30.01          61.32         31.31       49%

SANTA BARBARA AP         37.23          71.04         33.81       52%
SANTA MARIA AP           28.06          55.80         27.74       50%

SAN LUIS OBISPO AP+      37.59          76.04         38.45       49%
PASO ROBLES AP           27.06          51.12         24.06       53%

+ DUE TO INSUFFICIENT DATA DURING THE 1981-2010 PERIOD...NORMALS ARE
UNOFFICIAL AND ARE PROJECTED BASED ON AVAILABLE DATA

$$

BRUNO/SIRARD

NWS LOS ANGELES/OXNARD CA


000
NOUS46 KLOX 010512
PNSLOX

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE LOS ANGELES/OXNARD CA
1010 PM PDT TUE JUN 30 2015

...DRIEST FOUR CONSECUTIVE RAIN SEASONS EVER RECORDED IN DOWNTOWN LOS
ANGELES...

RAINFALL FOR THE 2014-2015 RAIN SEASON IN DOWNTOWN LOS ANGELES
TOTALED 8.52 INCHES...OR 57 PERCENT OF THE NORMAL RAINFALL OF 14.93
INCHES. THE RAINFALL TOTAL FOR THE PAST FOUR CONSECUTIVE RAIN
SEASONS BEGINNING WITH THE 2011-2012 SEASON WAS 29.14 INCHES. THAT WAS
THE LOWEST RAINFALL TOTAL FOR 4 CONSECUTIVE SEASONS SINCE RECORDS
BEGAN IN 1877. THE PREVIOUS RECORD WAS 34.02 INCHES FOR THE 4 SEASONS
FROM 1947-1951.

RAINFALL FOR THE PAST 4 CONSECUTIVE SEASONS COMBINED IN DOWNTOWN LOS
ANGELES WAS MORE THAN 30 INCHES...OR TWO AND A HALF FEET...BELOW THE
NORMAL FOR THAT PERIOD...WHICH WOULD BE 59.72 INCHES. RAINFALL HAS
AVERAGED JUST 49 PERCENT OF NORMAL DURING THIS EXTENDED TIME.

THIS IS THE FIRST TIME SINCE RECORDS BEGAN IN DOWNTOWN LOS ANGELES
IN 1877 IN WHICH LESS THAN 10 INCHES OF RAIN HAS BEEN RECORDED IN
FOUR CONSECUTIVE RAIN SEASONS.

RAINFALL HAS TOTALLED LESS THAN 10 INCHES IN THREE CONSECUTIVE
SEASONS JUST 5 TIMES...JULY 1ST 1897 TO JUNE 30TH 1900... JULY 1ST
1922 TO JUNE 30TH 1925...JULY 1ST 1958 THROUGH JUNE 30TH 1961...JULY
1ST 2011 TO JUNE 30TH 2014...AND JULY 1ST 2012 TO JUNE 30TH 2015.

THIS WAS ALSO THE 8TH SEASON SINCE THE 2001-2002 SEASON IN WHICH LESS
THAN 10 INCHES OF RAIN WAS RECORED.

SINCE 2001...FOUR OF THE SEVEN DRIEST RAINY SEASONS HAVE BEEN
RECORDED IN DOWNTOWN LOS ANGELES...INCLUDING THE DRIEST (2006-2007)
DURING WHICH A PALTRY 3.21 INCHES OF RAIN WAS MEASURED...THE 2ND
DRIEST (2001-2002) WHEN 4.42 INCHES OF RAIN WAS MEASURED...THE 6TH
DRIEST (2012-2013) WITH 5.85 INCHES...AND THE 7TH DRIEST (2013-
2014)...DURING WHICH 6.08 INCHES OF RAIN FELL.

IT SHOULD BE NOTED THAT THE OFFICIAL WATER YEAR IS FROM OCTOBER 1ST
THROUGH SEPTEMBER 30TH...BUT RAIN SEASON RECORDS IN DOWNTOWN LOS
ANGELES SINCE 1877 HAVE TRADITIONALLY BEEN FROM JULY 1ST THROUGH
JUNE 30TH.

THE FOLLOWING ARE THE DRIEST 4 CONSECUTIVE RAIN SEASONS
(TRADITIONALLY JUL 1-JUN 30) IN DOWNTOWN LOS ANGELES SINCE RECORDS
BEGAN IN 1877...THE TOTAL RAIN DURING THOSE FOUR SEASONS (IN
INCHES)...THE RAINFALL DEFICIT DURING THAT PERIOD...AND THE
PERCENTAGE OF NORMAL RAINFALL FOR A FOUR YEAR PERIOD (BASED ON 1981-
2010 NORMALS). NORMAL RAINFALL FOR FOUR SEASONS IS 59.72 INCHES.

                                          4 SEASON
                                TOTAL     RAINFALL    % OF NORMAL
                                RAIN      DEFICIT      RAIN FOR
      RANK        SEASONS     (INCHES)    (INCHES)     4 SEASONS
      ----       ---------    --------    --------    -----------

       1.        2011-2015      29.14      30.58          49%

       2.        1947-1951      34.02      25.70          57%

       3.        1986-1990      35.57      24.15          60%

       4.        1897-1901      36.85      22.87          62%

       5.        1958-1962      37.40      22.32          63%

       6.        1896-1900      37.42      22.30          63%

       7.        1895-1899      38.02      21.70          64%

       8.        1946-1950      38.42      21.30          64%

       9.        2005-2009      39.01      20.71          65%

      10.        1987-1991      39.38      20.34          66%
--------------------------------------------------------------------------

THE FOLLOWING IS A TABLE OF TOTAL RAINFALL FOR THE RAIN SEASON FROM
JULY 1ST 2014 THROUGH JUNE 30TH 2015...NORMAL RAINFALL FOR THE
SEASON (USING THE 1981-2010 NORMAL PERIOD)...AND PERCENT OF NORMAL
SEASONAL RAIN FOR SOME SELECTED LOCATIONS IN SOUTHWESTERN CALIFORNIA

                       TOTAL RAIN      NORMAL RAIN   PERCENT OF
                     7/1/14-6/30/15     7/1-6/30       NORMAL
                     ---------------   -----------   ----------

L.A. DOWNTOWN             8.52           14.93          57%
L.A. AIRPORT              7.45           12.82          58%
LONG BEACH                8.05           12.26          66%
UCLA                      9.17           18.63          49%
BURBANK AP                7.65           17.31          44%
WOODLAND HILLS            8.22           17.53          47%
SANDBERG                  7.56           12.33          61%
LANCASTER AP              4.68            7.38          63%
PALMDALE AP+              4.67            8.30          56%

CAMARILLO AP+             8.46           15.22          56%
OXNARD NWS+               9.19           15.33          60%

SANTA BARBARA AP          9.63           17.76          54%
SANTA MARIA AP            7.64           13.95          55%

SAN LUIS OBISPO AP+       8.67           19.01          46%
PASO ROBLES AP            8.81           12.78          69%

+ DUE TO INSUFFICIENT DATA DURING THE 1981-2010 PERIOD...NORMALS ARE
UNOFFICIAL AND ARE PROJECTED BASED ON AVAILABLE DATA

--------------------------------------------------------------------------

THE FOLLOWING IS A TABLE OF TOTAL RAINFALL FOR THE PAST 4 RAIN
SEASONS (IN INCHES) FROM JULY 1ST 2011 THROUGH JUNE 30TH 2015...NORMAL
RAINFALL FOR THE 4 SEASON PERIOD (USING THE 1981-2010 NORMAL PERIOD)...
RAINFALL DEFICIT...AND PERCENT OF NORMAL RAIN FOR THE PAST 4
SEASONS FOR SOME SELECTED LOCATIONS IN SOUTHWESTERN CALIFORNIA

ACROSS SOUTHWESTERN CALIFORNIA...RAINFALL HAS GENERALLY AVERAGED
45 TO 55 PERCENT OF NORMAL DURING THIS 4 YEAR PERIOD FROM
JULY 1ST 2011 THROUGH JUNE 30TH 2015.

                       TOTAL RAIN    NORMAL RAIN   TOTAL RAIN   % NORM
                        7/1/11 TO     7/1/11 TO     DEFICIT     RAIN
                        6/30/15        6/30/15       SINCE      SINCE
                                                    7/1/11      7/1/11
                       ----------    -----------   ----------   -------

L.A. DOWNTOWN            29.14          59.72         30.58       49%
L.A. AIRPORT             26.40          51.28         24.88       51%
LONG BEACH               26.79          49.04         22.25       55%
UCLA                     33.67          74.52         40.85       45%
BURBANK AP               27.16          69.24         42.07       39%
WOODLAND HILLS           30.75          70.12         38.89       44%
SANDBERG                 23.06          49.32         26.26       47%
LANCASTER AP             12.92          29.52         16.60       44%
PALMDALE AP+             14.66          33.20         18.55       44%

CAMARILLO AP+            27.04          60.88         33.84       44%
OXNARD NWS+              30.01          61.32         31.31       49%

SANTA BARBARA AP         37.23          71.04         33.81       52%
SANTA MARIA AP           28.06          55.80         27.74       50%

SAN LUIS OBISPO AP+      37.59          76.04         38.45       49%
PASO ROBLES AP           27.06          51.12         24.06       53%

+ DUE TO INSUFFICIENT DATA DURING THE 1981-2010 PERIOD...NORMALS ARE
UNOFFICIAL AND ARE PROJECTED BASED ON AVAILABLE DATA

$$

BRUNO/SIRARD

NWS LOS ANGELES/OXNARD CA



000
NOUS46 KLOX 010512
PNSLOX

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE LOS ANGELES/OXNARD CA
1010 PM PDT TUE JUN 30 2015

...DRIEST FOUR CONSECUTIVE RAIN SEASONS EVER RECORDED IN DOWNTOWN LOS
ANGELES...

RAINFALL FOR THE 2014-2015 RAIN SEASON IN DOWNTOWN LOS ANGELES
TOTALED 8.52 INCHES...OR 57 PERCENT OF THE NORMAL RAINFALL OF 14.93
INCHES. THE RAINFALL TOTAL FOR THE PAST FOUR CONSECUTIVE RAIN
SEASONS BEGINNING WITH THE 2011-2012 SEASON WAS 29.14 INCHES. THAT WAS
THE LOWEST RAINFALL TOTAL FOR 4 CONSECUTIVE SEASONS SINCE RECORDS
BEGAN IN 1877. THE PREVIOUS RECORD WAS 34.02 INCHES FOR THE 4 SEASONS
FROM 1947-1951.

RAINFALL FOR THE PAST 4 CONSECUTIVE SEASONS COMBINED IN DOWNTOWN LOS
ANGELES WAS MORE THAN 30 INCHES...OR TWO AND A HALF FEET...BELOW THE
NORMAL FOR THAT PERIOD...WHICH WOULD BE 59.72 INCHES. RAINFALL HAS
AVERAGED JUST 49 PERCENT OF NORMAL DURING THIS EXTENDED TIME.

THIS IS THE FIRST TIME SINCE RECORDS BEGAN IN DOWNTOWN LOS ANGELES
IN 1877 IN WHICH LESS THAN 10 INCHES OF RAIN HAS BEEN RECORDED IN
FOUR CONSECUTIVE RAIN SEASONS.

RAINFALL HAS TOTALLED LESS THAN 10 INCHES IN THREE CONSECUTIVE
SEASONS JUST 5 TIMES...JULY 1ST 1897 TO JUNE 30TH 1900... JULY 1ST
1922 TO JUNE 30TH 1925...JULY 1ST 1958 THROUGH JUNE 30TH 1961...JULY
1ST 2011 TO JUNE 30TH 2014...AND JULY 1ST 2012 TO JUNE 30TH 2015.

THIS WAS ALSO THE 8TH SEASON SINCE THE 2001-2002 SEASON IN WHICH LESS
THAN 10 INCHES OF RAIN WAS RECORED.

SINCE 2001...FOUR OF THE SEVEN DRIEST RAINY SEASONS HAVE BEEN
RECORDED IN DOWNTOWN LOS ANGELES...INCLUDING THE DRIEST (2006-2007)
DURING WHICH A PALTRY 3.21 INCHES OF RAIN WAS MEASURED...THE 2ND
DRIEST (2001-2002) WHEN 4.42 INCHES OF RAIN WAS MEASURED...THE 6TH
DRIEST (2012-2013) WITH 5.85 INCHES...AND THE 7TH DRIEST (2013-
2014)...DURING WHICH 6.08 INCHES OF RAIN FELL.

IT SHOULD BE NOTED THAT THE OFFICIAL WATER YEAR IS FROM OCTOBER 1ST
THROUGH SEPTEMBER 30TH...BUT RAIN SEASON RECORDS IN DOWNTOWN LOS
ANGELES SINCE 1877 HAVE TRADITIONALLY BEEN FROM JULY 1ST THROUGH
JUNE 30TH.

THE FOLLOWING ARE THE DRIEST 4 CONSECUTIVE RAIN SEASONS
(TRADITIONALLY JUL 1-JUN 30) IN DOWNTOWN LOS ANGELES SINCE RECORDS
BEGAN IN 1877...THE TOTAL RAIN DURING THOSE FOUR SEASONS (IN
INCHES)...THE RAINFALL DEFICIT DURING THAT PERIOD...AND THE
PERCENTAGE OF NORMAL RAINFALL FOR A FOUR YEAR PERIOD (BASED ON 1981-
2010 NORMALS). NORMAL RAINFALL FOR FOUR SEASONS IS 59.72 INCHES.

                                          4 SEASON
                                TOTAL     RAINFALL    % OF NORMAL
                                RAIN      DEFICIT      RAIN FOR
      RANK        SEASONS     (INCHES)    (INCHES)     4 SEASONS
      ----       ---------    --------    --------    -----------

       1.        2011-2015      29.14      30.58          49%

       2.        1947-1951      34.02      25.70          57%

       3.        1986-1990      35.57      24.15          60%

       4.        1897-1901      36.85      22.87          62%

       5.        1958-1962      37.40      22.32          63%

       6.        1896-1900      37.42      22.30          63%

       7.        1895-1899      38.02      21.70          64%

       8.        1946-1950      38.42      21.30          64%

       9.        2005-2009      39.01      20.71          65%

      10.        1987-1991      39.38      20.34          66%
--------------------------------------------------------------------------

THE FOLLOWING IS A TABLE OF TOTAL RAINFALL FOR THE RAIN SEASON FROM
JULY 1ST 2014 THROUGH JUNE 30TH 2015...NORMAL RAINFALL FOR THE
SEASON (USING THE 1981-2010 NORMAL PERIOD)...AND PERCENT OF NORMAL
SEASONAL RAIN FOR SOME SELECTED LOCATIONS IN SOUTHWESTERN CALIFORNIA

                       TOTAL RAIN      NORMAL RAIN   PERCENT OF
                     7/1/14-6/30/15     7/1-6/30       NORMAL
                     ---------------   -----------   ----------

L.A. DOWNTOWN             8.52           14.93          57%
L.A. AIRPORT              7.45           12.82          58%
LONG BEACH                8.05           12.26          66%
UCLA                      9.17           18.63          49%
BURBANK AP                7.65           17.31          44%
WOODLAND HILLS            8.22           17.53          47%
SANDBERG                  7.56           12.33          61%
LANCASTER AP              4.68            7.38          63%
PALMDALE AP+              4.67            8.30          56%

CAMARILLO AP+             8.46           15.22          56%
OXNARD NWS+               9.19           15.33          60%

SANTA BARBARA AP          9.63           17.76          54%
SANTA MARIA AP            7.64           13.95          55%

SAN LUIS OBISPO AP+       8.67           19.01          46%
PASO ROBLES AP            8.81           12.78          69%

+ DUE TO INSUFFICIENT DATA DURING THE 1981-2010 PERIOD...NORMALS ARE
UNOFFICIAL AND ARE PROJECTED BASED ON AVAILABLE DATA

--------------------------------------------------------------------------

THE FOLLOWING IS A TABLE OF TOTAL RAINFALL FOR THE PAST 4 RAIN
SEASONS (IN INCHES) FROM JULY 1ST 2011 THROUGH JUNE 30TH 2015...NORMAL
RAINFALL FOR THE 4 SEASON PERIOD (USING THE 1981-2010 NORMAL PERIOD)...
RAINFALL DEFICIT...AND PERCENT OF NORMAL RAIN FOR THE PAST 4
SEASONS FOR SOME SELECTED LOCATIONS IN SOUTHWESTERN CALIFORNIA

ACROSS SOUTHWESTERN CALIFORNIA...RAINFALL HAS GENERALLY AVERAGED
45 TO 55 PERCENT OF NORMAL DURING THIS 4 YEAR PERIOD FROM
JULY 1ST 2011 THROUGH JUNE 30TH 2015.

                       TOTAL RAIN    NORMAL RAIN   TOTAL RAIN   % NORM
                        7/1/11 TO     7/1/11 TO     DEFICIT     RAIN
                        6/30/15        6/30/15       SINCE      SINCE
                                                    7/1/11      7/1/11
                       ----------    -----------   ----------   -------

L.A. DOWNTOWN            29.14          59.72         30.58       49%
L.A. AIRPORT             26.40          51.28         24.88       51%
LONG BEACH               26.79          49.04         22.25       55%
UCLA                     33.67          74.52         40.85       45%
BURBANK AP               27.16          69.24         42.07       39%
WOODLAND HILLS           30.75          70.12         38.89       44%
SANDBERG                 23.06          49.32         26.26       47%
LANCASTER AP             12.92          29.52         16.60       44%
PALMDALE AP+             14.66          33.20         18.55       44%

CAMARILLO AP+            27.04          60.88         33.84       44%
OXNARD NWS+              30.01          61.32         31.31       49%

SANTA BARBARA AP         37.23          71.04         33.81       52%
SANTA MARIA AP           28.06          55.80         27.74       50%

SAN LUIS OBISPO AP+      37.59          76.04         38.45       49%
PASO ROBLES AP           27.06          51.12         24.06       53%

+ DUE TO INSUFFICIENT DATA DURING THE 1981-2010 PERIOD...NORMALS ARE
UNOFFICIAL AND ARE PROJECTED BASED ON AVAILABLE DATA

$$

BRUNO/SIRARD

NWS LOS ANGELES/OXNARD CA


000
NOUS46 KLOX 010512
PNSLOX

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE LOS ANGELES/OXNARD CA
1010 PM PDT TUE JUN 30 2015

...DRIEST FOUR CONSECUTIVE RAIN SEASONS EVER RECORDED IN DOWNTOWN LOS
ANGELES...

RAINFALL FOR THE 2014-2015 RAIN SEASON IN DOWNTOWN LOS ANGELES
TOTALED 8.52 INCHES...OR 57 PERCENT OF THE NORMAL RAINFALL OF 14.93
INCHES. THE RAINFALL TOTAL FOR THE PAST FOUR CONSECUTIVE RAIN
SEASONS BEGINNING WITH THE 2011-2012 SEASON WAS 29.14 INCHES. THAT WAS
THE LOWEST RAINFALL TOTAL FOR 4 CONSECUTIVE SEASONS SINCE RECORDS
BEGAN IN 1877. THE PREVIOUS RECORD WAS 34.02 INCHES FOR THE 4 SEASONS
FROM 1947-1951.

RAINFALL FOR THE PAST 4 CONSECUTIVE SEASONS COMBINED IN DOWNTOWN LOS
ANGELES WAS MORE THAN 30 INCHES...OR TWO AND A HALF FEET...BELOW THE
NORMAL FOR THAT PERIOD...WHICH WOULD BE 59.72 INCHES. RAINFALL HAS
AVERAGED JUST 49 PERCENT OF NORMAL DURING THIS EXTENDED TIME.

THIS IS THE FIRST TIME SINCE RECORDS BEGAN IN DOWNTOWN LOS ANGELES
IN 1877 IN WHICH LESS THAN 10 INCHES OF RAIN HAS BEEN RECORDED IN
FOUR CONSECUTIVE RAIN SEASONS.

RAINFALL HAS TOTALLED LESS THAN 10 INCHES IN THREE CONSECUTIVE
SEASONS JUST 5 TIMES...JULY 1ST 1897 TO JUNE 30TH 1900... JULY 1ST
1922 TO JUNE 30TH 1925...JULY 1ST 1958 THROUGH JUNE 30TH 1961...JULY
1ST 2011 TO JUNE 30TH 2014...AND JULY 1ST 2012 TO JUNE 30TH 2015.

THIS WAS ALSO THE 8TH SEASON SINCE THE 2001-2002 SEASON IN WHICH LESS
THAN 10 INCHES OF RAIN WAS RECORED.

SINCE 2001...FOUR OF THE SEVEN DRIEST RAINY SEASONS HAVE BEEN
RECORDED IN DOWNTOWN LOS ANGELES...INCLUDING THE DRIEST (2006-2007)
DURING WHICH A PALTRY 3.21 INCHES OF RAIN WAS MEASURED...THE 2ND
DRIEST (2001-2002) WHEN 4.42 INCHES OF RAIN WAS MEASURED...THE 6TH
DRIEST (2012-2013) WITH 5.85 INCHES...AND THE 7TH DRIEST (2013-
2014)...DURING WHICH 6.08 INCHES OF RAIN FELL.

IT SHOULD BE NOTED THAT THE OFFICIAL WATER YEAR IS FROM OCTOBER 1ST
THROUGH SEPTEMBER 30TH...BUT RAIN SEASON RECORDS IN DOWNTOWN LOS
ANGELES SINCE 1877 HAVE TRADITIONALLY BEEN FROM JULY 1ST THROUGH
JUNE 30TH.

THE FOLLOWING ARE THE DRIEST 4 CONSECUTIVE RAIN SEASONS
(TRADITIONALLY JUL 1-JUN 30) IN DOWNTOWN LOS ANGELES SINCE RECORDS
BEGAN IN 1877...THE TOTAL RAIN DURING THOSE FOUR SEASONS (IN
INCHES)...THE RAINFALL DEFICIT DURING THAT PERIOD...AND THE
PERCENTAGE OF NORMAL RAINFALL FOR A FOUR YEAR PERIOD (BASED ON 1981-
2010 NORMALS). NORMAL RAINFALL FOR FOUR SEASONS IS 59.72 INCHES.

                                          4 SEASON
                                TOTAL     RAINFALL    % OF NORMAL
                                RAIN      DEFICIT      RAIN FOR
      RANK        SEASONS     (INCHES)    (INCHES)     4 SEASONS
      ----       ---------    --------    --------    -----------

       1.        2011-2015      29.14      30.58          49%

       2.        1947-1951      34.02      25.70          57%

       3.        1986-1990      35.57      24.15          60%

       4.        1897-1901      36.85      22.87          62%

       5.        1958-1962      37.40      22.32          63%

       6.        1896-1900      37.42      22.30          63%

       7.        1895-1899      38.02      21.70          64%

       8.        1946-1950      38.42      21.30          64%

       9.        2005-2009      39.01      20.71          65%

      10.        1987-1991      39.38      20.34          66%
--------------------------------------------------------------------------

THE FOLLOWING IS A TABLE OF TOTAL RAINFALL FOR THE RAIN SEASON FROM
JULY 1ST 2014 THROUGH JUNE 30TH 2015...NORMAL RAINFALL FOR THE
SEASON (USING THE 1981-2010 NORMAL PERIOD)...AND PERCENT OF NORMAL
SEASONAL RAIN FOR SOME SELECTED LOCATIONS IN SOUTHWESTERN CALIFORNIA

                       TOTAL RAIN      NORMAL RAIN   PERCENT OF
                     7/1/14-6/30/15     7/1-6/30       NORMAL
                     ---------------   -----------   ----------

L.A. DOWNTOWN             8.52           14.93          57%
L.A. AIRPORT              7.45           12.82          58%
LONG BEACH                8.05           12.26          66%
UCLA                      9.17           18.63          49%
BURBANK AP                7.65           17.31          44%
WOODLAND HILLS            8.22           17.53          47%
SANDBERG                  7.56           12.33          61%
LANCASTER AP              4.68            7.38          63%
PALMDALE AP+              4.67            8.30          56%

CAMARILLO AP+             8.46           15.22          56%
OXNARD NWS+               9.19           15.33          60%

SANTA BARBARA AP          9.63           17.76          54%
SANTA MARIA AP            7.64           13.95          55%

SAN LUIS OBISPO AP+       8.67           19.01          46%
PASO ROBLES AP            8.81           12.78          69%

+ DUE TO INSUFFICIENT DATA DURING THE 1981-2010 PERIOD...NORMALS ARE
UNOFFICIAL AND ARE PROJECTED BASED ON AVAILABLE DATA

--------------------------------------------------------------------------

THE FOLLOWING IS A TABLE OF TOTAL RAINFALL FOR THE PAST 4 RAIN
SEASONS (IN INCHES) FROM JULY 1ST 2011 THROUGH JUNE 30TH 2015...NORMAL
RAINFALL FOR THE 4 SEASON PERIOD (USING THE 1981-2010 NORMAL PERIOD)...
RAINFALL DEFICIT...AND PERCENT OF NORMAL RAIN FOR THE PAST 4
SEASONS FOR SOME SELECTED LOCATIONS IN SOUTHWESTERN CALIFORNIA

ACROSS SOUTHWESTERN CALIFORNIA...RAINFALL HAS GENERALLY AVERAGED
45 TO 55 PERCENT OF NORMAL DURING THIS 4 YEAR PERIOD FROM
JULY 1ST 2011 THROUGH JUNE 30TH 2015.

                       TOTAL RAIN    NORMAL RAIN   TOTAL RAIN   % NORM
                        7/1/11 TO     7/1/11 TO     DEFICIT     RAIN
                        6/30/15        6/30/15       SINCE      SINCE
                                                    7/1/11      7/1/11
                       ----------    -----------   ----------   -------

L.A. DOWNTOWN            29.14          59.72         30.58       49%
L.A. AIRPORT             26.40          51.28         24.88       51%
LONG BEACH               26.79          49.04         22.25       55%
UCLA                     33.67          74.52         40.85       45%
BURBANK AP               27.16          69.24         42.07       39%
WOODLAND HILLS           30.75          70.12         38.89       44%
SANDBERG                 23.06          49.32         26.26       47%
LANCASTER AP             12.92          29.52         16.60       44%
PALMDALE AP+             14.66          33.20         18.55       44%

CAMARILLO AP+            27.04          60.88         33.84       44%
OXNARD NWS+              30.01          61.32         31.31       49%

SANTA BARBARA AP         37.23          71.04         33.81       52%
SANTA MARIA AP           28.06          55.80         27.74       50%

SAN LUIS OBISPO AP+      37.59          76.04         38.45       49%
PASO ROBLES AP           27.06          51.12         24.06       53%

+ DUE TO INSUFFICIENT DATA DURING THE 1981-2010 PERIOD...NORMALS ARE
UNOFFICIAL AND ARE PROJECTED BASED ON AVAILABLE DATA

$$

BRUNO/SIRARD

NWS LOS ANGELES/OXNARD CA



000
NOUS45 KSLC 010255
PNSSLC

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE SALT LAKE CITY UT
850 PM MDT TUE JUN 30 2015

...PRELIMINARY STORM INFORMATION...

TODAYS RAINFALL AND PEAK WIND GUST REPORTS THROUGH 800 PM.

***** PRECIP REPORTS *****                 TIME      PRECIP

...CACHE VALLEY/UTAH PORTION...
LOGAN - 4444 FT                          8 PM TUE     0.17
CACHE COUNTY EOC - 4452 FT               8 PM TUE     0.02

...NORTHERN WASATCH FRONT...
BRIGHAM CITY - 4400 FT                   8 PM TUE     0.30
BRIGHAM CITY - 4590 FT                   8 PM TUE     0.20
BOUNTIFUL - 4760 FT                      9 PM MON     0.12
RIVERSIDE UDOT - 4416 FT                 8 PM TUE     0.02

...SALT LAKE AND TOOELE VALLEYS...
VERNON - 5639 FT                         7 PM TUE     0.07
MURRAY - 4290 FT                         8 PM TUE     0.04

...SOUTHERN WASATCH FRONT...
LEVAN - 5290 FT                          5 PM TUE     0.03

...GREAT SALT LAKE DESERT AND MOUNTAINS...
ROSEBUD - 4987 FT                        7 PM TUE     0.08

...WASATCH MOUNTAIN VALLEYS...
MORGAN - 5059 FT                         8 PM TUE     0.02

...WASATCH MOUNTAINS I-80 NORTH...
MANTUA - 5899 FT                         8 PM TUE     0.11

...WESTERN UINTA MOUNTAINS...
YELLOWSTONE RIVER NR ALTONAH - 7506 FT   8 PM TUE     0.62
CHEPETA - 12120 FT                       7 PM TUE     0.28
YELLOWSTONE DRAINAGE - 7800 FT           8 PM TUE     0.16
MOON LAKE - 8150 FT                      8 PM TUE     0.06

...WESTERN UINTA BASIN...
BLACKTAIL - 7311 FT                      7 PM TUE     0.09
DUCHESNE RIVER NR TABIONA - 6209 FT      7 PM TUE     0.06

...CASTLE COUNTRY...
WELLINGTON 3 E - 5400 FT                 5 PM TUE     0.17

...WEST CENTRAL UTAH...
TULE VALLEY - 5135 FT                    7 PM TUE     0.03

...SOUTHWEST UTAH...
ENTERPRISE - 5384 FT                     8 PM TUE     0.17
ENTERPRISE - 5340 FT                     8 PM TUE     0.11

...UTAH`S DIXIE AND ZION NATIONAL PARK...
ZION NATIONAL PARK - 5741 FT             8 PM TUE     0.17

...SOUTH CENTRAL UTAH...
ESCALANTE - 5810 FT                      5 PM TUE     0.04

...CENTRAL UTAH MOUNTAINS...
LOST CREEK - 7490 FT                     7 PM TUE     0.05
MUDDY CREEK NR EMERY - 6440 FT           8 PM TUE     0.02

...SOUTHERN UTAH MOUNTAINS...
BRYCE CANYON AIRPORT - 7585 FT           8 PM TUE     0.28
LARB HOLLOW - 8490 FT                    8 PM TUE     0.24
WILLOW GULCH - 6840 FT                   7 PM TUE     0.20
GARDNER PEAK - 8350 FT                   7 PM TUE     0.20
ASSAY - 8100 FT                          8 PM TUE     0.06
TOM BEST SPRING - 7718 FT                8 PM TUE     0.03
HENRY MTN - 8294 FT                      7 PM TUE     0.03
BUCK FLAT - 8000 FT                      8 PM TUE     0.02

...SOUTHWEST WYOMING...
SMITHS FORK NR ROBERTSON - 8470 FT       8 PM TUE     0.22

***** WIND REPORTS *****                   TIME     WINDSPEED

...CACHE VALLEY/UTAH PORTION...
LOGAN - 4444 FT                          2 AM TUE     43 MPH

...GREAT SALT LAKE DESERT AND MOUNTAINS...
WENDOVER PORT OF ENTRY - 4227 FT         5 PM TUE     49 MPH
SLDURO - 4220 FT                         5 PM TUE     45 MPH
GROOME - 4223 FT                         5 PM TUE     44 MPH
I-80 AT MP 1 - 4270 FT                   5 PM TUE     43 MPH
WEST SALT FLATS - 4237 FT                5 PM TUE     43 MPH
CAUSEWAY - 4246 FT                      10 PM MON     41 MPH
NORTH SALT FLATS - 4218 FT               5 PM TUE     40 MPH

...SOUTHWEST UTAH...
MILFORD MUNICIPAL AIRPORT - 5039 FT      5 PM TUE     40 MPH

$$


000
NOUS45 KSLC 010255
PNSSLC

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE SALT LAKE CITY UT
850 PM MDT TUE JUN 30 2015

...PRELIMINARY STORM INFORMATION...

TODAYS RAINFALL AND PEAK WIND GUST REPORTS THROUGH 800 PM.

***** PRECIP REPORTS *****                 TIME      PRECIP

...CACHE VALLEY/UTAH PORTION...
LOGAN - 4444 FT                          8 PM TUE     0.17
CACHE COUNTY EOC - 4452 FT               8 PM TUE     0.02

...NORTHERN WASATCH FRONT...
BRIGHAM CITY - 4400 FT                   8 PM TUE     0.30
BRIGHAM CITY - 4590 FT                   8 PM TUE     0.20
BOUNTIFUL - 4760 FT                      9 PM MON     0.12
RIVERSIDE UDOT - 4416 FT                 8 PM TUE     0.02

...SALT LAKE AND TOOELE VALLEYS...
VERNON - 5639 FT                         7 PM TUE     0.07
MURRAY - 4290 FT                         8 PM TUE     0.04

...SOUTHERN WASATCH FRONT...
LEVAN - 5290 FT                          5 PM TUE     0.03

...GREAT SALT LAKE DESERT AND MOUNTAINS...
ROSEBUD - 4987 FT                        7 PM TUE     0.08

...WASATCH MOUNTAIN VALLEYS...
MORGAN - 5059 FT                         8 PM TUE     0.02

...WASATCH MOUNTAINS I-80 NORTH...
MANTUA - 5899 FT                         8 PM TUE     0.11

...WESTERN UINTA MOUNTAINS...
YELLOWSTONE RIVER NR ALTONAH - 7506 FT   8 PM TUE     0.62
CHEPETA - 12120 FT                       7 PM TUE     0.28
YELLOWSTONE DRAINAGE - 7800 FT           8 PM TUE     0.16
MOON LAKE - 8150 FT                      8 PM TUE     0.06

...WESTERN UINTA BASIN...
BLACKTAIL - 7311 FT                      7 PM TUE     0.09
DUCHESNE RIVER NR TABIONA - 6209 FT      7 PM TUE     0.06

...CASTLE COUNTRY...
WELLINGTON 3 E - 5400 FT                 5 PM TUE     0.17

...WEST CENTRAL UTAH...
TULE VALLEY - 5135 FT                    7 PM TUE     0.03

...SOUTHWEST UTAH...
ENTERPRISE - 5384 FT                     8 PM TUE     0.17
ENTERPRISE - 5340 FT                     8 PM TUE     0.11

...UTAH`S DIXIE AND ZION NATIONAL PARK...
ZION NATIONAL PARK - 5741 FT             8 PM TUE     0.17

...SOUTH CENTRAL UTAH...
ESCALANTE - 5810 FT                      5 PM TUE     0.04

...CENTRAL UTAH MOUNTAINS...
LOST CREEK - 7490 FT                     7 PM TUE     0.05
MUDDY CREEK NR EMERY - 6440 FT           8 PM TUE     0.02

...SOUTHERN UTAH MOUNTAINS...
BRYCE CANYON AIRPORT - 7585 FT           8 PM TUE     0.28
LARB HOLLOW - 8490 FT                    8 PM TUE     0.24
WILLOW GULCH - 6840 FT                   7 PM TUE     0.20
GARDNER PEAK - 8350 FT                   7 PM TUE     0.20
ASSAY - 8100 FT                          8 PM TUE     0.06
TOM BEST SPRING - 7718 FT                8 PM TUE     0.03
HENRY MTN - 8294 FT                      7 PM TUE     0.03
BUCK FLAT - 8000 FT                      8 PM TUE     0.02

...SOUTHWEST WYOMING...
SMITHS FORK NR ROBERTSON - 8470 FT       8 PM TUE     0.22

***** WIND REPORTS *****                   TIME     WINDSPEED

...CACHE VALLEY/UTAH PORTION...
LOGAN - 4444 FT                          2 AM TUE     43 MPH

...GREAT SALT LAKE DESERT AND MOUNTAINS...
WENDOVER PORT OF ENTRY - 4227 FT         5 PM TUE     49 MPH
SLDURO - 4220 FT                         5 PM TUE     45 MPH
GROOME - 4223 FT                         5 PM TUE     44 MPH
I-80 AT MP 1 - 4270 FT                   5 PM TUE     43 MPH
WEST SALT FLATS - 4237 FT                5 PM TUE     43 MPH
CAUSEWAY - 4246 FT                      10 PM MON     41 MPH
NORTH SALT FLATS - 4218 FT               5 PM TUE     40 MPH

...SOUTHWEST UTAH...
MILFORD MUNICIPAL AIRPORT - 5039 FT      5 PM TUE     40 MPH

$$


000
NOUS45 KSLC 010255
PNSSLC

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE SALT LAKE CITY UT
850 PM MDT TUE JUN 30 2015

...PRELIMINARY STORM INFORMATION...

TODAYS RAINFALL AND PEAK WIND GUST REPORTS THROUGH 800 PM.

***** PRECIP REPORTS *****                 TIME      PRECIP

...CACHE VALLEY/UTAH PORTION...
LOGAN - 4444 FT                          8 PM TUE     0.17
CACHE COUNTY EOC - 4452 FT               8 PM TUE     0.02

...NORTHERN WASATCH FRONT...
BRIGHAM CITY - 4400 FT                   8 PM TUE     0.30
BRIGHAM CITY - 4590 FT                   8 PM TUE     0.20
BOUNTIFUL - 4760 FT                      9 PM MON     0.12
RIVERSIDE UDOT - 4416 FT                 8 PM TUE     0.02

...SALT LAKE AND TOOELE VALLEYS...
VERNON - 5639 FT                         7 PM TUE     0.07
MURRAY - 4290 FT                         8 PM TUE     0.04

...SOUTHERN WASATCH FRONT...
LEVAN - 5290 FT                          5 PM TUE     0.03

...GREAT SALT LAKE DESERT AND MOUNTAINS...
ROSEBUD - 4987 FT                        7 PM TUE     0.08

...WASATCH MOUNTAIN VALLEYS...
MORGAN - 5059 FT                         8 PM TUE     0.02

...WASATCH MOUNTAINS I-80 NORTH...
MANTUA - 5899 FT                         8 PM TUE     0.11

...WESTERN UINTA MOUNTAINS...
YELLOWSTONE RIVER NR ALTONAH - 7506 FT   8 PM TUE     0.62
CHEPETA - 12120 FT                       7 PM TUE     0.28
YELLOWSTONE DRAINAGE - 7800 FT           8 PM TUE     0.16
MOON LAKE - 8150 FT                      8 PM TUE     0.06

...WESTERN UINTA BASIN...
BLACKTAIL - 7311 FT                      7 PM TUE     0.09
DUCHESNE RIVER NR TABIONA - 6209 FT      7 PM TUE     0.06

...CASTLE COUNTRY...
WELLINGTON 3 E - 5400 FT                 5 PM TUE     0.17

...WEST CENTRAL UTAH...
TULE VALLEY - 5135 FT                    7 PM TUE     0.03

...SOUTHWEST UTAH...
ENTERPRISE - 5384 FT                     8 PM TUE     0.17
ENTERPRISE - 5340 FT                     8 PM TUE     0.11

...UTAH`S DIXIE AND ZION NATIONAL PARK...
ZION NATIONAL PARK - 5741 FT             8 PM TUE     0.17

...SOUTH CENTRAL UTAH...
ESCALANTE - 5810 FT                      5 PM TUE     0.04

...CENTRAL UTAH MOUNTAINS...
LOST CREEK - 7490 FT                     7 PM TUE     0.05
MUDDY CREEK NR EMERY - 6440 FT           8 PM TUE     0.02

...SOUTHERN UTAH MOUNTAINS...
BRYCE CANYON AIRPORT - 7585 FT           8 PM TUE     0.28
LARB HOLLOW - 8490 FT                    8 PM TUE     0.24
WILLOW GULCH - 6840 FT                   7 PM TUE     0.20
GARDNER PEAK - 8350 FT                   7 PM TUE     0.20
ASSAY - 8100 FT                          8 PM TUE     0.06
TOM BEST SPRING - 7718 FT                8 PM TUE     0.03
HENRY MTN - 8294 FT                      7 PM TUE     0.03
BUCK FLAT - 8000 FT                      8 PM TUE     0.02

...SOUTHWEST WYOMING...
SMITHS FORK NR ROBERTSON - 8470 FT       8 PM TUE     0.22

***** WIND REPORTS *****                   TIME     WINDSPEED

...CACHE VALLEY/UTAH PORTION...
LOGAN - 4444 FT                          2 AM TUE     43 MPH

...GREAT SALT LAKE DESERT AND MOUNTAINS...
WENDOVER PORT OF ENTRY - 4227 FT         5 PM TUE     49 MPH
SLDURO - 4220 FT                         5 PM TUE     45 MPH
GROOME - 4223 FT                         5 PM TUE     44 MPH
I-80 AT MP 1 - 4270 FT                   5 PM TUE     43 MPH
WEST SALT FLATS - 4237 FT                5 PM TUE     43 MPH
CAUSEWAY - 4246 FT                      10 PM MON     41 MPH
NORTH SALT FLATS - 4218 FT               5 PM TUE     40 MPH

...SOUTHWEST UTAH...
MILFORD MUNICIPAL AIRPORT - 5039 FT      5 PM TUE     40 MPH

$$



000
NOUS42 KJAX 010057
PNSJAX
FLZ032-033-037-038-030200-

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE JACKSONVILLE FL
1055 PM EDT TUE JUL 1 2015

...PALATKA NOAA WEATHER RADIO TRANSMITTER REMAINS OFF THE AIR...

THE PALATKA TRANSMITTER WNG-522 ON A FREQUENCY OF 162.425 MHZ IS
STILL OFF THE AIR. PHONE COMPANY TECHNICIANS WILL TROUBLESHOOT THE
LINE CIRCUIT ON TUESDAY AND WILL RESTORE THE SERVICE AS SOON AS
POSSIBLE. WE APOLOGIZE FOR THE OUTAGE. HERE IS A LIST OF ALTERNATIVE
TRANSMITTERS COVERING THE PALATKA LISTENING AREA...

162.40  MHZ IN DAYTONA BEACH...
162.525 MHZ IN OCALA...
162.475 MHZ IN GAINESVILLE...
162.55  MHZ IN JACKSONVILLE.

$$


000
NOUS42 KJAX 010057
PNSJAX
FLZ032-033-037-038-030200-

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE JACKSONVILLE FL
1055 PM EDT TUE JUL 1 2015

...PALATKA NOAA WEATHER RADIO TRANSMITTER REMAINS OFF THE AIR...

THE PALATKA TRANSMITTER WNG-522 ON A FREQUENCY OF 162.425 MHZ IS
STILL OFF THE AIR. PHONE COMPANY TECHNICIANS WILL TROUBLESHOOT THE
LINE CIRCUIT ON TUESDAY AND WILL RESTORE THE SERVICE AS SOON AS
POSSIBLE. WE APOLOGIZE FOR THE OUTAGE. HERE IS A LIST OF ALTERNATIVE
TRANSMITTERS COVERING THE PALATKA LISTENING AREA...

162.40  MHZ IN DAYTONA BEACH...
162.525 MHZ IN OCALA...
162.475 MHZ IN GAINESVILLE...
162.55  MHZ IN JACKSONVILLE.

$$



000
NOUS42 KJAX 010057
PNSJAX
FLZ032-033-037-038-030200-

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE JACKSONVILLE FL
1055 PM EDT TUE JUL 1 2015

...PALATKA NOAA WEATHER RADIO TRANSMITTER REMAINS OFF THE AIR...

THE PALATKA TRANSMITTER WNG-522 ON A FREQUENCY OF 162.425 MHZ IS
STILL OFF THE AIR. PHONE COMPANY TECHNICIANS WILL TROUBLESHOOT THE
LINE CIRCUIT ON TUESDAY AND WILL RESTORE THE SERVICE AS SOON AS
POSSIBLE. WE APOLOGIZE FOR THE OUTAGE. HERE IS A LIST OF ALTERNATIVE
TRANSMITTERS COVERING THE PALATKA LISTENING AREA...

162.40  MHZ IN DAYTONA BEACH...
162.525 MHZ IN OCALA...
162.475 MHZ IN GAINESVILLE...
162.55  MHZ IN JACKSONVILLE.

$$


000
NOUS46 KPQR 302345
PNSPQR

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE PORTLAND OR
445 PM PDT TUE JUN 30 2015

...WARMEST JUNE ON RECORD...AND DRY TOO..

JUNE WAS A MONTH THAT MANY WILL REMEMBER FOR BEING WARM. BUT IT WAS
ALSO QUITE DRY...AND QUITE SUNNY. LIGHTER ONSHORE FLOW HAS LEAD TO
MORE SUNNY DAYS. LACK OF FRONTS BROUGHT MORE DRY DAYS. AND A LATE
MONTH HEAT WAVE BROUGHT HOT DAYS AND WARM NIGHTS.

EVEN THE RIVERS ARE RUNNING WARMER THAN NORMAL FOR LATE JUNE. ON THE
29TH...THE COLUMBIA NEAR WAS VANCOUVER WAS AROUND 70 DEG WHICH IS 6
TO 7 DEG ABOVE ITS NORMAL. THE WILLAMETTE RIVER NEAR SALEM WAS IN
THE MIDDLE 70S. MANY OTHER RIVERS ARE ALSO WARMER DUE TO DECREASED
SNOW MELT AND LOWER LEVELS.


JUNE 2015:  MONTHLY TEMPERATURE DATA AND RANKINGS ...
                2015  DEG FM  RANK AS| AVG  DEP FM  / AVG  DEG FM
SITE            MEAN  NORMAL  WARMEST|MAX T NORMAL  / MIN T NORMAL
==================================================================
ASTORIA         59.8    +2.9     12TH | 67.8  +5.9  / 51.8  +1.8
PORTLAND APRT   70.3    +6.7     1ST | 82.6   +9.1  / 57.9  +4.3
PORTLAND CITY   69.1    +6.0     1ST | 81.0   +8.1  / 57.2  +3.9
VANCOUVER       69.3    +6.0     1ST | 82.0   +8.6  / 56.5  +3.2
HILLSBORO       67.4    +5.9     1ST | 82.8   +9.6  / 56.5  +6.6
MCMINNVILLE     67.5    +3.4     1ST | 83.1   +8.2  / 51.9  +2.5
SALEM           69.3    +7.7     1ST | 84.1  +10.2  / 54.4  +5.1
EUGENE          67.1    +6.7     1ST | 83.5  +11.3  / 50.7  +3.1

TOP 5 WARMEST JUNES...
     PORTLAND AIRPORT  PORTLAND CITY     SALEM          EUGENE
1.   70.3 DEG/ 2015     69.1 / 2015    69.3 / 2015    67.1 / 2015
2.   67.4    / 1992     67.5 / 1940    67.0 / 1926    65.7 / 1926
3.   66.5    / 1969     67.4 / 1967    66.2 / 1922    65.4 / 1970
4.   66.5    / 1987     67.3 / 1978    66.2 / 1918    65.3 / 1969
5.   66.5    / 1948     67.3 / 1969    65.9 / 1900    65.2 / 1918

JUNE 2015:  DAYS WITH MAXIMUM TEMPERATURE OF 80S AND 90S...
                    80 DEG OR WARMER   |     90 DEG OR WARMER
SITE           2015  NORM  PREV RECORD | 2015 NORM  PREV RECORD
==================================================================
PORTLAND APRT   21   (7)   16 IN 1987  |   9  (1)   6 IN 2003,1970
PORTLAND CITY   18   (7)   16 IN 1918  |   3  (1)   5 IN 2003+
VANCOUVER       20   (7)   16 IN 1940  |   7  (1)   6 IN 2003
HILLSBORO       22   (8)   18 IN 1961+ |  10  (1)   8 IN 1961
MCMINNVILLE     22   (9)   23 IN 1922  |   9  (2)  11 IN 1926
SALEM           22   (8)   23 IN 1922  |   9  (2)  10 IN 1970
EUGENE          23   (7)   20 IN 1951  |   8  (1)   9 IN 1970

JUNE 2015:  DAILY EXTREME TEMPERATURE DATA...
                    MAXIMUM (DATE)     |      MINIMUM (DATE)
SITE             WARMEST      COOLEST  |   WARMEST    COOLEST
================================================================
ASTORIA         85 (27TH)    61 (1,2ND)| 57 (30TH)   47 (23RD)
PORTLAND APRT   95 (26TH)    62 ( 2ND) | 71 (27TH)    51 (13,14TH)
PORTLAND CITY   92 (26TH)    60 ( 2ND) | 71 (27TH)    49 (13TH)
VANCOUVER       94 (26TH)    61 ( 2ND) | 69 (27TH)    48 (12TH)
HILLSBORO       97 (26TH)    61 ( 2ND) | 69 (27,28TH) 41 (13,14TH)
MCMINNVILLE     99 (26TH)    61 ( 2ND) | 64 (27TH)    43 (13,14TH)
SALEM          100 (26TH)    64 ( 1ST) | 71 (27TH)    46 (13TH)
EUGENE          98 (26,27TH) 61 ( 1ST) | 64 (27TH)    41 (13TH)

27TH JUNE 2015 BECAME WARMEST OVERNIGHT LOW EVER FOR JUNE...
  PORTLAND   71 DEG /27 JUN  **NEW RECORD. OLD: 68 ON 8,29 JUN 1948
  VANCOUVER  69 DEG /27 JUN  **NEW RECORD. OLD: 68 ON 27 JUN 1956
  SALEM      71 DEG /27 JUN  **NEW RECORD. OLD: 69 ON 24 JUN 1926
  EUGENE     64 DEG /27 JUN  *TIED RECORD. OLD: 64 ON 8 JUN 1948


JUNE 2015:  TOTAL MONTHLY RAINFALL AND RANKING AS DRIEST...
       TOTAL  DEPARTURE   RANK AS DRIEST JUNE
       RAIN   FM NORMAL   DRIEST     ON RECORD
================================================================
ASTORIA             0.73    -1.82      11TH      0.33 / 1926
PORTLAND APRT       0.40    -1.30       6TH      0.03 / 1951
PORTLAND CITY       0.44    -1.25      16TH      0.03 / 1951
VANCOUVER           0.39    -1.40      11TH      0.00 / 1940
HILLSBORO           0.54    -0.93      17TH      TRACE/ 1940
MCMINNVILLE         0.67    -0.62      30TH      TRACE/ 1965+
SALEM               0.67    -0.88      32ND      0.00 / 1918
EUGENE              0.23    -1.27      10TH      TRACE/ 1951

JUNE 2015:  DRY DAYS AND RECORDS... NO RECORDS...BUT CLOSE.
            TRACE OR LESS DAYS   |NO RAIN DAYS (NOT A DROP)
              JUNE            PREV.   | JUNE           PREV.
              2015 (NORMAL)   RECORD  | 2015 (NORMAL)  RECORD
=================================================================
ASTORIA         25  (17)    28 /1948  |  22   (12)     28 /1922
PORTLAND APRT   27  (21)    28 /1987+ |  26   (17)     26 /1987+
PORTLAND CITY   27  (21)    29 /1951+ |  26   (20)     27 /1996
VANCOUVER       27  (21)    30 /1940  |  26   (20)     30 /1940
HILLSBORO       27  (22)    30 /1940  |  25   (20)     29 /1962
MCMINNVILLE     27  (23)    30 /1965  |  22   (20)     29 /1979
SALEM           28  (23)    30 /1918  |  27   (20)     30 /1918
EUGENE          28  (22)    30 /1951  |  27   (19)     28 /1940+

JUNE 2015: CONSECUTIVE DAYS WITH NO RAIN IN MONTH OF JUNE...
RAINFALL OF A TRACE OR LESS...
  PORTLAND APRT     27 DAYS  *NEW JUNE RECORD.  OLD REC: 23 IN 1985.
  PORTLAND CITY     27 DAYS  2ND LONGEST IN JUN. RECORD: 28 IN 1932.
  HILLSBORO         27 DAYS  2ND LONGEST IN JUN. RECORD: 30 IN 1940.
  EUGENE            28 DAYS  3RD LONGEST IN JUN. RECORD: 30 IN 1951.
  VANCOUVER         27 DAYS  3RD LONGEST IN JUN. RECORD: 30 IN 1940.

NO RAINFALL (NOT A DROP!)
  PORTLAND ARPT     24 DAYS * NEW JUNE RECORD. OLD: 18 DAYS IN 1951.
  EUGENE            25 DAYS * TIED AS LONGEST.   RECORD IS 25 /1911.
  PORTLAND CITY     24 DAYS  3RD LONGEST IN JUN. RECORD: 26 IN 1883.


+ INDICATES OTHER YEARS...BUT MOST RECENT OCCURRENCE IS LISTED.

FOR ADDITIONAL WEATHER INFORMATION...VISIT OUR WEB SITE AT
WWW.WEATHER.GOV/PORTLAND

$$

ROCKEY.



000
NOUS46 KPQR 302345
PNSPQR

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE PORTLAND OR
445 PM PDT TUE JUN 30 2015

...WARMEST JUNE ON RECORD...AND DRY TOO..

JUNE WAS A MONTH THAT MANY WILL REMEMBER FOR BEING WARM. BUT IT WAS
ALSO QUITE DRY...AND QUITE SUNNY. LIGHTER ONSHORE FLOW HAS LEAD TO
MORE SUNNY DAYS. LACK OF FRONTS BROUGHT MORE DRY DAYS. AND A LATE
MONTH HEAT WAVE BROUGHT HOT DAYS AND WARM NIGHTS.

EVEN THE RIVERS ARE RUNNING WARMER THAN NORMAL FOR LATE JUNE. ON THE
29TH...THE COLUMBIA NEAR WAS VANCOUVER WAS AROUND 70 DEG WHICH IS 6
TO 7 DEG ABOVE ITS NORMAL. THE WILLAMETTE RIVER NEAR SALEM WAS IN
THE MIDDLE 70S. MANY OTHER RIVERS ARE ALSO WARMER DUE TO DECREASED
SNOW MELT AND LOWER LEVELS.


JUNE 2015:  MONTHLY TEMPERATURE DATA AND RANKINGS ...
                2015  DEG FM  RANK AS| AVG  DEP FM  / AVG  DEG FM
SITE            MEAN  NORMAL  WARMEST|MAX T NORMAL  / MIN T NORMAL
==================================================================
ASTORIA         59.8    +2.9     12TH | 67.8  +5.9  / 51.8  +1.8
PORTLAND APRT   70.3    +6.7     1ST | 82.6   +9.1  / 57.9  +4.3
PORTLAND CITY   69.1    +6.0     1ST | 81.0   +8.1  / 57.2  +3.9
VANCOUVER       69.3    +6.0     1ST | 82.0   +8.6  / 56.5  +3.2
HILLSBORO       67.4    +5.9     1ST | 82.8   +9.6  / 56.5  +6.6
MCMINNVILLE     67.5    +3.4     1ST | 83.1   +8.2  / 51.9  +2.5
SALEM           69.3    +7.7     1ST | 84.1  +10.2  / 54.4  +5.1
EUGENE          67.1    +6.7     1ST | 83.5  +11.3  / 50.7  +3.1

TOP 5 WARMEST JUNES...
     PORTLAND AIRPORT  PORTLAND CITY     SALEM          EUGENE
1.   70.3 DEG/ 2015     69.1 / 2015    69.3 / 2015    67.1 / 2015
2.   67.4    / 1992     67.5 / 1940    67.0 / 1926    65.7 / 1926
3.   66.5    / 1969     67.4 / 1967    66.2 / 1922    65.4 / 1970
4.   66.5    / 1987     67.3 / 1978    66.2 / 1918    65.3 / 1969
5.   66.5    / 1948     67.3 / 1969    65.9 / 1900    65.2 / 1918

JUNE 2015:  DAYS WITH MAXIMUM TEMPERATURE OF 80S AND 90S...
                    80 DEG OR WARMER   |     90 DEG OR WARMER
SITE           2015  NORM  PREV RECORD | 2015 NORM  PREV RECORD
==================================================================
PORTLAND APRT   21   (7)   16 IN 1987  |   9  (1)   6 IN 2003,1970
PORTLAND CITY   18   (7)   16 IN 1918  |   3  (1)   5 IN 2003+
VANCOUVER       20   (7)   16 IN 1940  |   7  (1)   6 IN 2003
HILLSBORO       22   (8)   18 IN 1961+ |  10  (1)   8 IN 1961
MCMINNVILLE     22   (9)   23 IN 1922  |   9  (2)  11 IN 1926
SALEM           22   (8)   23 IN 1922  |   9  (2)  10 IN 1970
EUGENE          23   (7)   20 IN 1951  |   8  (1)   9 IN 1970

JUNE 2015:  DAILY EXTREME TEMPERATURE DATA...
                    MAXIMUM (DATE)     |      MINIMUM (DATE)
SITE             WARMEST      COOLEST  |   WARMEST    COOLEST
================================================================
ASTORIA         85 (27TH)    61 (1,2ND)| 57 (30TH)   47 (23RD)
PORTLAND APRT   95 (26TH)    62 ( 2ND) | 71 (27TH)    51 (13,14TH)
PORTLAND CITY   92 (26TH)    60 ( 2ND) | 71 (27TH)    49 (13TH)
VANCOUVER       94 (26TH)    61 ( 2ND) | 69 (27TH)    48 (12TH)
HILLSBORO       97 (26TH)    61 ( 2ND) | 69 (27,28TH) 41 (13,14TH)
MCMINNVILLE     99 (26TH)    61 ( 2ND) | 64 (27TH)    43 (13,14TH)
SALEM          100 (26TH)    64 ( 1ST) | 71 (27TH)    46 (13TH)
EUGENE          98 (26,27TH) 61 ( 1ST) | 64 (27TH)    41 (13TH)

27TH JUNE 2015 BECAME WARMEST OVERNIGHT LOW EVER FOR JUNE...
  PORTLAND   71 DEG /27 JUN  **NEW RECORD. OLD: 68 ON 8,29 JUN 1948
  VANCOUVER  69 DEG /27 JUN  **NEW RECORD. OLD: 68 ON 27 JUN 1956
  SALEM      71 DEG /27 JUN  **NEW RECORD. OLD: 69 ON 24 JUN 1926
  EUGENE     64 DEG /27 JUN  *TIED RECORD. OLD: 64 ON 8 JUN 1948


JUNE 2015:  TOTAL MONTHLY RAINFALL AND RANKING AS DRIEST...
       TOTAL  DEPARTURE   RANK AS DRIEST JUNE
       RAIN   FM NORMAL   DRIEST     ON RECORD
================================================================
ASTORIA             0.73    -1.82      11TH      0.33 / 1926
PORTLAND APRT       0.40    -1.30       6TH      0.03 / 1951
PORTLAND CITY       0.44    -1.25      16TH      0.03 / 1951
VANCOUVER           0.39    -1.40      11TH      0.00 / 1940
HILLSBORO           0.54    -0.93      17TH      TRACE/ 1940
MCMINNVILLE         0.67    -0.62      30TH      TRACE/ 1965+
SALEM               0.67    -0.88      32ND      0.00 / 1918
EUGENE              0.23    -1.27      10TH      TRACE/ 1951

JUNE 2015:  DRY DAYS AND RECORDS... NO RECORDS...BUT CLOSE.
            TRACE OR LESS DAYS   |NO RAIN DAYS (NOT A DROP)
              JUNE            PREV.   | JUNE           PREV.
              2015 (NORMAL)   RECORD  | 2015 (NORMAL)  RECORD
=================================================================
ASTORIA         25  (17)    28 /1948  |  22   (12)     28 /1922
PORTLAND APRT   27  (21)    28 /1987+ |  26   (17)     26 /1987+
PORTLAND CITY   27  (21)    29 /1951+ |  26   (20)     27 /1996
VANCOUVER       27  (21)    30 /1940  |  26   (20)     30 /1940
HILLSBORO       27  (22)    30 /1940  |  25   (20)     29 /1962
MCMINNVILLE     27  (23)    30 /1965  |  22   (20)     29 /1979
SALEM           28  (23)    30 /1918  |  27   (20)     30 /1918
EUGENE          28  (22)    30 /1951  |  27   (19)     28 /1940+

JUNE 2015: CONSECUTIVE DAYS WITH NO RAIN IN MONTH OF JUNE...
RAINFALL OF A TRACE OR LESS...
  PORTLAND APRT     27 DAYS  *NEW JUNE RECORD.  OLD REC: 23 IN 1985.
  PORTLAND CITY     27 DAYS  2ND LONGEST IN JUN. RECORD: 28 IN 1932.
  HILLSBORO         27 DAYS  2ND LONGEST IN JUN. RECORD: 30 IN 1940.
  EUGENE            28 DAYS  3RD LONGEST IN JUN. RECORD: 30 IN 1951.
  VANCOUVER         27 DAYS  3RD LONGEST IN JUN. RECORD: 30 IN 1940.

NO RAINFALL (NOT A DROP!)
  PORTLAND ARPT     24 DAYS * NEW JUNE RECORD. OLD: 18 DAYS IN 1951.
  EUGENE            25 DAYS * TIED AS LONGEST.   RECORD IS 25 /1911.
  PORTLAND CITY     24 DAYS  3RD LONGEST IN JUN. RECORD: 26 IN 1883.


+ INDICATES OTHER YEARS...BUT MOST RECENT OCCURRENCE IS LISTED.

FOR ADDITIONAL WEATHER INFORMATION...VISIT OUR WEB SITE AT
WWW.WEATHER.GOV/PORTLAND

$$

ROCKEY.



000
NOUS46 KPQR 302342
PNSPQR

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE PORTLAND OR
442 PM PDT TUE JUN 30 2015

...WARMEST JUNE ON RECORD...AND DRY TOO..

JUNE WAS A MONTH THAT MANY WILL REMEMBER FOR BEING WARM. BUT IT WAS
ALSO QUITE DRY...AND QUITE SUNNY. LIGHTER ONSHORE FLOW HAS LEAD TO
MORE SUNNY DAYS. LACK OF FRONTS BROUGHT MORE DRY DAYS. AND A LATE
MONTH HEAT WAVE BROUGHT HOT DAYS AND WARM NIGHTS.

EVEN THE RIVERS ARE RUNNING WARMER THAN NORMAL FOR LATE JUNE. ON THE
29TH...THE COLUMBIA NEAR WAS VANCOUVER WAS AROUND 70 DEG WHICH IS 6
TO 7 DEG ABOVE ITS NORMAL. THE WILLAMETTE RIVER NEAR SALEM WAS IN
THE MIDDLE 70S. MANY OTHER RIVERS ARE ALSO WARMER DUE TO DECREASED
SNOW MELT AND LOWER LEVELS.


JUNE 2015:  MONTHLY TEMPERATURE DATA AND RANKINGS ...
                2015  DEG FM  RANK AS| AVG  DEP FM  / AVG  DEG FM
SITE            MEAN  NORMAL  WARMEST|MAX T NORMAL  / MIN T NORMAL
==================================================================
ASTORIA         59.8    +2.9     12TH | 67.8  +5.9  / 51.8  +1.8
PORTLAND APRT   70.3    +6.7     1ST | 82.6   +9.1  / 57.9  +4.3
PORTLAND CITY   69.1    +6.0     1ST | 81.0   +8.1  / 57.2  +3.9
VANCOUVER       69.3    +6.0     1ST | 82.0   +8.6  / 56.5  +3.2
HILLSBORO       67.4    +5.9     1ST | 82.8   +9.6  / 56.5  +6.6
MCMINNVILLE    67.5    +3.4     1ST | 83.1   +8.2  / 51.9  +2.5
SALEM           69.3    +7.7     1ST | 84.1  +10.2  / 54.4  +5.1
EUGENE          67.1    +6.7     1ST | 83.5  +11.3  / 50.7  +3.1

TOP 5 WARMEST JUNES...
     PORTLAND AIRPORT  PORTLAND CITY     SALEM          EUGENE
1.   70.3 DEG/ 2015     69.1 / 2015    69.3 / 2015    67.1 / 2015
2.   67.4    / 1992     67.5 / 1940    67.0 / 1926    65.7 / 1926
3.   66.5    / 1969     67.4 / 1967    66.2 / 1922    65.4 / 1970
4.   66.5    / 1987     67.3 / 1978    66.2 / 1918    65.3 / 1969
5.   66.5    / 1948     67.3 / 1969    65.9 / 1900    65.2 / 1918

JUNE 2015:  DAYS WITH MAXIMUM TEMPERATURE OF 80S AND 90S...
                    80 DEG OR WARMER   |     90 DEG OR WARMER
SITE           2015  NORM  PREV RECORD | 2015 NORM  PREV RECORD
==================================================================
PORTLAND APRT   21   (7)   16 IN 1987  |   9  (1)   6 IN 2003,1970
PORTLAND CITY   18   (7)   16 IN 1918  |   3  (1)   5 IN 2003+
VANCOUVER       20   (7)   16 IN 1940  |   7  (1)   6 IN 2003
HILLSBORO       22   (8)   18 IN 1961+ |  10  (1)   8 IN 1961
MCMINNVILLE    22   (9)   23 IN 1922  |   9  (2)  11 IN 1926
SALEM           22   (8)   23 IN 1922  |   9  (2)  10 IN 1970
EUGENE          23   (7)   20 IN 1951  |   8  (1)   9 IN 1970

JUNE 2015:  DAILY EXTREME TEMPERATURE DATA...
                    MAXIMUM (DATE)     |      MINIMUM (DATE)
SITE             WARMEST      COOLEST  |   WARMEST    COOLEST
================================================================
ASTORIA        85 (27TH) 61 (1,2ND)| 57 (30TH)   47 (23RD)
PORTLAND APRT   95 (26TH)    62 ( 2ND) | 71 (27TH)    51 (13,14TH)
PORTLAND CITY   92 (26TH)    60 ( 2ND) | 71 (27TH)    49 (13TH)
VANCOUVER       94 (26TH)    61 ( 2ND) | 69 (27TH)    48 (12TH)
HILLSBORO       97 (26TH)    61 ( 2ND) | 69 (27,28TH) 41 (13,14TH)
MCMINNVILLE    99 (26TH)    61 ( 2ND) | 64 (27TH)    43 (13,14TH)
SALEM          100 (26TH)    64 ( 1ST) | 71 (27TH)    46 (13TH)
EUGENE          98 (26,27TH) 61 ( 1ST) | 64 (27TH)    41 (13TH)

27TH JUNE 2015 BECAME WARMEST OVERNIGHT LOW EVER FOR JUNE...
  PORTLAND   71 DEG /27 JUN  **NEW RECORD. OLD: 68 ON 8,29 JUN 1948
  VANCOUVER  69 DEG /27 JUN  **NEW RECORD. OLD: 68 ON 27 JUN 1956
  SALEM      71 DEG /27 JUN  **NEW RECORD. OLD: 69 ON 24 JUN 1926
  EUGENE     64 DEG /27 JUN  *TIED RECORD. OLD: 64 ON 8 JUN 1948


JUNE 2015:  TOTAL MONTHLY RAINFALL AND RANKING AS DRIEST...
       TOTAL  DEPARTURE   RANK AS DRIEST JUNE
       RAIN   FM NORMAL   DRIEST     ON RECORD
================================================================
ASTORIA            0.73    -1.82      11TH      0.33 / 1926
PORTLAND APRT       0.40    -1.30       6TH      0.03 / 1951
PORTLAND CITY       0.44    -1.25      16TH      0.03 / 1951
VANCOUVER           0.39    -1.40      11TH      0.00 / 1940
HILLSBORO           0.54    -0.93      17TH      TRACE/ 1940
MCMINNVILLE        0.67    -0.62      30TH      TRACE/ 1965+
SALEM               0.67    -0.88      32ND      0.00 / 1918
EUGENE              0.23    -1.27      10TH      TRACE/ 1951

JUNE 2015:  DRY DAYS AND RECORDS... NO RECORDS...BUT CLOSE.
            TRACE OR LESS DAYS   |NO RAIN DAYS (NOT A DROP)
              JUNE            PREV.   | JUNE           PREV.
              2015 (NORMAL)   RECORD  | 2015 (NORMAL)  RECORD
=================================================================
ASTORIA        25  (17)    28 /1948  |  22   (12)     28 /1922
PORTLAND APRT   27  (21)    28 /1987+ |  26   (17)     26 /1987+
PORTLAND CITY   27  (21)    29 /1951+ |  26   (20)     27 /1996
VANCOUVER       27  (21)    30 /1940  |  26   (20)     30 /1940
HILLSBORO       27  (22)    30 /1940  |  25   (20)     29 /1962
MCMINNVILLE    27  (23)    30 /1965  |  22   (20)     29 /1979
SALEM           28  (23)    30 /1918  |  27   (20)     30 /1918
EUGENE          28  (22)    30 /1951  |  27   (19)     28 /1940+

JUNE 2015: CONSECUTIVE DAYS WITH NO RAIN IN MONTH OF JUNE...
RAINFALL OF A TRACE OR LESS...
  PORTLAND APRT    27 DAYS  *NEW JUNE RECORD.  OLD REC: 23 IN 1985.
  PORTLAND CITY    27 DAYS  2ND LONGEST IN JUN. RECORD: 28 IN 1932.
  HILLSBORO         27 DAYS  2ND LONGEST IN JUN. RECORD: 30 IN 1940.
  EUGENE            28 DAYS  3RD LONGEST IN JUN. RECORD: 30 IN 1951.
  VANCOUVER        27 DAYS  3RD LONGEST IN JUN. RECORD: 30 IN 1940.

NO RAINFALL (NOT A DROP!)
  PORTLAND ARPT    24 DAYS * NEW JUNE RECORD. OLD: 18 DAYS IN 1951.
  EUGENE            25 DAYS * TIED AS LONGEST.   RECORD IS 25 /1911.
  PORTLAND CITY     24 DAYS  3RD LONGEST IN JUN. RECORD: 26 IN 1883.


+ INDICATES OTHER YEARS...BUT MOST RECENT OCCURRENCE IS LISTED.

FOR ADDITIONAL WEATHER INFORMATION...VISIT OUR WEB SITE AT
WWW.WEATHER.GOV/PORTLAND

$$

ROCKEY.



000
NOUS46 KPQR 302342
PNSPQR

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE PORTLAND OR
442 PM PDT TUE JUN 30 2015

...WARMEST JUNE ON RECORD...AND DRY TOO..

JUNE WAS A MONTH THAT MANY WILL REMEMBER FOR BEING WARM. BUT IT WAS
ALSO QUITE DRY...AND QUITE SUNNY. LIGHTER ONSHORE FLOW HAS LEAD TO
MORE SUNNY DAYS. LACK OF FRONTS BROUGHT MORE DRY DAYS. AND A LATE
MONTH HEAT WAVE BROUGHT HOT DAYS AND WARM NIGHTS.

EVEN THE RIVERS ARE RUNNING WARMER THAN NORMAL FOR LATE JUNE. ON THE
29TH...THE COLUMBIA NEAR WAS VANCOUVER WAS AROUND 70 DEG WHICH IS 6
TO 7 DEG ABOVE ITS NORMAL. THE WILLAMETTE RIVER NEAR SALEM WAS IN
THE MIDDLE 70S. MANY OTHER RIVERS ARE ALSO WARMER DUE TO DECREASED
SNOW MELT AND LOWER LEVELS.


JUNE 2015:  MONTHLY TEMPERATURE DATA AND RANKINGS ...
                2015  DEG FM  RANK AS| AVG  DEP FM  / AVG  DEG FM
SITE            MEAN  NORMAL  WARMEST|MAX T NORMAL  / MIN T NORMAL
==================================================================
ASTORIA         59.8    +2.9     12TH | 67.8  +5.9  / 51.8  +1.8
PORTLAND APRT   70.3    +6.7     1ST | 82.6   +9.1  / 57.9  +4.3
PORTLAND CITY   69.1    +6.0     1ST | 81.0   +8.1  / 57.2  +3.9
VANCOUVER       69.3    +6.0     1ST | 82.0   +8.6  / 56.5  +3.2
HILLSBORO       67.4    +5.9     1ST | 82.8   +9.6  / 56.5  +6.6
MCMINNVILLE    67.5    +3.4     1ST | 83.1   +8.2  / 51.9  +2.5
SALEM           69.3    +7.7     1ST | 84.1  +10.2  / 54.4  +5.1
EUGENE          67.1    +6.7     1ST | 83.5  +11.3  / 50.7  +3.1

TOP 5 WARMEST JUNES...
     PORTLAND AIRPORT  PORTLAND CITY     SALEM          EUGENE
1.   70.3 DEG/ 2015     69.1 / 2015    69.3 / 2015    67.1 / 2015
2.   67.4    / 1992     67.5 / 1940    67.0 / 1926    65.7 / 1926
3.   66.5    / 1969     67.4 / 1967    66.2 / 1922    65.4 / 1970
4.   66.5    / 1987     67.3 / 1978    66.2 / 1918    65.3 / 1969
5.   66.5    / 1948     67.3 / 1969    65.9 / 1900    65.2 / 1918

JUNE 2015:  DAYS WITH MAXIMUM TEMPERATURE OF 80S AND 90S...
                    80 DEG OR WARMER   |     90 DEG OR WARMER
SITE           2015  NORM  PREV RECORD | 2015 NORM  PREV RECORD
==================================================================
PORTLAND APRT   21   (7)   16 IN 1987  |   9  (1)   6 IN 2003,1970
PORTLAND CITY   18   (7)   16 IN 1918  |   3  (1)   5 IN 2003+
VANCOUVER       20   (7)   16 IN 1940  |   7  (1)   6 IN 2003
HILLSBORO       22   (8)   18 IN 1961+ |  10  (1)   8 IN 1961
MCMINNVILLE    22   (9)   23 IN 1922  |   9  (2)  11 IN 1926
SALEM           22   (8)   23 IN 1922  |   9  (2)  10 IN 1970
EUGENE          23   (7)   20 IN 1951  |   8  (1)   9 IN 1970

JUNE 2015:  DAILY EXTREME TEMPERATURE DATA...
                    MAXIMUM (DATE)     |      MINIMUM (DATE)
SITE             WARMEST      COOLEST  |   WARMEST    COOLEST
================================================================
ASTORIA        85 (27TH) 61 (1,2ND)| 57 (30TH)   47 (23RD)
PORTLAND APRT   95 (26TH)    62 ( 2ND) | 71 (27TH)    51 (13,14TH)
PORTLAND CITY   92 (26TH)    60 ( 2ND) | 71 (27TH)    49 (13TH)
VANCOUVER       94 (26TH)    61 ( 2ND) | 69 (27TH)    48 (12TH)
HILLSBORO       97 (26TH)    61 ( 2ND) | 69 (27,28TH) 41 (13,14TH)
MCMINNVILLE    99 (26TH)    61 ( 2ND) | 64 (27TH)    43 (13,14TH)
SALEM          100 (26TH)    64 ( 1ST) | 71 (27TH)    46 (13TH)
EUGENE          98 (26,27TH) 61 ( 1ST) | 64 (27TH)    41 (13TH)

27TH JUNE 2015 BECAME WARMEST OVERNIGHT LOW EVER FOR JUNE...
  PORTLAND   71 DEG /27 JUN  **NEW RECORD. OLD: 68 ON 8,29 JUN 1948
  VANCOUVER  69 DEG /27 JUN  **NEW RECORD. OLD: 68 ON 27 JUN 1956
  SALEM      71 DEG /27 JUN  **NEW RECORD. OLD: 69 ON 24 JUN 1926
  EUGENE     64 DEG /27 JUN  *TIED RECORD. OLD: 64 ON 8 JUN 1948


JUNE 2015:  TOTAL MONTHLY RAINFALL AND RANKING AS DRIEST...
       TOTAL  DEPARTURE   RANK AS DRIEST JUNE
       RAIN   FM NORMAL   DRIEST     ON RECORD
================================================================
ASTORIA            0.73    -1.82      11TH      0.33 / 1926
PORTLAND APRT       0.40    -1.30       6TH      0.03 / 1951
PORTLAND CITY       0.44    -1.25      16TH      0.03 / 1951
VANCOUVER           0.39    -1.40      11TH      0.00 / 1940
HILLSBORO           0.54    -0.93      17TH      TRACE/ 1940
MCMINNVILLE        0.67    -0.62      30TH      TRACE/ 1965+
SALEM               0.67    -0.88      32ND      0.00 / 1918
EUGENE              0.23    -1.27      10TH      TRACE/ 1951

JUNE 2015:  DRY DAYS AND RECORDS... NO RECORDS...BUT CLOSE.
            TRACE OR LESS DAYS   |NO RAIN DAYS (NOT A DROP)
              JUNE            PREV.   | JUNE           PREV.
              2015 (NORMAL)   RECORD  | 2015 (NORMAL)  RECORD
=================================================================
ASTORIA        25  (17)    28 /1948  |  22   (12)     28 /1922
PORTLAND APRT   27  (21)    28 /1987+ |  26   (17)     26 /1987+
PORTLAND CITY   27  (21)    29 /1951+ |  26   (20)     27 /1996
VANCOUVER       27  (21)    30 /1940  |  26   (20)     30 /1940
HILLSBORO       27  (22)    30 /1940  |  25   (20)     29 /1962
MCMINNVILLE    27  (23)    30 /1965  |  22   (20)     29 /1979
SALEM           28  (23)    30 /1918  |  27   (20)     30 /1918
EUGENE          28  (22)    30 /1951  |  27   (19)     28 /1940+

JUNE 2015: CONSECUTIVE DAYS WITH NO RAIN IN MONTH OF JUNE...
RAINFALL OF A TRACE OR LESS...
  PORTLAND APRT    27 DAYS  *NEW JUNE RECORD.  OLD REC: 23 IN 1985.
  PORTLAND CITY    27 DAYS  2ND LONGEST IN JUN. RECORD: 28 IN 1932.
  HILLSBORO         27 DAYS  2ND LONGEST IN JUN. RECORD: 30 IN 1940.
  EUGENE            28 DAYS  3RD LONGEST IN JUN. RECORD: 30 IN 1951.
  VANCOUVER        27 DAYS  3RD LONGEST IN JUN. RECORD: 30 IN 1940.

NO RAINFALL (NOT A DROP!)
  PORTLAND ARPT    24 DAYS * NEW JUNE RECORD. OLD: 18 DAYS IN 1951.
  EUGENE            25 DAYS * TIED AS LONGEST.   RECORD IS 25 /1911.
  PORTLAND CITY     24 DAYS  3RD LONGEST IN JUN. RECORD: 26 IN 1883.


+ INDICATES OTHER YEARS...BUT MOST RECENT OCCURRENCE IS LISTED.

FOR ADDITIONAL WEATHER INFORMATION...VISIT OUR WEB SITE AT
WWW.WEATHER.GOV/PORTLAND

$$

ROCKEY.



000
NOUS46 KPQR 302332
PNSPQR

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE PORTLAND OR
432 PM PDT TUE JUN 30 2015

...WARMEST JUNE ON RECORD...AND DRY TOO..

JUNE WAS A MONTH THAT MANY WILL REMEMBER FOR BEING WARM. BUT IT WAS
ALSO QUITE DRY...AND QUITE SUNNY. LIGHTER ONSHORE FLOW HAS LEAD TO
MORE SUNNY DAYS. LACK OF FRONTS BROUGHT MORE DRY DAYS. AND A LATE
MONTH HEAT WAVE BROUGHT HOT DAYS AND WARM NIGHTS.

EVEN THE RIVERS ARE RUNNING WARMER THAN NORMAL FOR LATE JUNE. ON THE
29TH...THE COLUMBIA NEAR WAS VANCOUVER WAS AROUND 70 DEG WHICH IS 6
TO 7 DEG ABOVE ITS NORMAL. THE WILLAMETTE RIVER NEAR SALEM WAS IN
THE MIDDLE 70S. MANY OTHER RIVERS ARE ALSO WARMER DUE TO DECREASED
SNOW MELT AND LOWER LEVELS.


JUNE 2015:  MONTHLY TEMPERATURE DATA AND RANKINGS ...
                2015  DEG FM  RANK AS| AVG  DEP FM  / AVG  DEG FM
SITE            MEAN  NORMAL  WARMEST|MAX T NORMAL  / MIN T NORMAL
==================================================================
ASTORIA 59.8+2.9    12TH | 67.8   +5.9  / 51.8  +1.8
PORTLAND APRT   70.3    +6.7     1ST | 82.6   +9.1  / 57.9  +4.3
PORTLAND CITY   69.1    +6.0     1ST | 81.0   +8.1  / 57.2  +3.9
VANCOUVER       69.3    +6.0     1ST | 82.0   +8.6  / 56.5  +3.2
HILLSBORO  67.4    +5.9     1ST | 82.8   +9.6  / 56.5  +6.6
MCMINNVILLE67.5    +3.4     1ST | 83.1   +8.2  / 51.9  +2.5
SALEM69.3    +7.7     1ST | 84.1  +10.2  / 54.4  +5.1
EUGENE67.1    +6.7     1ST | 83.5  +11.3  / 50.7  +3.1

TOP 5 WARMEST JUNES...
     PORTLAND AIRPORT  PORTLAND CITY     SALEM          EUGENE
1.   70.3 DEG/ 2015     69.1 / 2015    69.3 / 2015    67.1 / 2015
2.   67.4    / 1992     67.5 / 1940    67.0 / 1926    65.7 / 1926
3.   66.5    / 1969     67.4 / 1967    66.2 / 1922    65.4 / 1970
4.   66.5    / 1987     67.3 / 1978    66.2 / 1918    65.3 / 1969
5.   66.5    / 1948     67.3 / 1969    65.9 / 1900    65.2 / 1918

JUNE 2015:  DAYS WITH MAXIMUM TEMPERATURE OF 80S AND 90S...
                    80 DEG OR WARMER   |     90 DEG OR WARMER
SITE           2015  NORM  PREV RECORD | 2015 NORM  PREV RECORD
==================================================================
PORTLAND APRT21   (7)   16 IN 1987  |   9  (1)   6 IN 2003,1970
PORTLAND CITY18   (7)   16 IN 1918  |   3  (1)   5 IN 2003+
VANCOUVER       20   (7)   16 IN 1940  |   7  (1)   6 IN 2003
HILLSBORO  22   (8)   18 IN 1961+ |  10  (1)   8 IN 1961
MCMINNVILLE22   (9)   23 IN 1922  |   9  (2)  11 IN 1926
SALEM22   (8)   23 IN 1922  |   9  (2)  10 IN 1970
EUGENE23   (7)   20 IN 1951  |   8  (1)   9 IN 1970

JUNE 2015:  DAILY EXTREME TEMPERATURE DATA...
                    MAXIMUM (DATE)     |      MINIMUM (DATE)
SITE             WARMEST      COOLEST  |   WARMEST    COOLEST
================================================================
ASTORIA85 (27TH) 61 (1,2ND)| 57 (30TH)   47 (23RD)
PORTLAND APRT95 (26TH)    62 ( 2ND) | 71 (27TH)    51 (13,14TH)
PORTLAND CITY92 (26TH)    60 ( 2ND) | 71 (27TH)    49 (13TH)
VANCOUVER    94 (26TH)    61 ( 2ND) | 69 (27TH)    48 (12TH)
HILLSBORO  97 (26TH)    61 ( 2ND) | 69 (27,28TH) 41 (13,14TH)
MCMINNVILLE99 (26TH)    61 ( 2ND) | 64 (27TH)    43 (13,14TH)
SALEM   100 (26TH)    64 ( 1ST) | 71 (27TH)    46 (13TH)
EUGENE98 (26,27TH) 61 ( 1ST) | 64 (27TH)    41 (13TH)

27TH JUNE 2015 BECAME WARMEST OVERNIGHT LOW EVER FOR JUNE...
  PORTLAND   71 DEG /27 JUN  **NEW RECORD. OLD: 68 ON 8,29 JUN 1948
  VANCOUVER  69 DEG /27 JUN  **NEW RECORD. OLD: 68 ON 27 JUN 1956
  SALEM      71 DEG /27 JUN  **NEW RECORD. OLD: 69 ON 24 JUN 1926
  EUGENE     64 DEG /27 JUN  *TIED RECORD. OLD: 64 ON 8 JUN 1948


JUNE 2015:  TOTAL MONTHLY RAINFALL AND RANKING AS DRIEST...
       TOTAL  DEPARTURE   RANK AS DRIEST JUNE
       RAIN   FM NORMAL   DRIEST     ON RECORD
================================================================
ASTORIA0.73-1.82      11TH      0.33 / 1926
PORTLAND APRT0.40-1.30       6TH      0.03 / 1951
PORTLAND CITY0.44-1.25      16TH      0.03 / 1951
VANCOUVER    0.39-1.40      11TH      0.00 / 1940
HILLSBORO  0.54-0.93      17TH      TRACE/ 1940
MCMINNVILLE0.67-0.62      30TH      TRACE/ 1965+
SALEM   0.67-0.88      32ND      0.00 / 1918
EUGENE0.23-1.27      10TH      TRACE/ 1951

JUNE 2015:  DRY DAYS AND RECORDS... NO RECORDS...BUT CLOSE.
            TRACE OR LESS DAYS   |NO RAIN DAYS (NOT A DROP)
              JUNE            PREV.   | JUNE           PREV.
              2015 (NORMAL)   RECORD  | 2015 (NORMAL)  RECORD
=================================================================
ASTORIA25(17)    28 /1948  |  22   (12)     28 /1922
PORTLAND APRT27(21)    28 /1987+ |  26   (17)     26 /1987+
PORTLAND CITY27(21)    29 /1951+ |  26   (20)     27 /1996
VANCOUVER    27(21)    30 /1940  |  26   (20)     30 /1940
HILLSBORO  27(22)    30 /1940  |  25   (20)     29 /1962
MCMINNVILLE27(23)    30 /1965  |  22   (20)     29 /1979
SALEM   28(23)    30 /1918  |  27   (20)     30 /1918
EUGENE28(22)    30 /1951  |  27   (19)     28 /1940+

JUNE 2015: CONSECUTIVE DAYS WITH NO RAIN IN MONTH OF JUNE...
RAINFALL OF A TRACE OR LESS...
  PORTLAND APRT    27 DAYS  *NEW JUNE RECORD.  OLD REC: 23 IN 1985.
  PORTLAND CITY27 DAYS  2ND LONGEST IN JUN. RECORD: 28 IN 1932.
  HILLSBORO    27 DAYS  2ND LONGEST IN JUN. RECORD: 30 IN 1940.
  EUGENE       28 DAYS  3RD LONGEST IN JUN. RECORD: 30 IN 1951.
  VANCOUVER 27 DAYS  3RD LONGEST IN JUN. RECORD: 30 IN 1940.

NO RAINFALL (NOT A DROP!)
  PORTLAND ARPT    24 DAYS * NEW JUNE RECORD. OLD: 18 DAYS IN 1951.
  EUGENE       25 DAYS* TIED AS LONGEST.   RECORD IS 25 /1911.
  PORTLAND CITY 24 DAYS  3RD LONGEST IN JUN. RECORD: 26 IN 1883.


+ INDICATES OTHER YEARS...BUT MOST RECENT OCCURRENCE IS LISTED.

FOR ADDITIONAL WEATHER INFORMATION...VISIT OUR WEB SITE AT
WWW.WEATHER.GOV/PORTLAND

$$

ROCKEY.



000
NOUS41 KLWX 301841
PNSLWX

...SEVERE WEATHER SAFETY RULES...

DAMAGING THUNDERSTORMS ARE POSSIBLE THIS AFTERNOON AND EVENING.
RESIDENTS ACROSS THE BALTIMORE AND WASHINGTON DC METRO AREAS...NORTH
AND CENTRAL VIRGINIA...MUCH OF MARYLAND AND THE EASTERN WEST
VIRGINIA PANHANDLE SHOULD MONITOR THIS SITUATION VERY CLOSELY AND
ENSURE YOUR NOAA WEATHER RADIOS ARE SET TO ALERT MODE. SEVERE
WEATHER WARNINGS MAY BECOME NECESSARY. HERE ARE SOME SAFETY RULES TO
KEEP IN MIND WHEN SEVERE WEATHER IS EXPECTED OR IS OCCURRING.

IF A WARNING IS ISSUED...SEEK SHELTER INDOORS IMMEDIATELY. A SEVERE
THUNDERSTORM IS DEFINED AS PRODUCING QUARTER SIZE OR GREATER HAIL
AND WIND GUSTS OF 58 MPH OR MORE.

TORNADOES CAN FORM VERY RAPIDLY FROM SEVERE THUNDERSTORMS. IF YOU
ARE IN A TORNADO WATCH...AND A SEVERE THUNDERSTORM WARNING IS ISSUED
FOR YOUR AREA...MONITOR LOCAL CONDITIONS CLOSELY AND BE READY TO
TAKE QUICK ACTION TO SAVE YOUR LIFE.

STAY TUNED TO NOAA WEATHER RADIO...COMMERCIAL RADIO OR TELEVISION
FOR THE LATEST ON THIS POTENTIAL SEVERE WEATHER EVENT. ADDITIONAL
WEATHER INFORMATION...CAN BE FOUND AT WEATHER.GOV/WASHINGTON OR
WEATHER.GOV/BALTIMORE.



000
NOUS41 KLWX 301841
PNSLWX

...SEVERE WEATHER SAFETY RULES...

DAMAGING THUNDERSTORMS ARE POSSIBLE THIS AFTERNOON AND EVENING.
RESIDENTS ACROSS THE BALTIMORE AND WASHINGTON DC METRO AREAS...NORTH
AND CENTRAL VIRGINIA...MUCH OF MARYLAND AND THE EASTERN WEST
VIRGINIA PANHANDLE SHOULD MONITOR THIS SITUATION VERY CLOSELY AND
ENSURE YOUR NOAA WEATHER RADIOS ARE SET TO ALERT MODE. SEVERE
WEATHER WARNINGS MAY BECOME NECESSARY. HERE ARE SOME SAFETY RULES TO
KEEP IN MIND WHEN SEVERE WEATHER IS EXPECTED OR IS OCCURRING.

IF A WARNING IS ISSUED...SEEK SHELTER INDOORS IMMEDIATELY. A SEVERE
THUNDERSTORM IS DEFINED AS PRODUCING QUARTER SIZE OR GREATER HAIL
AND WIND GUSTS OF 58 MPH OR MORE.

TORNADOES CAN FORM VERY RAPIDLY FROM SEVERE THUNDERSTORMS. IF YOU
ARE IN A TORNADO WATCH...AND A SEVERE THUNDERSTORM WARNING IS ISSUED
FOR YOUR AREA...MONITOR LOCAL CONDITIONS CLOSELY AND BE READY TO
TAKE QUICK ACTION TO SAVE YOUR LIFE.

STAY TUNED TO NOAA WEATHER RADIO...COMMERCIAL RADIO OR TELEVISION
FOR THE LATEST ON THIS POTENTIAL SEVERE WEATHER EVENT. ADDITIONAL
WEATHER INFORMATION...CAN BE FOUND AT WEATHER.GOV/WASHINGTON OR
WEATHER.GOV/BALTIMORE.


000
NOUS41 KLWX 301841
PNSLWX

...SEVERE WEATHER SAFETY RULES...

DAMAGING THUNDERSTORMS ARE POSSIBLE THIS AFTERNOON AND EVENING.
RESIDENTS ACROSS THE BALTIMORE AND WASHINGTON DC METRO AREAS...NORTH
AND CENTRAL VIRGINIA...MUCH OF MARYLAND AND THE EASTERN WEST
VIRGINIA PANHANDLE SHOULD MONITOR THIS SITUATION VERY CLOSELY AND
ENSURE YOUR NOAA WEATHER RADIOS ARE SET TO ALERT MODE. SEVERE
WEATHER WARNINGS MAY BECOME NECESSARY. HERE ARE SOME SAFETY RULES TO
KEEP IN MIND WHEN SEVERE WEATHER IS EXPECTED OR IS OCCURRING.

IF A WARNING IS ISSUED...SEEK SHELTER INDOORS IMMEDIATELY. A SEVERE
THUNDERSTORM IS DEFINED AS PRODUCING QUARTER SIZE OR GREATER HAIL
AND WIND GUSTS OF 58 MPH OR MORE.

TORNADOES CAN FORM VERY RAPIDLY FROM SEVERE THUNDERSTORMS. IF YOU
ARE IN A TORNADO WATCH...AND A SEVERE THUNDERSTORM WARNING IS ISSUED
FOR YOUR AREA...MONITOR LOCAL CONDITIONS CLOSELY AND BE READY TO
TAKE QUICK ACTION TO SAVE YOUR LIFE.

STAY TUNED TO NOAA WEATHER RADIO...COMMERCIAL RADIO OR TELEVISION
FOR THE LATEST ON THIS POTENTIAL SEVERE WEATHER EVENT. ADDITIONAL
WEATHER INFORMATION...CAN BE FOUND AT WEATHER.GOV/WASHINGTON OR
WEATHER.GOV/BALTIMORE.


000
NOUS41 KLWX 301841
PNSLWX

...SEVERE WEATHER SAFETY RULES...

DAMAGING THUNDERSTORMS ARE POSSIBLE THIS AFTERNOON AND EVENING.
RESIDENTS ACROSS THE BALTIMORE AND WASHINGTON DC METRO AREAS...NORTH
AND CENTRAL VIRGINIA...MUCH OF MARYLAND AND THE EASTERN WEST
VIRGINIA PANHANDLE SHOULD MONITOR THIS SITUATION VERY CLOSELY AND
ENSURE YOUR NOAA WEATHER RADIOS ARE SET TO ALERT MODE. SEVERE
WEATHER WARNINGS MAY BECOME NECESSARY. HERE ARE SOME SAFETY RULES TO
KEEP IN MIND WHEN SEVERE WEATHER IS EXPECTED OR IS OCCURRING.

IF A WARNING IS ISSUED...SEEK SHELTER INDOORS IMMEDIATELY. A SEVERE
THUNDERSTORM IS DEFINED AS PRODUCING QUARTER SIZE OR GREATER HAIL
AND WIND GUSTS OF 58 MPH OR MORE.

TORNADOES CAN FORM VERY RAPIDLY FROM SEVERE THUNDERSTORMS. IF YOU
ARE IN A TORNADO WATCH...AND A SEVERE THUNDERSTORM WARNING IS ISSUED
FOR YOUR AREA...MONITOR LOCAL CONDITIONS CLOSELY AND BE READY TO
TAKE QUICK ACTION TO SAVE YOUR LIFE.

STAY TUNED TO NOAA WEATHER RADIO...COMMERCIAL RADIO OR TELEVISION
FOR THE LATEST ON THIS POTENTIAL SEVERE WEATHER EVENT. ADDITIONAL
WEATHER INFORMATION...CAN BE FOUND AT WEATHER.GOV/WASHINGTON OR
WEATHER.GOV/BALTIMORE.



000
NOUS45 KTFX 301752
PNSTFX

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE GREAT FALLS MT
1150 AM MDT TUE JUN 30 2015

...SUMMARY OF RECORD WARM TEMPERATURES FROM JUNE 26 TO THE PRESENT
IN SOUTHWEST AND NORTH CENTRAL MONTANA...

THIS SUMMARY WILL BE UPDATED FOR THE DURATION OF THE PRESENT HEAT
WAVE IN MONTANA.

...RECORD WARM MAXIMUM TEMPERATURES FOR FRIDAY JUNE 26...

LOCATION           NEW RECORD    OLD RECORD    YEAR SET  RECORDS BEGAN
DILLON AIRPORT         94   (TIED)   94          1970       1929
DILLON WMU             94   (TIED)   94          2002       1895
HELENA                 98            96          1910       1880
WISDOM                 88            87          1932       1906

######################################################################
...RECORD WARM MINIMUM TEMPERATURES FOR SATURDAY JUN 27...

LOCATION           NEW RECORD    OLD RECORD    YEAR SET  RECORDS BEGAN
DILLON AIRPORT         57            55          2002       1929


...RECORD WARM MAXIMUM TEMPERATURES FOR SATURDAY JUN 27...

LOCATION           NEW RECORD    OLD RECORD    YEAR SET  RECORDS BEGAN
BOULDER                95            91          2002       1891
BOZEMAN EXP FARM       92            88          2002/1970  1966
BOZEMAN MSU            94            93          1919       1892
BELGRADE-YELLOWSTN APT 98            94          1958       1935
CUT BANK               95            92          1910       1903
DILLON AIRPORT         96            91          1966       1929
DILLON WMU             97            91    2013/1987/1981   1895
ENNIS                  96            94          1919       1918
FORT BENTON           100            97          2002       1894
HELENA                103*           96          1936       1880
LOMA 1W               102            99          2002       1950
MILLEGAN 14SE          96**          89          2002       1965
SIMPSON                99            97          1988       1948
WEST YELLOWSTONE       91            89          1926       1905

*ALL-TIME RECORD HIGH TEMPERATURE FOR JUNE SET AT HELENA. THE OLD
  RECORD WAS 102 SET ON JUNE 21 1900.
**ALL-TIME RECORD HIGH TEMPERATURE FOR JUNE TIED AT MILLEGAN 14SE.
  THIS TIES THE PREVIOUS ALL-TIME WARMEST DAY OF 96 DEGREES ON JUNE
  25 2012.

######################################################################
...RECORD WARM MINIMUM TEMPERATURES FOR SUNDAY JUNE 28...

LOCATION           NEW RECORD    OLD RECORD    YEAR SET  RECORDS BEGAN
BOZEMAN MSU            61            60          1936       1892
HELENA                 68 (TIED)     68          1883       1880
LEWISTOWN              59 (TIED)     59          1988       1896
DILLON AIRPORT         57            54          2003       1929
TOWNSEND               59 (TIED)     59          1988       1948


...RECORD WARM MAXIMUM TEMPERATURES FOR SUNDAY JUN 28...

LOCATION           NEW RECORD    OLD RECORD    YEAR SET  RECORDS BEGAN
BOULDER                95            94          2007       1891
BOZEMAN EXP FARM       93            90          2007       1966
BOZEMAN MSU            94 (TIED)     94          2007       1892
CHINOOK               101            99          1988/1984  1895
CHOTEAU                93 (TIED)     93          1896       1893
CUT BANK               95            91          2006/1937  1903
DILLON AIRPORT         98            95          2007       1929
DILLON WMU             98            93          2007       1895
DUNKIRK 19NNE          99            97          1966       1922
ENNIS                  97            95          1919       1918
FORT BENTON           100            99          1885       1880
GOLD BUTTE 7N          93            92          1984       1905
GREAT FALLS            99            95     1973/1966/1925  1892
HAVRE                 103           100          2006       1880
HELENA                102            99          2007       1880
HOLTER DAM             99            99          1936       1903
LOMA 1W               104           103          1966       1950
MILLEGAN 14SE          94            91          2007       1965
NEIHART 7NW            91            89          2011       1905
SHELBY                 97            92          2006       1899
SIMPSON 6W             99 (TIED)     99          1984       1948
TOWNSEND               95            94          2007       1948
WEST YELLOWSTONE       90            88          2007       1905

THE 6 PM JUNE 28 RADIOSONDE OBSERVATION AT GREAT FALLS RECORDED A
HEIGHT OF 5940 METERS AT 500 MILLIBARS. THIS TIES THE RECORD HIGHEST
VALUE IN JUNE AT GREAT FALLS WHICH WAS FIRST SET AT 6 PM JUNE 29
2008. THE HIGHEST 500 MILLIBAR VALUE AT GREAT FALLS IS 5990 METERS
ON THREE OCCASIONS IN AUGUST 1983, SEPTEMBER 1988 AND JULY 2002.


######################################################################
...RECORD WARM MINIMUM TEMPERATURES FOR MONDAY JUNE 29...

LOCATION           NEW RECORD    OLD RECORD    YEAR SET  RECORDS BEGAN
DILLON AIRPORT         57            57          1984       1929
GREAT FALLS            63            63          1972       1892
HAVRE                  64            63          1984       1880

...RECORD WARM MAXIMUM TEMPERATURES FOR MONDAY JUN 29...

LOCATION           NEW RECORD    OLD RECORD    YEAR SET  RECORDS BEGAN
BOULDER                95            94          2007       1891
DILLON AIRPORT         96            94          2008       1929
ENNIS                  99            94          1919       1918
HELENA                100            97          1937       1880
TOWNSEND               96 (TIED)     96          1984       1948
W YELLOWSTONE GT       91            88          1979       1905

$$


000
NOUS45 KTFX 301752
PNSTFX

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE GREAT FALLS MT
1150 AM MDT TUE JUN 30 2015

...SUMMARY OF RECORD WARM TEMPERATURES FROM JUNE 26 TO THE PRESENT
IN SOUTHWEST AND NORTH CENTRAL MONTANA...

THIS SUMMARY WILL BE UPDATED FOR THE DURATION OF THE PRESENT HEAT
WAVE IN MONTANA.

...RECORD WARM MAXIMUM TEMPERATURES FOR FRIDAY JUNE 26...

LOCATION           NEW RECORD    OLD RECORD    YEAR SET  RECORDS BEGAN
DILLON AIRPORT         94   (TIED)   94          1970       1929
DILLON WMU             94   (TIED)   94          2002       1895
HELENA                 98            96          1910       1880
WISDOM                 88            87          1932       1906

######################################################################
...RECORD WARM MINIMUM TEMPERATURES FOR SATURDAY JUN 27...

LOCATION           NEW RECORD    OLD RECORD    YEAR SET  RECORDS BEGAN
DILLON AIRPORT         57            55          2002       1929


...RECORD WARM MAXIMUM TEMPERATURES FOR SATURDAY JUN 27...

LOCATION           NEW RECORD    OLD RECORD    YEAR SET  RECORDS BEGAN
BOULDER                95            91          2002       1891
BOZEMAN EXP FARM       92            88          2002/1970  1966
BOZEMAN MSU            94            93          1919       1892
BELGRADE-YELLOWSTN APT 98            94          1958       1935
CUT BANK               95            92          1910       1903
DILLON AIRPORT         96            91          1966       1929
DILLON WMU             97            91    2013/1987/1981   1895
ENNIS                  96            94          1919       1918
FORT BENTON           100            97          2002       1894
HELENA                103*           96          1936       1880
LOMA 1W               102            99          2002       1950
MILLEGAN 14SE          96**          89          2002       1965
SIMPSON                99            97          1988       1948
WEST YELLOWSTONE       91            89          1926       1905

*ALL-TIME RECORD HIGH TEMPERATURE FOR JUNE SET AT HELENA. THE OLD
  RECORD WAS 102 SET ON JUNE 21 1900.
**ALL-TIME RECORD HIGH TEMPERATURE FOR JUNE TIED AT MILLEGAN 14SE.
  THIS TIES THE PREVIOUS ALL-TIME WARMEST DAY OF 96 DEGREES ON JUNE
  25 2012.

######################################################################
...RECORD WARM MINIMUM TEMPERATURES FOR SUNDAY JUNE 28...

LOCATION           NEW RECORD    OLD RECORD    YEAR SET  RECORDS BEGAN
BOZEMAN MSU            61            60          1936       1892
HELENA                 68 (TIED)     68          1883       1880
LEWISTOWN              59 (TIED)     59          1988       1896
DILLON AIRPORT         57            54          2003       1929
TOWNSEND               59 (TIED)     59          1988       1948


...RECORD WARM MAXIMUM TEMPERATURES FOR SUNDAY JUN 28...

LOCATION           NEW RECORD    OLD RECORD    YEAR SET  RECORDS BEGAN
BOULDER                95            94          2007       1891
BOZEMAN EXP FARM       93            90          2007       1966
BOZEMAN MSU            94 (TIED)     94          2007       1892
CHINOOK               101            99          1988/1984  1895
CHOTEAU                93 (TIED)     93          1896       1893
CUT BANK               95            91          2006/1937  1903
DILLON AIRPORT         98            95          2007       1929
DILLON WMU             98            93          2007       1895
DUNKIRK 19NNE          99            97          1966       1922
ENNIS                  97            95          1919       1918
FORT BENTON           100            99          1885       1880
GOLD BUTTE 7N          93            92          1984       1905
GREAT FALLS            99            95     1973/1966/1925  1892
HAVRE                 103           100          2006       1880
HELENA                102            99          2007       1880
HOLTER DAM             99            99          1936       1903
LOMA 1W               104           103          1966       1950
MILLEGAN 14SE          94            91          2007       1965
NEIHART 7NW            91            89          2011       1905
SHELBY                 97            92          2006       1899
SIMPSON 6W             99 (TIED)     99          1984       1948
TOWNSEND               95            94          2007       1948
WEST YELLOWSTONE       90            88          2007       1905

THE 6 PM JUNE 28 RADIOSONDE OBSERVATION AT GREAT FALLS RECORDED A
HEIGHT OF 5940 METERS AT 500 MILLIBARS. THIS TIES THE RECORD HIGHEST
VALUE IN JUNE AT GREAT FALLS WHICH WAS FIRST SET AT 6 PM JUNE 29
2008. THE HIGHEST 500 MILLIBAR VALUE AT GREAT FALLS IS 5990 METERS
ON THREE OCCASIONS IN AUGUST 1983, SEPTEMBER 1988 AND JULY 2002.


######################################################################
...RECORD WARM MINIMUM TEMPERATURES FOR MONDAY JUNE 29...

LOCATION           NEW RECORD    OLD RECORD    YEAR SET  RECORDS BEGAN
DILLON AIRPORT         57            57          1984       1929
GREAT FALLS            63            63          1972       1892
HAVRE                  64            63          1984       1880

...RECORD WARM MAXIMUM TEMPERATURES FOR MONDAY JUN 29...

LOCATION           NEW RECORD    OLD RECORD    YEAR SET  RECORDS BEGAN
BOULDER                95            94          2007       1891
DILLON AIRPORT         96            94          2008       1929
ENNIS                  99            94          1919       1918
HELENA                100            97          1937       1880
TOWNSEND               96 (TIED)     96          1984       1948
W YELLOWSTONE GT       91            88          1979       1905

$$


000
NOUS45 KTFX 301752
PNSTFX

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE GREAT FALLS MT
1150 AM MDT TUE JUN 30 2015

...SUMMARY OF RECORD WARM TEMPERATURES FROM JUNE 26 TO THE PRESENT
IN SOUTHWEST AND NORTH CENTRAL MONTANA...

THIS SUMMARY WILL BE UPDATED FOR THE DURATION OF THE PRESENT HEAT
WAVE IN MONTANA.

...RECORD WARM MAXIMUM TEMPERATURES FOR FRIDAY JUNE 26...

LOCATION           NEW RECORD    OLD RECORD    YEAR SET  RECORDS BEGAN
DILLON AIRPORT         94   (TIED)   94          1970       1929
DILLON WMU             94   (TIED)   94          2002       1895
HELENA                 98            96          1910       1880
WISDOM                 88            87          1932       1906

######################################################################
...RECORD WARM MINIMUM TEMPERATURES FOR SATURDAY JUN 27...

LOCATION           NEW RECORD    OLD RECORD    YEAR SET  RECORDS BEGAN
DILLON AIRPORT         57            55          2002       1929


...RECORD WARM MAXIMUM TEMPERATURES FOR SATURDAY JUN 27...

LOCATION           NEW RECORD    OLD RECORD    YEAR SET  RECORDS BEGAN
BOULDER                95            91          2002       1891
BOZEMAN EXP FARM       92            88          2002/1970  1966
BOZEMAN MSU            94            93          1919       1892
BELGRADE-YELLOWSTN APT 98            94          1958       1935
CUT BANK               95            92          1910       1903
DILLON AIRPORT         96            91          1966       1929
DILLON WMU             97            91    2013/1987/1981   1895
ENNIS                  96            94          1919       1918
FORT BENTON           100            97          2002       1894
HELENA                103*           96          1936       1880
LOMA 1W               102            99          2002       1950
MILLEGAN 14SE          96**          89          2002       1965
SIMPSON                99            97          1988       1948
WEST YELLOWSTONE       91            89          1926       1905

*ALL-TIME RECORD HIGH TEMPERATURE FOR JUNE SET AT HELENA. THE OLD
  RECORD WAS 102 SET ON JUNE 21 1900.
**ALL-TIME RECORD HIGH TEMPERATURE FOR JUNE TIED AT MILLEGAN 14SE.
  THIS TIES THE PREVIOUS ALL-TIME WARMEST DAY OF 96 DEGREES ON JUNE
  25 2012.

######################################################################
...RECORD WARM MINIMUM TEMPERATURES FOR SUNDAY JUNE 28...

LOCATION           NEW RECORD    OLD RECORD    YEAR SET  RECORDS BEGAN
BOZEMAN MSU            61            60          1936       1892
HELENA                 68 (TIED)     68          1883       1880
LEWISTOWN              59 (TIED)     59          1988       1896
DILLON AIRPORT         57            54          2003       1929
TOWNSEND               59 (TIED)     59          1988       1948


...RECORD WARM MAXIMUM TEMPERATURES FOR SUNDAY JUN 28...

LOCATION           NEW RECORD    OLD RECORD    YEAR SET  RECORDS BEGAN
BOULDER                95            94          2007       1891
BOZEMAN EXP FARM       93            90          2007       1966
BOZEMAN MSU            94 (TIED)     94          2007       1892
CHINOOK               101            99          1988/1984  1895
CHOTEAU                93 (TIED)     93          1896       1893
CUT BANK               95            91          2006/1937  1903
DILLON AIRPORT         98            95          2007       1929
DILLON WMU             98            93          2007       1895
DUNKIRK 19NNE          99            97          1966       1922
ENNIS                  97            95          1919       1918
FORT BENTON           100            99          1885       1880
GOLD BUTTE 7N          93            92          1984       1905
GREAT FALLS            99            95     1973/1966/1925  1892
HAVRE                 103           100          2006       1880
HELENA                102            99          2007       1880
HOLTER DAM             99            99          1936       1903
LOMA 1W               104           103          1966       1950
MILLEGAN 14SE          94            91          2007       1965
NEIHART 7NW            91            89          2011       1905
SHELBY                 97            92          2006       1899
SIMPSON 6W             99 (TIED)     99          1984       1948
TOWNSEND               95            94          2007       1948
WEST YELLOWSTONE       90            88          2007       1905

THE 6 PM JUNE 28 RADIOSONDE OBSERVATION AT GREAT FALLS RECORDED A
HEIGHT OF 5940 METERS AT 500 MILLIBARS. THIS TIES THE RECORD HIGHEST
VALUE IN JUNE AT GREAT FALLS WHICH WAS FIRST SET AT 6 PM JUNE 29
2008. THE HIGHEST 500 MILLIBAR VALUE AT GREAT FALLS IS 5990 METERS
ON THREE OCCASIONS IN AUGUST 1983, SEPTEMBER 1988 AND JULY 2002.


######################################################################
...RECORD WARM MINIMUM TEMPERATURES FOR MONDAY JUNE 29...

LOCATION           NEW RECORD    OLD RECORD    YEAR SET  RECORDS BEGAN
DILLON AIRPORT         57            57          1984       1929
GREAT FALLS            63            63          1972       1892
HAVRE                  64            63          1984       1880

...RECORD WARM MAXIMUM TEMPERATURES FOR MONDAY JUN 29...

LOCATION           NEW RECORD    OLD RECORD    YEAR SET  RECORDS BEGAN
BOULDER                95            94          2007       1891
DILLON AIRPORT         96            94          2008       1929
ENNIS                  99            94          1919       1918
HELENA                100            97          1937       1880
TOWNSEND               96 (TIED)     96          1984       1948
W YELLOWSTONE GT       91            88          1979       1905

$$


000
NOUS45 KTFX 301752
PNSTFX

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE GREAT FALLS MT
1150 AM MDT TUE JUN 30 2015

...SUMMARY OF RECORD WARM TEMPERATURES FROM JUNE 26 TO THE PRESENT
IN SOUTHWEST AND NORTH CENTRAL MONTANA...

THIS SUMMARY WILL BE UPDATED FOR THE DURATION OF THE PRESENT HEAT
WAVE IN MONTANA.

...RECORD WARM MAXIMUM TEMPERATURES FOR FRIDAY JUNE 26...

LOCATION           NEW RECORD    OLD RECORD    YEAR SET  RECORDS BEGAN
DILLON AIRPORT         94   (TIED)   94          1970       1929
DILLON WMU             94   (TIED)   94          2002       1895
HELENA                 98            96          1910       1880
WISDOM                 88            87          1932       1906

######################################################################
...RECORD WARM MINIMUM TEMPERATURES FOR SATURDAY JUN 27...

LOCATION           NEW RECORD    OLD RECORD    YEAR SET  RECORDS BEGAN
DILLON AIRPORT         57            55          2002       1929


...RECORD WARM MAXIMUM TEMPERATURES FOR SATURDAY JUN 27...

LOCATION           NEW RECORD    OLD RECORD    YEAR SET  RECORDS BEGAN
BOULDER                95            91          2002       1891
BOZEMAN EXP FARM       92            88          2002/1970  1966
BOZEMAN MSU            94            93          1919       1892
BELGRADE-YELLOWSTN APT 98            94          1958       1935
CUT BANK               95            92          1910       1903
DILLON AIRPORT         96            91          1966       1929
DILLON WMU             97            91    2013/1987/1981   1895
ENNIS                  96            94          1919       1918
FORT BENTON           100            97          2002       1894
HELENA                103*           96          1936       1880
LOMA 1W               102            99          2002       1950
MILLEGAN 14SE          96**          89          2002       1965
SIMPSON                99            97          1988       1948
WEST YELLOWSTONE       91            89          1926       1905

*ALL-TIME RECORD HIGH TEMPERATURE FOR JUNE SET AT HELENA. THE OLD
  RECORD WAS 102 SET ON JUNE 21 1900.
**ALL-TIME RECORD HIGH TEMPERATURE FOR JUNE TIED AT MILLEGAN 14SE.
  THIS TIES THE PREVIOUS ALL-TIME WARMEST DAY OF 96 DEGREES ON JUNE
  25 2012.

######################################################################
...RECORD WARM MINIMUM TEMPERATURES FOR SUNDAY JUNE 28...

LOCATION           NEW RECORD    OLD RECORD    YEAR SET  RECORDS BEGAN
BOZEMAN MSU            61            60          1936       1892
HELENA                 68 (TIED)     68          1883       1880
LEWISTOWN              59 (TIED)     59          1988       1896
DILLON AIRPORT         57            54          2003       1929
TOWNSEND               59 (TIED)     59          1988       1948


...RECORD WARM MAXIMUM TEMPERATURES FOR SUNDAY JUN 28...

LOCATION           NEW RECORD    OLD RECORD    YEAR SET  RECORDS BEGAN
BOULDER                95            94          2007       1891
BOZEMAN EXP FARM       93            90          2007       1966
BOZEMAN MSU            94 (TIED)     94          2007       1892
CHINOOK               101            99          1988/1984  1895
CHOTEAU                93 (TIED)     93          1896       1893
CUT BANK               95            91          2006/1937  1903
DILLON AIRPORT         98            95          2007       1929
DILLON WMU             98            93          2007       1895
DUNKIRK 19NNE          99            97          1966       1922
ENNIS                  97            95          1919       1918
FORT BENTON           100            99          1885       1880
GOLD BUTTE 7N          93            92          1984       1905
GREAT FALLS            99            95     1973/1966/1925  1892
HAVRE                 103           100          2006       1880
HELENA                102            99          2007       1880
HOLTER DAM             99            99          1936       1903
LOMA 1W               104           103          1966       1950
MILLEGAN 14SE          94            91          2007       1965
NEIHART 7NW            91            89          2011       1905
SHELBY                 97            92          2006       1899
SIMPSON 6W             99 (TIED)     99          1984       1948
TOWNSEND               95            94          2007       1948
WEST YELLOWSTONE       90            88          2007       1905

THE 6 PM JUNE 28 RADIOSONDE OBSERVATION AT GREAT FALLS RECORDED A
HEIGHT OF 5940 METERS AT 500 MILLIBARS. THIS TIES THE RECORD HIGHEST
VALUE IN JUNE AT GREAT FALLS WHICH WAS FIRST SET AT 6 PM JUNE 29
2008. THE HIGHEST 500 MILLIBAR VALUE AT GREAT FALLS IS 5990 METERS
ON THREE OCCASIONS IN AUGUST 1983, SEPTEMBER 1988 AND JULY 2002.


######################################################################
...RECORD WARM MINIMUM TEMPERATURES FOR MONDAY JUNE 29...

LOCATION           NEW RECORD    OLD RECORD    YEAR SET  RECORDS BEGAN
DILLON AIRPORT         57            57          1984       1929
GREAT FALLS            63            63          1972       1892
HAVRE                  64            63          1984       1880

...RECORD WARM MAXIMUM TEMPERATURES FOR MONDAY JUN 29...

LOCATION           NEW RECORD    OLD RECORD    YEAR SET  RECORDS BEGAN
BOULDER                95            94          2007       1891
DILLON AIRPORT         96            94          2008       1929
ENNIS                  99            94          1919       1918
HELENA                100            97          1937       1880
TOWNSEND               96 (TIED)     96          1984       1948
W YELLOWSTONE GT       91            88          1979       1905

$$


000
NOUS45 KTFX 301752
PNSTFX

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE GREAT FALLS MT
1150 AM MDT TUE JUN 30 2015

...SUMMARY OF RECORD WARM TEMPERATURES FROM JUNE 26 TO THE PRESENT
IN SOUTHWEST AND NORTH CENTRAL MONTANA...

THIS SUMMARY WILL BE UPDATED FOR THE DURATION OF THE PRESENT HEAT
WAVE IN MONTANA.

...RECORD WARM MAXIMUM TEMPERATURES FOR FRIDAY JUNE 26...

LOCATION           NEW RECORD    OLD RECORD    YEAR SET  RECORDS BEGAN
DILLON AIRPORT         94   (TIED)   94          1970       1929
DILLON WMU             94   (TIED)   94          2002       1895
HELENA                 98            96          1910       1880
WISDOM                 88            87          1932       1906

######################################################################
...RECORD WARM MINIMUM TEMPERATURES FOR SATURDAY JUN 27...

LOCATION           NEW RECORD    OLD RECORD    YEAR SET  RECORDS BEGAN
DILLON AIRPORT         57            55          2002       1929


...RECORD WARM MAXIMUM TEMPERATURES FOR SATURDAY JUN 27...

LOCATION           NEW RECORD    OLD RECORD    YEAR SET  RECORDS BEGAN
BOULDER                95            91          2002       1891
BOZEMAN EXP FARM       92            88          2002/1970  1966
BOZEMAN MSU            94            93          1919       1892
BELGRADE-YELLOWSTN APT 98            94          1958       1935
CUT BANK               95            92          1910       1903
DILLON AIRPORT         96            91          1966       1929
DILLON WMU             97            91    2013/1987/1981   1895
ENNIS                  96            94          1919       1918
FORT BENTON           100            97          2002       1894
HELENA                103*           96          1936       1880
LOMA 1W               102            99          2002       1950
MILLEGAN 14SE          96**          89          2002       1965
SIMPSON                99            97          1988       1948
WEST YELLOWSTONE       91            89          1926       1905

*ALL-TIME RECORD HIGH TEMPERATURE FOR JUNE SET AT HELENA. THE OLD
  RECORD WAS 102 SET ON JUNE 21 1900.
**ALL-TIME RECORD HIGH TEMPERATURE FOR JUNE TIED AT MILLEGAN 14SE.
  THIS TIES THE PREVIOUS ALL-TIME WARMEST DAY OF 96 DEGREES ON JUNE
  25 2012.

######################################################################
...RECORD WARM MINIMUM TEMPERATURES FOR SUNDAY JUNE 28...

LOCATION           NEW RECORD    OLD RECORD    YEAR SET  RECORDS BEGAN
BOZEMAN MSU            61            60          1936       1892
HELENA                 68 (TIED)     68          1883       1880
LEWISTOWN              59 (TIED)     59          1988       1896
DILLON AIRPORT         57            54          2003       1929
TOWNSEND               59 (TIED)     59          1988       1948


...RECORD WARM MAXIMUM TEMPERATURES FOR SUNDAY JUN 28...

LOCATION           NEW RECORD    OLD RECORD    YEAR SET  RECORDS BEGAN
BOULDER                95            94          2007       1891
BOZEMAN EXP FARM       93            90          2007       1966
BOZEMAN MSU            94 (TIED)     94          2007       1892
CHINOOK               101            99          1988/1984  1895
CHOTEAU                93 (TIED)     93          1896       1893
CUT BANK               95            91          2006/1937  1903
DILLON AIRPORT         98            95          2007       1929
DILLON WMU             98            93          2007       1895
DUNKIRK 19NNE          99            97          1966       1922
ENNIS                  97            95          1919       1918
FORT BENTON           100            99          1885       1880
GOLD BUTTE 7N          93            92          1984       1905
GREAT FALLS            99            95     1973/1966/1925  1892
HAVRE                 103           100          2006       1880
HELENA                102            99          2007       1880
HOLTER DAM             99            99          1936       1903
LOMA 1W               104           103          1966       1950
MILLEGAN 14SE          94            91          2007       1965
NEIHART 7NW            91            89          2011       1905
SHELBY                 97            92          2006       1899
SIMPSON 6W             99 (TIED)     99          1984       1948
TOWNSEND               95            94          2007       1948
WEST YELLOWSTONE       90            88          2007       1905

THE 6 PM JUNE 28 RADIOSONDE OBSERVATION AT GREAT FALLS RECORDED A
HEIGHT OF 5940 METERS AT 500 MILLIBARS. THIS TIES THE RECORD HIGHEST
VALUE IN JUNE AT GREAT FALLS WHICH WAS FIRST SET AT 6 PM JUNE 29
2008. THE HIGHEST 500 MILLIBAR VALUE AT GREAT FALLS IS 5990 METERS
ON THREE OCCASIONS IN AUGUST 1983, SEPTEMBER 1988 AND JULY 2002.


######################################################################
...RECORD WARM MINIMUM TEMPERATURES FOR MONDAY JUNE 29...

LOCATION           NEW RECORD    OLD RECORD    YEAR SET  RECORDS BEGAN
DILLON AIRPORT         57            57          1984       1929
GREAT FALLS            63            63          1972       1892
HAVRE                  64            63          1984       1880

...RECORD WARM MAXIMUM TEMPERATURES FOR MONDAY JUN 29...

LOCATION           NEW RECORD    OLD RECORD    YEAR SET  RECORDS BEGAN
BOULDER                95            94          2007       1891
DILLON AIRPORT         96            94          2008       1929
ENNIS                  99            94          1919       1918
HELENA                100            97          1937       1880
TOWNSEND               96 (TIED)     96          1984       1948
W YELLOWSTONE GT       91            88          1979       1905

$$


000
NOUS45 KTFX 301752
PNSTFX

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE GREAT FALLS MT
1150 AM MDT TUE JUN 30 2015

...SUMMARY OF RECORD WARM TEMPERATURES FROM JUNE 26 TO THE PRESENT
IN SOUTHWEST AND NORTH CENTRAL MONTANA...

THIS SUMMARY WILL BE UPDATED FOR THE DURATION OF THE PRESENT HEAT
WAVE IN MONTANA.

...RECORD WARM MAXIMUM TEMPERATURES FOR FRIDAY JUNE 26...

LOCATION           NEW RECORD    OLD RECORD    YEAR SET  RECORDS BEGAN
DILLON AIRPORT         94   (TIED)   94          1970       1929
DILLON WMU             94   (TIED)   94          2002       1895
HELENA                 98            96          1910       1880
WISDOM                 88            87          1932       1906

######################################################################
...RECORD WARM MINIMUM TEMPERATURES FOR SATURDAY JUN 27...

LOCATION           NEW RECORD    OLD RECORD    YEAR SET  RECORDS BEGAN
DILLON AIRPORT         57            55          2002       1929


...RECORD WARM MAXIMUM TEMPERATURES FOR SATURDAY JUN 27...

LOCATION           NEW RECORD    OLD RECORD    YEAR SET  RECORDS BEGAN
BOULDER                95            91          2002       1891
BOZEMAN EXP FARM       92            88          2002/1970  1966
BOZEMAN MSU            94            93          1919       1892
BELGRADE-YELLOWSTN APT 98            94          1958       1935
CUT BANK               95            92          1910       1903
DILLON AIRPORT         96            91          1966       1929
DILLON WMU             97            91    2013/1987/1981   1895
ENNIS                  96            94          1919       1918
FORT BENTON           100            97          2002       1894
HELENA                103*           96          1936       1880
LOMA 1W               102            99          2002       1950
MILLEGAN 14SE          96**          89          2002       1965
SIMPSON                99            97          1988       1948
WEST YELLOWSTONE       91            89          1926       1905

*ALL-TIME RECORD HIGH TEMPERATURE FOR JUNE SET AT HELENA. THE OLD
  RECORD WAS 102 SET ON JUNE 21 1900.
**ALL-TIME RECORD HIGH TEMPERATURE FOR JUNE TIED AT MILLEGAN 14SE.
  THIS TIES THE PREVIOUS ALL-TIME WARMEST DAY OF 96 DEGREES ON JUNE
  25 2012.

######################################################################
...RECORD WARM MINIMUM TEMPERATURES FOR SUNDAY JUNE 28...

LOCATION           NEW RECORD    OLD RECORD    YEAR SET  RECORDS BEGAN
BOZEMAN MSU            61            60          1936       1892
HELENA                 68 (TIED)     68          1883       1880
LEWISTOWN              59 (TIED)     59          1988       1896
DILLON AIRPORT         57            54          2003       1929
TOWNSEND               59 (TIED)     59          1988       1948


...RECORD WARM MAXIMUM TEMPERATURES FOR SUNDAY JUN 28...

LOCATION           NEW RECORD    OLD RECORD    YEAR SET  RECORDS BEGAN
BOULDER                95            94          2007       1891
BOZEMAN EXP FARM       93            90          2007       1966
BOZEMAN MSU            94 (TIED)     94          2007       1892
CHINOOK               101            99          1988/1984  1895
CHOTEAU                93 (TIED)     93          1896       1893
CUT BANK               95            91          2006/1937  1903
DILLON AIRPORT         98            95          2007       1929
DILLON WMU             98            93          2007       1895
DUNKIRK 19NNE          99            97          1966       1922
ENNIS                  97            95          1919       1918
FORT BENTON           100            99          1885       1880
GOLD BUTTE 7N          93            92          1984       1905
GREAT FALLS            99            95     1973/1966/1925  1892
HAVRE                 103           100          2006       1880
HELENA                102            99          2007       1880
HOLTER DAM             99            99          1936       1903
LOMA 1W               104           103          1966       1950
MILLEGAN 14SE          94            91          2007       1965
NEIHART 7NW            91            89          2011       1905
SHELBY                 97            92          2006       1899
SIMPSON 6W             99 (TIED)     99          1984       1948
TOWNSEND               95            94          2007       1948
WEST YELLOWSTONE       90            88          2007       1905

THE 6 PM JUNE 28 RADIOSONDE OBSERVATION AT GREAT FALLS RECORDED A
HEIGHT OF 5940 METERS AT 500 MILLIBARS. THIS TIES THE RECORD HIGHEST
VALUE IN JUNE AT GREAT FALLS WHICH WAS FIRST SET AT 6 PM JUNE 29
2008. THE HIGHEST 500 MILLIBAR VALUE AT GREAT FALLS IS 5990 METERS
ON THREE OCCASIONS IN AUGUST 1983, SEPTEMBER 1988 AND JULY 2002.


######################################################################
...RECORD WARM MINIMUM TEMPERATURES FOR MONDAY JUNE 29...

LOCATION           NEW RECORD    OLD RECORD    YEAR SET  RECORDS BEGAN
DILLON AIRPORT         57            57          1984       1929
GREAT FALLS            63            63          1972       1892
HAVRE                  64            63          1984       1880

...RECORD WARM MAXIMUM TEMPERATURES FOR MONDAY JUN 29...

LOCATION           NEW RECORD    OLD RECORD    YEAR SET  RECORDS BEGAN
BOULDER                95            94          2007       1891
DILLON AIRPORT         96            94          2008       1929
ENNIS                  99            94          1919       1918
HELENA                100            97          1937       1880
TOWNSEND               96 (TIED)     96          1984       1948
W YELLOWSTONE GT       91            88          1979       1905

$$



000
NOUS41 KLWX 301747
PNSLWX

...SEVERE WEATHER SAFETY RULES...

DAMAGING THUNDERSTORMS ARE POSSIBLE THIS AFTERNOON AND EVENING.
RESIDENTS ACROSS NORTH CENTRAL AND NORTHEAST MARYLAND SHOULD MONITOR
THIS SITUATION VERY CLOSELY AND ENSURE YOUR NOAA WEATHER RADIOS ARE
SET TO ALERT MODE. SEVERE WEATHER WARNINGS MAY BECOME NECESSARY.
HERE ARE SOME SAFETY RULES TO KEEP IN MIND WHEN SEVERE WEATHER IS
EXPECTED OR IS OCCURRING.

IF A WARNING IS ISSUED...SEEK SHELTER INDOORS IMMEDIATELY. A SEVERE
THUNDERSTORM IS DEFINED AS PRODUCING QUARTER SIZE OR GREATER HAIL
AND WIND GUSTS OF 58 MPH OR MORE.

TORNADOES CAN FORM VERY RAPIDLY FROM SEVERE THUNDERSTORMS. IF YOU
ARE IN A TORNADO WATCH...AND A SEVERE THUNDERSTORM WARNING IS ISSUED
FOR YOUR AREA...MONITOR LOCAL CONDITIONS CLOSELY AND BE READY TO
TAKE QUICK ACTION TO SAVE YOUR LIFE.

STAY TUNED TO NOAA WEATHER RADIO...COMMERCIAL RADIO OR TELEVISION
FOR THE LATEST ON THIS POTENTIAL SEVERE WEATHER EVENT. ADDITIONAL
WEATHER INFORMATION...CAN BE FOUND AT WEATHER.GOV/WASHINGTON OR
WEATHER.GOV/BALTIMORE.



000
NOUS41 KLWX 301747
PNSLWX

...SEVERE WEATHER SAFETY RULES...

DAMAGING THUNDERSTORMS ARE POSSIBLE THIS AFTERNOON AND EVENING.
RESIDENTS ACROSS NORTH CENTRAL AND NORTHEAST MARYLAND SHOULD MONITOR
THIS SITUATION VERY CLOSELY AND ENSURE YOUR NOAA WEATHER RADIOS ARE
SET TO ALERT MODE. SEVERE WEATHER WARNINGS MAY BECOME NECESSARY.
HERE ARE SOME SAFETY RULES TO KEEP IN MIND WHEN SEVERE WEATHER IS
EXPECTED OR IS OCCURRING.

IF A WARNING IS ISSUED...SEEK SHELTER INDOORS IMMEDIATELY. A SEVERE
THUNDERSTORM IS DEFINED AS PRODUCING QUARTER SIZE OR GREATER HAIL
AND WIND GUSTS OF 58 MPH OR MORE.

TORNADOES CAN FORM VERY RAPIDLY FROM SEVERE THUNDERSTORMS. IF YOU
ARE IN A TORNADO WATCH...AND A SEVERE THUNDERSTORM WARNING IS ISSUED
FOR YOUR AREA...MONITOR LOCAL CONDITIONS CLOSELY AND BE READY TO
TAKE QUICK ACTION TO SAVE YOUR LIFE.

STAY TUNED TO NOAA WEATHER RADIO...COMMERCIAL RADIO OR TELEVISION
FOR THE LATEST ON THIS POTENTIAL SEVERE WEATHER EVENT. ADDITIONAL
WEATHER INFORMATION...CAN BE FOUND AT WEATHER.GOV/WASHINGTON OR
WEATHER.GOV/BALTIMORE.


000
NOUS43 KGLD 301201
PNSGLD

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE GOODLAND KS
600 AM MDT TUE JUN 30 2015

...ON THIS DATE IN WEATHER HISTORY...

IN 1999, A LINE OF SEVERE THUNDERSTORMS DEVELOPED DURING THE EARLY
MORNING HOURS ACROSS EASTERN COLORADO AND SOUTHWEST NEBRASKA. THE
EARLY MORNING SEVERE STORMS PRODUCED HAIL UP TO PING PONG BALL SIZE AND
STRONG WINDS. SEVERE THUNDERSTORMS ALSO OCCURRED DURING THE LATE MORNING,
EARLY AFTERNOON AND EVENING HOURS ACROSS THE REGION. SEVERAL WEAK
TORNADOES, ALONG WITH HAIL UP TO BASEBALL SIZE, WERE REPORTED ACROSS
NORTHWEST KANSAS WITH THESE LATER STORMS.

$$



000
NOUS43 KGLD 301201
PNSGLD

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE GOODLAND KS
600 AM MDT TUE JUN 30 2015

...ON THIS DATE IN WEATHER HISTORY...

IN 1999, A LINE OF SEVERE THUNDERSTORMS DEVELOPED DURING THE EARLY
MORNING HOURS ACROSS EASTERN COLORADO AND SOUTHWEST NEBRASKA. THE
EARLY MORNING SEVERE STORMS PRODUCED HAIL UP TO PING PONG BALL SIZE AND
STRONG WINDS. SEVERE THUNDERSTORMS ALSO OCCURRED DURING THE LATE MORNING,
EARLY AFTERNOON AND EVENING HOURS ACROSS THE REGION. SEVERAL WEAK
TORNADOES, ALONG WITH HAIL UP TO BASEBALL SIZE, WERE REPORTED ACROSS
NORTHWEST KANSAS WITH THESE LATER STORMS.

$$


000
NOUS45 KSLC 300501
PNSSLC

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE SALT LAKE CITY UT
1101 PM MDT MON JUN 29 2015

...NOAA-WEATHER RADIO STATIONS DOWN...

ALL NOAA-WEATHER RADIO STATIONS ORIGINATING FROM THE NWS SALT LAKE
CITY OFFICE...AFFECTING MOST OF UTAH AND SOUTHWEST WYOMING...WILL
REMAIN OFF THE AIR OVERNIGHT INTO TUESDAY. TECHNICIANS HOPE TO HAVE
THE ISSUE RESOLVED TUESDAY.

$$

ROGOWSKI



000
NOUS45 KSLC 300501
PNSSLC

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE SALT LAKE CITY UT
1101 PM MDT MON JUN 29 2015

...NOAA-WEATHER RADIO STATIONS DOWN...

ALL NOAA-WEATHER RADIO STATIONS ORIGINATING FROM THE NWS SALT LAKE
CITY OFFICE...AFFECTING MOST OF UTAH AND SOUTHWEST WYOMING...WILL
REMAIN OFF THE AIR OVERNIGHT INTO TUESDAY. TECHNICIANS HOPE TO HAVE
THE ISSUE RESOLVED TUESDAY.

$$

ROGOWSKI


000
NOUS43 KFGF 300053 CCA
PNSFGF
MNZ001>009-013>017-022>024-027>032-040-NDZ006>008-014>016-024-
026>030-038-039-049-052>054-290600-

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT...CORRECTED
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE GRAND FORKS ND
120 PM CDT SUN JUN 28 2015

...CORRECTED FOR TIME OF TORNADO...

...EF1 TORNADO CONFIRMED BY NWS DAMAGE SURVEY IN STEELE
COUNTY NORTHEAST OF HOPE...

RATING:  EF-1
ESTIMATED PEAK WIND: 100-110 MPH
PATH LENGTH:  3.2 MILES
PATH WIDTH: 800 YARDS
START DATE: 06/27/2015
START/END TIME: 548 PM CDT-558 PM CDT

SURVEY SUMMARY: VERY PRELIMINARY RESULTS FROM THE NWS DAMAGE
ASSESSMENT INDICATED AN EF1 TORNADO OCCURRED YESTERDAY
AFTERNOON ABOUT 6 MILES NORTHEAST OF HOPE IN OPEN COUNTRY. THERE
WAS DAMAGE TO TREES AND POWERLINES. THERE WAS A STRONG RADAR
SIGNATURE AND A TORNADO DEBRIS SIGNATURE (TDS) THAT LIKELY RESULTED
FROM CROPS...LEAVES AND DUST BEING LIFTED INTO THE TORNADO. THE
TORNADO SPARED TWO NEARBY FARMSTEADS IN THE AREA.

EF SCALE: THE ENHANCED FUJITA SCALE CLASSIFIES
TORNADOES INTO THE FOLLOWING CATEGORIES.

EF0...WEAK......65 TO 85 MPH
EF1...WEAK......86 TO 110 MPH
EF2...STRONG....111 TO 135 MPH
EF3...STRONG....136 TO 165 MPH
EF4...VIOLENT...166 TO 200 MPH
EF5...VIOLENT...>200 MPH

NOTE:
THE INFORMATION IN THIS STATEMENT IS PRELIMINARY AND SUBJECT TO
CHANGE PENDING FINAL REVIEW OF THE EVENT AND PUBLICATION IN
NWS STORM DATA.

$$

DK/JK



000
NOUS43 KFGF 300053 CCA
PNSFGF
MNZ001>009-013>017-022>024-027>032-040-NDZ006>008-014>016-024-
026>030-038-039-049-052>054-290600-

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT...CORRECTED
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE GRAND FORKS ND
120 PM CDT SUN JUN 28 2015

...CORRECTED FOR TIME OF TORNADO...

...EF1 TORNADO CONFIRMED BY NWS DAMAGE SURVEY IN STEELE
COUNTY NORTHEAST OF HOPE...

RATING:  EF-1
ESTIMATED PEAK WIND: 100-110 MPH
PATH LENGTH:  3.2 MILES
PATH WIDTH: 800 YARDS
START DATE: 06/27/2015
START/END TIME: 548 PM CDT-558 PM CDT

SURVEY SUMMARY: VERY PRELIMINARY RESULTS FROM THE NWS DAMAGE
ASSESSMENT INDICATED AN EF1 TORNADO OCCURRED YESTERDAY
AFTERNOON ABOUT 6 MILES NORTHEAST OF HOPE IN OPEN COUNTRY. THERE
WAS DAMAGE TO TREES AND POWERLINES. THERE WAS A STRONG RADAR
SIGNATURE AND A TORNADO DEBRIS SIGNATURE (TDS) THAT LIKELY RESULTED
FROM CROPS...LEAVES AND DUST BEING LIFTED INTO THE TORNADO. THE
TORNADO SPARED TWO NEARBY FARMSTEADS IN THE AREA.

EF SCALE: THE ENHANCED FUJITA SCALE CLASSIFIES
TORNADOES INTO THE FOLLOWING CATEGORIES.

EF0...WEAK......65 TO 85 MPH
EF1...WEAK......86 TO 110 MPH
EF2...STRONG....111 TO 135 MPH
EF3...STRONG....136 TO 165 MPH
EF4...VIOLENT...166 TO 200 MPH
EF5...VIOLENT...>200 MPH

NOTE:
THE INFORMATION IN THIS STATEMENT IS PRELIMINARY AND SUBJECT TO
CHANGE PENDING FINAL REVIEW OF THE EVENT AND PUBLICATION IN
NWS STORM DATA.

$$

DK/JK


000
NOUS43 KFGF 300053 CCA
PNSFGF
MNZ001>009-013>017-022>024-027>032-040-NDZ006>008-014>016-024-
026>030-038-039-049-052>054-290600-

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT...CORRECTED
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE GRAND FORKS ND
120 PM CDT SUN JUN 28 2015

...CORRECTED FOR TIME OF TORNADO...

...EF1 TORNADO CONFIRMED BY NWS DAMAGE SURVEY IN STEELE
COUNTY NORTHEAST OF HOPE...

RATING:  EF-1
ESTIMATED PEAK WIND: 100-110 MPH
PATH LENGTH:  3.2 MILES
PATH WIDTH: 800 YARDS
START DATE: 06/27/2015
START/END TIME: 548 PM CDT-558 PM CDT

SURVEY SUMMARY: VERY PRELIMINARY RESULTS FROM THE NWS DAMAGE
ASSESSMENT INDICATED AN EF1 TORNADO OCCURRED YESTERDAY
AFTERNOON ABOUT 6 MILES NORTHEAST OF HOPE IN OPEN COUNTRY. THERE
WAS DAMAGE TO TREES AND POWERLINES. THERE WAS A STRONG RADAR
SIGNATURE AND A TORNADO DEBRIS SIGNATURE (TDS) THAT LIKELY RESULTED
FROM CROPS...LEAVES AND DUST BEING LIFTED INTO THE TORNADO. THE
TORNADO SPARED TWO NEARBY FARMSTEADS IN THE AREA.

EF SCALE: THE ENHANCED FUJITA SCALE CLASSIFIES
TORNADOES INTO THE FOLLOWING CATEGORIES.

EF0...WEAK......65 TO 85 MPH
EF1...WEAK......86 TO 110 MPH
EF2...STRONG....111 TO 135 MPH
EF3...STRONG....136 TO 165 MPH
EF4...VIOLENT...166 TO 200 MPH
EF5...VIOLENT...>200 MPH

NOTE:
THE INFORMATION IN THIS STATEMENT IS PRELIMINARY AND SUBJECT TO
CHANGE PENDING FINAL REVIEW OF THE EVENT AND PUBLICATION IN
NWS STORM DATA.

$$

DK/JK



000
NOUS43 KFGF 300051 CCA
PNSFGF
MNZ001>009-013>017-022>024-027>032-040-NDZ006>008-014>016-024-
026>030-038-039-049-052>054-290600-

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT...CORRECTED
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE GRAND FORKS ND
315 PM CDT SUN JUN 28 2015

...CORRECTED FOR TIME OF TORNADO...

...EF2 TORNADO CONFIRMED BY NWS DAMAGE SURVEY 6 MILES NORHTHEAST
OF HATTON IN GRAND FORKS COUNTY...

RATING:  EF-2
ESTIMATED PEAK WIND: 120 MPH
PATH LENGTH:  1 MILE
PATH WIDTH: 400 YARDS
START DATE: 06/27/2015
START/END TIME: 601 PM CDT - 606 PM CDT

SURVEY SUMMARY: VERY PRELIMINARY RESULTS FROM THE NWS DAMAGE
ASSESSMENT INDICATED AN EF2 TORNADO OCCURRED YESTERDAY
AFTERNOON ABOUT 6 MILES NORTHEAST OF HATTON ND IN OPEN COUNTRY. THERE
WAS SIGNIFICANT TREE DAMAGE TO SEVERAL SHELTERBELTS...WITH SOME DEBARKING
OF TREES AND TREES SNAPPED AT THE BASE. THERE WAS A STRONG RADAR
SIGNATURE AND A TORNADO DEBRIS SIGNATURE (TDS) THAT LIKELY RESULTED
FROM CROPS...LEAVES AND DUST BEING LIFTED INTO THE TORNADO. THE
TORNADO SPARED TWO NEARBY FARMSTEADS IN THE AREA SIMILAR TO THE HOPE
TORNADO.

EF SCALE: THE ENHANCED FUJITA SCALE CLASSIFIES
TORNADOES INTO THE FOLLOWING CATEGORIES.

EF0...WEAK......65 TO 85 MPH
EF1...WEAK......86 TO 110 MPH
EF2...STRONG....111 TO 135 MPH
EF3...STRONG....136 TO 165 MPH
EF4...VIOLENT...166 TO 200 MPH
EF5...VIOLENT...>200 MPH

NOTE:
THE INFORMATION IN THIS STATEMENT IS PRELIMINARY AND SUBJECT TO
CHANGE PENDING FINAL REVIEW OF THE EVENT AND PUBLICATION IN
NWS STORM DATA.

$$

DK/JK


000
NOUS43 KFGF 300051 CCA
PNSFGF
MNZ001>009-013>017-022>024-027>032-040-NDZ006>008-014>016-024-
026>030-038-039-049-052>054-290600-

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT...CORRECTED
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE GRAND FORKS ND
315 PM CDT SUN JUN 28 2015

...CORRECTED FOR TIME OF TORNADO...

...EF2 TORNADO CONFIRMED BY NWS DAMAGE SURVEY 6 MILES NORHTHEAST
OF HATTON IN GRAND FORKS COUNTY...

RATING:  EF-2
ESTIMATED PEAK WIND: 120 MPH
PATH LENGTH:  1 MILE
PATH WIDTH: 400 YARDS
START DATE: 06/27/2015
START/END TIME: 601 PM CDT - 606 PM CDT

SURVEY SUMMARY: VERY PRELIMINARY RESULTS FROM THE NWS DAMAGE
ASSESSMENT INDICATED AN EF2 TORNADO OCCURRED YESTERDAY
AFTERNOON ABOUT 6 MILES NORTHEAST OF HATTON ND IN OPEN COUNTRY. THERE
WAS SIGNIFICANT TREE DAMAGE TO SEVERAL SHELTERBELTS...WITH SOME DEBARKING
OF TREES AND TREES SNAPPED AT THE BASE. THERE WAS A STRONG RADAR
SIGNATURE AND A TORNADO DEBRIS SIGNATURE (TDS) THAT LIKELY RESULTED
FROM CROPS...LEAVES AND DUST BEING LIFTED INTO THE TORNADO. THE
TORNADO SPARED TWO NEARBY FARMSTEADS IN THE AREA SIMILAR TO THE HOPE
TORNADO.

EF SCALE: THE ENHANCED FUJITA SCALE CLASSIFIES
TORNADOES INTO THE FOLLOWING CATEGORIES.

EF0...WEAK......65 TO 85 MPH
EF1...WEAK......86 TO 110 MPH
EF2...STRONG....111 TO 135 MPH
EF3...STRONG....136 TO 165 MPH
EF4...VIOLENT...166 TO 200 MPH
EF5...VIOLENT...>200 MPH

NOTE:
THE INFORMATION IN THIS STATEMENT IS PRELIMINARY AND SUBJECT TO
CHANGE PENDING FINAL REVIEW OF THE EVENT AND PUBLICATION IN
NWS STORM DATA.

$$

DK/JK



000
NOUS43 KFGF 300051 CCA
PNSFGF
MNZ001>009-013>017-022>024-027>032-040-NDZ006>008-014>016-024-
026>030-038-039-049-052>054-290600-

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT...CORRECTED
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE GRAND FORKS ND
315 PM CDT SUN JUN 28 2015

...CORRECTED FOR TIME OF TORNADO...

...EF2 TORNADO CONFIRMED BY NWS DAMAGE SURVEY 6 MILES NORHTHEAST
OF HATTON IN GRAND FORKS COUNTY...

RATING:  EF-2
ESTIMATED PEAK WIND: 120 MPH
PATH LENGTH:  1 MILE
PATH WIDTH: 400 YARDS
START DATE: 06/27/2015
START/END TIME: 601 PM CDT - 606 PM CDT

SURVEY SUMMARY: VERY PRELIMINARY RESULTS FROM THE NWS DAMAGE
ASSESSMENT INDICATED AN EF2 TORNADO OCCURRED YESTERDAY
AFTERNOON ABOUT 6 MILES NORTHEAST OF HATTON ND IN OPEN COUNTRY. THERE
WAS SIGNIFICANT TREE DAMAGE TO SEVERAL SHELTERBELTS...WITH SOME DEBARKING
OF TREES AND TREES SNAPPED AT THE BASE. THERE WAS A STRONG RADAR
SIGNATURE AND A TORNADO DEBRIS SIGNATURE (TDS) THAT LIKELY RESULTED
FROM CROPS...LEAVES AND DUST BEING LIFTED INTO THE TORNADO. THE
TORNADO SPARED TWO NEARBY FARMSTEADS IN THE AREA SIMILAR TO THE HOPE
TORNADO.

EF SCALE: THE ENHANCED FUJITA SCALE CLASSIFIES
TORNADOES INTO THE FOLLOWING CATEGORIES.

EF0...WEAK......65 TO 85 MPH
EF1...WEAK......86 TO 110 MPH
EF2...STRONG....111 TO 135 MPH
EF3...STRONG....136 TO 165 MPH
EF4...VIOLENT...166 TO 200 MPH
EF5...VIOLENT...>200 MPH

NOTE:
THE INFORMATION IN THIS STATEMENT IS PRELIMINARY AND SUBJECT TO
CHANGE PENDING FINAL REVIEW OF THE EVENT AND PUBLICATION IN
NWS STORM DATA.

$$

DK/JK


000
NOUS43 KFGF 300051 CCA
PNSFGF
MNZ001>009-013>017-022>024-027>032-040-NDZ006>008-014>016-024-
026>030-038-039-049-052>054-290600-

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT...CORRECTED
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE GRAND FORKS ND
315 PM CDT SUN JUN 28 2015

...CORRECTED FOR TIME OF TORNADO...

...EF2 TORNADO CONFIRMED BY NWS DAMAGE SURVEY 6 MILES NORHTHEAST
OF HATTON IN GRAND FORKS COUNTY...

RATING:  EF-2
ESTIMATED PEAK WIND: 120 MPH
PATH LENGTH:  1 MILE
PATH WIDTH: 400 YARDS
START DATE: 06/27/2015
START/END TIME: 601 PM CDT - 606 PM CDT

SURVEY SUMMARY: VERY PRELIMINARY RESULTS FROM THE NWS DAMAGE
ASSESSMENT INDICATED AN EF2 TORNADO OCCURRED YESTERDAY
AFTERNOON ABOUT 6 MILES NORTHEAST OF HATTON ND IN OPEN COUNTRY. THERE
WAS SIGNIFICANT TREE DAMAGE TO SEVERAL SHELTERBELTS...WITH SOME DEBARKING
OF TREES AND TREES SNAPPED AT THE BASE. THERE WAS A STRONG RADAR
SIGNATURE AND A TORNADO DEBRIS SIGNATURE (TDS) THAT LIKELY RESULTED
FROM CROPS...LEAVES AND DUST BEING LIFTED INTO THE TORNADO. THE
TORNADO SPARED TWO NEARBY FARMSTEADS IN THE AREA SIMILAR TO THE HOPE
TORNADO.

EF SCALE: THE ENHANCED FUJITA SCALE CLASSIFIES
TORNADOES INTO THE FOLLOWING CATEGORIES.

EF0...WEAK......65 TO 85 MPH
EF1...WEAK......86 TO 110 MPH
EF2...STRONG....111 TO 135 MPH
EF3...STRONG....136 TO 165 MPH
EF4...VIOLENT...166 TO 200 MPH
EF5...VIOLENT...>200 MPH

NOTE:
THE INFORMATION IN THIS STATEMENT IS PRELIMINARY AND SUBJECT TO
CHANGE PENDING FINAL REVIEW OF THE EVENT AND PUBLICATION IN
NWS STORM DATA.

$$

DK/JK



000
NOUS45 KGJT 291900
PNSGJT

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE GRAND JUNCTION CO
100 PM MDT MON JUN 29 2015

THE FOLLOWING ARE PRELIMINARY 24 HOUR PRECIPITATION REPORTS FROM
WESTERN COLORADO AND EASTERN UTAH, ENDING MONDAY MORNING AT 11
AM. AMOUNTS ARE IN INCHES.


**********************24 HOUR PRECIPITATION**********************

LOCATION              24 HOUR     TIME/DATE   COMMENTS
                     PRECIPITATION           OF
                     /INCHES/   MEASUREMENT

COLORADO

...ARCHULETA COUNTY...
   PAGOSA SPRINGS 1.6 S  0.08   738 AM  6/29  COCORAHS
   PAGOSA SPRINGS 4.2 W  0.01   717 AM  6/29  COCORAHS

...EAGLE COUNTY...
   VAIL 0.9 WNW          0.04   651 AM  6/29  COCORAHS
   GYPSUM 1.9 SSW        0.03   639 AM  6/29  COCORAHS
   VAIL 2.6 E            0.02   647 AM  6/29  COCORAHS
   WOLCOTT 2.3 N         0.01   716 AM  6/29  COCORAHS

...GUNNISON COUNTY...
   DOYLEVILLE 2.1 W      0.11   752 AM  6/29  COCORAHS
   GOTHIC                0.08   800 AM  6/29  UNOFFICIAL STATION
   CRESTED BUTTE 6.2 N   0.08   732 AM  6/29  COCORAHS
   PITKIN 1.1 SW         0.04   658 AM  6/29  COCORAHS
   POWDERHORN 4.4 NNE    0.04   938 AM  6/29  COCORAHS

...LA PLATA COUNTY...
   BAYFIELD 7.0 N        0.03   744 AM  6/29  COCORAHS

...PITKIN COUNTY...
   ASPEN 5.8 NW          0.05   706 AM  6/29  COCORAHS

$$

MMS



000
NOUS41 KWBC 291826
PNSWSH

Public Information Statement, Comments Sought: Corrected
National Weather Service Headquarters Washington DC
227 PM EDT Mon Jun 29 2015

To:      Subscribers:
         -Family of Services
         -NOAA Weather Wire Service
         -Emergency Managers Weather Information Network
         -NOAAPORT
         Other NWS users and NWS employees

From:    Eli Jacks
         Acting Chief, Forecast Services Division

Subject: Corrected: Seeking Public Comment and Review on
         Experimental Severe Weather Impact Graphics through
         February 9, 2016 (CONUS only)

Corrected ending date for accepting comments in Subject to
February 9, 2016

From June 9, 2015, through February 9, 2016, NWS is seeking
additional public comment and review on experimental Severe
Weather Impact Graphics. The graphics are available online at:

     http://www.weather.gov/crh/impact

A graphic depicting the warning area, storm information, and
societal impact statistics will be automatically produced upon
the initial issuance of, and subsequent updates to, each NWS
text short-fuse warning product (Tornado Warning, Severe
Thunderstorm Warning, and Flash Flood Warning). NWS will produce
a new graphic for each subsequent Severe Weather Statement (SVS)
or Flash Flood Statement (FLS) associated with the original
warnings.

During the experimental period, the graphics will only be
produced for short-fuse warning and update products issued
within the Contiguous United States (CONUS) and will be removed
from the web service when associated text warning expires.

In addition, the graphics will be distributed automatically via
Twitter feeds of the following selected NWS Weather Forecast
Offices (WFO):

     Weather Forecast Office              Twitter Username
     Atlanta, Georgia                     @NWSAtlanta
     Billings, Montana                    @NWSBillings
     Binghamton, New York                 @NWSBinghamton
     Burlington, Vermont                  @NWSBurlington
     Chicago, Illinois                    @NWSChicago
     Columbia, South Carolina             @NWSColumbia
     Elko, Nevada                         @NWSElko
     Fort Worth, Texas                    @NWSFortWorth
     Hastings, Nebraska                   @NWSHastings
     New York City, New York              @NWSNewYorkNY
     Omaha, Nebraska                      @NWSOmaha
     Raleigh, North Carolina              @NWSRaleigh
     San Antonio, Texas                   @NWSSanAntonio
     Shreveport, Louisiana                @NWSShreveport
     Tucson, Arizona                      @NWSTucson

The experimental graphics are described in detail, with example
graphics included, in a Product Description Document available
online at:

http://products.weather.gov/PDD/PDD-
SVRgraphics%20final%2005jun15.pdf

Comments and feedback on this experimental service for proposed
implementation as a nationally-available product may be directed
to the NWS via an online survey form at:

     http://www.nws.noaa.gov/survey/nws-survey.php?code=EGSFWKS

This statement extends the comment period announced July 1,
2014, with changes to the format of the graphics to improve
readability and addition of Twitter-based dissemination.
Additional comments will be collected from June 9, 2015, through
February 9, 2016. At the end of this comment period, NWS will
evaluate feedback and determine whether to approve as
operational for national implementation, discontinue the
product, or revise and extend the experimental feedback period.

For questions regarding this notice or the experimental short-
fuse warning graphics, please contact:

     Brian Walawender
     Chief, Information Technology Branch
     NWS Central Region Headquarters
     Kansas City, MO 64153-2371
     E-mail: ipwg@noaa.gov

National Public Information Notices are online at:

     http://www.weather.gov/os/notif.htm

$$


000
NOUS41 KWBC 291826
PNSWSH

Public Information Statement, Comments Sought: Corrected
National Weather Service Headquarters Washington DC
227 PM EDT Mon Jun 29 2015

To:      Subscribers:
         -Family of Services
         -NOAA Weather Wire Service
         -Emergency Managers Weather Information Network
         -NOAAPORT
         Other NWS users and NWS employees

From:    Eli Jacks
         Acting Chief, Forecast Services Division

Subject: Corrected: Seeking Public Comment and Review on
         Experimental Severe Weather Impact Graphics through
         February 9, 2016 (CONUS only)

Corrected ending date for accepting comments in Subject to
February 9, 2016

From June 9, 2015, through February 9, 2016, NWS is seeking
additional public comment and review on experimental Severe
Weather Impact Graphics. The graphics are available online at:

     http://www.weather.gov/crh/impact

A graphic depicting the warning area, storm information, and
societal impact statistics will be automatically produced upon
the initial issuance of, and subsequent updates to, each NWS
text short-fuse warning product (Tornado Warning, Severe
Thunderstorm Warning, and Flash Flood Warning). NWS will produce
a new graphic for each subsequent Severe Weather Statement (SVS)
or Flash Flood Statement (FLS) associated with the original
warnings.

During the experimental period, the graphics will only be
produced for short-fuse warning and update products issued
within the Contiguous United States (CONUS) and will be removed
from the web service when associated text warning expires.

In addition, the graphics will be distributed automatically via
Twitter feeds of the following selected NWS Weather Forecast
Offices (WFO):

     Weather Forecast Office              Twitter Username
     Atlanta, Georgia                     @NWSAtlanta
     Billings, Montana                    @NWSBillings
     Binghamton, New York                 @NWSBinghamton
     Burlington, Vermont                  @NWSBurlington
     Chicago, Illinois                    @NWSChicago
     Columbia, South Carolina             @NWSColumbia
     Elko, Nevada                         @NWSElko
     Fort Worth, Texas                    @NWSFortWorth
     Hastings, Nebraska                   @NWSHastings
     New York City, New York              @NWSNewYorkNY
     Omaha, Nebraska                      @NWSOmaha
     Raleigh, North Carolina              @NWSRaleigh
     San Antonio, Texas                   @NWSSanAntonio
     Shreveport, Louisiana                @NWSShreveport
     Tucson, Arizona                      @NWSTucson

The experimental graphics are described in detail, with example
graphics included, in a Product Description Document available
online at:

http://products.weather.gov/PDD/PDD-
SVRgraphics%20final%2005jun15.pdf

Comments and feedback on this experimental service for proposed
implementation as a nationally-available product may be directed
to the NWS via an online survey form at:

     http://www.nws.noaa.gov/survey/nws-survey.php?code=EGSFWKS

This statement extends the comment period announced July 1,
2014, with changes to the format of the graphics to improve
readability and addition of Twitter-based dissemination.
Additional comments will be collected from June 9, 2015, through
February 9, 2016. At the end of this comment period, NWS will
evaluate feedback and determine whether to approve as
operational for national implementation, discontinue the
product, or revise and extend the experimental feedback period.

For questions regarding this notice or the experimental short-
fuse warning graphics, please contact:

     Brian Walawender
     Chief, Information Technology Branch
     NWS Central Region Headquarters
     Kansas City, MO 64153-2371
     E-mail: ipwg@noaa.gov

National Public Information Notices are online at:

     http://www.weather.gov/os/notif.htm

$$



000
NOUS45 KTFX 291822 AAA
PNSTFX

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE GREAT FALLS MT
1218 PM MDT MON JUN 29 2015

...SUMMARY OF RECORD WARM TEMPERATURES FROM JUNE 26 TO THE PRESENT
IN SOUTHWEST AND NORTH CENTRAL MONTANA...

THIS SUMMARY WILL BE UPDATED FOR THE DURATION OF THE PRESENT HEAT
WAVE IN MONTANA.

...RECORD WARM MAXIMUM TEMPERATURES FOR FRIDAY JUNE 26...

LOCATION           NEW RECORD    OLD RECORD    YEAR SET  RECORDS BEGAN
DILLON AIRPORT         94   (TIED)   94          1970       1929
DILLON WMU             94   (TIED)   94          2002       1895
HELENA                 98            96          1910       1880
WISDOM                 88            87          1932       1906

######################################################################
...RECORD WARM MINIMUM TEMPERATURES FOR SATURDAY JUN 27...

LOCATION           NEW RECORD    OLD RECORD    YEAR SET  RECORDS BEGAN
DILLON AIRPORT         57            55          2002       1929


...RECORD WARM MAXIMUM TEMPERATURES FOR SATURDAY JUN 27...

LOCATION           NEW RECORD    OLD RECORD    YEAR SET  RECORDS BEGAN
BOULDER                95            91          2002       1891
BOZEMAN EXP FARM       92            88          2002/1970  1966
BOZEMAN MSU            94            93          1919       1892
BELGRADE-YELLOWSTN APT 98            94          1958       1935
CUT BANK               95            92          1910       1903
DILLON AIRPORT         96            91          1966       1929
DILLON WMU             97            91    2013/1987/1981   1895
ENNIS                  96            94          1919       1918
FORT BENTON           100            97          2002       1894
HELENA                103*           96          1936       1880
LOMA 1W               102            99          2002       1950
MILLEGAN 14SE          96**          89          2002       1965
SIMPSON                99            97          1988       1948
WEST YELLOWSTONE       91            89          1926       1905

*ALL-TIME RECORD HIGH TEMPERATURE FOR JUNE SET AT HELENA. THE OLD
  RECORD WAS 102 SET ON JUNE 21 1900.
**ALL-TIME RECORD HIGH TEMPERATURE FOR JUNE TIED AT MILLEGAN 14SE.
  THIS TIES THE PREVIOUS ALL-TIME WARMEST DAY OF 96 DEGREES ON JUNE
  25 2012.

######################################################################
...RECORD WARM MINIMUM TEMPERATURES FOR SUNDAY JUNE 28...

LOCATION           NEW RECORD    OLD RECORD    YEAR SET  RECORDS BEGAN
BOZEMAN MSU            61            60          1936       1892
HELENA                 68 (TIED)     68          1883       1880
LEWISTOWN              59 (TIED)     59          1988       1896
DILLON AIRPORT         57            54          2003       1929
TOWNSEND               59 (TIED)     59          1988       1948


...RECORD WARM MAXIMUM TEMPERATURES FOR SUNDAY JUN 28...

LOCATION           NEW RECORD    OLD RECORD    YEAR SET  RECORDS BEGAN
BOULDER                95            94          2007       1891
BOZEMAN EXP FARM       93            90          2007       1966
BOZEMAN MSU            94 (TIED)     94          2007       1892
CHINOOK               101            99          1988/1984  1895
CHOTEAU                93 (TIED)     93          1896       1893
CUT BANK               95            91          2006/1937  1903
DILLON AIRPORT         98            95          2007       1929
DILLON WMU             98            93          2007       1895
DUNKIRK 19NNE          99            97          1966       1922
ENNIS                  97            95          1919       1918
FORT BENTON           100            99          1885       1880
GOLD BUTTE 7N          93            92          1984       1905
GREAT FALLS            99            95     1973/1966/1925  1892
HAVRE                 103           100          2006       1880
HELENA                102            99          2007       1880
HOLTER DAM             99            99          1936       1903
LOMA 1W               104           103          1966       1950
MILLEGAN 14SE          94            91          2007       1965
NEIHART 7NW            91            89          2011       1905
SHELBY                 97            92          2006       1899
SIMPSON 6W             99 (TIED)     99          1984       1948
TOWNSEND               95            94          2007       1948
WEST YELLOWSTONE       90            88          2007       1905

THE 6 PM JUNE 28 RADIOSONDE OBSERVATION AT GREAT FALLS RECORDED A
HEIGHT OF 5940 METERS AT 500 MILLIBARS. THIS TIES THE RECORD HIGHEST
VALUE IN JUNE AT GREAT FALLS WHICH WAS FIRST SET AT 6 PM JUNE 29
2008. THE HIGHEST 500 MILLIBAR VALUE AT GREAT FALLS IS 5990 METERS
ON THREE OCCASIONS IN AUGUST 1983, SEPTEMBER 1988 AND JULY 2002.

$$


000
NOUS45 KTFX 291822 AAA
PNSTFX

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE GREAT FALLS MT
1218 PM MDT MON JUN 29 2015

...SUMMARY OF RECORD WARM TEMPERATURES FROM JUNE 26 TO THE PRESENT
IN SOUTHWEST AND NORTH CENTRAL MONTANA...

THIS SUMMARY WILL BE UPDATED FOR THE DURATION OF THE PRESENT HEAT
WAVE IN MONTANA.

...RECORD WARM MAXIMUM TEMPERATURES FOR FRIDAY JUNE 26...

LOCATION           NEW RECORD    OLD RECORD    YEAR SET  RECORDS BEGAN
DILLON AIRPORT         94   (TIED)   94          1970       1929
DILLON WMU             94   (TIED)   94          2002       1895
HELENA                 98            96          1910       1880
WISDOM                 88            87          1932       1906

######################################################################
...RECORD WARM MINIMUM TEMPERATURES FOR SATURDAY JUN 27...

LOCATION           NEW RECORD    OLD RECORD    YEAR SET  RECORDS BEGAN
DILLON AIRPORT         57            55          2002       1929


...RECORD WARM MAXIMUM TEMPERATURES FOR SATURDAY JUN 27...

LOCATION           NEW RECORD    OLD RECORD    YEAR SET  RECORDS BEGAN
BOULDER                95            91          2002       1891
BOZEMAN EXP FARM       92            88          2002/1970  1966
BOZEMAN MSU            94            93          1919       1892
BELGRADE-YELLOWSTN APT 98            94          1958       1935
CUT BANK               95            92          1910       1903
DILLON AIRPORT         96            91          1966       1929
DILLON WMU             97            91    2013/1987/1981   1895
ENNIS                  96            94          1919       1918
FORT BENTON           100            97          2002       1894
HELENA                103*           96          1936       1880
LOMA 1W               102            99          2002       1950
MILLEGAN 14SE          96**          89          2002       1965
SIMPSON                99            97          1988       1948
WEST YELLOWSTONE       91            89          1926       1905

*ALL-TIME RECORD HIGH TEMPERATURE FOR JUNE SET AT HELENA. THE OLD
  RECORD WAS 102 SET ON JUNE 21 1900.
**ALL-TIME RECORD HIGH TEMPERATURE FOR JUNE TIED AT MILLEGAN 14SE.
  THIS TIES THE PREVIOUS ALL-TIME WARMEST DAY OF 96 DEGREES ON JUNE
  25 2012.

######################################################################
...RECORD WARM MINIMUM TEMPERATURES FOR SUNDAY JUNE 28...

LOCATION           NEW RECORD    OLD RECORD    YEAR SET  RECORDS BEGAN
BOZEMAN MSU            61            60          1936       1892
HELENA                 68 (TIED)     68          1883       1880
LEWISTOWN              59 (TIED)     59          1988       1896
DILLON AIRPORT         57            54          2003       1929
TOWNSEND               59 (TIED)     59          1988       1948


...RECORD WARM MAXIMUM TEMPERATURES FOR SUNDAY JUN 28...

LOCATION           NEW RECORD    OLD RECORD    YEAR SET  RECORDS BEGAN
BOULDER                95            94          2007       1891
BOZEMAN EXP FARM       93            90          2007       1966
BOZEMAN MSU            94 (TIED)     94          2007       1892
CHINOOK               101            99          1988/1984  1895
CHOTEAU                93 (TIED)     93          1896       1893
CUT BANK               95            91          2006/1937  1903
DILLON AIRPORT         98            95          2007       1929
DILLON WMU             98            93          2007       1895
DUNKIRK 19NNE          99            97          1966       1922
ENNIS                  97            95          1919       1918
FORT BENTON           100            99          1885       1880
GOLD BUTTE 7N          93            92          1984       1905
GREAT FALLS            99            95     1973/1966/1925  1892
HAVRE                 103           100          2006       1880
HELENA                102            99          2007       1880
HOLTER DAM             99            99          1936       1903
LOMA 1W               104           103          1966       1950
MILLEGAN 14SE          94            91          2007       1965
NEIHART 7NW            91            89          2011       1905
SHELBY                 97            92          2006       1899
SIMPSON 6W             99 (TIED)     99          1984       1948
TOWNSEND               95            94          2007       1948
WEST YELLOWSTONE       90            88          2007       1905

THE 6 PM JUNE 28 RADIOSONDE OBSERVATION AT GREAT FALLS RECORDED A
HEIGHT OF 5940 METERS AT 500 MILLIBARS. THIS TIES THE RECORD HIGHEST
VALUE IN JUNE AT GREAT FALLS WHICH WAS FIRST SET AT 6 PM JUNE 29
2008. THE HIGHEST 500 MILLIBAR VALUE AT GREAT FALLS IS 5990 METERS
ON THREE OCCASIONS IN AUGUST 1983, SEPTEMBER 1988 AND JULY 2002.

$$


000
NOUS45 KTFX 291822 AAA
PNSTFX

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE GREAT FALLS MT
1218 PM MDT MON JUN 29 2015

...SUMMARY OF RECORD WARM TEMPERATURES FROM JUNE 26 TO THE PRESENT
IN SOUTHWEST AND NORTH CENTRAL MONTANA...

THIS SUMMARY WILL BE UPDATED FOR THE DURATION OF THE PRESENT HEAT
WAVE IN MONTANA.

...RECORD WARM MAXIMUM TEMPERATURES FOR FRIDAY JUNE 26...

LOCATION           NEW RECORD    OLD RECORD    YEAR SET  RECORDS BEGAN
DILLON AIRPORT         94   (TIED)   94          1970       1929
DILLON WMU             94   (TIED)   94          2002       1895
HELENA                 98            96          1910       1880
WISDOM                 88            87          1932       1906

######################################################################
...RECORD WARM MINIMUM TEMPERATURES FOR SATURDAY JUN 27...

LOCATION           NEW RECORD    OLD RECORD    YEAR SET  RECORDS BEGAN
DILLON AIRPORT         57            55          2002       1929


...RECORD WARM MAXIMUM TEMPERATURES FOR SATURDAY JUN 27...

LOCATION           NEW RECORD    OLD RECORD    YEAR SET  RECORDS BEGAN
BOULDER                95            91          2002       1891
BOZEMAN EXP FARM       92            88          2002/1970  1966
BOZEMAN MSU            94            93          1919       1892
BELGRADE-YELLOWSTN APT 98            94          1958       1935
CUT BANK               95            92          1910       1903
DILLON AIRPORT         96            91          1966       1929
DILLON WMU             97            91    2013/1987/1981   1895
ENNIS                  96            94          1919       1918
FORT BENTON           100            97          2002       1894
HELENA                103*           96          1936       1880
LOMA 1W               102            99          2002       1950
MILLEGAN 14SE          96**          89          2002       1965
SIMPSON                99            97          1988       1948
WEST YELLOWSTONE       91            89          1926       1905

*ALL-TIME RECORD HIGH TEMPERATURE FOR JUNE SET AT HELENA. THE OLD
  RECORD WAS 102 SET ON JUNE 21 1900.
**ALL-TIME RECORD HIGH TEMPERATURE FOR JUNE TIED AT MILLEGAN 14SE.
  THIS TIES THE PREVIOUS ALL-TIME WARMEST DAY OF 96 DEGREES ON JUNE
  25 2012.

######################################################################
...RECORD WARM MINIMUM TEMPERATURES FOR SUNDAY JUNE 28...

LOCATION           NEW RECORD    OLD RECORD    YEAR SET  RECORDS BEGAN
BOZEMAN MSU            61            60          1936       1892
HELENA                 68 (TIED)     68          1883       1880
LEWISTOWN              59 (TIED)     59          1988       1896
DILLON AIRPORT         57            54          2003       1929
TOWNSEND               59 (TIED)     59          1988       1948


...RECORD WARM MAXIMUM TEMPERATURES FOR SUNDAY JUN 28...

LOCATION           NEW RECORD    OLD RECORD    YEAR SET  RECORDS BEGAN
BOULDER                95            94          2007       1891
BOZEMAN EXP FARM       93            90          2007       1966
BOZEMAN MSU            94 (TIED)     94          2007       1892
CHINOOK               101            99          1988/1984  1895
CHOTEAU                93 (TIED)     93          1896       1893
CUT BANK               95            91          2006/1937  1903
DILLON AIRPORT         98            95          2007       1929
DILLON WMU             98            93          2007       1895
DUNKIRK 19NNE          99            97          1966       1922
ENNIS                  97            95          1919       1918
FORT BENTON           100            99          1885       1880
GOLD BUTTE 7N          93            92          1984       1905
GREAT FALLS            99            95     1973/1966/1925  1892
HAVRE                 103           100          2006       1880
HELENA                102            99          2007       1880
HOLTER DAM             99            99          1936       1903
LOMA 1W               104           103          1966       1950
MILLEGAN 14SE          94            91          2007       1965
NEIHART 7NW            91            89          2011       1905
SHELBY                 97            92          2006       1899
SIMPSON 6W             99 (TIED)     99          1984       1948
TOWNSEND               95            94          2007       1948
WEST YELLOWSTONE       90            88          2007       1905

THE 6 PM JUNE 28 RADIOSONDE OBSERVATION AT GREAT FALLS RECORDED A
HEIGHT OF 5940 METERS AT 500 MILLIBARS. THIS TIES THE RECORD HIGHEST
VALUE IN JUNE AT GREAT FALLS WHICH WAS FIRST SET AT 6 PM JUNE 29
2008. THE HIGHEST 500 MILLIBAR VALUE AT GREAT FALLS IS 5990 METERS
ON THREE OCCASIONS IN AUGUST 1983, SEPTEMBER 1988 AND JULY 2002.

$$


000
NOUS45 KTFX 291822 AAA
PNSTFX

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE GREAT FALLS MT
1218 PM MDT MON JUN 29 2015

...SUMMARY OF RECORD WARM TEMPERATURES FROM JUNE 26 TO THE PRESENT
IN SOUTHWEST AND NORTH CENTRAL MONTANA...

THIS SUMMARY WILL BE UPDATED FOR THE DURATION OF THE PRESENT HEAT
WAVE IN MONTANA.

...RECORD WARM MAXIMUM TEMPERATURES FOR FRIDAY JUNE 26...

LOCATION           NEW RECORD    OLD RECORD    YEAR SET  RECORDS BEGAN
DILLON AIRPORT         94   (TIED)   94          1970       1929
DILLON WMU             94   (TIED)   94          2002       1895
HELENA                 98            96          1910       1880
WISDOM                 88            87          1932       1906

######################################################################
...RECORD WARM MINIMUM TEMPERATURES FOR SATURDAY JUN 27...

LOCATION           NEW RECORD    OLD RECORD    YEAR SET  RECORDS BEGAN
DILLON AIRPORT         57            55          2002       1929


...RECORD WARM MAXIMUM TEMPERATURES FOR SATURDAY JUN 27...

LOCATION           NEW RECORD    OLD RECORD    YEAR SET  RECORDS BEGAN
BOULDER                95            91          2002       1891
BOZEMAN EXP FARM       92            88          2002/1970  1966
BOZEMAN MSU            94            93          1919       1892
BELGRADE-YELLOWSTN APT 98            94          1958       1935
CUT BANK               95            92          1910       1903
DILLON AIRPORT         96            91          1966       1929
DILLON WMU             97            91    2013/1987/1981   1895
ENNIS                  96            94          1919       1918
FORT BENTON           100            97          2002       1894
HELENA                103*           96          1936       1880
LOMA 1W               102            99          2002       1950
MILLEGAN 14SE          96**          89          2002       1965
SIMPSON                99            97          1988       1948
WEST YELLOWSTONE       91            89          1926       1905

*ALL-TIME RECORD HIGH TEMPERATURE FOR JUNE SET AT HELENA. THE OLD
  RECORD WAS 102 SET ON JUNE 21 1900.
**ALL-TIME RECORD HIGH TEMPERATURE FOR JUNE TIED AT MILLEGAN 14SE.
  THIS TIES THE PREVIOUS ALL-TIME WARMEST DAY OF 96 DEGREES ON JUNE
  25 2012.

######################################################################
...RECORD WARM MINIMUM TEMPERATURES FOR SUNDAY JUNE 28...

LOCATION           NEW RECORD    OLD RECORD    YEAR SET  RECORDS BEGAN
BOZEMAN MSU            61            60          1936       1892
HELENA                 68 (TIED)     68          1883       1880
LEWISTOWN              59 (TIED)     59          1988       1896
DILLON AIRPORT         57            54          2003       1929
TOWNSEND               59 (TIED)     59          1988       1948


...RECORD WARM MAXIMUM TEMPERATURES FOR SUNDAY JUN 28...

LOCATION           NEW RECORD    OLD RECORD    YEAR SET  RECORDS BEGAN
BOULDER                95            94          2007       1891
BOZEMAN EXP FARM       93            90          2007       1966
BOZEMAN MSU            94 (TIED)     94          2007       1892
CHINOOK               101            99          1988/1984  1895
CHOTEAU                93 (TIED)     93          1896       1893
CUT BANK               95            91          2006/1937  1903
DILLON AIRPORT         98            95          2007       1929
DILLON WMU             98            93          2007       1895
DUNKIRK 19NNE          99            97          1966       1922
ENNIS                  97            95          1919       1918
FORT BENTON           100            99          1885       1880
GOLD BUTTE 7N          93            92          1984       1905
GREAT FALLS            99            95     1973/1966/1925  1892
HAVRE                 103           100          2006       1880
HELENA                102            99          2007       1880
HOLTER DAM             99            99          1936       1903
LOMA 1W               104           103          1966       1950
MILLEGAN 14SE          94            91          2007       1965
NEIHART 7NW            91            89          2011       1905
SHELBY                 97            92          2006       1899
SIMPSON 6W             99 (TIED)     99          1984       1948
TOWNSEND               95            94          2007       1948
WEST YELLOWSTONE       90            88          2007       1905

THE 6 PM JUNE 28 RADIOSONDE OBSERVATION AT GREAT FALLS RECORDED A
HEIGHT OF 5940 METERS AT 500 MILLIBARS. THIS TIES THE RECORD HIGHEST
VALUE IN JUNE AT GREAT FALLS WHICH WAS FIRST SET AT 6 PM JUNE 29
2008. THE HIGHEST 500 MILLIBAR VALUE AT GREAT FALLS IS 5990 METERS
ON THREE OCCASIONS IN AUGUST 1983, SEPTEMBER 1988 AND JULY 2002.

$$


000
NOUS45 KTFX 291822 AAA
PNSTFX

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE GREAT FALLS MT
1218 PM MDT MON JUN 29 2015

...SUMMARY OF RECORD WARM TEMPERATURES FROM JUNE 26 TO THE PRESENT
IN SOUTHWEST AND NORTH CENTRAL MONTANA...

THIS SUMMARY WILL BE UPDATED FOR THE DURATION OF THE PRESENT HEAT
WAVE IN MONTANA.

...RECORD WARM MAXIMUM TEMPERATURES FOR FRIDAY JUNE 26...

LOCATION           NEW RECORD    OLD RECORD    YEAR SET  RECORDS BEGAN
DILLON AIRPORT         94   (TIED)   94          1970       1929
DILLON WMU             94   (TIED)   94          2002       1895
HELENA                 98            96          1910       1880
WISDOM                 88            87          1932       1906

######################################################################
...RECORD WARM MINIMUM TEMPERATURES FOR SATURDAY JUN 27...

LOCATION           NEW RECORD    OLD RECORD    YEAR SET  RECORDS BEGAN
DILLON AIRPORT         57            55          2002       1929


...RECORD WARM MAXIMUM TEMPERATURES FOR SATURDAY JUN 27...

LOCATION           NEW RECORD    OLD RECORD    YEAR SET  RECORDS BEGAN
BOULDER                95            91          2002       1891
BOZEMAN EXP FARM       92            88          2002/1970  1966
BOZEMAN MSU            94            93          1919       1892
BELGRADE-YELLOWSTN APT 98            94          1958       1935
CUT BANK               95            92          1910       1903
DILLON AIRPORT         96            91          1966       1929
DILLON WMU             97            91    2013/1987/1981   1895
ENNIS                  96            94          1919       1918
FORT BENTON           100            97          2002       1894
HELENA                103*           96          1936       1880
LOMA 1W               102            99          2002       1950
MILLEGAN 14SE          96**          89          2002       1965
SIMPSON                99            97          1988       1948
WEST YELLOWSTONE       91            89          1926       1905

*ALL-TIME RECORD HIGH TEMPERATURE FOR JUNE SET AT HELENA. THE OLD
  RECORD WAS 102 SET ON JUNE 21 1900.
**ALL-TIME RECORD HIGH TEMPERATURE FOR JUNE TIED AT MILLEGAN 14SE.
  THIS TIES THE PREVIOUS ALL-TIME WARMEST DAY OF 96 DEGREES ON JUNE
  25 2012.

######################################################################
...RECORD WARM MINIMUM TEMPERATURES FOR SUNDAY JUNE 28...

LOCATION           NEW RECORD    OLD RECORD    YEAR SET  RECORDS BEGAN
BOZEMAN MSU            61            60          1936       1892
HELENA                 68 (TIED)     68          1883       1880
LEWISTOWN              59 (TIED)     59          1988       1896
DILLON AIRPORT         57            54          2003       1929
TOWNSEND               59 (TIED)     59          1988       1948


...RECORD WARM MAXIMUM TEMPERATURES FOR SUNDAY JUN 28...

LOCATION           NEW RECORD    OLD RECORD    YEAR SET  RECORDS BEGAN
BOULDER                95            94          2007       1891
BOZEMAN EXP FARM       93            90          2007       1966
BOZEMAN MSU            94 (TIED)     94          2007       1892
CHINOOK               101            99          1988/1984  1895
CHOTEAU                93 (TIED)     93          1896       1893
CUT BANK               95            91          2006/1937  1903
DILLON AIRPORT         98            95          2007       1929
DILLON WMU             98            93          2007       1895
DUNKIRK 19NNE          99            97          1966       1922
ENNIS                  97            95          1919       1918
FORT BENTON           100            99          1885       1880
GOLD BUTTE 7N          93            92          1984       1905
GREAT FALLS            99            95     1973/1966/1925  1892
HAVRE                 103           100          2006       1880
HELENA                102            99          2007       1880
HOLTER DAM             99            99          1936       1903
LOMA 1W               104           103          1966       1950
MILLEGAN 14SE          94            91          2007       1965
NEIHART 7NW            91            89          2011       1905
SHELBY                 97            92          2006       1899
SIMPSON 6W             99 (TIED)     99          1984       1948
TOWNSEND               95            94          2007       1948
WEST YELLOWSTONE       90            88          2007       1905

THE 6 PM JUNE 28 RADIOSONDE OBSERVATION AT GREAT FALLS RECORDED A
HEIGHT OF 5940 METERS AT 500 MILLIBARS. THIS TIES THE RECORD HIGHEST
VALUE IN JUNE AT GREAT FALLS WHICH WAS FIRST SET AT 6 PM JUNE 29
2008. THE HIGHEST 500 MILLIBAR VALUE AT GREAT FALLS IS 5990 METERS
ON THREE OCCASIONS IN AUGUST 1983, SEPTEMBER 1988 AND JULY 2002.

$$



000
NOUS45 KTFX 291822 AAA
PNSTFX

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE GREAT FALLS MT
1218 PM MDT MON JUN 29 2015

...SUMMARY OF RECORD WARM TEMPERATURES FROM JUNE 26 TO THE PRESENT
IN SOUTHWEST AND NORTH CENTRAL MONTANA...

THIS SUMMARY WILL BE UPDATED FOR THE DURATION OF THE PRESENT HEAT
WAVE IN MONTANA.

...RECORD WARM MAXIMUM TEMPERATURES FOR FRIDAY JUNE 26...

LOCATION           NEW RECORD    OLD RECORD    YEAR SET  RECORDS BEGAN
DILLON AIRPORT         94   (TIED)   94          1970       1929
DILLON WMU             94   (TIED)   94          2002       1895
HELENA                 98            96          1910       1880
WISDOM                 88            87          1932       1906

######################################################################
...RECORD WARM MINIMUM TEMPERATURES FOR SATURDAY JUN 27...

LOCATION           NEW RECORD    OLD RECORD    YEAR SET  RECORDS BEGAN
DILLON AIRPORT         57            55          2002       1929


...RECORD WARM MAXIMUM TEMPERATURES FOR SATURDAY JUN 27...

LOCATION           NEW RECORD    OLD RECORD    YEAR SET  RECORDS BEGAN
BOULDER                95            91          2002       1891
BOZEMAN EXP FARM       92            88          2002/1970  1966
BOZEMAN MSU            94            93          1919       1892
BELGRADE-YELLOWSTN APT 98            94          1958       1935
CUT BANK               95            92          1910       1903
DILLON AIRPORT         96            91          1966       1929
DILLON WMU             97            91    2013/1987/1981   1895
ENNIS                  96            94          1919       1918
FORT BENTON           100            97          2002       1894
HELENA                103*           96          1936       1880
LOMA 1W               102            99          2002       1950
MILLEGAN 14SE          96**          89          2002       1965
SIMPSON                99            97          1988       1948
WEST YELLOWSTONE       91            89          1926       1905

*ALL-TIME RECORD HIGH TEMPERATURE FOR JUNE SET AT HELENA. THE OLD
  RECORD WAS 102 SET ON JUNE 21 1900.
**ALL-TIME RECORD HIGH TEMPERATURE FOR JUNE TIED AT MILLEGAN 14SE.
  THIS TIES THE PREVIOUS ALL-TIME WARMEST DAY OF 96 DEGREES ON JUNE
  25 2012.

######################################################################
...RECORD WARM MINIMUM TEMPERATURES FOR SUNDAY JUNE 28...

LOCATION           NEW RECORD    OLD RECORD    YEAR SET  RECORDS BEGAN
BOZEMAN MSU            61            60          1936       1892
HELENA                 68 (TIED)     68          1883       1880
LEWISTOWN              59 (TIED)     59          1988       1896
DILLON AIRPORT         57            54          2003       1929
TOWNSEND               59 (TIED)     59          1988       1948


...RECORD WARM MAXIMUM TEMPERATURES FOR SUNDAY JUN 28...

LOCATION           NEW RECORD    OLD RECORD    YEAR SET  RECORDS BEGAN
BOULDER                95            94          2007       1891
BOZEMAN EXP FARM       93            90          2007       1966
BOZEMAN MSU            94 (TIED)     94          2007       1892
CHINOOK               101            99          1988/1984  1895
CHOTEAU                93 (TIED)     93          1896       1893
CUT BANK               95            91          2006/1937  1903
DILLON AIRPORT         98            95          2007       1929
DILLON WMU             98            93          2007       1895
DUNKIRK 19NNE          99            97          1966       1922
ENNIS                  97            95          1919       1918
FORT BENTON           100            99          1885       1880
GOLD BUTTE 7N          93            92          1984       1905
GREAT FALLS            99            95     1973/1966/1925  1892
HAVRE                 103           100          2006       1880
HELENA                102            99          2007       1880
HOLTER DAM             99            99          1936       1903
LOMA 1W               104           103          1966       1950
MILLEGAN 14SE          94            91          2007       1965
NEIHART 7NW            91            89          2011       1905
SHELBY                 97            92          2006       1899
SIMPSON 6W             99 (TIED)     99          1984       1948
TOWNSEND               95            94          2007       1948
WEST YELLOWSTONE       90            88          2007       1905

THE 6 PM JUNE 28 RADIOSONDE OBSERVATION AT GREAT FALLS RECORDED A
HEIGHT OF 5940 METERS AT 500 MILLIBARS. THIS TIES THE RECORD HIGHEST
VALUE IN JUNE AT GREAT FALLS WHICH WAS FIRST SET AT 6 PM JUNE 29
2008. THE HIGHEST 500 MILLIBAR VALUE AT GREAT FALLS IS 5990 METERS
ON THREE OCCASIONS IN AUGUST 1983, SEPTEMBER 1988 AND JULY 2002.

$$


000
NOUS41 KWBC 291402
PNSWSH

Technical Implementation Notice 15-34
National Weather Service Headquarters Washington DC
1000 AM EDT Mon June 29 2015

To:       Subscribers:
          -Family of Services
          -NOAA Weather Wire Service
          -Emergency Managers Weather Information Network
          -NOAAPORT
          Other NWS Partners, Users and Employees

From:     Tim McClung
          Chief Operating Officer
          Office of Science and Technology Integration

Subject:  Changes to GFS-based Model Output Statistics (MOS)
          Guidance effective September 15, 2015

On or about Tuesday, September 15, 2015, beginning with the
1200 Coordinated Universal Time (UTC) model run, the NWS
Meteorological Development Laboratory (MDL) will implement
changes to the Global Forecast System (GFS)-based Model Output
Statistics (MOS) guidance. The changes will include:

1.  Add gridded MOS guidance for CONUS and Alaska for the
Day 8-11 period. Guidance will be available for the following
elements:

1) 2-meter temperature (every 6 h)
2) 2-meter dew point temperature (every 6 h)
3) Daytime maximum temperature
4) Nighttime minimum temperature
5) Relative humidity (every 6 h)
6) Wind speed (every 6 h)
7) Wind direction (every 6 h)
8) 12-h probability of precipitation (every 12 h)

These day 8-11 products will be produced on a 2.5-km Lambert
Conformal grid over the CONUS and 3-km Polar Stereographic grid
over Alaska.  Guidance will be available for the 0000 and
1200 UTC model cycles for projections out to 11 days in advance.
These Day 8-11 Gridded MOS products will be disseminated on the
Satellite Broadcast Network (SBN), NOAAPORT, and the NWS FTP
server in GRIB2 format.

The day 8-11 products for the CONUS and Alaska will be available
in GRIB2 format in the experimental area of the National Digital
Guidance Database (NDGD) on the NWS ftp server at:

ftp://tgftp.nws.noaa.gov/SL.us008001/ST.expr/DF.gr2/DC.ndgd/GT
.mosgfs/AR.conus/

ftp://tgftp.nws.noaa.gov/SL.us008001/ST.expr/DF.gr2/DC.ndgd/GT
.mosgfs/AR.alaska/

Each element-specific GRIB2 file will reside in the VP.008-450
directory and contain a WMO super header and individual headers.
A listing of the GRIB2 file names for each element is given in
Table 1 below.  Tables 2 and 3 list WMO super headers for CONUS
and Alaska Day 8-11 gridded MOS elements.

A Web page outlining the gridded MOS guidance and the ftp server
structure can be found at:

http://www.nws.noaa.gov/mdl/synop/gmos.php

2.  This change will expand the output mask for the 2.5-km CONUS
grid northward from its current National Digital Forecast
Database (NDFD) extent to include all of the Northwest River
Forecast Center basin and a buffer of 170 km elsewhere along the
border with Canada. This change will affect the following 2.5-km
CONUS Gridded MOS elements:

1) 2-meter temperature
2) 2-meter dew point temperature
3) Daytime maximum temperature
4) Nighttime minimum temperature
5) Wind speed, wind direction, wind gust
6) 6-h/12-h probability of precipitation
7) 6-h/12-h quantitative precipitation amount
8) Relative humidity
9) Total sky cover
  10) 24-h snowfall amount

The northward expansion of the 2.5-km CONUS grid will result in a
small increase in GRIB2 file sizes (generally less than 10
percent) for the above listed elements. Grids of 24-h snowfall
amount will be clipped to their current extent and contain
missing values elsewhere. Other elements not listed above will
not be affected by the grid expansion. WMO super headers for the
2.5-km CONUS Gridded MOS elements affected by this change are
listed in Table 4 below. The operational 5-km CONUS Gridded MOS
products will remain on their current NDFD extent and will not be
affected by the expansion of the 2.5-km CONUS grids.

3.  NWS will add new stations to the GFS-based short-range and
extended-range Cooperative Observer Program (COOP) maximum and
minimum temperature messages, known by their AWIPS IDs MCG and
MCX, respectively.  Communication identifiers for affected
products are listed in Table 5 below. A list of the stations
being added can be found at:

http://www.nws.noaa.gov/mdl/synop/gfsmos_changes/newsitesSept2
015.php

4.  NWS will remove stations from the GFS-based short-range and
extended-range COOP maximum and minimum temperature messages,
known by their AWIPS IDs MCG and MCX, respectively. These are
stations that have closed, stopped reporting, or do not contain
sufficient cases to develop MOS equations. Communication
identifiers for the affected products are listed in Table 5
below. A list of the stations being removed can be found at:

http://www.nws.noaa.gov/mdl/synop/gfsmos_changes/droppedsitesS
ept2015.php

5.  NWS will remove stations from the GFS-based River Forecast
Center maximum and minimum temperature SHEF message with AWIPS ID
FTP. These are stations that have closed, stopped reporting, or
do not contain sufficient cases to develop MOS equations.
Communication identifiers for the affected products are listed in
Table 6 below. Stations being removed can be found at:

http://www.nws.noaa.gov/mdl/synop/gfsmos_changes/droppedsitesS
ept2015.php

6.  This change provides updated thunderstorm guidance for Alaska
valid for the warm season, May through September. NWS has updated
guidance for probability of a thunderstorm in 3-, 6-, 12- and
24-h periods over Alaska with more recent model data and
lightning observations. Communication identifiers for the
products affected by this update are listed in Tables 7 and 8
below.

Table 1: GRIB2 file names for the day 8-11 GFS-based Gridded MOS
elements (These files will reside in the VP.008-450 directory on
the ftp server.)

GRIB2 FILE NAME   ELEMENT
---------------   -----------------------------
ds.wdir.bin       Wind direction
ds.wspd.bin       Wind speed
ds.pop12.bin      12-h prob. of precipitation
ds.temp.bin       2-meter temperature
ds.td.bin         2-meter dew point temperature
ds.maxt.bin       Daytime maximum temperature
ds.mint.bin       Nighttime minimum temperature
ds.rhm.bin        Relative humidity

Table 2: WMO super headers for the day 8-11 Gridded MOS products
over the CONUS

WMO SUPERHEADER   ELEMENT
---------------   -----------------------------
YBUZ96 KWBQ       Wind direction
YCUZ96 KWBQ       Wind speed
YDUZ96 KWBQ       12-h prob. of precipitation
YEUZ96 KWBQ       2-meter temperature
YFUZ96 KWBQ       2-meter dew point temperature
YGUZ96 KWBQ       Daytime maximum temperature
YHUZ96 KWBQ       Nighttime minimum temperature
YRUZ96 KWBQ       Relative humidity

Table 3: WMO super headers for the day 8-11 Gridded MOS products
over Alaska

WMO SUPERHEADER   ELEMENT
---------------   -----------------------------
   LBRZ96 KWBQ       Wind direction
   LCRZ96 KWBQ       Wind speed
   LDRZ96 KWBQ       12-h prob. of precipitation
   LERZ96 KWBQ       2-meter temperature
   LFRZ96 KWBQ       2-meter dew point temperature
   LGRZ96 KWBQ       Daytime maximum temperature
   LHRZ96 KWBQ       Nighttime minimum temperature
   LRRZ96 KWBQ       Relative humidity

Table 4. WMO superheaders for each 2.5-km CONUS Gridded MOS
element affected by the grid expansion.  Listed below are
representations of the superheaders where ii=98 for short-range
guidance (days 1-3) and ii=97 for medium-range guidance (days 4-
7). Elements indicated by (**) will include ii=96 for extra
extended-range (days 8-11).

WMO SUPERHEADER   ELEMENT
---------------   -----------------------------
YAUZii KWBQ       Total sky cover
YBUZii KWBQ**     Wind direction
YCUZii KWBQ**     Wind speed
YDUZii KWBQ**     12-h prob. of precipitation
YEUZii KWBQ**     2-meter temperature
YFUZii KWBQ**     2-meter dew point temperature
YGUZii KWBQ**     Daytime maximum temperature
YHUZii KWBQ**     Nighttime minimum temperature
YIUZii KWBQ       6-h quant. precipitation amount
YRUZii KWBQ**     Relative humidity
YSUZii KWBQ       24-h snowfall amount
YUUZii KWBQ       6-h prob. of precipitation
YVUZii KWBQ       12-h quant. precipitation amount
YWUZii KWBQ       Wind Gusts

Table 5:  Communication identifiers for the GFS-based COOP
maximum and minimum temperature text products affected by the
changes

WMO HEADING       AWIPS ID
-----------       --------
FOUS10 KWNO       MCGUSA   (Short-range)
FEUS10 KWNO       MCXUSA   (Extended-range)

Table 6: Communication identifiers for the GFS-based River
Forecast Center SHEF products affected by the changes

   WMO HEADING      AWIPS ID
   -----------      --------
   FOUS12 KWNO      FTPCIN
   FOUS12 KWNO      FTPHFD
   FOUS12 KWNO      FTPKRF
   FOUS12 KWNO      FTPMSR
   FOUS12 KWNO      FTPPTR
   FOUS12 KWNO      FTPRHA
   FOUS12 KWNO      FTPRSA
   FOUS12 KWNO      FTPSLR
   FOUS12 KWNO      FTPTUR
   FOAK12 KWNO      FTPACR

Table 7: Communication identifiers for the GFS-based MOS text
products affected by the updated Alaska thunderstorm guidance

   WMO HEADING      AWIPS ID
   -----------      --------
   FOAK37 KWNO      MAVAJK
   FOAK38 KWNO      MAVAFC
   FOAK39 KWNO      MAVAFG
   FEAK37 KWNO      MEXAJK
   FEAK38 KWNO      MEXAFC
   FEAK39 KWNO      MEXAFG

Table 8: Representations of WMO headers for the Alaska Gridded
MOS products affected by the updated thunderstorm guidance, where
XXX represents the valid day and time

WMO SUPERHEADER   ELEMENT
---------------   -----------------------------
   LJRXXX KWBQ       3-h Prob. of a thunderstorm
   LYRXXX KWBQ       6-h Prob. of a thunderstorm
   LXRXXX KWBQ       12-h Prob. of a thunderstorm

For questions regarding the above changes to the GFS-based MOS
guidance, please contact:

  Phil Shafer
  MDL/Silver Spring, Maryland
  301-427-9488
  Phil.Shafer@noaa.gov
or
  Matthew Peroutka
  MDL/Silver Spring, Maryland
  301-427-9483
  Matthew.Peroutka@noaa.gov

Links to MOS products and descriptions are online at:

  http://www.nws.noaa.gov/mdl/synop

NWS national TINs are online at:

  http://www.weather.gov/os/notif.htm

$$




000
NOUS41 KWBC 291402
PNSWSH

Technical Implementation Notice 15-34
National Weather Service Headquarters Washington DC
1000 AM EDT Mon June 29 2015

To:       Subscribers:
          -Family of Services
          -NOAA Weather Wire Service
          -Emergency Managers Weather Information Network
          -NOAAPORT
          Other NWS Partners, Users and Employees

From:     Tim McClung
          Chief Operating Officer
          Office of Science and Technology Integration

Subject:  Changes to GFS-based Model Output Statistics (MOS)
          Guidance effective September 15, 2015

On or about Tuesday, September 15, 2015, beginning with the
1200 Coordinated Universal Time (UTC) model run, the NWS
Meteorological Development Laboratory (MDL) will implement
changes to the Global Forecast System (GFS)-based Model Output
Statistics (MOS) guidance. The changes will include:

1.  Add gridded MOS guidance for CONUS and Alaska for the
Day 8-11 period. Guidance will be available for the following
elements:

1) 2-meter temperature (every 6 h)
2) 2-meter dew point temperature (every 6 h)
3) Daytime maximum temperature
4) Nighttime minimum temperature
5) Relative humidity (every 6 h)
6) Wind speed (every 6 h)
7) Wind direction (every 6 h)
8) 12-h probability of precipitation (every 12 h)

These day 8-11 products will be produced on a 2.5-km Lambert
Conformal grid over the CONUS and 3-km Polar Stereographic grid
over Alaska.  Guidance will be available for the 0000 and
1200 UTC model cycles for projections out to 11 days in advance.
These Day 8-11 Gridded MOS products will be disseminated on the
Satellite Broadcast Network (SBN), NOAAPORT, and the NWS FTP
server in GRIB2 format.

The day 8-11 products for the CONUS and Alaska will be available
in GRIB2 format in the experimental area of the National Digital
Guidance Database (NDGD) on the NWS ftp server at:

ftp://tgftp.nws.noaa.gov/SL.us008001/ST.expr/DF.gr2/DC.ndgd/GT
.mosgfs/AR.conus/

ftp://tgftp.nws.noaa.gov/SL.us008001/ST.expr/DF.gr2/DC.ndgd/GT
.mosgfs/AR.alaska/

Each element-specific GRIB2 file will reside in the VP.008-450
directory and contain a WMO super header and individual headers.
A listing of the GRIB2 file names for each element is given in
Table 1 below.  Tables 2 and 3 list WMO super headers for CONUS
and Alaska Day 8-11 gridded MOS elements.

A Web page outlining the gridded MOS guidance and the ftp server
structure can be found at:

http://www.nws.noaa.gov/mdl/synop/gmos.php

2.  This change will expand the output mask for the 2.5-km CONUS
grid northward from its current National Digital Forecast
Database (NDFD) extent to include all of the Northwest River
Forecast Center basin and a buffer of 170 km elsewhere along the
border with Canada. This change will affect the following 2.5-km
CONUS Gridded MOS elements:

1) 2-meter temperature
2) 2-meter dew point temperature
3) Daytime maximum temperature
4) Nighttime minimum temperature
5) Wind speed, wind direction, wind gust
6) 6-h/12-h probability of precipitation
7) 6-h/12-h quantitative precipitation amount
8) Relative humidity
9) Total sky cover
  10) 24-h snowfall amount

The northward expansion of the 2.5-km CONUS grid will result in a
small increase in GRIB2 file sizes (generally less than 10
percent) for the above listed elements. Grids of 24-h snowfall
amount will be clipped to their current extent and contain
missing values elsewhere. Other elements not listed above will
not be affected by the grid expansion. WMO super headers for the
2.5-km CONUS Gridded MOS elements affected by this change are
listed in Table 4 below. The operational 5-km CONUS Gridded MOS
products will remain on their current NDFD extent and will not be
affected by the expansion of the 2.5-km CONUS grids.

3.  NWS will add new stations to the GFS-based short-range and
extended-range Cooperative Observer Program (COOP) maximum and
minimum temperature messages, known by their AWIPS IDs MCG and
MCX, respectively.  Communication identifiers for affected
products are listed in Table 5 below. A list of the stations
being added can be found at:

http://www.nws.noaa.gov/mdl/synop/gfsmos_changes/newsitesSept2
015.php

4.  NWS will remove stations from the GFS-based short-range and
extended-range COOP maximum and minimum temperature messages,
known by their AWIPS IDs MCG and MCX, respectively. These are
stations that have closed, stopped reporting, or do not contain
sufficient cases to develop MOS equations. Communication
identifiers for the affected products are listed in Table 5
below. A list of the stations being removed can be found at:

http://www.nws.noaa.gov/mdl/synop/gfsmos_changes/droppedsitesS
ept2015.php

5.  NWS will remove stations from the GFS-based River Forecast
Center maximum and minimum temperature SHEF message with AWIPS ID
FTP. These are stations that have closed, stopped reporting, or
do not contain sufficient cases to develop MOS equations.
Communication identifiers for the affected products are listed in
Table 6 below. Stations being removed can be found at:

http://www.nws.noaa.gov/mdl/synop/gfsmos_changes/droppedsitesS
ept2015.php

6.  This change provides updated thunderstorm guidance for Alaska
valid for the warm season, May through September. NWS has updated
guidance for probability of a thunderstorm in 3-, 6-, 12- and
24-h periods over Alaska with more recent model data and
lightning observations. Communication identifiers for the
products affected by this update are listed in Tables 7 and 8
below.

Table 1: GRIB2 file names for the day 8-11 GFS-based Gridded MOS
elements (These files will reside in the VP.008-450 directory on
the ftp server.)

GRIB2 FILE NAME   ELEMENT
---------------   -----------------------------
ds.wdir.bin       Wind direction
ds.wspd.bin       Wind speed
ds.pop12.bin      12-h prob. of precipitation
ds.temp.bin       2-meter temperature
ds.td.bin         2-meter dew point temperature
ds.maxt.bin       Daytime maximum temperature
ds.mint.bin       Nighttime minimum temperature
ds.rhm.bin        Relative humidity

Table 2: WMO super headers for the day 8-11 Gridded MOS products
over the CONUS

WMO SUPERHEADER   ELEMENT
---------------   -----------------------------
YBUZ96 KWBQ       Wind direction
YCUZ96 KWBQ       Wind speed
YDUZ96 KWBQ       12-h prob. of precipitation
YEUZ96 KWBQ       2-meter temperature
YFUZ96 KWBQ       2-meter dew point temperature
YGUZ96 KWBQ       Daytime maximum temperature
YHUZ96 KWBQ       Nighttime minimum temperature
YRUZ96 KWBQ       Relative humidity

Table 3: WMO super headers for the day 8-11 Gridded MOS products
over Alaska

WMO SUPERHEADER   ELEMENT
---------------   -----------------------------
   LBRZ96 KWBQ       Wind direction
   LCRZ96 KWBQ       Wind speed
   LDRZ96 KWBQ       12-h prob. of precipitation
   LERZ96 KWBQ       2-meter temperature
   LFRZ96 KWBQ       2-meter dew point temperature
   LGRZ96 KWBQ       Daytime maximum temperature
   LHRZ96 KWBQ       Nighttime minimum temperature
   LRRZ96 KWBQ       Relative humidity

Table 4. WMO superheaders for each 2.5-km CONUS Gridded MOS
element affected by the grid expansion.  Listed below are
representations of the superheaders where ii=98 for short-range
guidance (days 1-3) and ii=97 for medium-range guidance (days 4-
7). Elements indicated by (**) will include ii=96 for extra
extended-range (days 8-11).

WMO SUPERHEADER   ELEMENT
---------------   -----------------------------
YAUZii KWBQ       Total sky cover
YBUZii KWBQ**     Wind direction
YCUZii KWBQ**     Wind speed
YDUZii KWBQ**     12-h prob. of precipitation
YEUZii KWBQ**     2-meter temperature
YFUZii KWBQ**     2-meter dew point temperature
YGUZii KWBQ**     Daytime maximum temperature
YHUZii KWBQ**     Nighttime minimum temperature
YIUZii KWBQ       6-h quant. precipitation amount
YRUZii KWBQ**     Relative humidity
YSUZii KWBQ       24-h snowfall amount
YUUZii KWBQ       6-h prob. of precipitation
YVUZii KWBQ       12-h quant. precipitation amount
YWUZii KWBQ       Wind Gusts

Table 5:  Communication identifiers for the GFS-based COOP
maximum and minimum temperature text products affected by the
changes

WMO HEADING       AWIPS ID
-----------       --------
FOUS10 KWNO       MCGUSA   (Short-range)
FEUS10 KWNO       MCXUSA   (Extended-range)

Table 6: Communication identifiers for the GFS-based River
Forecast Center SHEF products affected by the changes

   WMO HEADING      AWIPS ID
   -----------      --------
   FOUS12 KWNO      FTPCIN
   FOUS12 KWNO      FTPHFD
   FOUS12 KWNO      FTPKRF
   FOUS12 KWNO      FTPMSR
   FOUS12 KWNO      FTPPTR
   FOUS12 KWNO      FTPRHA
   FOUS12 KWNO      FTPRSA
   FOUS12 KWNO      FTPSLR
   FOUS12 KWNO      FTPTUR
   FOAK12 KWNO      FTPACR

Table 7: Communication identifiers for the GFS-based MOS text
products affected by the updated Alaska thunderstorm guidance

   WMO HEADING      AWIPS ID
   -----------      --------
   FOAK37 KWNO      MAVAJK
   FOAK38 KWNO      MAVAFC
   FOAK39 KWNO      MAVAFG
   FEAK37 KWNO      MEXAJK
   FEAK38 KWNO      MEXAFC
   FEAK39 KWNO      MEXAFG

Table 8: Representations of WMO headers for the Alaska Gridded
MOS products affected by the updated thunderstorm guidance, where
XXX represents the valid day and time

WMO SUPERHEADER   ELEMENT
---------------   -----------------------------
   LJRXXX KWBQ       3-h Prob. of a thunderstorm
   LYRXXX KWBQ       6-h Prob. of a thunderstorm
   LXRXXX KWBQ       12-h Prob. of a thunderstorm

For questions regarding the above changes to the GFS-based MOS
guidance, please contact:

  Phil Shafer
  MDL/Silver Spring, Maryland
  301-427-9488
  Phil.Shafer@noaa.gov
or
  Matthew Peroutka
  MDL/Silver Spring, Maryland
  301-427-9483
  Matthew.Peroutka@noaa.gov

Links to MOS products and descriptions are online at:

  http://www.nws.noaa.gov/mdl/synop

NWS national TINs are online at:

  http://www.weather.gov/os/notif.htm

$$



000
NOUS41 KWBC 291402
PNSWSH

Technical Implementation Notice 15-34
National Weather Service Headquarters Washington DC
1000 AM EDT Mon June 29 2015

To:       Subscribers:
          -Family of Services
          -NOAA Weather Wire Service
          -Emergency Managers Weather Information Network
          -NOAAPORT
          Other NWS Partners, Users and Employees

From:     Tim McClung
          Chief Operating Officer
          Office of Science and Technology Integration

Subject:  Changes to GFS-based Model Output Statistics (MOS)
          Guidance effective September 15, 2015

On or about Tuesday, September 15, 2015, beginning with the
1200 Coordinated Universal Time (UTC) model run, the NWS
Meteorological Development Laboratory (MDL) will implement
changes to the Global Forecast System (GFS)-based Model Output
Statistics (MOS) guidance. The changes will include:

1.  Add gridded MOS guidance for CONUS and Alaska for the
Day 8-11 period. Guidance will be available for the following
elements:

1) 2-meter temperature (every 6 h)
2) 2-meter dew point temperature (every 6 h)
3) Daytime maximum temperature
4) Nighttime minimum temperature
5) Relative humidity (every 6 h)
6) Wind speed (every 6 h)
7) Wind direction (every 6 h)
8) 12-h probability of precipitation (every 12 h)

These day 8-11 products will be produced on a 2.5-km Lambert
Conformal grid over the CONUS and 3-km Polar Stereographic grid
over Alaska.  Guidance will be available for the 0000 and
1200 UTC model cycles for projections out to 11 days in advance.
These Day 8-11 Gridded MOS products will be disseminated on the
Satellite Broadcast Network (SBN), NOAAPORT, and the NWS FTP
server in GRIB2 format.

The day 8-11 products for the CONUS and Alaska will be available
in GRIB2 format in the experimental area of the National Digital
Guidance Database (NDGD) on the NWS ftp server at:

ftp://tgftp.nws.noaa.gov/SL.us008001/ST.expr/DF.gr2/DC.ndgd/GT
.mosgfs/AR.conus/

ftp://tgftp.nws.noaa.gov/SL.us008001/ST.expr/DF.gr2/DC.ndgd/GT
.mosgfs/AR.alaska/

Each element-specific GRIB2 file will reside in the VP.008-450
directory and contain a WMO super header and individual headers.
A listing of the GRIB2 file names for each element is given in
Table 1 below.  Tables 2 and 3 list WMO super headers for CONUS
and Alaska Day 8-11 gridded MOS elements.

A Web page outlining the gridded MOS guidance and the ftp server
structure can be found at:

http://www.nws.noaa.gov/mdl/synop/gmos.php

2.  This change will expand the output mask for the 2.5-km CONUS
grid northward from its current National Digital Forecast
Database (NDFD) extent to include all of the Northwest River
Forecast Center basin and a buffer of 170 km elsewhere along the
border with Canada. This change will affect the following 2.5-km
CONUS Gridded MOS elements:

1) 2-meter temperature
2) 2-meter dew point temperature
3) Daytime maximum temperature
4) Nighttime minimum temperature
5) Wind speed, wind direction, wind gust
6) 6-h/12-h probability of precipitation
7) 6-h/12-h quantitative precipitation amount
8) Relative humidity
9) Total sky cover
  10) 24-h snowfall amount

The northward expansion of the 2.5-km CONUS grid will result in a
small increase in GRIB2 file sizes (generally less than 10
percent) for the above listed elements. Grids of 24-h snowfall
amount will be clipped to their current extent and contain
missing values elsewhere. Other elements not listed above will
not be affected by the grid expansion. WMO super headers for the
2.5-km CONUS Gridded MOS elements affected by this change are
listed in Table 4 below. The operational 5-km CONUS Gridded MOS
products will remain on their current NDFD extent and will not be
affected by the expansion of the 2.5-km CONUS grids.

3.  NWS will add new stations to the GFS-based short-range and
extended-range Cooperative Observer Program (COOP) maximum and
minimum temperature messages, known by their AWIPS IDs MCG and
MCX, respectively.  Communication identifiers for affected
products are listed in Table 5 below. A list of the stations
being added can be found at:

http://www.nws.noaa.gov/mdl/synop/gfsmos_changes/newsitesSept2
015.php

4.  NWS will remove stations from the GFS-based short-range and
extended-range COOP maximum and minimum temperature messages,
known by their AWIPS IDs MCG and MCX, respectively. These are
stations that have closed, stopped reporting, or do not contain
sufficient cases to develop MOS equations. Communication
identifiers for the affected products are listed in Table 5
below. A list of the stations being removed can be found at:

http://www.nws.noaa.gov/mdl/synop/gfsmos_changes/droppedsitesS
ept2015.php

5.  NWS will remove stations from the GFS-based River Forecast
Center maximum and minimum temperature SHEF message with AWIPS ID
FTP. These are stations that have closed, stopped reporting, or
do not contain sufficient cases to develop MOS equations.
Communication identifiers for the affected products are listed in
Table 6 below. Stations being removed can be found at:

http://www.nws.noaa.gov/mdl/synop/gfsmos_changes/droppedsitesS
ept2015.php

6.  This change provides updated thunderstorm guidance for Alaska
valid for the warm season, May through September. NWS has updated
guidance for probability of a thunderstorm in 3-, 6-, 12- and
24-h periods over Alaska with more recent model data and
lightning observations. Communication identifiers for the
products affected by this update are listed in Tables 7 and 8
below.

Table 1: GRIB2 file names for the day 8-11 GFS-based Gridded MOS
elements (These files will reside in the VP.008-450 directory on
the ftp server.)

GRIB2 FILE NAME   ELEMENT
---------------   -----------------------------
ds.wdir.bin       Wind direction
ds.wspd.bin       Wind speed
ds.pop12.bin      12-h prob. of precipitation
ds.temp.bin       2-meter temperature
ds.td.bin         2-meter dew point temperature
ds.maxt.bin       Daytime maximum temperature
ds.mint.bin       Nighttime minimum temperature
ds.rhm.bin        Relative humidity

Table 2: WMO super headers for the day 8-11 Gridded MOS products
over the CONUS

WMO SUPERHEADER   ELEMENT
---------------   -----------------------------
YBUZ96 KWBQ       Wind direction
YCUZ96 KWBQ       Wind speed
YDUZ96 KWBQ       12-h prob. of precipitation
YEUZ96 KWBQ       2-meter temperature
YFUZ96 KWBQ       2-meter dew point temperature
YGUZ96 KWBQ       Daytime maximum temperature
YHUZ96 KWBQ       Nighttime minimum temperature
YRUZ96 KWBQ       Relative humidity

Table 3: WMO super headers for the day 8-11 Gridded MOS products
over Alaska

WMO SUPERHEADER   ELEMENT
---------------   -----------------------------
   LBRZ96 KWBQ       Wind direction
   LCRZ96 KWBQ       Wind speed
   LDRZ96 KWBQ       12-h prob. of precipitation
   LERZ96 KWBQ       2-meter temperature
   LFRZ96 KWBQ       2-meter dew point temperature
   LGRZ96 KWBQ       Daytime maximum temperature
   LHRZ96 KWBQ       Nighttime minimum temperature
   LRRZ96 KWBQ       Relative humidity

Table 4. WMO superheaders for each 2.5-km CONUS Gridded MOS
element affected by the grid expansion.  Listed below are
representations of the superheaders where ii=98 for short-range
guidance (days 1-3) and ii=97 for medium-range guidance (days 4-
7). Elements indicated by (**) will include ii=96 for extra
extended-range (days 8-11).

WMO SUPERHEADER   ELEMENT
---------------   -----------------------------
YAUZii KWBQ       Total sky cover
YBUZii KWBQ**     Wind direction
YCUZii KWBQ**     Wind speed
YDUZii KWBQ**     12-h prob. of precipitation
YEUZii KWBQ**     2-meter temperature
YFUZii KWBQ**     2-meter dew point temperature
YGUZii KWBQ**     Daytime maximum temperature
YHUZii KWBQ**     Nighttime minimum temperature
YIUZii KWBQ       6-h quant. precipitation amount
YRUZii KWBQ**     Relative humidity
YSUZii KWBQ       24-h snowfall amount
YUUZii KWBQ       6-h prob. of precipitation
YVUZii KWBQ       12-h quant. precipitation amount
YWUZii KWBQ       Wind Gusts

Table 5:  Communication identifiers for the GFS-based COOP
maximum and minimum temperature text products affected by the
changes

WMO HEADING       AWIPS ID
-----------       --------
FOUS10 KWNO       MCGUSA   (Short-range)
FEUS10 KWNO       MCXUSA   (Extended-range)

Table 6: Communication identifiers for the GFS-based River
Forecast Center SHEF products affected by the changes

   WMO HEADING      AWIPS ID
   -----------      --------
   FOUS12 KWNO      FTPCIN
   FOUS12 KWNO      FTPHFD
   FOUS12 KWNO      FTPKRF
   FOUS12 KWNO      FTPMSR
   FOUS12 KWNO      FTPPTR
   FOUS12 KWNO      FTPRHA
   FOUS12 KWNO      FTPRSA
   FOUS12 KWNO      FTPSLR
   FOUS12 KWNO      FTPTUR
   FOAK12 KWNO      FTPACR

Table 7: Communication identifiers for the GFS-based MOS text
products affected by the updated Alaska thunderstorm guidance

   WMO HEADING      AWIPS ID
   -----------      --------
   FOAK37 KWNO      MAVAJK
   FOAK38 KWNO      MAVAFC
   FOAK39 KWNO      MAVAFG
   FEAK37 KWNO      MEXAJK
   FEAK38 KWNO      MEXAFC
   FEAK39 KWNO      MEXAFG

Table 8: Representations of WMO headers for the Alaska Gridded
MOS products affected by the updated thunderstorm guidance, where
XXX represents the valid day and time

WMO SUPERHEADER   ELEMENT
---------------   -----------------------------
   LJRXXX KWBQ       3-h Prob. of a thunderstorm
   LYRXXX KWBQ       6-h Prob. of a thunderstorm
   LXRXXX KWBQ       12-h Prob. of a thunderstorm

For questions regarding the above changes to the GFS-based MOS
guidance, please contact:

  Phil Shafer
  MDL/Silver Spring, Maryland
  301-427-9488
  Phil.Shafer@noaa.gov
or
  Matthew Peroutka
  MDL/Silver Spring, Maryland
  301-427-9483
  Matthew.Peroutka@noaa.gov

Links to MOS products and descriptions are online at:

  http://www.nws.noaa.gov/mdl/synop

NWS national TINs are online at:

  http://www.weather.gov/os/notif.htm

$$




000
NOUS43 KGLD 291200
PNSGLD

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE GOODLAND KS
600 AM MDT MON JUN 29 2015

...ON THIS DATE IN WEATHER HISTORY...

IN 1989, THUNDERSTORMS PRODUCED SEVERE WEATHER IN THE SOUTHERN AND
CENTRAL HIGH PLAINS REGION. THUNDERSTORMS IN COLORADO PRODUCED
SOFTBALL SIZE HAIL AT KIT CARSON.

IN 2000, AN F1 TORNADO MOVED ACROSS OPEN FIELDS 10 MILES SOUTHWEST
OF BIRD CITY KANSAS DAMAGING CORN CROP AND AN IRRIGATION SPRINKLER
SYSTEM. THE TORNADO WAS IMPRESSIVE VISUALLY, AND COULD BE SEEN
FROM 20 TO 30 MILES AWAY. THE TORNADO PATH WAS APPROXIMATELY 3
MILES LONG AND 650 YARDS WIDE.

$$



000
NOUS45 KTFX 290112 AAA
PNSTFX

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE GREAT FALLS MT
710 PM MDT SUN JUN 28 2015

...SUMMARY OF RECORD WARM TEMPERATURES FROM JUNE 26 TO THE PRESENT
IN SOUTHWEST AND NORTH CENTRAL MONTANA...

THIS SUMMARY WILL BE UPDATED FOR THE DURATION OF THE PRESENT HEAT
WAVE IN MONTANA.

...RECORD WARM MAXIMUM TEMPERATURES FOR FRIDAY JUNE 26...

LOCATION           NEW RECORD    OLD RECORD    YEAR SET  RECORDS BEGAN
DILLON AIRPORT         94   (TIED)   94          1970       1929
DILLON WMU             94   (TIED)   94          2002       1895
HELENA                 98            96          1910       1866
WISDOM                 88            87          1932       1906


...RECORD WARM MINIMUM TEMPERATURES FOR SATURDAY JUN 27...

LOCATION           NEW RECORD    OLD RECORD    YEAR SET  RECORDS BEGAN
DILLON AIRPORT         57            55          2002       1929


...RECORD WARM MAXIMUM TEMPERATURES FOR SATURDAY JUN 27...

LOCATION           NEW RECORD    OLD RECORD    YEAR SET  RECORDS BEGAN
BOULDER                95            91          2002       1891
BOZEMAN EXP FARM       92            88          2002/1970  1966
BOZEMAN MSU            94            93          1919       1892
BELGRADE-YELLOWSTN APT 98            94          1958       1935
CUT BANK               95            92          1910       1903
DILLON AIRPORT         96            91          1966       1929
DILLON WMU             97            91    2013/1987/1981   1895
ENNIS                  96            94          1919       1918
FORT BENTON           100            97          2002       1894
HELENA                103*           96          1936       1866
LOMA 1W               102            99          2002       1950
MILLEGAN 14SE          96**          89          2002       1965
SIMPSON                99            97          1988       1948
WEST YELLOWSTONE       91            89          1926       1905

*ALL-TIME RECORD HIGH TEMPERATURE FOR JUNE SET AT HELENA. THE OLD
  RECORD WAS 102 SET ON JUNE 21 1900.
**ALL-TIME RECORD HIGH TEMPERATURE FOR JUNE TIED AT MILLEGAN 14SE.
  THIS TIES THE PREVIOUS ALL-TIME WARMEST DAY OF 96 DEGREES ON JUNE
  25 2012.


...RECORD WARM MINIMUM TEMPERATURES FOR SUNDAY JUNE 28...

LOCATION           NEW RECORD    OLD RECORD    YEAR SET  RECORDS BEGAN
HELENA                 68 (TIED)     68          1883       1866
LEWISTOWN              59 (TIED)     59          1988       1896
DILLON AIRPORT         57            54          2003       1929


...RECORD WARM MAXIMUM TEMPERATURES FOR SUNDAY JUN 28...

LOCATION           NEW RECORD    OLD RECORD    YEAR SET  RECORDS BEGAN
BOULDER                95            94          2007       1891
BOZEMAN EXP FARM       93            90          2007       1966
BOZEMAN MSU            94 (TIED)     94          2007       1892
CHOTEAU                93 (TIED)     93          1896       1893
CUT BANK               95            91          2006/1937  1903
DILLON AIRPORT         98            95          2007       1929
GOLD BUTTE 7N          93            92          1984       1905
GREAT FALLS            99            95     1973/1966/1925  1892
HAVRE                 103           100          2006       1880
HELENA                102            99          2007       1880
HOLTER DAM             99            99          1936       1903
NEIHART 7NW            91            89          2011       1905
SIMPSON 6W             99 (TIED)     99          1984       1948

$$



000
NOUS45 KTFX 290112 AAA
PNSTFX

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE GREAT FALLS MT
710 PM MDT SUN JUN 28 2015

...SUMMARY OF RECORD WARM TEMPERATURES FROM JUNE 26 TO THE PRESENT
IN SOUTHWEST AND NORTH CENTRAL MONTANA...

THIS SUMMARY WILL BE UPDATED FOR THE DURATION OF THE PRESENT HEAT
WAVE IN MONTANA.

...RECORD WARM MAXIMUM TEMPERATURES FOR FRIDAY JUNE 26...

LOCATION           NEW RECORD    OLD RECORD    YEAR SET  RECORDS BEGAN
DILLON AIRPORT         94   (TIED)   94          1970       1929
DILLON WMU             94   (TIED)   94          2002       1895
HELENA                 98            96          1910       1866
WISDOM                 88            87          1932       1906


...RECORD WARM MINIMUM TEMPERATURES FOR SATURDAY JUN 27...

LOCATION           NEW RECORD    OLD RECORD    YEAR SET  RECORDS BEGAN
DILLON AIRPORT         57            55          2002       1929


...RECORD WARM MAXIMUM TEMPERATURES FOR SATURDAY JUN 27...

LOCATION           NEW RECORD    OLD RECORD    YEAR SET  RECORDS BEGAN
BOULDER                95            91          2002       1891
BOZEMAN EXP FARM       92            88          2002/1970  1966
BOZEMAN MSU            94            93          1919       1892
BELGRADE-YELLOWSTN APT 98            94          1958       1935
CUT BANK               95            92          1910       1903
DILLON AIRPORT         96            91          1966       1929
DILLON WMU             97            91    2013/1987/1981   1895
ENNIS                  96            94          1919       1918
FORT BENTON           100            97          2002       1894
HELENA                103*           96          1936       1866
LOMA 1W               102            99          2002       1950
MILLEGAN 14SE          96**          89          2002       1965
SIMPSON                99            97          1988       1948
WEST YELLOWSTONE       91            89          1926       1905

*ALL-TIME RECORD HIGH TEMPERATURE FOR JUNE SET AT HELENA. THE OLD
  RECORD WAS 102 SET ON JUNE 21 1900.
**ALL-TIME RECORD HIGH TEMPERATURE FOR JUNE TIED AT MILLEGAN 14SE.
  THIS TIES THE PREVIOUS ALL-TIME WARMEST DAY OF 96 DEGREES ON JUNE
  25 2012.


...RECORD WARM MINIMUM TEMPERATURES FOR SUNDAY JUNE 28...

LOCATION           NEW RECORD    OLD RECORD    YEAR SET  RECORDS BEGAN
HELENA                 68 (TIED)     68          1883       1866
LEWISTOWN              59 (TIED)     59          1988       1896
DILLON AIRPORT         57            54          2003       1929


...RECORD WARM MAXIMUM TEMPERATURES FOR SUNDAY JUN 28...

LOCATION           NEW RECORD    OLD RECORD    YEAR SET  RECORDS BEGAN
BOULDER                95            94          2007       1891
BOZEMAN EXP FARM       93            90          2007       1966
BOZEMAN MSU            94 (TIED)     94          2007       1892
CHOTEAU                93 (TIED)     93          1896       1893
CUT BANK               95            91          2006/1937  1903
DILLON AIRPORT         98            95          2007       1929
GOLD BUTTE 7N          93            92          1984       1905
GREAT FALLS            99            95     1973/1966/1925  1892
HAVRE                 103           100          2006       1880
HELENA                102            99          2007       1880
HOLTER DAM             99            99          1936       1903
NEIHART 7NW            91            89          2011       1905
SIMPSON 6W             99 (TIED)     99          1984       1948

$$



000
NOUS45 KTFX 290112 AAA
PNSTFX

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE GREAT FALLS MT
710 PM MDT SUN JUN 28 2015

...SUMMARY OF RECORD WARM TEMPERATURES FROM JUNE 26 TO THE PRESENT
IN SOUTHWEST AND NORTH CENTRAL MONTANA...

THIS SUMMARY WILL BE UPDATED FOR THE DURATION OF THE PRESENT HEAT
WAVE IN MONTANA.

...RECORD WARM MAXIMUM TEMPERATURES FOR FRIDAY JUNE 26...

LOCATION           NEW RECORD    OLD RECORD    YEAR SET  RECORDS BEGAN
DILLON AIRPORT         94   (TIED)   94          1970       1929
DILLON WMU             94   (TIED)   94          2002       1895
HELENA                 98            96          1910       1866
WISDOM                 88            87          1932       1906


...RECORD WARM MINIMUM TEMPERATURES FOR SATURDAY JUN 27...

LOCATION           NEW RECORD    OLD RECORD    YEAR SET  RECORDS BEGAN
DILLON AIRPORT         57            55          2002       1929


...RECORD WARM MAXIMUM TEMPERATURES FOR SATURDAY JUN 27...

LOCATION           NEW RECORD    OLD RECORD    YEAR SET  RECORDS BEGAN
BOULDER                95            91          2002       1891
BOZEMAN EXP FARM       92            88          2002/1970  1966
BOZEMAN MSU            94            93          1919       1892
BELGRADE-YELLOWSTN APT 98            94          1958       1935
CUT BANK               95            92          1910       1903
DILLON AIRPORT         96            91          1966       1929
DILLON WMU             97            91    2013/1987/1981   1895
ENNIS                  96            94          1919       1918
FORT BENTON           100            97          2002       1894
HELENA                103*           96          1936       1866
LOMA 1W               102            99          2002       1950
MILLEGAN 14SE          96**          89          2002       1965
SIMPSON                99            97          1988       1948
WEST YELLOWSTONE       91            89          1926       1905

*ALL-TIME RECORD HIGH TEMPERATURE FOR JUNE SET AT HELENA. THE OLD
  RECORD WAS 102 SET ON JUNE 21 1900.
**ALL-TIME RECORD HIGH TEMPERATURE FOR JUNE TIED AT MILLEGAN 14SE.
  THIS TIES THE PREVIOUS ALL-TIME WARMEST DAY OF 96 DEGREES ON JUNE
  25 2012.


...RECORD WARM MINIMUM TEMPERATURES FOR SUNDAY JUNE 28...

LOCATION           NEW RECORD    OLD RECORD    YEAR SET  RECORDS BEGAN
HELENA                 68 (TIED)     68          1883       1866
LEWISTOWN              59 (TIED)     59          1988       1896
DILLON AIRPORT         57            54          2003       1929


...RECORD WARM MAXIMUM TEMPERATURES FOR SUNDAY JUN 28...

LOCATION           NEW RECORD    OLD RECORD    YEAR SET  RECORDS BEGAN
BOULDER                95            94          2007       1891
BOZEMAN EXP FARM       93            90          2007       1966
BOZEMAN MSU            94 (TIED)     94          2007       1892
CHOTEAU                93 (TIED)     93          1896       1893
CUT BANK               95            91          2006/1937  1903
DILLON AIRPORT         98            95          2007       1929
GOLD BUTTE 7N          93            92          1984       1905
GREAT FALLS            99            95     1973/1966/1925  1892
HAVRE                 103           100          2006       1880
HELENA                102            99          2007       1880
HOLTER DAM             99            99          1936       1903
NEIHART 7NW            91            89          2011       1905
SIMPSON 6W             99 (TIED)     99          1984       1948

$$



000
NOUS45 KTFX 290112 AAA
PNSTFX

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE GREAT FALLS MT
710 PM MDT SUN JUN 28 2015

...SUMMARY OF RECORD WARM TEMPERATURES FROM JUNE 26 TO THE PRESENT
IN SOUTHWEST AND NORTH CENTRAL MONTANA...

THIS SUMMARY WILL BE UPDATED FOR THE DURATION OF THE PRESENT HEAT
WAVE IN MONTANA.

...RECORD WARM MAXIMUM TEMPERATURES FOR FRIDAY JUNE 26...

LOCATION           NEW RECORD    OLD RECORD    YEAR SET  RECORDS BEGAN
DILLON AIRPORT         94   (TIED)   94          1970       1929
DILLON WMU             94   (TIED)   94          2002       1895
HELENA                 98            96          1910       1866
WISDOM                 88            87          1932       1906


...RECORD WARM MINIMUM TEMPERATURES FOR SATURDAY JUN 27...

LOCATION           NEW RECORD    OLD RECORD    YEAR SET  RECORDS BEGAN
DILLON AIRPORT         57            55          2002       1929


...RECORD WARM MAXIMUM TEMPERATURES FOR SATURDAY JUN 27...

LOCATION           NEW RECORD    OLD RECORD    YEAR SET  RECORDS BEGAN
BOULDER                95            91          2002       1891
BOZEMAN EXP FARM       92            88          2002/1970  1966
BOZEMAN MSU            94            93          1919       1892
BELGRADE-YELLOWSTN APT 98            94          1958       1935
CUT BANK               95            92          1910       1903
DILLON AIRPORT         96            91          1966       1929
DILLON WMU             97            91    2013/1987/1981   1895
ENNIS                  96            94          1919       1918
FORT BENTON           100            97          2002       1894
HELENA                103*           96          1936       1866
LOMA 1W               102            99          2002       1950
MILLEGAN 14SE          96**          89          2002       1965
SIMPSON                99            97          1988       1948
WEST YELLOWSTONE       91            89          1926       1905

*ALL-TIME RECORD HIGH TEMPERATURE FOR JUNE SET AT HELENA. THE OLD
  RECORD WAS 102 SET ON JUNE 21 1900.
**ALL-TIME RECORD HIGH TEMPERATURE FOR JUNE TIED AT MILLEGAN 14SE.
  THIS TIES THE PREVIOUS ALL-TIME WARMEST DAY OF 96 DEGREES ON JUNE
  25 2012.


...RECORD WARM MINIMUM TEMPERATURES FOR SUNDAY JUNE 28...

LOCATION           NEW RECORD    OLD RECORD    YEAR SET  RECORDS BEGAN
HELENA                 68 (TIED)     68          1883       1866
LEWISTOWN              59 (TIED)     59          1988       1896
DILLON AIRPORT         57            54          2003       1929


...RECORD WARM MAXIMUM TEMPERATURES FOR SUNDAY JUN 28...

LOCATION           NEW RECORD    OLD RECORD    YEAR SET  RECORDS BEGAN
BOULDER                95            94          2007       1891
BOZEMAN EXP FARM       93            90          2007       1966
BOZEMAN MSU            94 (TIED)     94          2007       1892
CHOTEAU                93 (TIED)     93          1896       1893
CUT BANK               95            91          2006/1937  1903
DILLON AIRPORT         98            95          2007       1929
GOLD BUTTE 7N          93            92          1984       1905
GREAT FALLS            99            95     1973/1966/1925  1892
HAVRE                 103           100          2006       1880
HELENA                102            99          2007       1880
HOLTER DAM             99            99          1936       1903
NEIHART 7NW            91            89          2011       1905
SIMPSON 6W             99 (TIED)     99          1984       1948

$$



000
NOUS45 KGJT 281907
PNSGJT

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE GRAND JUNCTION CO
107 PM MDT SUN JUN 28 2015

THE FOLLOWING ARE PRELIMINARY 24 HOUR PRECIPITATION REPORTS FROM
WESTERN COLORADO AND EASTERN UTAH, ENDING SUNDAY MORNING AT 11
AM. AMOUNTS ARE IN INCHES.


**********************24 HOUR PRECIPITATION**********************

LOCATION              24 HOUR     TIME/DATE   COMMENTS
                     PRECIPITATION           OF
                     /INCHES/   MEASUREMENT

COLORADO

...ARCHULETA COUNTY...
   PAGOSA SPRINGS 4.2 W  0.09   701 AM  6/28  COCORAHS
   PAGOSA SPRINGS 1.6 S  0.01   743 AM  6/28  COCORAHS

...GUNNISON COUNTY...
   PITKIN 1.1 SW         0.06   730 AM  6/28  COCORAHS

...LA PLATA COUNTY...
   HESPERUS 7.8 SW       0.33   750 AM  6/28  COCORAHS
   DURANGO 7.1 N         0.29   823 AM  6/28  COCORAHS
   DURANGO 10 NNE        0.28   845 AM  6/28  COCORAHS
   DURANGO               0.09  1000 AM  6/28  W CO COOP SITE
   DURANGO 4.8 WSW       0.06  1000 AM  6/28  COCORAHS
   HESPERUS 6.9 S        0.06   658 AM  6/28  COCORAHS
   DURANGO 0.7 NNE       0.05   914 AM  6/28  COCORAHS
   HESPERUS 4.9 SE       0.04   645 AM  6/28  COCORAHS
   BAYFIELD 7.0 N        0.02   838 AM  6/28  COCORAHS

...ROUTT COUNTY...
   STEAMBOAT SPRINGS 1.  0.05   540 AM  6/28  COCORAHS
   STEAMBOAT SPRINGS 0.  0.02   744 AM  6/28  COCORAHS
   STMBOAT SPGS 1SE      0.01   759 AM  6/28  UNOFFICIAL STATION
   STEAMBOAT SPRINGS 1   0.01   748 AM  6/28  COCORAHS

$$

MMS


000
NOUS45 KGJT 281907
PNSGJT

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE GRAND JUNCTION CO
107 PM MDT SUN JUN 28 2015

THE FOLLOWING ARE PRELIMINARY 24 HOUR PRECIPITATION REPORTS FROM
WESTERN COLORADO AND EASTERN UTAH, ENDING SUNDAY MORNING AT 11
AM. AMOUNTS ARE IN INCHES.


**********************24 HOUR PRECIPITATION**********************

LOCATION              24 HOUR     TIME/DATE   COMMENTS
                     PRECIPITATION           OF
                     /INCHES/   MEASUREMENT

COLORADO

...ARCHULETA COUNTY...
   PAGOSA SPRINGS 4.2 W  0.09   701 AM  6/28  COCORAHS
   PAGOSA SPRINGS 1.6 S  0.01   743 AM  6/28  COCORAHS

...GUNNISON COUNTY...
   PITKIN 1.1 SW         0.06   730 AM  6/28  COCORAHS

...LA PLATA COUNTY...
   HESPERUS 7.8 SW       0.33   750 AM  6/28  COCORAHS
   DURANGO 7.1 N         0.29   823 AM  6/28  COCORAHS
   DURANGO 10 NNE        0.28   845 AM  6/28  COCORAHS
   DURANGO               0.09  1000 AM  6/28  W CO COOP SITE
   DURANGO 4.8 WSW       0.06  1000 AM  6/28  COCORAHS
   HESPERUS 6.9 S        0.06   658 AM  6/28  COCORAHS
   DURANGO 0.7 NNE       0.05   914 AM  6/28  COCORAHS
   HESPERUS 4.9 SE       0.04   645 AM  6/28  COCORAHS
   BAYFIELD 7.0 N        0.02   838 AM  6/28  COCORAHS

...ROUTT COUNTY...
   STEAMBOAT SPRINGS 1.  0.05   540 AM  6/28  COCORAHS
   STEAMBOAT SPRINGS 0.  0.02   744 AM  6/28  COCORAHS
   STMBOAT SPGS 1SE      0.01   759 AM  6/28  UNOFFICIAL STATION
   STEAMBOAT SPRINGS 1   0.01   748 AM  6/28  COCORAHS

$$

MMS


000
NOUS45 KGJT 281907
PNSGJT

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE GRAND JUNCTION CO
107 PM MDT SUN JUN 28 2015

THE FOLLOWING ARE PRELIMINARY 24 HOUR PRECIPITATION REPORTS FROM
WESTERN COLORADO AND EASTERN UTAH, ENDING SUNDAY MORNING AT 11
AM. AMOUNTS ARE IN INCHES.


**********************24 HOUR PRECIPITATION**********************

LOCATION              24 HOUR     TIME/DATE   COMMENTS
                     PRECIPITATION           OF
                     /INCHES/   MEASUREMENT

COLORADO

...ARCHULETA COUNTY...
   PAGOSA SPRINGS 4.2 W  0.09   701 AM  6/28  COCORAHS
   PAGOSA SPRINGS 1.6 S  0.01   743 AM  6/28  COCORAHS

...GUNNISON COUNTY...
   PITKIN 1.1 SW         0.06   730 AM  6/28  COCORAHS

...LA PLATA COUNTY...
   HESPERUS 7.8 SW       0.33   750 AM  6/28  COCORAHS
   DURANGO 7.1 N         0.29   823 AM  6/28  COCORAHS
   DURANGO 10 NNE        0.28   845 AM  6/28  COCORAHS
   DURANGO               0.09  1000 AM  6/28  W CO COOP SITE
   DURANGO 4.8 WSW       0.06  1000 AM  6/28  COCORAHS
   HESPERUS 6.9 S        0.06   658 AM  6/28  COCORAHS
   DURANGO 0.7 NNE       0.05   914 AM  6/28  COCORAHS
   HESPERUS 4.9 SE       0.04   645 AM  6/28  COCORAHS
   BAYFIELD 7.0 N        0.02   838 AM  6/28  COCORAHS

...ROUTT COUNTY...
   STEAMBOAT SPRINGS 1.  0.05   540 AM  6/28  COCORAHS
   STEAMBOAT SPRINGS 0.  0.02   744 AM  6/28  COCORAHS
   STMBOAT SPGS 1SE      0.01   759 AM  6/28  UNOFFICIAL STATION
   STEAMBOAT SPRINGS 1   0.01   748 AM  6/28  COCORAHS

$$

MMS


000
NOUS45 KGJT 281907
PNSGJT

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE GRAND JUNCTION CO
107 PM MDT SUN JUN 28 2015

THE FOLLOWING ARE PRELIMINARY 24 HOUR PRECIPITATION REPORTS FROM
WESTERN COLORADO AND EASTERN UTAH, ENDING SUNDAY MORNING AT 11
AM. AMOUNTS ARE IN INCHES.


**********************24 HOUR PRECIPITATION**********************

LOCATION              24 HOUR     TIME/DATE   COMMENTS
                     PRECIPITATION           OF
                     /INCHES/   MEASUREMENT

COLORADO

...ARCHULETA COUNTY...
   PAGOSA SPRINGS 4.2 W  0.09   701 AM  6/28  COCORAHS
   PAGOSA SPRINGS 1.6 S  0.01   743 AM  6/28  COCORAHS

...GUNNISON COUNTY...
   PITKIN 1.1 SW         0.06   730 AM  6/28  COCORAHS

...LA PLATA COUNTY...
   HESPERUS 7.8 SW       0.33   750 AM  6/28  COCORAHS
   DURANGO 7.1 N         0.29   823 AM  6/28  COCORAHS
   DURANGO 10 NNE        0.28   845 AM  6/28  COCORAHS
   DURANGO               0.09  1000 AM  6/28  W CO COOP SITE
   DURANGO 4.8 WSW       0.06  1000 AM  6/28  COCORAHS
   HESPERUS 6.9 S        0.06   658 AM  6/28  COCORAHS
   DURANGO 0.7 NNE       0.05   914 AM  6/28  COCORAHS
   HESPERUS 4.9 SE       0.04   645 AM  6/28  COCORAHS
   BAYFIELD 7.0 N        0.02   838 AM  6/28  COCORAHS

...ROUTT COUNTY...
   STEAMBOAT SPRINGS 1.  0.05   540 AM  6/28  COCORAHS
   STEAMBOAT SPRINGS 0.  0.02   744 AM  6/28  COCORAHS
   STMBOAT SPGS 1SE      0.01   759 AM  6/28  UNOFFICIAL STATION
   STEAMBOAT SPRINGS 1   0.01   748 AM  6/28  COCORAHS

$$

MMS


000
NOUS43 KGLD 281205
PNSGLD

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE GOODLAND KS
600 AM MDT SUN JUN 28 2015

...ON THIS DATE IN WEATHER HISTORY...

IN 1989, THE GREATEST DAILY RAINFALL AMOUNT ON RECORD OCCURRED IN
GOODLAND, WHICH RECEIVED 4.15 INCHES. THIS WAS NEARLY ONE QUARTER
OF THE TOTAL RAINFALL FOR THE YEAR, WHICH WAS 18 INCHES.

IN 2003, A LINE OF SEVERE THUNDERSTORMS MOVED FROM THE NORTHWEST
DURING THE EVENING OF THE 28TH. NUMEROUS REPORTS OF GOLF BALL SIZED
HAIL WERE RECEIVED FROM EAST CENTRAL COLORADO INTO NORTHWEST KANSAS.
TWO BRIEF TORNADOES WERE REPORTED, ONE PRODUCING NO DAMAGE NORTH OF
TRIBUNE KANSAS AND A SECOND PRODUCING LOW END F1 DAMAGE 13 MILES
SOUTH OF ATWOOD.

IN 2011, AN INTENSE MICROBURST ROARED ACROSS KIT CARSON COUNTY MUNICIPAL AIRPORT SOUTH OF BURLINGTON DURING THE EVENING HOURS, COMPLETELY DESTROYING TWO HANGARS AND SEVERAL AIRCRAFT.  WINDS WERE CLOCKED AT 84 MPH FROM THE WEST.  THE TWO HANGARS DESTROYED WERE HIT BROADSIDE BY THE COLLAPSING THUNDERSTORM WINDS, WHILE ANOTHER HANGAR NEARBY EXPERIENCED LITTLE DAMAGE.

$$



000
NOUS43 KGLD 281205
PNSGLD

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE GOODLAND KS
600 AM MDT SUN JUN 28 2015

...ON THIS DATE IN WEATHER HISTORY...

IN 1989, THE GREATEST DAILY RAINFALL AMOUNT ON RECORD OCCURRED IN
GOODLAND, WHICH RECEIVED 4.15 INCHES. THIS WAS NEARLY ONE QUARTER
OF THE TOTAL RAINFALL FOR THE YEAR, WHICH WAS 18 INCHES.

IN 2003, A LINE OF SEVERE THUNDERSTORMS MOVED FROM THE NORTHWEST
DURING THE EVENING OF THE 28TH. NUMEROUS REPORTS OF GOLF BALL SIZED
HAIL WERE RECEIVED FROM EAST CENTRAL COLORADO INTO NORTHWEST KANSAS.
TWO BRIEF TORNADOES WERE REPORTED, ONE PRODUCING NO DAMAGE NORTH OF
TRIBUNE KANSAS AND A SECOND PRODUCING LOW END F1 DAMAGE 13 MILES
SOUTH OF ATWOOD.

IN 2011, AN INTENSE MICROBURST ROARED ACROSS KIT CARSON COUNTY MUNICIPAL AIRPORT SOUTH OF BURLINGTON DURING THE EVENING HOURS, COMPLETELY DESTROYING TWO HANGARS AND SEVERAL AIRCRAFT.  WINDS WERE CLOCKED AT 84 MPH FROM THE WEST.  THE TWO HANGARS DESTROYED WERE HIT BROADSIDE BY THE COLLAPSING THUNDERSTORM WINDS, WHILE ANOTHER HANGAR NEARBY EXPERIENCED LITTLE DAMAGE.

$$


000
NOUS43 KGLD 281205
PNSGLD

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE GOODLAND KS
600 AM MDT SUN JUN 28 2015

...ON THIS DATE IN WEATHER HISTORY...

IN 1989, THE GREATEST DAILY RAINFALL AMOUNT ON RECORD OCCURRED IN
GOODLAND, WHICH RECEIVED 4.15 INCHES. THIS WAS NEARLY ONE QUARTER
OF THE TOTAL RAINFALL FOR THE YEAR, WHICH WAS 18 INCHES.

IN 2003, A LINE OF SEVERE THUNDERSTORMS MOVED FROM THE NORTHWEST
DURING THE EVENING OF THE 28TH. NUMEROUS REPORTS OF GOLF BALL SIZED
HAIL WERE RECEIVED FROM EAST CENTRAL COLORADO INTO NORTHWEST KANSAS.
TWO BRIEF TORNADOES WERE REPORTED, ONE PRODUCING NO DAMAGE NORTH OF
TRIBUNE KANSAS AND A SECOND PRODUCING LOW END F1 DAMAGE 13 MILES
SOUTH OF ATWOOD.

IN 2011, AN INTENSE MICROBURST ROARED ACROSS KIT CARSON COUNTY MUNICIPAL AIRPORT SOUTH OF BURLINGTON DURING THE EVENING HOURS, COMPLETELY DESTROYING TWO HANGARS AND SEVERAL AIRCRAFT.  WINDS WERE CLOCKED AT 84 MPH FROM THE WEST.  THE TWO HANGARS DESTROYED WERE HIT BROADSIDE BY THE COLLAPSING THUNDERSTORM WINDS, WHILE ANOTHER HANGAR NEARBY EXPERIENCED LITTLE DAMAGE.

$$


000
NOUS43 KGLD 281205
PNSGLD

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE GOODLAND KS
600 AM MDT SUN JUN 28 2015

...ON THIS DATE IN WEATHER HISTORY...

IN 1989, THE GREATEST DAILY RAINFALL AMOUNT ON RECORD OCCURRED IN
GOODLAND, WHICH RECEIVED 4.15 INCHES. THIS WAS NEARLY ONE QUARTER
OF THE TOTAL RAINFALL FOR THE YEAR, WHICH WAS 18 INCHES.

IN 2003, A LINE OF SEVERE THUNDERSTORMS MOVED FROM THE NORTHWEST
DURING THE EVENING OF THE 28TH. NUMEROUS REPORTS OF GOLF BALL SIZED
HAIL WERE RECEIVED FROM EAST CENTRAL COLORADO INTO NORTHWEST KANSAS.
TWO BRIEF TORNADOES WERE REPORTED, ONE PRODUCING NO DAMAGE NORTH OF
TRIBUNE KANSAS AND A SECOND PRODUCING LOW END F1 DAMAGE 13 MILES
SOUTH OF ATWOOD.

IN 2011, AN INTENSE MICROBURST ROARED ACROSS KIT CARSON COUNTY MUNICIPAL AIRPORT SOUTH OF BURLINGTON DURING THE EVENING HOURS, COMPLETELY DESTROYING TWO HANGARS AND SEVERAL AIRCRAFT.  WINDS WERE CLOCKED AT 84 MPH FROM THE WEST.  THE TWO HANGARS DESTROYED WERE HIT BROADSIDE BY THE COLLAPSING THUNDERSTORM WINDS, WHILE ANOTHER HANGAR NEARBY EXPERIENCED LITTLE DAMAGE.

$$



000
NOUS45 KBOU 272140
PNSBOU

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE PUEBLO CO
400 PM MDT SAT JUN 27 2015

COLORADO LIGHTNING SAFETY WEEK CONCLUDES TODAY...WITH WILDFIRES
BEING THE FINAL TOPIC.

DURING THE PAST WEEK WE HAVE PRESENTED LIGHTNING INFORMATION AND
SAFETY RULES.  ALTHOUGH WILDFIRES ARE NOT AN ACTUAL WEATHER
PHENOMENON...WILDFIRES ARE DIRECTLY RELATED TO LIGHTNING AND OTHER
WEATHER ELEMENTS.

NORMALLY...THE WILDFIRE THREAT IN COLORADO INCREASES SIGNIFICANTLY
AFTER THE MIDDLE OF JUNE AND USUALLY PEAKS IN EARLY JULY...AND
REMAINS HIGH THROUGH AUGUST AND EARLY SEPTEMBER.  COLORADO AVERAGES
ABOUT 2500 WILDFIRES EACH YEAR.

ABOUT HALF OF ALL FOREST FIRES IN COLORADO ARE IGNITED BY LIGHTNING.
ADDITIONALLY...MANY RANGELAND AND WHEAT FIELD FIRES ARE CAUSED BY
LIGHTNING. MANY OF THESE LIGHTNING CAUSED WILDFIRES OCCUR IN THE
ABSENCE OF RAIN AND ARE THE RESULT OF WHAT IS REFERRED TO AS DRY
THUNDERSTORMS.

LIGHTNING IS OFTEN ACCOMPANIED BY STRONG WINDS FROM THUNDERSTORMS.
THESE WINDS CAN QUICKLY TURN SMOLDERING ORGANIC MATERIAL INTO A
RAGING FIRE.  THUNDERSTORM WINDS TEND TO BE ERRATIC IN DIRECTION AND
SPEED...POSING ONE OF THE GREATEST DANGERS FOR FIREFIGHTERS.

LIGHTNING THAT STRIKES THE GROUND IS USUALLY DIVIDED INTO TWO
CATEGORIES...NEGATIVE AND POSITIVE STRIKES...DEPENDING ON THE IONIC
SOURCE REGION OF THE THUNDERSTORM.  THE NEGATIVE STRIKES ARE FAR
MORE COMMON THAN POSITIVE STRIKES.  THE POSITIVE STRIKES ARE MORE
INTENSE AND HAVE A LONGER DURATION THAN THE NEGATIVE STRIKES AND ARE
MORE LIKELY TO IGNITE A FIRE.  LIGHTNING DETECTION TECHNOLOGY
PROVIDES LAND MANAGERS AND WEATHER FORECASTERS WITH THE ABILITY TO
IDENTIFY THE GENERAL LOCATION AND CHARGE CATEGORY OF EACH LIGHTNING
STRIKE.

NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE FORECASTERS HELP LAND MANAGERS AND
FIREFIGHTERS BY PRODUCING FIRE WEATHER ZONE FORECASTS ON A DAILY
BASIS.  SPOT FIRE WEATHER FORECASTS ARE ALSO PROVIDED FOR THOSE WHO
WORK ON PRESCRIBED BURNS OR SPECIFIC WILDFIRES.  FORECASTERS ALSO
ISSUE RED FLAG WARNINGS FOR USE BY LAND MANAGERS WHEN THE
COMBINATION OF DRY VEGETATION AND CRITICAL WEATHER CONDITIONS WILL
RESULT IN A HIGH POTENTIAL FOR THE DEVELOPMENT AND SPREAD OF
WILDFIRES.  LAND MANAGERS...IN TURN...TYPICALLY INFORM THE GENERAL
PUBLIC OF THE FIRE DANGER IN NATIONAL PARKS...FORESTS...AND OTHER
PUBLIC LANDS.

DURING PERIODS OF EXTREME FIRE DANGER IN FORESTS AND RANGELANDS...

YOU SHOULD AVOID BEING IN AREAS WHERE YOU MIGHT BECOME TRAPPED BY A
WILDFIRE.

YOU SHOULD AVOID THE USE OF MATCHES OR ANYTHING ELSE WHICH COULD
IGNITE A FIRE.

MAKE SURE THAT HOT PARTS OF MOTORIZED EQUIPMENT...SUCH AS
MUFFLERS...ARE NOT ALLOWED TO COME IN CONTACT WITH DRY GRASSES OR
OTHER POTENTIALLY FLAMMABLE MATERIAL.

IF YOU BECOME TRAPPED OR CUT OFF BY A WILDFIRE SEEK SHELTER IN AREAS
WITH LITTLE OR NO FUEL...SUCH AS ROCK SLIDE AREAS OR LAKES.

FOR MORE INFORMATION ON WILDFIRES AND FIRE SAFETY...PLEASE CHECK OUT
THE FOLLOWING WEB ADDRESSES...

HTTP://WEATHER.GOV/FIRE

HTTP://WWW.NIFC.GOV

HTTP://CSFS.COLOSTATE.EDU/

HTTPS://SITES.GOOGLE.COM/A/STATE.CO.US/DFPC/PROGRAM-2/WILDIRE-
INFORMATION-AND-RESOURCE-CENTER/WILDFIRE-PREPARATION

WHICH IS THE COLORADO DIVISION OF FIRE PREVENTION AND CONTROL.


000
NOUS45 KBOU 272140
PNSBOU

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE PUEBLO CO
400 PM MDT SAT JUN 27 2015

COLORADO LIGHTNING SAFETY WEEK CONCLUDES TODAY...WITH WILDFIRES
BEING THE FINAL TOPIC.

DURING THE PAST WEEK WE HAVE PRESENTED LIGHTNING INFORMATION AND
SAFETY RULES.  ALTHOUGH WILDFIRES ARE NOT AN ACTUAL WEATHER
PHENOMENON...WILDFIRES ARE DIRECTLY RELATED TO LIGHTNING AND OTHER
WEATHER ELEMENTS.

NORMALLY...THE WILDFIRE THREAT IN COLORADO INCREASES SIGNIFICANTLY
AFTER THE MIDDLE OF JUNE AND USUALLY PEAKS IN EARLY JULY...AND
REMAINS HIGH THROUGH AUGUST AND EARLY SEPTEMBER.  COLORADO AVERAGES
ABOUT 2500 WILDFIRES EACH YEAR.

ABOUT HALF OF ALL FOREST FIRES IN COLORADO ARE IGNITED BY LIGHTNING.
ADDITIONALLY...MANY RANGELAND AND WHEAT FIELD FIRES ARE CAUSED BY
LIGHTNING. MANY OF THESE LIGHTNING CAUSED WILDFIRES OCCUR IN THE
ABSENCE OF RAIN AND ARE THE RESULT OF WHAT IS REFERRED TO AS DRY
THUNDERSTORMS.

LIGHTNING IS OFTEN ACCOMPANIED BY STRONG WINDS FROM THUNDERSTORMS.
THESE WINDS CAN QUICKLY TURN SMOLDERING ORGANIC MATERIAL INTO A
RAGING FIRE.  THUNDERSTORM WINDS TEND TO BE ERRATIC IN DIRECTION AND
SPEED...POSING ONE OF THE GREATEST DANGERS FOR FIREFIGHTERS.

LIGHTNING THAT STRIKES THE GROUND IS USUALLY DIVIDED INTO TWO
CATEGORIES...NEGATIVE AND POSITIVE STRIKES...DEPENDING ON THE IONIC
SOURCE REGION OF THE THUNDERSTORM.  THE NEGATIVE STRIKES ARE FAR
MORE COMMON THAN POSITIVE STRIKES.  THE POSITIVE STRIKES ARE MORE
INTENSE AND HAVE A LONGER DURATION THAN THE NEGATIVE STRIKES AND ARE
MORE LIKELY TO IGNITE A FIRE.  LIGHTNING DETECTION TECHNOLOGY
PROVIDES LAND MANAGERS AND WEATHER FORECASTERS WITH THE ABILITY TO
IDENTIFY THE GENERAL LOCATION AND CHARGE CATEGORY OF EACH LIGHTNING
STRIKE.

NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE FORECASTERS HELP LAND MANAGERS AND
FIREFIGHTERS BY PRODUCING FIRE WEATHER ZONE FORECASTS ON A DAILY
BASIS.  SPOT FIRE WEATHER FORECASTS ARE ALSO PROVIDED FOR THOSE WHO
WORK ON PRESCRIBED BURNS OR SPECIFIC WILDFIRES.  FORECASTERS ALSO
ISSUE RED FLAG WARNINGS FOR USE BY LAND MANAGERS WHEN THE
COMBINATION OF DRY VEGETATION AND CRITICAL WEATHER CONDITIONS WILL
RESULT IN A HIGH POTENTIAL FOR THE DEVELOPMENT AND SPREAD OF
WILDFIRES.  LAND MANAGERS...IN TURN...TYPICALLY INFORM THE GENERAL
PUBLIC OF THE FIRE DANGER IN NATIONAL PARKS...FORESTS...AND OTHER
PUBLIC LANDS.

DURING PERIODS OF EXTREME FIRE DANGER IN FORESTS AND RANGELANDS...

YOU SHOULD AVOID BEING IN AREAS WHERE YOU MIGHT BECOME TRAPPED BY A
WILDFIRE.

YOU SHOULD AVOID THE USE OF MATCHES OR ANYTHING ELSE WHICH COULD
IGNITE A FIRE.

MAKE SURE THAT HOT PARTS OF MOTORIZED EQUIPMENT...SUCH AS
MUFFLERS...ARE NOT ALLOWED TO COME IN CONTACT WITH DRY GRASSES OR
OTHER POTENTIALLY FLAMMABLE MATERIAL.

IF YOU BECOME TRAPPED OR CUT OFF BY A WILDFIRE SEEK SHELTER IN AREAS
WITH LITTLE OR NO FUEL...SUCH AS ROCK SLIDE AREAS OR LAKES.

FOR MORE INFORMATION ON WILDFIRES AND FIRE SAFETY...PLEASE CHECK OUT
THE FOLLOWING WEB ADDRESSES...

HTTP://WEATHER.GOV/FIRE

HTTP://WWW.NIFC.GOV

HTTP://CSFS.COLOSTATE.EDU/

HTTPS://SITES.GOOGLE.COM/A/STATE.CO.US/DFPC/PROGRAM-2/WILDIRE-
INFORMATION-AND-RESOURCE-CENTER/WILDFIRE-PREPARATION

WHICH IS THE COLORADO DIVISION OF FIRE PREVENTION AND CONTROL.



000
NOUS43 KLMK 272001 CCA
PNSLMK

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT...CORRECTED
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE LOUISVILLE KY
350 PM EDT Sat Jun 27 2015

...NWS Damage Survey for 06/26/2015 Thunderstorm Wind Event...

.Extreme eastern Jefferson through southern Shelby Counties in
Kentucky...

Peak Wind:                 45-65 MPH
Path Length/Statue/:       15 miles
Path Width/Maximum/:       4 miles
Fatalities:                0
Injuries:                  0

Start Date:                Fri 26 2015
Start Time:                5:50 PM EDT
Start Location:            5 miles SSW of Simpsonville

End Date:                  Fri 26 2015
End Times:                 6:04 PM EDT
End Location:              5 miles SSE of Shelbyville

Survey Summary:

The National Weather Service in conjunction with Shelby County
Emergency Management conducted a storm survey across eastern
Jefferson and Shelby counties in Kentucky.  The survey team
investigated areas from the destructive bow echo that went through
the area Friday evening.

There was sporadic wind damage from west of Finchville through
southern portions of Shelbyville.  The majority of the damage was
due to sections of trees snapping or falling over.  The survey team
was extremely thankful to have renowned tree expert Dr. Bill
Fountain from the University of Kentucky Horticulture Department
come and assess the damage to the trees.  The team observed damage
to over 50 hackberry, black cherry, different types of maple, Osage
orange, and especially Bradford pear trees.

There was some barn damage along with a tree on top of a home.  All
the damage was from the west southwest to the east northeast.

The Kentucky mesonet observed 55mph and the winds on the ground were
estimated to be as low as 45mph and as high as 65mph.  The worst
damage occurred just northeast of Finchville.

The National Weather Service would like to thank Shelby County
Emergency Manager Paul Whitman for his help with the survey.


Note: The information in this statement is preliminary and subject to
change pending final review of the event and publication in NWS
storm data.

For the latest updates, please visit our webpage at
weather.gov/louisville.

You can follow us on Facebook at www.facebook.com/nwslouisville.

You can follow us on Twitter at @nwslouisville.


$$

JDG/MD/RB/KW/JD/CA/BG






000
NOUS43 KLMK 272001 CCA
PNSLMK

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT...CORRECTED
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE LOUISVILLE KY
350 PM EDT Sat Jun 27 2015

...NWS Damage Survey for 06/26/2015 Thunderstorm Wind Event...

.Extreme eastern Jefferson through southern Shelby Counties in
Kentucky...

Peak Wind:                 45-65 MPH
Path Length/Statue/:       15 miles
Path Width/Maximum/:       4 miles
Fatalities:                0
Injuries:                  0

Start Date:                Fri 26 2015
Start Time:                5:50 PM EDT
Start Location:            5 miles SSW of Simpsonville

End Date:                  Fri 26 2015
End Times:                 6:04 PM EDT
End Location:              5 miles SSE of Shelbyville

Survey Summary:

The National Weather Service in conjunction with Shelby County
Emergency Management conducted a storm survey across eastern
Jefferson and Shelby counties in Kentucky.  The survey team
investigated areas from the destructive bow echo that went through
the area Friday evening.

There was sporadic wind damage from west of Finchville through
southern portions of Shelbyville.  The majority of the damage was
due to sections of trees snapping or falling over.  The survey team
was extremely thankful to have renowned tree expert Dr. Bill
Fountain from the University of Kentucky Horticulture Department
come and assess the damage to the trees.  The team observed damage
to over 50 hackberry, black cherry, different types of maple, Osage
orange, and especially Bradford pear trees.

There was some barn damage along with a tree on top of a home.  All
the damage was from the west southwest to the east northeast.

The Kentucky mesonet observed 55mph and the winds on the ground were
estimated to be as low as 45mph and as high as 65mph.  The worst
damage occurred just northeast of Finchville.

The National Weather Service would like to thank Shelby County
Emergency Manager Paul Whitman for his help with the survey.


Note: The information in this statement is preliminary and subject to
change pending final review of the event and publication in NWS
storm data.

For the latest updates, please visit our webpage at
weather.gov/louisville.

You can follow us on Facebook at www.facebook.com/nwslouisville.

You can follow us on Twitter at @nwslouisville.


$$

JDG/MD/RB/KW/JD/CA/BG





000
NOUS43 KLMK 272001 CCA
PNSLMK

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT...CORRECTED
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE LOUISVILLE KY
350 PM EDT Sat Jun 27 2015

...NWS Damage Survey for 06/26/2015 Thunderstorm Wind Event...

.Extreme eastern Jefferson through southern Shelby Counties in
Kentucky...

Peak Wind:                 45-65 MPH
Path Length/Statue/:       15 miles
Path Width/Maximum/:       4 miles
Fatalities:                0
Injuries:                  0

Start Date:                Fri 26 2015
Start Time:                5:50 PM EDT
Start Location:            5 miles SSW of Simpsonville

End Date:                  Fri 26 2015
End Times:                 6:04 PM EDT
End Location:              5 miles SSE of Shelbyville

Survey Summary:

The National Weather Service in conjunction with Shelby County
Emergency Management conducted a storm survey across eastern
Jefferson and Shelby counties in Kentucky.  The survey team
investigated areas from the destructive bow echo that went through
the area Friday evening.

There was sporadic wind damage from west of Finchville through
southern portions of Shelbyville.  The majority of the damage was
due to sections of trees snapping or falling over.  The survey team
was extremely thankful to have renowned tree expert Dr. Bill
Fountain from the University of Kentucky Horticulture Department
come and assess the damage to the trees.  The team observed damage
to over 50 hackberry, black cherry, different types of maple, Osage
orange, and especially Bradford pear trees.

There was some barn damage along with a tree on top of a home.  All
the damage was from the west southwest to the east northeast.

The Kentucky mesonet observed 55mph and the winds on the ground were
estimated to be as low as 45mph and as high as 65mph.  The worst
damage occurred just northeast of Finchville.

The National Weather Service would like to thank Shelby County
Emergency Manager Paul Whitman for his help with the survey.


Note: The information in this statement is preliminary and subject to
change pending final review of the event and publication in NWS
storm data.

For the latest updates, please visit our webpage at
weather.gov/louisville.

You can follow us on Facebook at www.facebook.com/nwslouisville.

You can follow us on Twitter at @nwslouisville.


$$

JDG/MD/RB/KW/JD/CA/BG






000
NOUS43 KLMK 272001 CCA
PNSLMK

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT...CORRECTED
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE LOUISVILLE KY
350 PM EDT Sat Jun 27 2015

...NWS Damage Survey for 06/26/2015 Thunderstorm Wind Event...

.Extreme eastern Jefferson through southern Shelby Counties in
Kentucky...

Peak Wind:                 45-65 MPH
Path Length/Statue/:       15 miles
Path Width/Maximum/:       4 miles
Fatalities:                0
Injuries:                  0

Start Date:                Fri 26 2015
Start Time:                5:50 PM EDT
Start Location:            5 miles SSW of Simpsonville

End Date:                  Fri 26 2015
End Times:                 6:04 PM EDT
End Location:              5 miles SSE of Shelbyville

Survey Summary:

The National Weather Service in conjunction with Shelby County
Emergency Management conducted a storm survey across eastern
Jefferson and Shelby counties in Kentucky.  The survey team
investigated areas from the destructive bow echo that went through
the area Friday evening.

There was sporadic wind damage from west of Finchville through
southern portions of Shelbyville.  The majority of the damage was
due to sections of trees snapping or falling over.  The survey team
was extremely thankful to have renowned tree expert Dr. Bill
Fountain from the University of Kentucky Horticulture Department
come and assess the damage to the trees.  The team observed damage
to over 50 hackberry, black cherry, different types of maple, Osage
orange, and especially Bradford pear trees.

There was some barn damage along with a tree on top of a home.  All
the damage was from the west southwest to the east northeast.

The Kentucky mesonet observed 55mph and the winds on the ground were
estimated to be as low as 45mph and as high as 65mph.  The worst
damage occurred just northeast of Finchville.

The National Weather Service would like to thank Shelby County
Emergency Manager Paul Whitman for his help with the survey.


Note: The information in this statement is preliminary and subject to
change pending final review of the event and publication in NWS
storm data.

For the latest updates, please visit our webpage at
weather.gov/louisville.

You can follow us on Facebook at www.facebook.com/nwslouisville.

You can follow us on Twitter at @nwslouisville.


$$

JDG/MD/RB/KW/JD/CA/BG





000
NOUS43 KLMK 271951
PNSLMK

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE LOUISVILLE KY
350 PM EDT Sat Jun 27 2015

...NWS Damage Survey for 06/26/2015 Thunderstorm Wind Event...

.Extreme eastern Jefferson through southern Shelby Counties in
Kentucky...

Peak Wind:                 45-65 MPH
Path Length/Statue/:       15 miles
Path Width/Maximum/:       4 miles
Fatalities:                0
Injuries:                  0

Start Date:                Fri 26 2015
Start Time:                4:50 PM EDT
Start Location:            5 miles SSW of Simpsonville

End Date:                  Fri 26 2015
End Times:                 5:04 PM EST
End Location:              5 miles SSE of Shelbyville

Survey Summary:

The National Weather Service in conjunction with Shelby County
Emergency Management conducted a storm survey across eastern
Jefferson and Shelby counties in Kentucky.  The survey team
investigated areas from the destructive bow echo that went through
the area Friday evening.

There was sporadic wind damage from west of Finchville through
southern portions of Shelbyville.  The majority of the damage was
due to sections of trees snapping or falling over.  The survey team
was extremely thankful to have renowned tree expert Dr. Bill
Fountain from the University of Kentucky Horticulture Department
come and assess the damage to the trees.  The team observed damage
to over 50 hackberry, black cherry, different types of maple, Osage
orange, and especially Bradford pear trees.

There was some barn damage along with a tree on top of a home.  All
the damage was from the west southwest to the east northeast.

The Kentucky mesonet observed 55mph and the winds on the ground were
estimated to be as low as 45mph and as high as 65mph.  The worst
damage occurred just northeast of Finchville.

The National Weather Service would like to thank Shelby County
Emergency Manager Paul Whitman for his help with the survey.


Note: The information in this statement is preliminary and subject to
change pending final review of the event and publication in NWS
storm data.

For the latest updates, please visit our webpage at
weather.gov/louisville.

You can follow us on Facebook at www.facebook.com/nwslouisville.

You can follow us on Twitter at @nwslouisville.


$$

JDG/MD/RB/KW/JD/CA/BG






000
NOUS43 KLMK 271951
PNSLMK

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE LOUISVILLE KY
350 PM EDT Sat Jun 27 2015

...NWS Damage Survey for 06/26/2015 Thunderstorm Wind Event...

.Extreme eastern Jefferson through southern Shelby Counties in
Kentucky...

Peak Wind:                 45-65 MPH
Path Length/Statue/:       15 miles
Path Width/Maximum/:       4 miles
Fatalities:                0
Injuries:                  0

Start Date:                Fri 26 2015
Start Time:                4:50 PM EDT
Start Location:            5 miles SSW of Simpsonville

End Date:                  Fri 26 2015
End Times:                 5:04 PM EST
End Location:              5 miles SSE of Shelbyville

Survey Summary:

The National Weather Service in conjunction with Shelby County
Emergency Management conducted a storm survey across eastern
Jefferson and Shelby counties in Kentucky.  The survey team
investigated areas from the destructive bow echo that went through
the area Friday evening.

There was sporadic wind damage from west of Finchville through
southern portions of Shelbyville.  The majority of the damage was
due to sections of trees snapping or falling over.  The survey team
was extremely thankful to have renowned tree expert Dr. Bill
Fountain from the University of Kentucky Horticulture Department
come and assess the damage to the trees.  The team observed damage
to over 50 hackberry, black cherry, different types of maple, Osage
orange, and especially Bradford pear trees.

There was some barn damage along with a tree on top of a home.  All
the damage was from the west southwest to the east northeast.

The Kentucky mesonet observed 55mph and the winds on the ground were
estimated to be as low as 45mph and as high as 65mph.  The worst
damage occurred just northeast of Finchville.

The National Weather Service would like to thank Shelby County
Emergency Manager Paul Whitman for his help with the survey.


Note: The information in this statement is preliminary and subject to
change pending final review of the event and publication in NWS
storm data.

For the latest updates, please visit our webpage at
weather.gov/louisville.

You can follow us on Facebook at www.facebook.com/nwslouisville.

You can follow us on Twitter at @nwslouisville.


$$

JDG/MD/RB/KW/JD/CA/BG





000
NOUS41 KLWX 271808
PNSLWX

...SEVERE WEATHER SAFETY RULES...

DAMAGING THUNDERSTORMS AND TORNADOES ARE POSSIBLE INTO THIS EVENING.
RESIDENTS OF SOUTHERN MARYLAND AND KING GEORGE COUNTY SHOULD MONITOR
THIS SITUATION VERY CLOSELY AND ENSURE YOUR NOAA WEATHER RADIOS ARE
SET TO ALERT MODE. SEVERE WEATHER WARNINGS MAY BECOME NECESSARY.
HERE ARE SOME SAFETY RULES TO KEEP IN MIND WHEN SEVERE WEATHER IS
EXPECTED OR IS OCCURRING.

IF A WARNING IS ISSUED...SEEK SHELTER INDOORS IMMEDIATELY. A SEVERE
THUNDERSTORM IS DEFINED AS PRODUCING QUARTER SIZE OR GREATER HAIL
AND WIND GUSTS OF 58 MPH OR MORE.

TORNADOES OFTEN FORM VERY RAPIDLY FROM SEVERE THUNDERSTORMS. IF
YOU ARE IN A TORNADO WATCH...AND A SEVERE THUNDERSTORM WARNING IS
ISSUED FOR YOUR AREA...MONITOR LOCAL CONDITIONS CLOSELY AND BE
READY TO TAKE QUICK ACTION TO SAVE YOUR LIFE.

STAY TUNED TO NOAA WEATHER RADIO...COMMERCIAL RADIO OR TELEVISION
FOR THE LATEST ON THIS POTENTIAL SEVERE WEATHER EVENT. ADDITIONAL
WEATHER INFORMATION...CAN BE FOUND AT WEATHER.GOV/WASHINGTON OR
WEATHER.GOV/BALTIMORE.


000
NOUS41 KLWX 271808
PNSLWX

...SEVERE WEATHER SAFETY RULES...

DAMAGING THUNDERSTORMS AND TORNADOES ARE POSSIBLE INTO THIS EVENING.
RESIDENTS OF SOUTHERN MARYLAND AND KING GEORGE COUNTY SHOULD MONITOR
THIS SITUATION VERY CLOSELY AND ENSURE YOUR NOAA WEATHER RADIOS ARE
SET TO ALERT MODE. SEVERE WEATHER WARNINGS MAY BECOME NECESSARY.
HERE ARE SOME SAFETY RULES TO KEEP IN MIND WHEN SEVERE WEATHER IS
EXPECTED OR IS OCCURRING.

IF A WARNING IS ISSUED...SEEK SHELTER INDOORS IMMEDIATELY. A SEVERE
THUNDERSTORM IS DEFINED AS PRODUCING QUARTER SIZE OR GREATER HAIL
AND WIND GUSTS OF 58 MPH OR MORE.

TORNADOES OFTEN FORM VERY RAPIDLY FROM SEVERE THUNDERSTORMS. IF
YOU ARE IN A TORNADO WATCH...AND A SEVERE THUNDERSTORM WARNING IS
ISSUED FOR YOUR AREA...MONITOR LOCAL CONDITIONS CLOSELY AND BE
READY TO TAKE QUICK ACTION TO SAVE YOUR LIFE.

STAY TUNED TO NOAA WEATHER RADIO...COMMERCIAL RADIO OR TELEVISION
FOR THE LATEST ON THIS POTENTIAL SEVERE WEATHER EVENT. ADDITIONAL
WEATHER INFORMATION...CAN BE FOUND AT WEATHER.GOV/WASHINGTON OR
WEATHER.GOV/BALTIMORE.



000
NOUS43 KGLD 271202
PNSGLD

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE GOODLAND KS
600 AM MDT SAT JUN 27 2015

...ON THIS DATE IN WEATHER HISTORY...

IN 1975, A TORNADO WAS REPORTED TO HAVE DESTROYED A BARN IN ARAPAHOE
COLORADO.

$$



000
NOUS43 KGLD 271202
PNSGLD

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE GOODLAND KS
600 AM MDT SAT JUN 27 2015

...ON THIS DATE IN WEATHER HISTORY...

IN 1975, A TORNADO WAS REPORTED TO HAVE DESTROYED A BARN IN ARAPAHOE
COLORADO.

$$


000
NOUS43 KGLD 271202
PNSGLD

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE GOODLAND KS
600 AM MDT SAT JUN 27 2015

...ON THIS DATE IN WEATHER HISTORY...

IN 1975, A TORNADO WAS REPORTED TO HAVE DESTROYED A BARN IN ARAPAHOE
COLORADO.

$$



000
NOUS43 KGLD 271202
PNSGLD

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE GOODLAND KS
600 AM MDT SAT JUN 27 2015

...ON THIS DATE IN WEATHER HISTORY...

IN 1975, A TORNADO WAS REPORTED TO HAVE DESTROYED A BARN IN ARAPAHOE
COLORADO.

$$


000
NOUS45 KBOU 271150
PNSBOU

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE PUEBLO CO
600 AM MDT SAT JUN 27 2015

COLORADO LIGHTNING SAFETY WEEK CONCLUDES TODAY...WITH WILDFIRES
BEING THE FINAL TOPIC.

DURING THE PAST WEEK WE HAVE PRESENTED LIGHTNING INFORMATION AND
SAFETY RULES.  ALTHOUGH WILDFIRES ARE NOT AN ACTUAL WEATHER
PHENOMENON...WILDFIRES ARE DIRECTLY RELATED TO LIGHTNING AND OTHER
WEATHER ELEMENTS.

NORMALLY...THE WILDFIRE THREAT IN COLORADO INCREASES SIGNIFICANTLY
AFTER THE MIDDLE OF JUNE AND USUALLY PEAKS IN EARLY JULY...AND
REMAINS HIGH THROUGH AUGUST AND EARLY SEPTEMBER.  COLORADO AVERAGES
ABOUT 2500 WILDFIRES EACH YEAR.

ABOUT HALF OF ALL FOREST FIRES IN COLORADO ARE IGNITED BY LIGHTNING.
ADDITIONALLY...MANY RANGELAND AND WHEAT FIELD FIRES ARE CAUSED BY
LIGHTNING. MANY OF THESE LIGHTNING CAUSED WILDFIRES OCCUR IN THE
ABSENCE OF RAIN AND ARE THE RESULT OF WHAT IS REFERRED TO AS DRY
THUNDERSTORMS.

LIGHTNING IS OFTEN ACCOMPANIED BY STRONG WINDS FROM THUNDERSTORMS.
THESE WINDS CAN QUICKLY TURN SMOLDERING ORGANIC MATERIAL INTO A
RAGING FIRE.  THUNDERSTORM WINDS TEND TO BE ERRATIC IN DIRECTION AND
SPEED...POSING ONE OF THE GREATEST DANGERS FOR FIREFIGHTERS.

LIGHTNING THAT STRIKES THE GROUND IS USUALLY DIVIDED INTO TWO
CATEGORIES...NEGATIVE AND POSITIVE STRIKES...DEPENDING ON THE IONIC
SOURCE REGION OF THE THUNDERSTORM.  THE NEGATIVE STRIKES ARE FAR
MORE COMMON THAN POSITIVE STRIKES.  THE POSITIVE STRIKES ARE MORE
INTENSE AND HAVE A LONGER DURATION THAN THE NEGATIVE STRIKES AND ARE
MORE LIKELY TO IGNITE A FIRE.  LIGHTNING DETECTION TECHNOLOGY
PROVIDES LAND MANAGERS AND WEATHER FORECASTERS WITH THE ABILITY TO
IDENTIFY THE GENERAL LOCATION AND CHARGE CATEGORY OF EACH LIGHTNING
STRIKE.

NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE FORECASTERS HELP LAND MANAGERS AND
FIREFIGHTERS BY PRODUCING FIRE WEATHER ZONE FORECASTS ON A DAILY
BASIS.  SPOT FIRE WEATHER FORECASTS ARE ALSO PROVIDED FOR THOSE WHO
WORK ON PRESCRIBED BURNS OR SPECIFIC WILDFIRES.  FORECASTERS ALSO
ISSUE RED FLAG WARNINGS FOR USE BY LAND MANAGERS WHEN THE
COMBINATION OF DRY VEGETATION AND CRITICAL WEATHER CONDITIONS WILL
RESULT IN A HIGH POTENTIAL FOR THE DEVELOPMENT AND SPREAD OF
WILDFIRES.  LAND MANAGERS...IN TURN...TYPICALLY INFORM THE GENERAL
PUBLIC OF THE FIRE DANGER IN NATIONAL PARKS...FORESTS...AND OTHER
PUBLIC LANDS.

DURING PERIODS OF EXTREME FIRE DANGER IN FORESTS AND RANGELANDS...

YOU SHOULD AVOID BEING IN AREAS WHERE YOU MIGHT BECOME TRAPPED BY A
WILDFIRE.

YOU SHOULD AVOID THE USE OF MATCHES OR ANYTHING ELSE WHICH COULD
IGNITE A FIRE.

MAKE SURE THAT HOT PARTS OF MOTORIZED EQUIPMENT...SUCH AS
MUFFLERS...ARE NOT ALLOWED TO COME IN CONTACT WITH DRY GRASSES OR
OTHER POTENTIALLY FLAMMABLE MATERIAL.

IF YOU BECOME TRAPPED OR CUT OFF BY A WILDFIRE SEEK SHELTER IN AREAS
WITH LITTLE OR NO FUEL...SUCH AS ROCK SLIDE AREAS OR LAKES.

FOR MORE INFORMATION ON WILDFIRES AND FIRE SAFETY...PLEASE CHECK OUT
THE FOLLOWING WEB ADDRESSES...

HTTP://WEATHER.GOV/FIRE

HTTP://WWW.NIFC.GOV

HTTP://CSFS.COLOSTATE.EDU/

HTTPS://SITES.GOOGLE.COM/A/STATE.CO.US/DFPC/PROGRAM-2/WILDIRE-
INFORMATION-AND-RESOURCE-CENTER/WILDFIRE-PREPARATION

WHICH IS THE COLORADO DIVISION OF FIRE PREVENTION AND CONTROL.


000
NOUS45 KBOU 271150
PNSBOU

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE PUEBLO CO
600 AM MDT SAT JUN 27 2015

COLORADO LIGHTNING SAFETY WEEK CONCLUDES TODAY...WITH WILDFIRES
BEING THE FINAL TOPIC.

DURING THE PAST WEEK WE HAVE PRESENTED LIGHTNING INFORMATION AND
SAFETY RULES.  ALTHOUGH WILDFIRES ARE NOT AN ACTUAL WEATHER
PHENOMENON...WILDFIRES ARE DIRECTLY RELATED TO LIGHTNING AND OTHER
WEATHER ELEMENTS.

NORMALLY...THE WILDFIRE THREAT IN COLORADO INCREASES SIGNIFICANTLY
AFTER THE MIDDLE OF JUNE AND USUALLY PEAKS IN EARLY JULY...AND
REMAINS HIGH THROUGH AUGUST AND EARLY SEPTEMBER.  COLORADO AVERAGES
ABOUT 2500 WILDFIRES EACH YEAR.

ABOUT HALF OF ALL FOREST FIRES IN COLORADO ARE IGNITED BY LIGHTNING.
ADDITIONALLY...MANY RANGELAND AND WHEAT FIELD FIRES ARE CAUSED BY
LIGHTNING. MANY OF THESE LIGHTNING CAUSED WILDFIRES OCCUR IN THE
ABSENCE OF RAIN AND ARE THE RESULT OF WHAT IS REFERRED TO AS DRY
THUNDERSTORMS.

LIGHTNING IS OFTEN ACCOMPANIED BY STRONG WINDS FROM THUNDERSTORMS.
THESE WINDS CAN QUICKLY TURN SMOLDERING ORGANIC MATERIAL INTO A
RAGING FIRE.  THUNDERSTORM WINDS TEND TO BE ERRATIC IN DIRECTION AND
SPEED...POSING ONE OF THE GREATEST DANGERS FOR FIREFIGHTERS.

LIGHTNING THAT STRIKES THE GROUND IS USUALLY DIVIDED INTO TWO
CATEGORIES...NEGATIVE AND POSITIVE STRIKES...DEPENDING ON THE IONIC
SOURCE REGION OF THE THUNDERSTORM.  THE NEGATIVE STRIKES ARE FAR
MORE COMMON THAN POSITIVE STRIKES.  THE POSITIVE STRIKES ARE MORE
INTENSE AND HAVE A LONGER DURATION THAN THE NEGATIVE STRIKES AND ARE
MORE LIKELY TO IGNITE A FIRE.  LIGHTNING DETECTION TECHNOLOGY
PROVIDES LAND MANAGERS AND WEATHER FORECASTERS WITH THE ABILITY TO
IDENTIFY THE GENERAL LOCATION AND CHARGE CATEGORY OF EACH LIGHTNING
STRIKE.

NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE FORECASTERS HELP LAND MANAGERS AND
FIREFIGHTERS BY PRODUCING FIRE WEATHER ZONE FORECASTS ON A DAILY
BASIS.  SPOT FIRE WEATHER FORECASTS ARE ALSO PROVIDED FOR THOSE WHO
WORK ON PRESCRIBED BURNS OR SPECIFIC WILDFIRES.  FORECASTERS ALSO
ISSUE RED FLAG WARNINGS FOR USE BY LAND MANAGERS WHEN THE
COMBINATION OF DRY VEGETATION AND CRITICAL WEATHER CONDITIONS WILL
RESULT IN A HIGH POTENTIAL FOR THE DEVELOPMENT AND SPREAD OF
WILDFIRES.  LAND MANAGERS...IN TURN...TYPICALLY INFORM THE GENERAL
PUBLIC OF THE FIRE DANGER IN NATIONAL PARKS...FORESTS...AND OTHER
PUBLIC LANDS.

DURING PERIODS OF EXTREME FIRE DANGER IN FORESTS AND RANGELANDS...

YOU SHOULD AVOID BEING IN AREAS WHERE YOU MIGHT BECOME TRAPPED BY A
WILDFIRE.

YOU SHOULD AVOID THE USE OF MATCHES OR ANYTHING ELSE WHICH COULD
IGNITE A FIRE.

MAKE SURE THAT HOT PARTS OF MOTORIZED EQUIPMENT...SUCH AS
MUFFLERS...ARE NOT ALLOWED TO COME IN CONTACT WITH DRY GRASSES OR
OTHER POTENTIALLY FLAMMABLE MATERIAL.

IF YOU BECOME TRAPPED OR CUT OFF BY A WILDFIRE SEEK SHELTER IN AREAS
WITH LITTLE OR NO FUEL...SUCH AS ROCK SLIDE AREAS OR LAKES.

FOR MORE INFORMATION ON WILDFIRES AND FIRE SAFETY...PLEASE CHECK OUT
THE FOLLOWING WEB ADDRESSES...

HTTP://WEATHER.GOV/FIRE

HTTP://WWW.NIFC.GOV

HTTP://CSFS.COLOSTATE.EDU/

HTTPS://SITES.GOOGLE.COM/A/STATE.CO.US/DFPC/PROGRAM-2/WILDIRE-
INFORMATION-AND-RESOURCE-CENTER/WILDFIRE-PREPARATION

WHICH IS THE COLORADO DIVISION OF FIRE PREVENTION AND CONTROL.


000
NOUS45 KBOU 271150
PNSBOU

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE PUEBLO CO
600 AM MDT SAT JUN 27 2015

COLORADO LIGHTNING SAFETY WEEK CONCLUDES TODAY...WITH WILDFIRES
BEING THE FINAL TOPIC.

DURING THE PAST WEEK WE HAVE PRESENTED LIGHTNING INFORMATION AND
SAFETY RULES.  ALTHOUGH WILDFIRES ARE NOT AN ACTUAL WEATHER
PHENOMENON...WILDFIRES ARE DIRECTLY RELATED TO LIGHTNING AND OTHER
WEATHER ELEMENTS.

NORMALLY...THE WILDFIRE THREAT IN COLORADO INCREASES SIGNIFICANTLY
AFTER THE MIDDLE OF JUNE AND USUALLY PEAKS IN EARLY JULY...AND
REMAINS HIGH THROUGH AUGUST AND EARLY SEPTEMBER.  COLORADO AVERAGES
ABOUT 2500 WILDFIRES EACH YEAR.

ABOUT HALF OF ALL FOREST FIRES IN COLORADO ARE IGNITED BY LIGHTNING.
ADDITIONALLY...MANY RANGELAND AND WHEAT FIELD FIRES ARE CAUSED BY
LIGHTNING. MANY OF THESE LIGHTNING CAUSED WILDFIRES OCCUR IN THE
ABSENCE OF RAIN AND ARE THE RESULT OF WHAT IS REFERRED TO AS DRY
THUNDERSTORMS.

LIGHTNING IS OFTEN ACCOMPANIED BY STRONG WINDS FROM THUNDERSTORMS.
THESE WINDS CAN QUICKLY TURN SMOLDERING ORGANIC MATERIAL INTO A
RAGING FIRE.  THUNDERSTORM WINDS TEND TO BE ERRATIC IN DIRECTION AND
SPEED...POSING ONE OF THE GREATEST DANGERS FOR FIREFIGHTERS.

LIGHTNING THAT STRIKES THE GROUND IS USUALLY DIVIDED INTO TWO
CATEGORIES...NEGATIVE AND POSITIVE STRIKES...DEPENDING ON THE IONIC
SOURCE REGION OF THE THUNDERSTORM.  THE NEGATIVE STRIKES ARE FAR
MORE COMMON THAN POSITIVE STRIKES.  THE POSITIVE STRIKES ARE MORE
INTENSE AND HAVE A LONGER DURATION THAN THE NEGATIVE STRIKES AND ARE
MORE LIKELY TO IGNITE A FIRE.  LIGHTNING DETECTION TECHNOLOGY
PROVIDES LAND MANAGERS AND WEATHER FORECASTERS WITH THE ABILITY TO
IDENTIFY THE GENERAL LOCATION AND CHARGE CATEGORY OF EACH LIGHTNING
STRIKE.

NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE FORECASTERS HELP LAND MANAGERS AND
FIREFIGHTERS BY PRODUCING FIRE WEATHER ZONE FORECASTS ON A DAILY
BASIS.  SPOT FIRE WEATHER FORECASTS ARE ALSO PROVIDED FOR THOSE WHO
WORK ON PRESCRIBED BURNS OR SPECIFIC WILDFIRES.  FORECASTERS ALSO
ISSUE RED FLAG WARNINGS FOR USE BY LAND MANAGERS WHEN THE
COMBINATION OF DRY VEGETATION AND CRITICAL WEATHER CONDITIONS WILL
RESULT IN A HIGH POTENTIAL FOR THE DEVELOPMENT AND SPREAD OF
WILDFIRES.  LAND MANAGERS...IN TURN...TYPICALLY INFORM THE GENERAL
PUBLIC OF THE FIRE DANGER IN NATIONAL PARKS...FORESTS...AND OTHER
PUBLIC LANDS.

DURING PERIODS OF EXTREME FIRE DANGER IN FORESTS AND RANGELANDS...

YOU SHOULD AVOID BEING IN AREAS WHERE YOU MIGHT BECOME TRAPPED BY A
WILDFIRE.

YOU SHOULD AVOID THE USE OF MATCHES OR ANYTHING ELSE WHICH COULD
IGNITE A FIRE.

MAKE SURE THAT HOT PARTS OF MOTORIZED EQUIPMENT...SUCH AS
MUFFLERS...ARE NOT ALLOWED TO COME IN CONTACT WITH DRY GRASSES OR
OTHER POTENTIALLY FLAMMABLE MATERIAL.

IF YOU BECOME TRAPPED OR CUT OFF BY A WILDFIRE SEEK SHELTER IN AREAS
WITH LITTLE OR NO FUEL...SUCH AS ROCK SLIDE AREAS OR LAKES.

FOR MORE INFORMATION ON WILDFIRES AND FIRE SAFETY...PLEASE CHECK OUT
THE FOLLOWING WEB ADDRESSES...

HTTP://WEATHER.GOV/FIRE

HTTP://WWW.NIFC.GOV

HTTP://CSFS.COLOSTATE.EDU/

HTTPS://SITES.GOOGLE.COM/A/STATE.CO.US/DFPC/PROGRAM-2/WILDIRE-
INFORMATION-AND-RESOURCE-CENTER/WILDFIRE-PREPARATION

WHICH IS THE COLORADO DIVISION OF FIRE PREVENTION AND CONTROL.



000
NOUS45 KBOU 271150
PNSBOU

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE PUEBLO CO
600 AM MDT SAT JUN 27 2015

COLORADO LIGHTNING SAFETY WEEK CONCLUDES TODAY...WITH WILDFIRES
BEING THE FINAL TOPIC.

DURING THE PAST WEEK WE HAVE PRESENTED LIGHTNING INFORMATION AND
SAFETY RULES.  ALTHOUGH WILDFIRES ARE NOT AN ACTUAL WEATHER
PHENOMENON...WILDFIRES ARE DIRECTLY RELATED TO LIGHTNING AND OTHER
WEATHER ELEMENTS.

NORMALLY...THE WILDFIRE THREAT IN COLORADO INCREASES SIGNIFICANTLY
AFTER THE MIDDLE OF JUNE AND USUALLY PEAKS IN EARLY JULY...AND
REMAINS HIGH THROUGH AUGUST AND EARLY SEPTEMBER.  COLORADO AVERAGES
ABOUT 2500 WILDFIRES EACH YEAR.

ABOUT HALF OF ALL FOREST FIRES IN COLORADO ARE IGNITED BY LIGHTNING.
ADDITIONALLY...MANY RANGELAND AND WHEAT FIELD FIRES ARE CAUSED BY
LIGHTNING. MANY OF THESE LIGHTNING CAUSED WILDFIRES OCCUR IN THE
ABSENCE OF RAIN AND ARE THE RESULT OF WHAT IS REFERRED TO AS DRY
THUNDERSTORMS.

LIGHTNING IS OFTEN ACCOMPANIED BY STRONG WINDS FROM THUNDERSTORMS.
THESE WINDS CAN QUICKLY TURN SMOLDERING ORGANIC MATERIAL INTO A
RAGING FIRE.  THUNDERSTORM WINDS TEND TO BE ERRATIC IN DIRECTION AND
SPEED...POSING ONE OF THE GREATEST DANGERS FOR FIREFIGHTERS.

LIGHTNING THAT STRIKES THE GROUND IS USUALLY DIVIDED INTO TWO
CATEGORIES...NEGATIVE AND POSITIVE STRIKES...DEPENDING ON THE IONIC
SOURCE REGION OF THE THUNDERSTORM.  THE NEGATIVE STRIKES ARE FAR
MORE COMMON THAN POSITIVE STRIKES.  THE POSITIVE STRIKES ARE MORE
INTENSE AND HAVE A LONGER DURATION THAN THE NEGATIVE STRIKES AND ARE
MORE LIKELY TO IGNITE A FIRE.  LIGHTNING DETECTION TECHNOLOGY
PROVIDES LAND MANAGERS AND WEATHER FORECASTERS WITH THE ABILITY TO
IDENTIFY THE GENERAL LOCATION AND CHARGE CATEGORY OF EACH LIGHTNING
STRIKE.

NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE FORECASTERS HELP LAND MANAGERS AND
FIREFIGHTERS BY PRODUCING FIRE WEATHER ZONE FORECASTS ON A DAILY
BASIS.  SPOT FIRE WEATHER FORECASTS ARE ALSO PROVIDED FOR THOSE WHO
WORK ON PRESCRIBED BURNS OR SPECIFIC WILDFIRES.  FORECASTERS ALSO
ISSUE RED FLAG WARNINGS FOR USE BY LAND MANAGERS WHEN THE
COMBINATION OF DRY VEGETATION AND CRITICAL WEATHER CONDITIONS WILL
RESULT IN A HIGH POTENTIAL FOR THE DEVELOPMENT AND SPREAD OF
WILDFIRES.  LAND MANAGERS...IN TURN...TYPICALLY INFORM THE GENERAL
PUBLIC OF THE FIRE DANGER IN NATIONAL PARKS...FORESTS...AND OTHER
PUBLIC LANDS.

DURING PERIODS OF EXTREME FIRE DANGER IN FORESTS AND RANGELANDS...

YOU SHOULD AVOID BEING IN AREAS WHERE YOU MIGHT BECOME TRAPPED BY A
WILDFIRE.

YOU SHOULD AVOID THE USE OF MATCHES OR ANYTHING ELSE WHICH COULD
IGNITE A FIRE.

MAKE SURE THAT HOT PARTS OF MOTORIZED EQUIPMENT...SUCH AS
MUFFLERS...ARE NOT ALLOWED TO COME IN CONTACT WITH DRY GRASSES OR
OTHER POTENTIALLY FLAMMABLE MATERIAL.

IF YOU BECOME TRAPPED OR CUT OFF BY A WILDFIRE SEEK SHELTER IN AREAS
WITH LITTLE OR NO FUEL...SUCH AS ROCK SLIDE AREAS OR LAKES.

FOR MORE INFORMATION ON WILDFIRES AND FIRE SAFETY...PLEASE CHECK OUT
THE FOLLOWING WEB ADDRESSES...

HTTP://WEATHER.GOV/FIRE

HTTP://WWW.NIFC.GOV

HTTP://CSFS.COLOSTATE.EDU/

HTTPS://SITES.GOOGLE.COM/A/STATE.CO.US/DFPC/PROGRAM-2/WILDIRE-
INFORMATION-AND-RESOURCE-CENTER/WILDFIRE-PREPARATION

WHICH IS THE COLORADO DIVISION OF FIRE PREVENTION AND CONTROL.



000
NOUS43 KLMK 270135
PNSLMK

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE LOUISVILLE KY
0940 PM EDT Fri Jun 26 2015

...NWS Damage Survey for 60 mph Bowling Green Straight Line Winds ...

Straight Line Wind Damage Information:

..Warren County Survey...

Peak Wind  Measured :      92 MPH - pending further analysis
Path Length/Statue/:       3 miles
Path Width/Maximum/:       0.5 miles
Fatalities:                0
Injuries:                  0

Start Date:                Jun 26 2015
Start Time:                16:15 PM EDT
Start Location:            1 SSW BWG
Start Lat/Lon:             36.93   / -86.47

End Date:                  Jun 26 2015
End Times:                 16:19 PM EDT
End Location:              1  E BWG
End Lat/Lon:               36.95   / -86.43

Survey Summary:

The Kentucky Mesonet measured 92 mph winds at 1515 CDT. A survey
team investigated the area this evening and found wind damage more
consistent of 50-60 mph winds. Several hundred Bradford Pears and
some sugar maples were knocked down in a 2 to 3 mile area around the
Mesonet station.  Much of the damage was around Elrod Road.  A corn
field next to the Mesonet had no visible damage to the corn crops.
A barn near the Mesonet had part of the barn folded back and there
were 2 hard wood trees knocked down at the farm.

We would like to thank Megan from the Kentucky Mesonet for all of
her help trying to to determine if the Mesonet wind was correct.
More scientific analysis will be undertaken over the next week. In
addition, we would like to sincerely thank Landon Hampton from
WxorNot Bowling Green for his help with the survey.

Note: The information in this statement is preliminary and subject to
change pending final review of the event and publication in NWS
storm data.

For the latest updates, please visit our webpage at
weather.gov/louisville.

You can follow us on Facebook at www.facebook.com/nwslouisville.

You can follow us on Twitter at @nwslouisville.

$$
JDG/WEW







000
NOUS45 KBOU 262158
PNSBOU

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE PUEBLO CO
400 PM MDT FRI JUN 26 2015

COLORADO LIGHTNING SAFETY WEEK CONTINUES THROUGH TOMORROW. TODAY WE
DISCUSS LIGHTNING MEDICAL ISSUES FOR SURVIVORS.

THE FACTS ABOUT LIGHTNING STRIKE VICTIMS...

IN COLORADO...CLOUD-TO-GROUND LIGHTNING FLASHES OCCUR NEARLY A HALF
MILLION TIMES EACH YEAR.  WITH MILLIONS OF VISITORS AND EXTENSIVE
OUTDOOR ACTIVITIES...IT IS NOT SURPRISING THAT...ON AVERAGE...THREE
PEOPLE ARE KILLED BY LIGHTNING WHILE 13 ARE INJURED. JUST LAST
YEAR...TWO PEOPLE WERE KILLED AND 11 WERE INJURED IN ROCKY MOUNTAIN
NATIONAL PARK. WHILE ANY LIGHTNING FATALITY IS TRAGIC...INJURIES
CAUSED BY LIGHTNING CAN BE DEVASTATING TO BOTH THE VICTIM AND THE
FAMILY.  FOR THOSE WHO HAVE A FAMILY MEMBER OR RELATIVE THAT SUFFERS
A SIGNIFICANT DISABILITY FROM LIGHTNING...LIFE CHANGES FOREVER.  IN
ADDITION TO THE PHYSICAL PAIN AND MENTAL ANGUISH SUFFERED BY THE
VICTIM AND THEIR FAMILY...THE INCIDENT MAY LEAD TO A LOSS OF INCOME
FOR ALL INVOLVED AS MEDICAL EXPENSES CAN DRAIN THE FAMILIES
FINANCIAL RESOURCES.

IF SOMEONE IS STRUCK BY LIGHTNING...IT IS CRITICALLY IMPORTANT THAT
THEY RECEIVE THE APPROPRIATE MEDICAL ATTENTION IMMEDIATELY.  SOME
DEATHS CAN BE PREVENTED IF THE VICTIMS ARE ATTENDED TO PROMPTLY.
LIGHTNING VICTIMS DO NOT CARRY AN ELECTRICAL CHARGE AND ARE SAFE TO
HANDLE.  FIRST...CHECK TO SEE THAT THE VICTIM IS BREATHING AND HAS A
PULSE...AND START CARDIO-PULMONARY RESUSCITATION...CPR IF NEEDED.
THEN HAVE SOMEONE DIAL 9-1-1. IF POSSIBLE...MOVE THE VICTIM TO A
SAFER PLACE.  DO NOT LET THE RESCUERS BECOME LIGHTNING VICTIMS.
LIGHTNING CAN STRIKE THE SAME PLACE TWICE.

LIGHTNING STRIKE VICTIMS MAY FACE MANY MENTAL CHALLENGES THAT THEY
WILL HAVE TO LIVE WITH FOR THE REST OF THEIR LIVES.  WHEN THE BRAIN
IS AFFECTED BY A LIGHTNING STRIKE...THE PERSON OFTEN HAS DIFFICULTY
WITH MANY OF THE MENTAL PROCESSES THAT MOST PEOPLE TAKE FOR GRANTED.
 THE PERSON MAY SUFFER FROM SHORT-TERM MEMORY LOSS...AND MAY HAVE
DIFFICULTY STORING NEW INFORMATION AND ACCESSING OLD INFORMATION.
VICTIMS MAY OFTEN FIND IT VERY DIFFICULT TO CARRY ON MORE THAN ONE
TASK AT A TIME... AND MAY BE EASILY DISTRACTED.  THEIR PERSONALITY
MAY CHANGE AND THEY MAY BECOME EASILY IRRITATED.

LIGHTNING STRIKE VICTIMS OFTEN BECOMING EASILY FATIGUED AND MAY
BECOME EXHAUSTED AFTER ONLY A FEW HOURS OF WORK.  THIS MAY BE
BECAUSE MENTAL TASKS THAT WERE ONCE AUTOMATIC MAY NOW REQUIRE
INTENSE CONCENTRATION TO ACCOMPLISH.  ALTHOUGH SOME VICTIMS MAY
SLEEP EXCESSIVELY AT FIRST...AFTER A FEW WEEKS MANY FIND IT
DIFFICULT TO SLEEP MORE THAN TWO OR THREE HOURS AT A TIME.

ANOTHER COMMON LONG-TERM PROBLEM FOR SURVIVORS IS PAIN.
MEDICALLY...PAIN IS DIFFICULT TO QUANTIFY.  LIGHTNING STRIKE VICTIMS
OFTEN SUFFER IRREPARABLE NERVE DAMAGE THAT CAUSES INTENSE PAIN THAT
AFFECTS THE ABILITY TO FUNCTION.  MANY SURVIVORS COMPLAIN OF CHRONIC
HEADACHES...SOME OF WHICH ARE VERY INTENSE AND DEBILITATING.

LIGHTNING STRIKE AND ELECTRIC SHOCK SURVIVORS...INTERNATIONAL...IS A
SUPPORT GROUP TO INDIVIDUALS AND FAMILIES THAT ARE STRUGGLING WITH
LIFE AFTER A LIGHTNING INJURY.  HELPFUL INFORMATION IS AVAILABLE AT
THEIR WEB ADDRESS:

LIGHTNING-STRIKE.ORG

IN ADDITION...NOAAS LIGHTNING WEBSITE CONTAINS ABUNDANT INFORMATION
ON LIGHTNING SAFETY AND CAN BE FOUND AT...

WWW.LIGHTNINGSAFETY.NOAA.GOV

LIGHTNING INFORMATION SPECIFIC FOR THE STATE OF COLORADO CAN BE
FOUND AT...

WWW.WEATHER.GOV/PUB/LIGHTNING

THE LIGHTNING TOPIC FOR TOMORROW WILL BE LIGHTNING CAUSED FIRES.


000
NOUS45 KBOU 262158
PNSBOU

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE PUEBLO CO
400 PM MDT FRI JUN 26 2015

COLORADO LIGHTNING SAFETY WEEK CONTINUES THROUGH TOMORROW. TODAY WE
DISCUSS LIGHTNING MEDICAL ISSUES FOR SURVIVORS.

THE FACTS ABOUT LIGHTNING STRIKE VICTIMS...

IN COLORADO...CLOUD-TO-GROUND LIGHTNING FLASHES OCCUR NEARLY A HALF
MILLION TIMES EACH YEAR.  WITH MILLIONS OF VISITORS AND EXTENSIVE
OUTDOOR ACTIVITIES...IT IS NOT SURPRISING THAT...ON AVERAGE...THREE
PEOPLE ARE KILLED BY LIGHTNING WHILE 13 ARE INJURED. JUST LAST
YEAR...TWO PEOPLE WERE KILLED AND 11 WERE INJURED IN ROCKY MOUNTAIN
NATIONAL PARK. WHILE ANY LIGHTNING FATALITY IS TRAGIC...INJURIES
CAUSED BY LIGHTNING CAN BE DEVASTATING TO BOTH THE VICTIM AND THE
FAMILY.  FOR THOSE WHO HAVE A FAMILY MEMBER OR RELATIVE THAT SUFFERS
A SIGNIFICANT DISABILITY FROM LIGHTNING...LIFE CHANGES FOREVER.  IN
ADDITION TO THE PHYSICAL PAIN AND MENTAL ANGUISH SUFFERED BY THE
VICTIM AND THEIR FAMILY...THE INCIDENT MAY LEAD TO A LOSS OF INCOME
FOR ALL INVOLVED AS MEDICAL EXPENSES CAN DRAIN THE FAMILIES
FINANCIAL RESOURCES.

IF SOMEONE IS STRUCK BY LIGHTNING...IT IS CRITICALLY IMPORTANT THAT
THEY RECEIVE THE APPROPRIATE MEDICAL ATTENTION IMMEDIATELY.  SOME
DEATHS CAN BE PREVENTED IF THE VICTIMS ARE ATTENDED TO PROMPTLY.
LIGHTNING VICTIMS DO NOT CARRY AN ELECTRICAL CHARGE AND ARE SAFE TO
HANDLE.  FIRST...CHECK TO SEE THAT THE VICTIM IS BREATHING AND HAS A
PULSE...AND START CARDIO-PULMONARY RESUSCITATION...CPR IF NEEDED.
THEN HAVE SOMEONE DIAL 9-1-1. IF POSSIBLE...MOVE THE VICTIM TO A
SAFER PLACE.  DO NOT LET THE RESCUERS BECOME LIGHTNING VICTIMS.
LIGHTNING CAN STRIKE THE SAME PLACE TWICE.

LIGHTNING STRIKE VICTIMS MAY FACE MANY MENTAL CHALLENGES THAT THEY
WILL HAVE TO LIVE WITH FOR THE REST OF THEIR LIVES.  WHEN THE BRAIN
IS AFFECTED BY A LIGHTNING STRIKE...THE PERSON OFTEN HAS DIFFICULTY
WITH MANY OF THE MENTAL PROCESSES THAT MOST PEOPLE TAKE FOR GRANTED.
 THE PERSON MAY SUFFER FROM SHORT-TERM MEMORY LOSS...AND MAY HAVE
DIFFICULTY STORING NEW INFORMATION AND ACCESSING OLD INFORMATION.
VICTIMS MAY OFTEN FIND IT VERY DIFFICULT TO CARRY ON MORE THAN ONE
TASK AT A TIME... AND MAY BE EASILY DISTRACTED.  THEIR PERSONALITY
MAY CHANGE AND THEY MAY BECOME EASILY IRRITATED.

LIGHTNING STRIKE VICTIMS OFTEN BECOMING EASILY FATIGUED AND MAY
BECOME EXHAUSTED AFTER ONLY A FEW HOURS OF WORK.  THIS MAY BE
BECAUSE MENTAL TASKS THAT WERE ONCE AUTOMATIC MAY NOW REQUIRE
INTENSE CONCENTRATION TO ACCOMPLISH.  ALTHOUGH SOME VICTIMS MAY
SLEEP EXCESSIVELY AT FIRST...AFTER A FEW WEEKS MANY FIND IT
DIFFICULT TO SLEEP MORE THAN TWO OR THREE HOURS AT A TIME.

ANOTHER COMMON LONG-TERM PROBLEM FOR SURVIVORS IS PAIN.
MEDICALLY...PAIN IS DIFFICULT TO QUANTIFY.  LIGHTNING STRIKE VICTIMS
OFTEN SUFFER IRREPARABLE NERVE DAMAGE THAT CAUSES INTENSE PAIN THAT
AFFECTS THE ABILITY TO FUNCTION.  MANY SURVIVORS COMPLAIN OF CHRONIC
HEADACHES...SOME OF WHICH ARE VERY INTENSE AND DEBILITATING.

LIGHTNING STRIKE AND ELECTRIC SHOCK SURVIVORS...INTERNATIONAL...IS A
SUPPORT GROUP TO INDIVIDUALS AND FAMILIES THAT ARE STRUGGLING WITH
LIFE AFTER A LIGHTNING INJURY.  HELPFUL INFORMATION IS AVAILABLE AT
THEIR WEB ADDRESS:

LIGHTNING-STRIKE.ORG

IN ADDITION...NOAAS LIGHTNING WEBSITE CONTAINS ABUNDANT INFORMATION
ON LIGHTNING SAFETY AND CAN BE FOUND AT...

WWW.LIGHTNINGSAFETY.NOAA.GOV

LIGHTNING INFORMATION SPECIFIC FOR THE STATE OF COLORADO CAN BE
FOUND AT...

WWW.WEATHER.GOV/PUB/LIGHTNING

THE LIGHTNING TOPIC FOR TOMORROW WILL BE LIGHTNING CAUSED FIRES.



000
NOUS45 KLKN 261456 AAD
PNSLKN
NVZ030-031-033>041-250700-

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE ELKO NV
0800 AM PDT FRI JUN 26 2015

...PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT...

THE NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE (NWS) IN ELKO, NEVADA HAS DECLARED JUNE
21ST THROUGH JUNE 27TH AS LIGHTNING SAFETY AWARENESS WEEK. EACH DAY
DURING THE AWARENESS WEEK WILL FEATURE INFORMATION ABOUT A DIFFERENT
LIGHTNING RELATED TOPIC.

BE AWARE: KNOWING WHEN LIGHTNING IS POSSIBLE WILL GIVE YOU TIME TO
PREPARE! YOU CAN ALWAYS FIND THE LATEST FORECASTS AND HAZARDOUS
WEATHER CONDITIONS AT WEATHER.GOV. IF YOU`RE NOT ON YOUR
COMPUTER...YOU CAN ACCESS THE SAME INFORMATION ON YOUR CELL PHONE OR
TABLET AT: HTTP://MOBILE.WEATHER.GOV.

BE A FORCE OF NATURE. WHEN THUNDER ROARS...STAY INDOORS! FIND OUT
TIPS FOR SAFETY INDOORS AND OUTDOORS NEAR AND FAR FROM HOME AT OUR
WEBSITE: WEATHER.GOV/LIGHTNING.

$$

MICHAEL FITZSIMMONS
WARNING COORDINATION METEOROLOGIST
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE
ELKO, NEVADA


000
NOUS45 KLKN 261456 AAD
PNSLKN
NVZ030-031-033>041-250700-

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE ELKO NV
0800 AM PDT FRI JUN 26 2015

...PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT...

THE NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE (NWS) IN ELKO, NEVADA HAS DECLARED JUNE
21ST THROUGH JUNE 27TH AS LIGHTNING SAFETY AWARENESS WEEK. EACH DAY
DURING THE AWARENESS WEEK WILL FEATURE INFORMATION ABOUT A DIFFERENT
LIGHTNING RELATED TOPIC.

BE AWARE: KNOWING WHEN LIGHTNING IS POSSIBLE WILL GIVE YOU TIME TO
PREPARE! YOU CAN ALWAYS FIND THE LATEST FORECASTS AND HAZARDOUS
WEATHER CONDITIONS AT WEATHER.GOV. IF YOU`RE NOT ON YOUR
COMPUTER...YOU CAN ACCESS THE SAME INFORMATION ON YOUR CELL PHONE OR
TABLET AT: HTTP://MOBILE.WEATHER.GOV.

BE A FORCE OF NATURE. WHEN THUNDER ROARS...STAY INDOORS! FIND OUT
TIPS FOR SAFETY INDOORS AND OUTDOORS NEAR AND FAR FROM HOME AT OUR
WEBSITE: WEATHER.GOV/LIGHTNING.

$$

MICHAEL FITZSIMMONS
WARNING COORDINATION METEOROLOGIST
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE
ELKO, NEVADA


000
NOUS45 KLKN 261456 AAD
PNSLKN
NVZ030-031-033>041-250700-

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE ELKO NV
0800 AM PDT FRI JUN 26 2015

...PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT...

THE NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE (NWS) IN ELKO, NEVADA HAS DECLARED JUNE
21ST THROUGH JUNE 27TH AS LIGHTNING SAFETY AWARENESS WEEK. EACH DAY
DURING THE AWARENESS WEEK WILL FEATURE INFORMATION ABOUT A DIFFERENT
LIGHTNING RELATED TOPIC.

BE AWARE: KNOWING WHEN LIGHTNING IS POSSIBLE WILL GIVE YOU TIME TO
PREPARE! YOU CAN ALWAYS FIND THE LATEST FORECASTS AND HAZARDOUS
WEATHER CONDITIONS AT WEATHER.GOV. IF YOU`RE NOT ON YOUR
COMPUTER...YOU CAN ACCESS THE SAME INFORMATION ON YOUR CELL PHONE OR
TABLET AT: HTTP://MOBILE.WEATHER.GOV.

BE A FORCE OF NATURE. WHEN THUNDER ROARS...STAY INDOORS! FIND OUT
TIPS FOR SAFETY INDOORS AND OUTDOORS NEAR AND FAR FROM HOME AT OUR
WEBSITE: WEATHER.GOV/LIGHTNING.

$$

MICHAEL FITZSIMMONS
WARNING COORDINATION METEOROLOGIST
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE
ELKO, NEVADA


000
NOUS45 KLKN 261456 AAD
PNSLKN
NVZ030-031-033>041-250700-

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE ELKO NV
0800 AM PDT FRI JUN 26 2015

...PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT...

THE NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE (NWS) IN ELKO, NEVADA HAS DECLARED JUNE
21ST THROUGH JUNE 27TH AS LIGHTNING SAFETY AWARENESS WEEK. EACH DAY
DURING THE AWARENESS WEEK WILL FEATURE INFORMATION ABOUT A DIFFERENT
LIGHTNING RELATED TOPIC.

BE AWARE: KNOWING WHEN LIGHTNING IS POSSIBLE WILL GIVE YOU TIME TO
PREPARE! YOU CAN ALWAYS FIND THE LATEST FORECASTS AND HAZARDOUS
WEATHER CONDITIONS AT WEATHER.GOV. IF YOU`RE NOT ON YOUR
COMPUTER...YOU CAN ACCESS THE SAME INFORMATION ON YOUR CELL PHONE OR
TABLET AT: HTTP://MOBILE.WEATHER.GOV.

BE A FORCE OF NATURE. WHEN THUNDER ROARS...STAY INDOORS! FIND OUT
TIPS FOR SAFETY INDOORS AND OUTDOORS NEAR AND FAR FROM HOME AT OUR
WEBSITE: WEATHER.GOV/LIGHTNING.

$$

MICHAEL FITZSIMMONS
WARNING COORDINATION METEOROLOGIST
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE
ELKO, NEVADA


000
NOUS42 KMFL 261410 AAA
PNSMFL

NOUS42 KMFL 261408
PNSMFL

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT...UPDATED
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE MIAMI FL
1012 AM EDT FRI JUN 26 2015

...NAPLES NOAA WEATHER RADIO TRANSMITTER IS BACK IN SERVICE!

WE APOLOGIZE FOR ANY ISSUES THIS MAY CAUSE. TECHNICIANS HAVE BROUGHT
THE TRANSMITTER BACK UP.

THE AFFECTED TRANSMITTER WAS:

TRANSMITTER   STATION   FREQUENCY
NAPLES        WWG92     162.525 MHZ

REMEMBER THAT THE LATEST WEATHER INFORMATION IS ALSO AVAILABLE ON
OUR WEBSITE AT WWW.WEATHER.GOV/SOUTHFLORIDA

$$



000
NOUS42 KMFL 261410 AAA
PNSMFL

NOUS42 KMFL 261408
PNSMFL

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT...UPDATED
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE MIAMI FL
1012 AM EDT FRI JUN 26 2015

...NAPLES NOAA WEATHER RADIO TRANSMITTER IS BACK IN SERVICE!

WE APOLOGIZE FOR ANY ISSUES THIS MAY CAUSE. TECHNICIANS HAVE BROUGHT
THE TRANSMITTER BACK UP.

THE AFFECTED TRANSMITTER WAS:

TRANSMITTER   STATION   FREQUENCY
NAPLES        WWG92     162.525 MHZ

REMEMBER THAT THE LATEST WEATHER INFORMATION IS ALSO AVAILABLE ON
OUR WEBSITE AT WWW.WEATHER.GOV/SOUTHFLORIDA

$$


000
NOUS42 KMFL 261410 AAA
PNSMFL

NOUS42 KMFL 261408
PNSMFL

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT...UPDATED
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE MIAMI FL
1012 AM EDT FRI JUN 26 2015

...NAPLES NOAA WEATHER RADIO TRANSMITTER IS BACK IN SERVICE!

WE APOLOGIZE FOR ANY ISSUES THIS MAY CAUSE. TECHNICIANS HAVE BROUGHT
THE TRANSMITTER BACK UP.

THE AFFECTED TRANSMITTER WAS:

TRANSMITTER   STATION   FREQUENCY
NAPLES        WWG92     162.525 MHZ

REMEMBER THAT THE LATEST WEATHER INFORMATION IS ALSO AVAILABLE ON
OUR WEBSITE AT WWW.WEATHER.GOV/SOUTHFLORIDA

$$


000
NOUS42 KMFL 261233 AAA
PNSMFL

NOUS42 KMFL 261225
PNSMFL

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT...UPDATED
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE MIAMI FL
825 AM EDT FRI JUN 26 2015

...NAPLES NOAA WEATHER RADIO TRANSMITTER IS OUT OF SERICE, AT&T IS
WORKING ON THE LINE.  TIME OF OUTAGE IS CURRENTLY UNKNOWN.

IN THE ABSENCE OF NWR STATION 22G92 ON REEQUENCY 162.525 MHZ, PLEASE
STAY TUNED TO OUR WEBSITE AT WWW.WEATHER.GOV/SOUTHFLORIDA, OR
OUR FACEBOOK AND TWITTER PAGES.

THE TECHNICIANS ARE AT THE SITE THIS MORNING AND ARE CONTINUING TO
WORKING ON THE PROBLEM.

THE AFFECTED TRANSMITTER WAS:

TRANSMITTER   STATION   FREQUENCY
NAPLES        WWG92     162.525 MHZ

REMEMBER THAT THE LATEST WEATHER INFORMATION IS ALSO AVAILABLE ON
OUR WEBSITE AT WWW.WEATHER.GOV/SOUTHFLORIDA

WE APOLOGIZE FOR ANY INCONVENIENCE THAT THIS OUTAGE MAY CAUSE.
$$

RAE


000
NOUS42 KMFL 261233 AAA
PNSMFL

NOUS42 KMFL 261225
PNSMFL

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT...UPDATED
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE MIAMI FL
825 AM EDT FRI JUN 26 2015

...NAPLES NOAA WEATHER RADIO TRANSMITTER IS OUT OF SERICE, AT&T IS
WORKING ON THE LINE.  TIME OF OUTAGE IS CURRENTLY UNKNOWN.

IN THE ABSENCE OF NWR STATION 22G92 ON REEQUENCY 162.525 MHZ, PLEASE
STAY TUNED TO OUR WEBSITE AT WWW.WEATHER.GOV/SOUTHFLORIDA, OR
OUR FACEBOOK AND TWITTER PAGES.

THE TECHNICIANS ARE AT THE SITE THIS MORNING AND ARE CONTINUING TO
WORKING ON THE PROBLEM.

THE AFFECTED TRANSMITTER WAS:

TRANSMITTER   STATION   FREQUENCY
NAPLES        WWG92     162.525 MHZ

REMEMBER THAT THE LATEST WEATHER INFORMATION IS ALSO AVAILABLE ON
OUR WEBSITE AT WWW.WEATHER.GOV/SOUTHFLORIDA

WE APOLOGIZE FOR ANY INCONVENIENCE THAT THIS OUTAGE MAY CAUSE.
$$

RAE


000
NOUS42 KMFL 261233 AAA
PNSMFL

NOUS42 KMFL 261225
PNSMFL

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT...UPDATED
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE MIAMI FL
825 AM EDT FRI JUN 26 2015

...NAPLES NOAA WEATHER RADIO TRANSMITTER IS OUT OF SERICE, AT&T IS
WORKING ON THE LINE.  TIME OF OUTAGE IS CURRENTLY UNKNOWN.

IN THE ABSENCE OF NWR STATION 22G92 ON REEQUENCY 162.525 MHZ, PLEASE
STAY TUNED TO OUR WEBSITE AT WWW.WEATHER.GOV/SOUTHFLORIDA, OR
OUR FACEBOOK AND TWITTER PAGES.

THE TECHNICIANS ARE AT THE SITE THIS MORNING AND ARE CONTINUING TO
WORKING ON THE PROBLEM.

THE AFFECTED TRANSMITTER WAS:

TRANSMITTER   STATION   FREQUENCY
NAPLES        WWG92     162.525 MHZ

REMEMBER THAT THE LATEST WEATHER INFORMATION IS ALSO AVAILABLE ON
OUR WEBSITE AT WWW.WEATHER.GOV/SOUTHFLORIDA

WE APOLOGIZE FOR ANY INCONVENIENCE THAT THIS OUTAGE MAY CAUSE.
$$

RAE


000
NOUS42 KMFL 261233 AAA
PNSMFL

NOUS42 KMFL 261225
PNSMFL

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT...UPDATED
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE MIAMI FL
825 AM EDT FRI JUN 26 2015

...NAPLES NOAA WEATHER RADIO TRANSMITTER IS OUT OF SERICE, AT&T IS
WORKING ON THE LINE.  TIME OF OUTAGE IS CURRENTLY UNKNOWN.

IN THE ABSENCE OF NWR STATION 22G92 ON REEQUENCY 162.525 MHZ, PLEASE
STAY TUNED TO OUR WEBSITE AT WWW.WEATHER.GOV/SOUTHFLORIDA, OR
OUR FACEBOOK AND TWITTER PAGES.

THE TECHNICIANS ARE AT THE SITE THIS MORNING AND ARE CONTINUING TO
WORKING ON THE PROBLEM.

THE AFFECTED TRANSMITTER WAS:

TRANSMITTER   STATION   FREQUENCY
NAPLES        WWG92     162.525 MHZ

REMEMBER THAT THE LATEST WEATHER INFORMATION IS ALSO AVAILABLE ON
OUR WEBSITE AT WWW.WEATHER.GOV/SOUTHFLORIDA

WE APOLOGIZE FOR ANY INCONVENIENCE THAT THIS OUTAGE MAY CAUSE.
$$

RAE


000
NOUS43 KGLD 261209
PNSGLD

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE GOODLAND KS
600 AM MDT FRI JUN 26 2015

...ON THIS DATE IN WEATHER HISTORY...

IN 1986, HILL CITY KANSAS REACHED 110 DEGREES, TYING ITS ALL TIME
RECORD HIGH AND SETTING THE RECORD HIGH FOR THE MONTH OF JUNE.

IN 1989, THUNDERSTORMS IN KANSAS PRODUCED WIND GUSTS TO 90 MPH AT
LIBERAL, AND HAIL FOUR INCHES IN DIAMETER AT QUINTER.

$$



000
NOUS43 KGLD 261209
PNSGLD

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE GOODLAND KS
600 AM MDT FRI JUN 26 2015

...ON THIS DATE IN WEATHER HISTORY...

IN 1986, HILL CITY KANSAS REACHED 110 DEGREES, TYING ITS ALL TIME
RECORD HIGH AND SETTING THE RECORD HIGH FOR THE MONTH OF JUNE.

IN 1989, THUNDERSTORMS IN KANSAS PRODUCED WIND GUSTS TO 90 MPH AT
LIBERAL, AND HAIL FOUR INCHES IN DIAMETER AT QUINTER.

$$



000
NOUS43 KGLD 261209
PNSGLD

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE GOODLAND KS
600 AM MDT FRI JUN 26 2015

...ON THIS DATE IN WEATHER HISTORY...

IN 1986, HILL CITY KANSAS REACHED 110 DEGREES, TYING ITS ALL TIME
RECORD HIGH AND SETTING THE RECORD HIGH FOR THE MONTH OF JUNE.

IN 1989, THUNDERSTORMS IN KANSAS PRODUCED WIND GUSTS TO 90 MPH AT
LIBERAL, AND HAIL FOUR INCHES IN DIAMETER AT QUINTER.

$$



000
NOUS43 KGLD 261209
PNSGLD

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE GOODLAND KS
600 AM MDT FRI JUN 26 2015

...ON THIS DATE IN WEATHER HISTORY...

IN 1986, HILL CITY KANSAS REACHED 110 DEGREES, TYING ITS ALL TIME
RECORD HIGH AND SETTING THE RECORD HIGH FOR THE MONTH OF JUNE.

IN 1989, THUNDERSTORMS IN KANSAS PRODUCED WIND GUSTS TO 90 MPH AT
LIBERAL, AND HAIL FOUR INCHES IN DIAMETER AT QUINTER.

$$



000
NOUS43 KGLD 261209
PNSGLD

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE GOODLAND KS
600 AM MDT FRI JUN 26 2015

...ON THIS DATE IN WEATHER HISTORY...

IN 1986, HILL CITY KANSAS REACHED 110 DEGREES, TYING ITS ALL TIME
RECORD HIGH AND SETTING THE RECORD HIGH FOR THE MONTH OF JUNE.

IN 1989, THUNDERSTORMS IN KANSAS PRODUCED WIND GUSTS TO 90 MPH AT
LIBERAL, AND HAIL FOUR INCHES IN DIAMETER AT QUINTER.

$$



000
NOUS43 KGLD 261209
PNSGLD

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE GOODLAND KS
600 AM MDT FRI JUN 26 2015

...ON THIS DATE IN WEATHER HISTORY...

IN 1986, HILL CITY KANSAS REACHED 110 DEGREES, TYING ITS ALL TIME
RECORD HIGH AND SETTING THE RECORD HIGH FOR THE MONTH OF JUNE.

IN 1989, THUNDERSTORMS IN KANSAS PRODUCED WIND GUSTS TO 90 MPH AT
LIBERAL, AND HAIL FOUR INCHES IN DIAMETER AT QUINTER.

$$


000
NOUS45 KBOU 261159
PNSBOU

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE PUEBLO CO
600 AM MDT FRI JUN 26 2015

COLORADO LIGHTNING SAFETY WEEK CONTINUES THROUGH TOMORROW. TODAY WE
DISCUSS LIGHTNING MEDICAL ISSUES FOR SURVIVORS.

THE FACTS ABOUT LIGHTNING STRIKE VICTIMS...

IN COLORADO...CLOUD-TO-GROUND LIGHTNING FLASHES OCCUR NEARLY A HALF
MILLION TIMES EACH YEAR.  WITH MILLIONS OF VISITORS AND EXTENSIVE
OUTDOOR ACTIVITIES...IT IS NOT SURPRISING THAT...ON AVERAGE...THREE
PEOPLE ARE KILLED BY LIGHTNING WHILE 13 ARE INJURED. JUST LAST
YEAR...TWO PEOPLE WERE KILLED AND 11 WERE INJURED IN ROCKY MOUNTAIN
NATIONAL PARK. WHILE ANY LIGHTNING FATALITY IS TRAGIC...INJURIES
CAUSED BY LIGHTNING CAN BE DEVASTATING TO BOTH THE VICTIM AND THE
FAMILY.  FOR THOSE WHO HAVE A FAMILY MEMBER OR RELATIVE THAT SUFFERS
A SIGNIFICANT DISABILITY FROM LIGHTNING...LIFE CHANGES FOREVER.  IN
ADDITION TO THE PHYSICAL PAIN AND MENTAL ANGUISH SUFFERED BY THE
VICTIM AND THEIR FAMILY...THE INCIDENT MAY LEAD TO A LOSS OF INCOME
FOR ALL INVOLVED AS MEDICAL EXPENSES CAN DRAIN THE FAMILIES
FINANCIAL RESOURCES.

IF SOMEONE IS STRUCK BY LIGHTNING...IT IS CRITICALLY IMPORTANT THAT
THEY RECEIVE THE APPROPRIATE MEDICAL ATTENTION IMMEDIATELY.  SOME
DEATHS CAN BE PREVENTED IF THE VICTIMS ARE ATTENDED TO PROMPTLY.
LIGHTNING VICTIMS DO NOT CARRY AN ELECTRICAL CHARGE AND ARE SAFE TO
HANDLE.  FIRST...CHECK TO SEE THAT THE VICTIM IS BREATHING AND HAS A
PULSE...AND START CARDIO-PULMONARY RESUSCITATION...CPR IF NEEDED.
THEN HAVE SOMEONE DIAL 9-1-1. IF POSSIBLE...MOVE THE VICTIM TO A
SAFER PLACE.  DO NOT LET THE RESCUERS BECOME LIGHTNING VICTIMS.
LIGHTNING CAN STRIKE THE SAME PLACE TWICE.

LIGHTNING STRIKE VICTIMS MAY FACE MANY MENTAL CHALLENGES THAT THEY
WILL HAVE TO LIVE WITH FOR THE REST OF THEIR LIVES.  WHEN THE BRAIN
IS AFFECTED BY A LIGHTNING STRIKE...THE PERSON OFTEN HAS DIFFICULTY
WITH MANY OF THE MENTAL PROCESSES THAT MOST PEOPLE TAKE FOR GRANTED.
 THE PERSON MAY SUFFER FROM SHORT-TERM MEMORY LOSS...AND MAY HAVE
DIFFICULTY STORING NEW INFORMATION AND ACCESSING OLD INFORMATION.
VICTIMS MAY OFTEN FIND IT VERY DIFFICULT TO CARRY ON MORE THAN ONE
TASK AT A TIME... AND MAY BE EASILY DISTRACTED.  THEIR PERSONALITY
MAY CHANGE AND THEY MAY BECOME EASILY IRRITATED.

LIGHTNING STRIKE VICTIMS OFTEN BECOMING EASILY FATIGUED AND MAY
BECOME EXHAUSTED AFTER ONLY A FEW HOURS OF WORK.  THIS MAY BE
BECAUSE MENTAL TASKS THAT WERE ONCE AUTOMATIC MAY NOW REQUIRE
INTENSE CONCENTRATION TO ACCOMPLISH.  ALTHOUGH SOME VICTIMS MAY
SLEEP EXCESSIVELY AT FIRST...AFTER A FEW WEEKS MANY FIND IT
DIFFICULT TO SLEEP MORE THAN TWO OR THREE HOURS AT A TIME.

ANOTHER COMMON LONG-TERM PROBLEM FOR SURVIVORS IS PAIN.
MEDICALLY...PAIN IS DIFFICULT TO QUANTIFY.  LIGHTNING STRIKE VICTIMS
OFTEN SUFFER IRREPARABLE NERVE DAMAGE THAT CAUSES INTENSE PAIN THAT
AFFECTS THE ABILITY TO FUNCTION.  MANY SURVIVORS COMPLAIN OF CHRONIC
HEADACHES...SOME OF WHICH ARE VERY INTENSE AND DEBILITATING.

LIGHTNING STRIKE AND ELECTRIC SHOCK SURVIVORS...INTERNATIONAL...IS A
SUPPORT GROUP TO INDIVIDUALS AND FAMILIES THAT ARE STRUGGLING WITH
LIFE AFTER A LIGHTNING INJURY.  HELPFUL INFORMATION IS AVAILABLE AT
THEIR WEB ADDRESS:

LIGHTNING-STRIKE.ORG

IN ADDITION...NOAAS LIGHTNING WEBSITE CONTAINS ABUNDANT INFORMATION
ON LIGHTNING SAFETY AND CAN BE FOUND AT...

WWW.LIGHTNINGSAFETY.NOAA.GOV

LIGHTNING INFORMATION SPECIFIC FOR THE STATE OF COLORADO CAN BE
FOUND AT...

WWW.WEATHER.GOV/PUB/LIGHTNING

THE LIGHTNING TOPIC FOR TOMORROW WILL BE LIGHTNING CAUSED FIRES.



000
NOUS45 KBOU 261159
PNSBOU

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE PUEBLO CO
600 AM MDT FRI JUN 26 2015

COLORADO LIGHTNING SAFETY WEEK CONTINUES THROUGH TOMORROW. TODAY WE
DISCUSS LIGHTNING MEDICAL ISSUES FOR SURVIVORS.

THE FACTS ABOUT LIGHTNING STRIKE VICTIMS...

IN COLORADO...CLOUD-TO-GROUND LIGHTNING FLASHES OCCUR NEARLY A HALF
MILLION TIMES EACH YEAR.  WITH MILLIONS OF VISITORS AND EXTENSIVE
OUTDOOR ACTIVITIES...IT IS NOT SURPRISING THAT...ON AVERAGE...THREE
PEOPLE ARE KILLED BY LIGHTNING WHILE 13 ARE INJURED. JUST LAST
YEAR...TWO PEOPLE WERE KILLED AND 11 WERE INJURED IN ROCKY MOUNTAIN
NATIONAL PARK. WHILE ANY LIGHTNING FATALITY IS TRAGIC...INJURIES
CAUSED BY LIGHTNING CAN BE DEVASTATING TO BOTH THE VICTIM AND THE
FAMILY.  FOR THOSE WHO HAVE A FAMILY MEMBER OR RELATIVE THAT SUFFERS
A SIGNIFICANT DISABILITY FROM LIGHTNING...LIFE CHANGES FOREVER.  IN
ADDITION TO THE PHYSICAL PAIN AND MENTAL ANGUISH SUFFERED BY THE
VICTIM AND THEIR FAMILY...THE INCIDENT MAY LEAD TO A LOSS OF INCOME
FOR ALL INVOLVED AS MEDICAL EXPENSES CAN DRAIN THE FAMILIES
FINANCIAL RESOURCES.

IF SOMEONE IS STRUCK BY LIGHTNING...IT IS CRITICALLY IMPORTANT THAT
THEY RECEIVE THE APPROPRIATE MEDICAL ATTENTION IMMEDIATELY.  SOME
DEATHS CAN BE PREVENTED IF THE VICTIMS ARE ATTENDED TO PROMPTLY.
LIGHTNING VICTIMS DO NOT CARRY AN ELECTRICAL CHARGE AND ARE SAFE TO
HANDLE.  FIRST...CHECK TO SEE THAT THE VICTIM IS BREATHING AND HAS A
PULSE...AND START CARDIO-PULMONARY RESUSCITATION...CPR IF NEEDED.
THEN HAVE SOMEONE DIAL 9-1-1. IF POSSIBLE...MOVE THE VICTIM TO A
SAFER PLACE.  DO NOT LET THE RESCUERS BECOME LIGHTNING VICTIMS.
LIGHTNING CAN STRIKE THE SAME PLACE TWICE.

LIGHTNING STRIKE VICTIMS MAY FACE MANY MENTAL CHALLENGES THAT THEY
WILL HAVE TO LIVE WITH FOR THE REST OF THEIR LIVES.  WHEN THE BRAIN
IS AFFECTED BY A LIGHTNING STRIKE...THE PERSON OFTEN HAS DIFFICULTY
WITH MANY OF THE MENTAL PROCESSES THAT MOST PEOPLE TAKE FOR GRANTED.
 THE PERSON MAY SUFFER FROM SHORT-TERM MEMORY LOSS...AND MAY HAVE
DIFFICULTY STORING NEW INFORMATION AND ACCESSING OLD INFORMATION.
VICTIMS MAY OFTEN FIND IT VERY DIFFICULT TO CARRY ON MORE THAN ONE
TASK AT A TIME... AND MAY BE EASILY DISTRACTED.  THEIR PERSONALITY
MAY CHANGE AND THEY MAY BECOME EASILY IRRITATED.

LIGHTNING STRIKE VICTIMS OFTEN BECOMING EASILY FATIGUED AND MAY
BECOME EXHAUSTED AFTER ONLY A FEW HOURS OF WORK.  THIS MAY BE
BECAUSE MENTAL TASKS THAT WERE ONCE AUTOMATIC MAY NOW REQUIRE
INTENSE CONCENTRATION TO ACCOMPLISH.  ALTHOUGH SOME VICTIMS MAY
SLEEP EXCESSIVELY AT FIRST...AFTER A FEW WEEKS MANY FIND IT
DIFFICULT TO SLEEP MORE THAN TWO OR THREE HOURS AT A TIME.

ANOTHER COMMON LONG-TERM PROBLEM FOR SURVIVORS IS PAIN.
MEDICALLY...PAIN IS DIFFICULT TO QUANTIFY.  LIGHTNING STRIKE VICTIMS
OFTEN SUFFER IRREPARABLE NERVE DAMAGE THAT CAUSES INTENSE PAIN THAT
AFFECTS THE ABILITY TO FUNCTION.  MANY SURVIVORS COMPLAIN OF CHRONIC
HEADACHES...SOME OF WHICH ARE VERY INTENSE AND DEBILITATING.

LIGHTNING STRIKE AND ELECTRIC SHOCK SURVIVORS...INTERNATIONAL...IS A
SUPPORT GROUP TO INDIVIDUALS AND FAMILIES THAT ARE STRUGGLING WITH
LIFE AFTER A LIGHTNING INJURY.  HELPFUL INFORMATION IS AVAILABLE AT
THEIR WEB ADDRESS:

LIGHTNING-STRIKE.ORG

IN ADDITION...NOAAS LIGHTNING WEBSITE CONTAINS ABUNDANT INFORMATION
ON LIGHTNING SAFETY AND CAN BE FOUND AT...

WWW.LIGHTNINGSAFETY.NOAA.GOV

LIGHTNING INFORMATION SPECIFIC FOR THE STATE OF COLORADO CAN BE
FOUND AT...

WWW.WEATHER.GOV/PUB/LIGHTNING

THE LIGHTNING TOPIC FOR TOMORROW WILL BE LIGHTNING CAUSED FIRES.


000
NOUS45 KBOU 261159
PNSBOU

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE PUEBLO CO
600 AM MDT FRI JUN 26 2015

COLORADO LIGHTNING SAFETY WEEK CONTINUES THROUGH TOMORROW. TODAY WE
DISCUSS LIGHTNING MEDICAL ISSUES FOR SURVIVORS.

THE FACTS ABOUT LIGHTNING STRIKE VICTIMS...

IN COLORADO...CLOUD-TO-GROUND LIGHTNING FLASHES OCCUR NEARLY A HALF
MILLION TIMES EACH YEAR.  WITH MILLIONS OF VISITORS AND EXTENSIVE
OUTDOOR ACTIVITIES...IT IS NOT SURPRISING THAT...ON AVERAGE...THREE
PEOPLE ARE KILLED BY LIGHTNING WHILE 13 ARE INJURED. JUST LAST
YEAR...TWO PEOPLE WERE KILLED AND 11 WERE INJURED IN ROCKY MOUNTAIN
NATIONAL PARK. WHILE ANY LIGHTNING FATALITY IS TRAGIC...INJURIES
CAUSED BY LIGHTNING CAN BE DEVASTATING TO BOTH THE VICTIM AND THE
FAMILY.  FOR THOSE WHO HAVE A FAMILY MEMBER OR RELATIVE THAT SUFFERS
A SIGNIFICANT DISABILITY FROM LIGHTNING...LIFE CHANGES FOREVER.  IN
ADDITION TO THE PHYSICAL PAIN AND MENTAL ANGUISH SUFFERED BY THE
VICTIM AND THEIR FAMILY...THE INCIDENT MAY LEAD TO A LOSS OF INCOME
FOR ALL INVOLVED AS MEDICAL EXPENSES CAN DRAIN THE FAMILIES
FINANCIAL RESOURCES.

IF SOMEONE IS STRUCK BY LIGHTNING...IT IS CRITICALLY IMPORTANT THAT
THEY RECEIVE THE APPROPRIATE MEDICAL ATTENTION IMMEDIATELY.  SOME
DEATHS CAN BE PREVENTED IF THE VICTIMS ARE ATTENDED TO PROMPTLY.
LIGHTNING VICTIMS DO NOT CARRY AN ELECTRICAL CHARGE AND ARE SAFE TO
HANDLE.  FIRST...CHECK TO SEE THAT THE VICTIM IS BREATHING AND HAS A
PULSE...AND START CARDIO-PULMONARY RESUSCITATION...CPR IF NEEDED.
THEN HAVE SOMEONE DIAL 9-1-1. IF POSSIBLE...MOVE THE VICTIM TO A
SAFER PLACE.  DO NOT LET THE RESCUERS BECOME LIGHTNING VICTIMS.
LIGHTNING CAN STRIKE THE SAME PLACE TWICE.

LIGHTNING STRIKE VICTIMS MAY FACE MANY MENTAL CHALLENGES THAT THEY
WILL HAVE TO LIVE WITH FOR THE REST OF THEIR LIVES.  WHEN THE BRAIN
IS AFFECTED BY A LIGHTNING STRIKE...THE PERSON OFTEN HAS DIFFICULTY
WITH MANY OF THE MENTAL PROCESSES THAT MOST PEOPLE TAKE FOR GRANTED.
 THE PERSON MAY SUFFER FROM SHORT-TERM MEMORY LOSS...AND MAY HAVE
DIFFICULTY STORING NEW INFORMATION AND ACCESSING OLD INFORMATION.
VICTIMS MAY OFTEN FIND IT VERY DIFFICULT TO CARRY ON MORE THAN ONE
TASK AT A TIME... AND MAY BE EASILY DISTRACTED.  THEIR PERSONALITY
MAY CHANGE AND THEY MAY BECOME EASILY IRRITATED.

LIGHTNING STRIKE VICTIMS OFTEN BECOMING EASILY FATIGUED AND MAY
BECOME EXHAUSTED AFTER ONLY A FEW HOURS OF WORK.  THIS MAY BE
BECAUSE MENTAL TASKS THAT WERE ONCE AUTOMATIC MAY NOW REQUIRE
INTENSE CONCENTRATION TO ACCOMPLISH.  ALTHOUGH SOME VICTIMS MAY
SLEEP EXCESSIVELY AT FIRST...AFTER A FEW WEEKS MANY FIND IT
DIFFICULT TO SLEEP MORE THAN TWO OR THREE HOURS AT A TIME.

ANOTHER COMMON LONG-TERM PROBLEM FOR SURVIVORS IS PAIN.
MEDICALLY...PAIN IS DIFFICULT TO QUANTIFY.  LIGHTNING STRIKE VICTIMS
OFTEN SUFFER IRREPARABLE NERVE DAMAGE THAT CAUSES INTENSE PAIN THAT
AFFECTS THE ABILITY TO FUNCTION.  MANY SURVIVORS COMPLAIN OF CHRONIC
HEADACHES...SOME OF WHICH ARE VERY INTENSE AND DEBILITATING.

LIGHTNING STRIKE AND ELECTRIC SHOCK SURVIVORS...INTERNATIONAL...IS A
SUPPORT GROUP TO INDIVIDUALS AND FAMILIES THAT ARE STRUGGLING WITH
LIFE AFTER A LIGHTNING INJURY.  HELPFUL INFORMATION IS AVAILABLE AT
THEIR WEB ADDRESS:

LIGHTNING-STRIKE.ORG

IN ADDITION...NOAAS LIGHTNING WEBSITE CONTAINS ABUNDANT INFORMATION
ON LIGHTNING SAFETY AND CAN BE FOUND AT...

WWW.LIGHTNINGSAFETY.NOAA.GOV

LIGHTNING INFORMATION SPECIFIC FOR THE STATE OF COLORADO CAN BE
FOUND AT...

WWW.WEATHER.GOV/PUB/LIGHTNING

THE LIGHTNING TOPIC FOR TOMORROW WILL BE LIGHTNING CAUSED FIRES.



000
NOUS41 KGYX 260959
PNSGYX

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE GRAY ME
0600 AM EDT FRI JUN 26 2015


THE NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE HAS DECLARED THE WEEK OF JUNE
21ST THROUGH 27TH, LIGHTNING SAFETY AWARENESS WEEK.  THIS
IS THE LAST IN A SERIES OF FIVE PUBLIC INFORMATION
STATEMENTS TO BE ISSUED BY THE NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE
OFFICE IN GRAY, ME CONTAINING INFORMATION ON LIGHTNING AND
LIGHTNING SAFETY.

LIGHTNING SAFETY AROUND THE HOME

ALTHOUGH HOUSES AND OTHER SUBSTANTIAL BUILDING OFFER THE
BEST PROTECTION FROM LIGHTNING, EACH YEAR MANY HOMES ACROSS
THE UNITED STATES ARE STRUCK BY LIGHTNING.  IN FACT, ON
AVERAGE, LIGHTNING CAUSES ABOUT 4400 HOUSE FIRES AND 1800
OTHER STRUCTURAL FIRES EACH YEAR, SOME OF WHICH ARE DEADLY.
ALL TOTALED, LIGHTNING CAUSES NEARLY $1 BILLION IN DAMAGES
EACH YEAR.

THERE ARE THREE MAIN WAYS LIGHTNING ENTERS HOMES AND
BUILDINGS: (1) A DIRECT STRIKE, (2) THROUGH WIRES OR PIPES
THAT EXTEND OUTSIDE THE STRUCTURE, AND (3) THROUGH THE
GROUND.  REGARDLESS OF THE METHOD OF ENTRANCE, ONCE IN A
STRUCTURE, THE LIGHTNING CAN TRAVEL THROUGH THE ELECTRICAL
AND PHONE WIRES, THE PLUMBING, AND/OR RADIO AND TELEVISION
RECEPTION SYSTEMS.

INDOOR SAFETY DEPENDS ON AVOIDING CONTACT WITH ITEMS THAT
COULD CONDUCT LIGHTNING WITHIN THE HOME.  HERE ARE SOME
INDOOR SAFETY TIPS TO FOLLOW WHEN A THUNDERSTORM IS IN THE
AREA.


  1. DON`T TOUCH ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT OR CORDS.  IF YOU PLAN TO
     UNPLUG ANY ELECTRONIC EQUIPMENT, DO SO WELL BEFORE THE
     STORM ARRIVES.
  2. STAY OFF CORDED PHONES.
  3. AVOID CONTACT WITH PLUMBING.  DO NOT WASH YOUR HANDS, TAKE
     A SHOWER, WASH DISHES, OR DO LAUNDRY.
  4. STAY AWAY FROM WINDOWS AND DOORS, AND STAY OFF PORCHES.


IN CASE YOUR HOME IS STRUCK BY LIGHTNING:

  * EVACUATE YOUR HOME IMMEDIATELY IF YOU SMELL SMOKE AND
    CALL 911.
  * CALL YOUR LOCAL FIRE DEPARTMENT AND, IF POSSIBLE, HAVE
    THEM CHECK FOR HOT SPOTS IN YOUR WALLS WITH THERMAL
    IMAGING EQUIPMENT.
  * MAKE SURE ALL SMOKE DETECTORS ARE POWERED AND
    OPERATING PROPERLY.
  * IF NEEDED, HAVE A LICENSED ELECTRICIAN CHECK THE
    WIRING IN YOUR HOME

LIGHTNING QUESTION OF THE DAY:  WHAT ARE LIGHTNING RODS AND HOW
DO THEY WORK?

LIGHTNING RODS PROTECT A HOME FROM A DIRECT LIGHTNING STRIKE,
BUT THEY DO NOT PREVENT A HOME FROM BEING STRUCK.  THEY ARE
DESIGNED TO INTERCEPT LIGHTNING, TO PROVIDE A CONDUCTIVE PATH
FOR THE HARMFUL ELECTRICAL DISCHARGE TO FOLLOW, AND TO DISPERSE
THE ENERGY SAFELY INTO THE GROUND. WHILE LIGHTNING RODS HELP
PROTECT A STRUCTURE FROM A DIRECT LIGHTNING STRIKE, A COMPLETE
LIGHTNING PROTECTION SYSTEM IS NEEDED TO HELP PREVENT HARMFUL
ELECTRICAL SURGES AND POSSIBLE FIRES CAUSED BY LIGHTNING
ENTERING A STRUCTURE VIA WIRES AND PIPES. LIGHTNING PROTECTION
SYSTEMS SHOULD BE PURCHASED FROM AND INSTALLED BY A CERTIFIED
LIGHTNING PROTECTION SPECIALIST.


HERE`S A LIST OF TOPICS THAT WERE COVERED EARLIER THIS.

MONDAY - LIGHTNING AND LIGHTNING SAFETY - AN INTRODUCTION
TUESDAY - LIGHTNING`S MOST DEADLY ACTIVITIES
WEDNESDAY - LIGHTNING SAFETY AND SPORTS ACTIVITIES
THURSDAY - LIGHTNING SAFETY AT WORK

FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION ABOUT LIGHTNING OR LIGHTNING
SAFETY, VISIT NOAA`S LIGHTNING SAFETY AWARENESS WEB SITE
AT:

     HTTP://WWW.LIGHTNINGSAFETY.NOAA.GOV
$$


NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE
GRAY...MAINE



000
NOUS41 KGYX 260959
PNSGYX

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE GRAY ME
0600 AM EDT FRI JUN 26 2015


THE NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE HAS DECLARED THE WEEK OF JUNE
21ST THROUGH 27TH, LIGHTNING SAFETY AWARENESS WEEK.  THIS
IS THE LAST IN A SERIES OF FIVE PUBLIC INFORMATION
STATEMENTS TO BE ISSUED BY THE NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE
OFFICE IN GRAY, ME CONTAINING INFORMATION ON LIGHTNING AND
LIGHTNING SAFETY.

LIGHTNING SAFETY AROUND THE HOME

ALTHOUGH HOUSES AND OTHER SUBSTANTIAL BUILDING OFFER THE
BEST PROTECTION FROM LIGHTNING, EACH YEAR MANY HOMES ACROSS
THE UNITED STATES ARE STRUCK BY LIGHTNING.  IN FACT, ON
AVERAGE, LIGHTNING CAUSES ABOUT 4400 HOUSE FIRES AND 1800
OTHER STRUCTURAL FIRES EACH YEAR, SOME OF WHICH ARE DEADLY.
ALL TOTALED, LIGHTNING CAUSES NEARLY $1 BILLION IN DAMAGES
EACH YEAR.

THERE ARE THREE MAIN WAYS LIGHTNING ENTERS HOMES AND
BUILDINGS: (1) A DIRECT STRIKE, (2) THROUGH WIRES OR PIPES
THAT EXTEND OUTSIDE THE STRUCTURE, AND (3) THROUGH THE
GROUND.  REGARDLESS OF THE METHOD OF ENTRANCE, ONCE IN A
STRUCTURE, THE LIGHTNING CAN TRAVEL THROUGH THE ELECTRICAL
AND PHONE WIRES, THE PLUMBING, AND/OR RADIO AND TELEVISION
RECEPTION SYSTEMS.

INDOOR SAFETY DEPENDS ON AVOIDING CONTACT WITH ITEMS THAT
COULD CONDUCT LIGHTNING WITHIN THE HOME.  HERE ARE SOME
INDOOR SAFETY TIPS TO FOLLOW WHEN A THUNDERSTORM IS IN THE
AREA.


  1. DON`T TOUCH ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT OR CORDS.  IF YOU PLAN TO
     UNPLUG ANY ELECTRONIC EQUIPMENT, DO SO WELL BEFORE THE
     STORM ARRIVES.
  2. STAY OFF CORDED PHONES.
  3. AVOID CONTACT WITH PLUMBING.  DO NOT WASH YOUR HANDS, TAKE
     A SHOWER, WASH DISHES, OR DO LAUNDRY.
  4. STAY AWAY FROM WINDOWS AND DOORS, AND STAY OFF PORCHES.


IN CASE YOUR HOME IS STRUCK BY LIGHTNING:

  * EVACUATE YOUR HOME IMMEDIATELY IF YOU SMELL SMOKE AND
    CALL 911.
  * CALL YOUR LOCAL FIRE DEPARTMENT AND, IF POSSIBLE, HAVE
    THEM CHECK FOR HOT SPOTS IN YOUR WALLS WITH THERMAL
    IMAGING EQUIPMENT.
  * MAKE SURE ALL SMOKE DETECTORS ARE POWERED AND
    OPERATING PROPERLY.
  * IF NEEDED, HAVE A LICENSED ELECTRICIAN CHECK THE
    WIRING IN YOUR HOME

LIGHTNING QUESTION OF THE DAY:  WHAT ARE LIGHTNING RODS AND HOW
DO THEY WORK?

LIGHTNING RODS PROTECT A HOME FROM A DIRECT LIGHTNING STRIKE,
BUT THEY DO NOT PREVENT A HOME FROM BEING STRUCK.  THEY ARE
DESIGNED TO INTERCEPT LIGHTNING, TO PROVIDE A CONDUCTIVE PATH
FOR THE HARMFUL ELECTRICAL DISCHARGE TO FOLLOW, AND TO DISPERSE
THE ENERGY SAFELY INTO THE GROUND. WHILE LIGHTNING RODS HELP
PROTECT A STRUCTURE FROM A DIRECT LIGHTNING STRIKE, A COMPLETE
LIGHTNING PROTECTION SYSTEM IS NEEDED TO HELP PREVENT HARMFUL
ELECTRICAL SURGES AND POSSIBLE FIRES CAUSED BY LIGHTNING
ENTERING A STRUCTURE VIA WIRES AND PIPES. LIGHTNING PROTECTION
SYSTEMS SHOULD BE PURCHASED FROM AND INSTALLED BY A CERTIFIED
LIGHTNING PROTECTION SPECIALIST.


HERE`S A LIST OF TOPICS THAT WERE COVERED EARLIER THIS.

MONDAY - LIGHTNING AND LIGHTNING SAFETY - AN INTRODUCTION
TUESDAY - LIGHTNING`S MOST DEADLY ACTIVITIES
WEDNESDAY - LIGHTNING SAFETY AND SPORTS ACTIVITIES
THURSDAY - LIGHTNING SAFETY AT WORK

FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION ABOUT LIGHTNING OR LIGHTNING
SAFETY, VISIT NOAA`S LIGHTNING SAFETY AWARENESS WEB SITE
AT:

     HTTP://WWW.LIGHTNINGSAFETY.NOAA.GOV
$$


NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE
GRAY...MAINE



000
NOUS41 KGYX 260959
PNSGYX

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE GRAY ME
0600 AM EDT FRI JUN 26 2015


THE NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE HAS DECLARED THE WEEK OF JUNE
21ST THROUGH 27TH, LIGHTNING SAFETY AWARENESS WEEK.  THIS
IS THE LAST IN A SERIES OF FIVE PUBLIC INFORMATION
STATEMENTS TO BE ISSUED BY THE NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE
OFFICE IN GRAY, ME CONTAINING INFORMATION ON LIGHTNING AND
LIGHTNING SAFETY.

LIGHTNING SAFETY AROUND THE HOME

ALTHOUGH HOUSES AND OTHER SUBSTANTIAL BUILDING OFFER THE
BEST PROTECTION FROM LIGHTNING, EACH YEAR MANY HOMES ACROSS
THE UNITED STATES ARE STRUCK BY LIGHTNING.  IN FACT, ON
AVERAGE, LIGHTNING CAUSES ABOUT 4400 HOUSE FIRES AND 1800
OTHER STRUCTURAL FIRES EACH YEAR, SOME OF WHICH ARE DEADLY.
ALL TOTALED, LIGHTNING CAUSES NEARLY $1 BILLION IN DAMAGES
EACH YEAR.

THERE ARE THREE MAIN WAYS LIGHTNING ENTERS HOMES AND
BUILDINGS: (1) A DIRECT STRIKE, (2) THROUGH WIRES OR PIPES
THAT EXTEND OUTSIDE THE STRUCTURE, AND (3) THROUGH THE
GROUND.  REGARDLESS OF THE METHOD OF ENTRANCE, ONCE IN A
STRUCTURE, THE LIGHTNING CAN TRAVEL THROUGH THE ELECTRICAL
AND PHONE WIRES, THE PLUMBING, AND/OR RADIO AND TELEVISION
RECEPTION SYSTEMS.

INDOOR SAFETY DEPENDS ON AVOIDING CONTACT WITH ITEMS THAT
COULD CONDUCT LIGHTNING WITHIN THE HOME.  HERE ARE SOME
INDOOR SAFETY TIPS TO FOLLOW WHEN A THUNDERSTORM IS IN THE
AREA.


  1. DON`T TOUCH ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT OR CORDS.  IF YOU PLAN TO
     UNPLUG ANY ELECTRONIC EQUIPMENT, DO SO WELL BEFORE THE
     STORM ARRIVES.
  2. STAY OFF CORDED PHONES.
  3. AVOID CONTACT WITH PLUMBING.  DO NOT WASH YOUR HANDS, TAKE
     A SHOWER, WASH DISHES, OR DO LAUNDRY.
  4. STAY AWAY FROM WINDOWS AND DOORS, AND STAY OFF PORCHES.


IN CASE YOUR HOME IS STRUCK BY LIGHTNING:

  * EVACUATE YOUR HOME IMMEDIATELY IF YOU SMELL SMOKE AND
    CALL 911.
  * CALL YOUR LOCAL FIRE DEPARTMENT AND, IF POSSIBLE, HAVE
    THEM CHECK FOR HOT SPOTS IN YOUR WALLS WITH THERMAL
    IMAGING EQUIPMENT.
  * MAKE SURE ALL SMOKE DETECTORS ARE POWERED AND
    OPERATING PROPERLY.
  * IF NEEDED, HAVE A LICENSED ELECTRICIAN CHECK THE
    WIRING IN YOUR HOME

LIGHTNING QUESTION OF THE DAY:  WHAT ARE LIGHTNING RODS AND HOW
DO THEY WORK?

LIGHTNING RODS PROTECT A HOME FROM A DIRECT LIGHTNING STRIKE,
BUT THEY DO NOT PREVENT A HOME FROM BEING STRUCK.  THEY ARE
DESIGNED TO INTERCEPT LIGHTNING, TO PROVIDE A CONDUCTIVE PATH
FOR THE HARMFUL ELECTRICAL DISCHARGE TO FOLLOW, AND TO DISPERSE
THE ENERGY SAFELY INTO THE GROUND. WHILE LIGHTNING RODS HELP
PROTECT A STRUCTURE FROM A DIRECT LIGHTNING STRIKE, A COMPLETE
LIGHTNING PROTECTION SYSTEM IS NEEDED TO HELP PREVENT HARMFUL
ELECTRICAL SURGES AND POSSIBLE FIRES CAUSED BY LIGHTNING
ENTERING A STRUCTURE VIA WIRES AND PIPES. LIGHTNING PROTECTION
SYSTEMS SHOULD BE PURCHASED FROM AND INSTALLED BY A CERTIFIED
LIGHTNING PROTECTION SPECIALIST.


HERE`S A LIST OF TOPICS THAT WERE COVERED EARLIER THIS.

MONDAY - LIGHTNING AND LIGHTNING SAFETY - AN INTRODUCTION
TUESDAY - LIGHTNING`S MOST DEADLY ACTIVITIES
WEDNESDAY - LIGHTNING SAFETY AND SPORTS ACTIVITIES
THURSDAY - LIGHTNING SAFETY AT WORK

FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION ABOUT LIGHTNING OR LIGHTNING
SAFETY, VISIT NOAA`S LIGHTNING SAFETY AWARENESS WEB SITE
AT:

     HTTP://WWW.LIGHTNINGSAFETY.NOAA.GOV
$$


NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE
GRAY...MAINE
NNNN


000
NOUS41 KGYX 260959
PNSGYX

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE GRAY ME
0600 AM EDT FRI JUN 26 2015


THE NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE HAS DECLARED THE WEEK OF JUNE
21ST THROUGH 27TH, LIGHTNING SAFETY AWARENESS WEEK.  THIS
IS THE LAST IN A SERIES OF FIVE PUBLIC INFORMATION
STATEMENTS TO BE ISSUED BY THE NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE
OFFICE IN GRAY, ME CONTAINING INFORMATION ON LIGHTNING AND
LIGHTNING SAFETY.

LIGHTNING SAFETY AROUND THE HOME

ALTHOUGH HOUSES AND OTHER SUBSTANTIAL BUILDING OFFER THE
BEST PROTECTION FROM LIGHTNING, EACH YEAR MANY HOMES ACROSS
THE UNITED STATES ARE STRUCK BY LIGHTNING.  IN FACT, ON
AVERAGE, LIGHTNING CAUSES ABOUT 4400 HOUSE FIRES AND 1800
OTHER STRUCTURAL FIRES EACH YEAR, SOME OF WHICH ARE DEADLY.
ALL TOTALED, LIGHTNING CAUSES NEARLY $1 BILLION IN DAMAGES
EACH YEAR.

THERE ARE THREE MAIN WAYS LIGHTNING ENTERS HOMES AND
BUILDINGS: (1) A DIRECT STRIKE, (2) THROUGH WIRES OR PIPES
THAT EXTEND OUTSIDE THE STRUCTURE, AND (3) THROUGH THE
GROUND.  REGARDLESS OF THE METHOD OF ENTRANCE, ONCE IN A
STRUCTURE, THE LIGHTNING CAN TRAVEL THROUGH THE ELECTRICAL
AND PHONE WIRES, THE PLUMBING, AND/OR RADIO AND TELEVISION
RECEPTION SYSTEMS.

INDOOR SAFETY DEPENDS ON AVOIDING CONTACT WITH ITEMS THAT
COULD CONDUCT LIGHTNING WITHIN THE HOME.  HERE ARE SOME
INDOOR SAFETY TIPS TO FOLLOW WHEN A THUNDERSTORM IS IN THE
AREA.


  1. DON`T TOUCH ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT OR CORDS.  IF YOU PLAN TO
     UNPLUG ANY ELECTRONIC EQUIPMENT, DO SO WELL BEFORE THE
     STORM ARRIVES.
  2. STAY OFF CORDED PHONES.
  3. AVOID CONTACT WITH PLUMBING.  DO NOT WASH YOUR HANDS, TAKE
     A SHOWER, WASH DISHES, OR DO LAUNDRY.
  4. STAY AWAY FROM WINDOWS AND DOORS, AND STAY OFF PORCHES.


IN CASE YOUR HOME IS STRUCK BY LIGHTNING:

  * EVACUATE YOUR HOME IMMEDIATELY IF YOU SMELL SMOKE AND
    CALL 911.
  * CALL YOUR LOCAL FIRE DEPARTMENT AND, IF POSSIBLE, HAVE
    THEM CHECK FOR HOT SPOTS IN YOUR WALLS WITH THERMAL
    IMAGING EQUIPMENT.
  * MAKE SURE ALL SMOKE DETECTORS ARE POWERED AND
    OPERATING PROPERLY.
  * IF NEEDED, HAVE A LICENSED ELECTRICIAN CHECK THE
    WIRING IN YOUR HOME

LIGHTNING QUESTION OF THE DAY:  WHAT ARE LIGHTNING RODS AND HOW
DO THEY WORK?

LIGHTNING RODS PROTECT A HOME FROM A DIRECT LIGHTNING STRIKE,
BUT THEY DO NOT PREVENT A HOME FROM BEING STRUCK.  THEY ARE
DESIGNED TO INTERCEPT LIGHTNING, TO PROVIDE A CONDUCTIVE PATH
FOR THE HARMFUL ELECTRICAL DISCHARGE TO FOLLOW, AND TO DISPERSE
THE ENERGY SAFELY INTO THE GROUND. WHILE LIGHTNING RODS HELP
PROTECT A STRUCTURE FROM A DIRECT LIGHTNING STRIKE, A COMPLETE
LIGHTNING PROTECTION SYSTEM IS NEEDED TO HELP PREVENT HARMFUL
ELECTRICAL SURGES AND POSSIBLE FIRES CAUSED BY LIGHTNING
ENTERING A STRUCTURE VIA WIRES AND PIPES. LIGHTNING PROTECTION
SYSTEMS SHOULD BE PURCHASED FROM AND INSTALLED BY A CERTIFIED
LIGHTNING PROTECTION SPECIALIST.


HERE`S A LIST OF TOPICS THAT WERE COVERED EARLIER THIS.

MONDAY - LIGHTNING AND LIGHTNING SAFETY - AN INTRODUCTION
TUESDAY - LIGHTNING`S MOST DEADLY ACTIVITIES
WEDNESDAY - LIGHTNING SAFETY AND SPORTS ACTIVITIES
THURSDAY - LIGHTNING SAFETY AT WORK

FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION ABOUT LIGHTNING OR LIGHTNING
SAFETY, VISIT NOAA`S LIGHTNING SAFETY AWARENESS WEB SITE
AT:

     HTTP://WWW.LIGHTNINGSAFETY.NOAA.GOV
$$


NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE
GRAY...MAINE
NNNN



000
NOUS45 KLKN 260632
PNSLKN
NVZ030-031-033>041-250700-

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE ELKO NV
1130 PM PDT THU JUN 25 2015

...PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT...

THE NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE (NWS) IN ELKO, NEVADA HAS DECLARED JUNE
21ST THROUGH JUNE 27TH AS LIGHTNING SAFETY AWARENESS WEEK.EACH DAY
DURING THE AWARENESS WEEK WILL FEATURE INFORMATION ABOUT A DIFFERENT
LIGHTNING RELATED TOPIC.

LAST RESORT TIPS WHEN YOU ARE FAR FROM A SAFE PLACE:

WHEN YOU ARE GOING CAMPING...HIKING...FISHING...OR TAKING PART IN
OTHER ACTIVITIES WHERE YOU WILL BE FAR FROM AN ENCLOSED BUILDING OR
VEHICLE...YOU ARE NOT SAFE DURING A THUNDERSTORM. IF YOU ABSOLUTELY
CANNOT GET TO A SAFE BUILDING OR VEHICLE...YOU CAN SLIGHTLY LESSEN
THE THREAT OF BEING STRUCK WITH THE FOLLOWING TIPS:

AVOID OPEN FIELDS...THE TOP OF A HILL OR A RIDGE TOP. STAY AWAY FROM
TALL...ISOLATED TREES OR OTHER TALL OBJECTS. IF YOU ARE IN A
FOREST...STAY NEAR A LOWER STAND OF TREES. IF YOU ARE IN A
GROUP...SPREAD OUT TO AVOID THE CURRENT TRAVELING BETWEEN GROUP
MEMBERS. IF YOU ARE CAMPING IN AN OPEN AREA...SET UP CAMP IN A
VALLEY OR OTHER LOW AREA. REMEMBER...A TENT OFFERS NO PROTECTION
FROM LIGHTNING. STAY AWAY FROM WATER...WET ITEMS...SUCH AS ROPES...
AND METAL OBJECTS...SUCH AS FENCES AND POLES. WATER AND METAL DO NOT
ATTRACT LIGHTNING BUT THEY ARE EXCELLENT CONDUCTORS OF ELECTRICITY.
THE CURRENT FROM THE LIGHTNING FLASH WILL EASILY TRAVEL FOR LONG
DISTANCES.

BUT DON`T KID YOURSELF...YOU ARE NOT SAFE OUTSIDE. KNOW THE WEATHER
PATTERNS OF THE AREA YOU PLAN TO VISIT. FOR EXAMPLE...IN MOUNTAINOUS
AREAS...THUNDERSTORMS TYPICALLY DEVELOP IN THE EARLY AFTERNOON... SO
PLAN TO HIKE EARLY IN THE DAY AND BE DOWN THE MOUNTAIN BY NOON.
LISTEN TO THE WEATHER FORECAST FOR THE OUTDOOR AREA YOU PLAN TO
VISIT. THE FORECAST MAY BE VERY DIFFERENT FROM THE ONE NEAR YOUR
HOME. IF THERE IS A HIGH CHANCE OF THUNDERSTORMS...STAY HOME OR NEAR
A SAFE LOCATION YOU CAN GET TO EASILY.

BE A FORCE OF NATURE. WHEN THUNDER ROARS...STAY INDOORS! FIND OUT
TIPS FOR SAFETY INDOORS AND OUTDOORS NEAR AND FAR FROM HOME AT OUR
WEBSITE: WEATHER.GOV/LIGHTNING

$$

MICHAEL FITZSIMMONS
WARNING COORDINATION METEOROLOGIST NATIONAL
WEATHER SERVICE ELKO, NEVADA



000
NOUS45 KLKN 260632
PNSLKN
NVZ030-031-033>041-250700-

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE ELKO NV
1130 PM PDT THU JUN 25 2015

...PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT...

THE NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE (NWS) IN ELKO, NEVADA HAS DECLARED JUNE
21ST THROUGH JUNE 27TH AS LIGHTNING SAFETY AWARENESS WEEK.EACH DAY
DURING THE AWARENESS WEEK WILL FEATURE INFORMATION ABOUT A DIFFERENT
LIGHTNING RELATED TOPIC.

LAST RESORT TIPS WHEN YOU ARE FAR FROM A SAFE PLACE:

WHEN YOU ARE GOING CAMPING...HIKING...FISHING...OR TAKING PART IN
OTHER ACTIVITIES WHERE YOU WILL BE FAR FROM AN ENCLOSED BUILDING OR
VEHICLE...YOU ARE NOT SAFE DURING A THUNDERSTORM. IF YOU ABSOLUTELY
CANNOT GET TO A SAFE BUILDING OR VEHICLE...YOU CAN SLIGHTLY LESSEN
THE THREAT OF BEING STRUCK WITH THE FOLLOWING TIPS:

AVOID OPEN FIELDS...THE TOP OF A HILL OR A RIDGE TOP. STAY AWAY FROM
TALL...ISOLATED TREES OR OTHER TALL OBJECTS. IF YOU ARE IN A
FOREST...STAY NEAR A LOWER STAND OF TREES. IF YOU ARE IN A
GROUP...SPREAD OUT TO AVOID THE CURRENT TRAVELING BETWEEN GROUP
MEMBERS. IF YOU ARE CAMPING IN AN OPEN AREA...SET UP CAMP IN A
VALLEY OR OTHER LOW AREA. REMEMBER...A TENT OFFERS NO PROTECTION
FROM LIGHTNING. STAY AWAY FROM WATER...WET ITEMS...SUCH AS ROPES...
AND METAL OBJECTS...SUCH AS FENCES AND POLES. WATER AND METAL DO NOT
ATTRACT LIGHTNING BUT THEY ARE EXCELLENT CONDUCTORS OF ELECTRICITY.
THE CURRENT FROM THE LIGHTNING FLASH WILL EASILY TRAVEL FOR LONG
DISTANCES.

BUT DON`T KID YOURSELF...YOU ARE NOT SAFE OUTSIDE. KNOW THE WEATHER
PATTERNS OF THE AREA YOU PLAN TO VISIT. FOR EXAMPLE...IN MOUNTAINOUS
AREAS...THUNDERSTORMS TYPICALLY DEVELOP IN THE EARLY AFTERNOON... SO
PLAN TO HIKE EARLY IN THE DAY AND BE DOWN THE MOUNTAIN BY NOON.
LISTEN TO THE WEATHER FORECAST FOR THE OUTDOOR AREA YOU PLAN TO
VISIT. THE FORECAST MAY BE VERY DIFFERENT FROM THE ONE NEAR YOUR
HOME. IF THERE IS A HIGH CHANCE OF THUNDERSTORMS...STAY HOME OR NEAR
A SAFE LOCATION YOU CAN GET TO EASILY.

BE A FORCE OF NATURE. WHEN THUNDER ROARS...STAY INDOORS! FIND OUT
TIPS FOR SAFETY INDOORS AND OUTDOORS NEAR AND FAR FROM HOME AT OUR
WEBSITE: WEATHER.GOV/LIGHTNING

$$

MICHAEL FITZSIMMONS
WARNING COORDINATION METEOROLOGIST NATIONAL
WEATHER SERVICE ELKO, NEVADA


000
NOUS43 KBIS 260300
PNSBIS
NDZ001>005-009>013-017>023-025-031>037-040>048-050-051-222347-

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE BISMARCK ND
945 PM CDT THU JUN 25 2015

...STORM REPORTS FOR THURSDAY JUNE 25...

..TIME...   ...EVENT...      ...CITY LOCATION...     ...LAT.LON...
..DATE...   ....MAG....      ..COUNTY LOCATION..ST.. ...SOURCE....
            ..REMARKS..

1123 AM     FUNNEL CLOUD     PLAZA                   48.03N 101.96W
06/25/2015                   MOUNTRAIL          ND   PUBLIC

            FUNNEL CLOUD DID NOT TOUCH THE GROUND AND WENT BACK
            INTO THE STORM...NO HAIL AND NO GUSTY WIND.

0235 PM     FUNNEL CLOUD     2 SSW STANLEY           48.29N 102.41W
06/25/2015                   MOUNTRAIL          ND   LAW ENFORCEMENT

            OFF DUTY POLICE OFFICER REPORTED A THIN FUNNEL CLOUD
            HALFWAY TO THE GROUND A COUPLE MILES SOUTH OF HWY 2.

0305 PM     FUNNEL CLOUD     4 NNW BUTTE             47.89N 100.70W
06/25/2015                   MCHENRY            ND   TRAINED SPOTTER

            PERSISTENT FUNNEL... STILL PRETTY HIGH IN THE SKY

0306 PM     FUNNEL CLOUD     5 S MINOT               48.16N 101.30W
06/25/2015                   WARD               ND   LAW ENFORCEMENT

            THIN FUNNEL CLOUD REPORTED BY LAW ENFORCEMENT.

0322 PM     FUNNEL CLOUD     10 W NEW ENGLAND        46.54N 103.08W
06/25/2015                   SLOPE              ND   PUBLIC

            FUNNEL CAME ABOUT 100 YARDS FROM THE GROUND.

0327 PM     FUNNEL CLOUD     7 E STANLEY             48.32N 102.24W
06/25/2015                   MOUNTRAIL          ND   PUBLIC

            FUNNEL CLOUD WAS OBSERVED DROPPING FROM A CLOUD TO THE
            WSW... ROTATION OBSERVED BUT HAS RECEDED.

0340 PM     FUNNEL CLOUD     8 SSW HAVELOCK          46.37N 102.80W
06/25/2015                   HETTINGER          ND   PUBLIC

            FUNNEL CLOUD KEEPS FORMING AND DISSIPATING.

0412 PM     HAIL             MINOT                   48.23N 101.30W
06/25/2015  M1.00 INCH       WARD               ND   TRAINED SPOTTER

            PEA AND PENNY SIZE HAIL INCREASED TO QUARTER SIZED
            HAIL. WAS STILL HAILING WHEN THIS REPORT WAS SENT. SOUTH
            SIDE OF MINOT.

0455 PM     HAIL             8 N HALLIDAY            47.47N 102.34W
06/25/2015  M1.00 INCH       DUNN               ND   PUBLIC

            VERY FEW STONES 1 INCH DIAMETER...MOSTLY PEA SIZE HAIL.
            A LITTLE STANDING WATER IN THE YARD. HAIL LASTED ABOUT 4
            MINUTES.

0456 PM     HAIL             1 E BURLINGTON          48.28N 101.41W
06/25/2015  E1.00 INCH       WARD               ND   TRAINED SPOTTER

            HAIL LASTED ABOUT 5 MINUTES BEFORE SPOTTER DROVE OUT OF
            IT.

0528 PM     FUNNEL CLOUD     10 S COTEAU             48.61N 102.32W
06/25/2015                   BURKE              ND   LAW ENFORCEMENT

            FUNNEL CLOUD CAME OUT OF STORM AND RETREATED BACK INTO
            STORM. LASTED A MINUTE OR SO. NO HAIL OR GUSTY WINDS.
            BURKE COUNTY SHERIFF.

0613 PM     HEAVY RAIN       MINOT                   48.23N 101.30W
06/25/2015  M2.20 INCH       WARD               ND   BROADCAST MEDIA

            SOUTHWEST PART OF THE CITY. MINOR STREET FLOODING
            REPORTED.

0615 PM     HEAVY RAIN       MINOT                   48.23N 101.30W
06/25/2015  M1.75 INCH       WARD               ND   BROADCAST MEDIA

            REPORTED NEAR WALMART.

0615 PM     HEAVY RAIN       12 NW HALLIDAY          47.48N 102.52W
06/25/2015  M1.03 INCH       DUNN               ND   TRAINED SPOTTER

            STORM TOTAL RAIN FROM THIS AFTERNOON STORMS. NO
            FLOODING ISSUES. VERY FEW TINY HAIL STONES. NO GUSTY
            WIND.

0621 PM     HEAVY RAIN       MINOT                   48.23N 101.30W
06/25/2015  M2.10 INCH       WARD               ND   BROADCAST MEDIA

            TOTAL REPORTED AT KMOT IN THE SW PART OF THE CITY.

0725 PM     HAIL             BISMARCK                46.81N 100.78W
06/25/2015  E0.25 INCH       BURLEIGH           ND   PUBLIC

            SIGNIFICANT AMOUNT OF PEA SIZE HAIL NORTH SIDE OF
            BISMARCK.

0730 PM     TSTM WND GST     BISMARCK AIRPORT        46.81N 100.78W
06/25/2015  M56 MPH          BURLEIGH           ND   OFFICIAL NWS OBS

0920 PM     HEAVY RAIN       4 SW TRENTON            48.03N 103.90W
06/25/2015  M1.87 INCH       WILLIAMS           ND   TRAINED SPOTTER

            RAINFALL THUS FAR. STILL RAINING.

0942 PM     FLASH FLOOD      TRENTON                 48.07N 103.84W
06/25/2015                   WILLIAMS           ND   LAW ENFORCEMENT

            INTERSECTION OF 147TH AVE NW AND 1804 COMPLETELY UNDER
            WATER. STILL PASSABLE. REPORT OF HOME OWNER UNABLE TO
            LEAVE HOME BECAUSE OF FLOODING.

$$

ZH


000
NOUS43 KBIS 260300
PNSBIS
NDZ001>005-009>013-017>023-025-031>037-040>048-050-051-222347-

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE BISMARCK ND
945 PM CDT THU JUN 25 2015

...STORM REPORTS FOR THURSDAY JUNE 25...

..TIME...   ...EVENT...      ...CITY LOCATION...     ...LAT.LON...
..DATE...   ....MAG....      ..COUNTY LOCATION..ST.. ...SOURCE....
            ..REMARKS..

1123 AM     FUNNEL CLOUD     PLAZA                   48.03N 101.96W
06/25/2015                   MOUNTRAIL          ND   PUBLIC

            FUNNEL CLOUD DID NOT TOUCH THE GROUND AND WENT BACK
            INTO THE STORM...NO HAIL AND NO GUSTY WIND.

0235 PM     FUNNEL CLOUD     2 SSW STANLEY           48.29N 102.41W
06/25/2015                   MOUNTRAIL          ND   LAW ENFORCEMENT

            OFF DUTY POLICE OFFICER REPORTED A THIN FUNNEL CLOUD
            HALFWAY TO THE GROUND A COUPLE MILES SOUTH OF HWY 2.

0305 PM     FUNNEL CLOUD     4 NNW BUTTE             47.89N 100.70W
06/25/2015                   MCHENRY            ND   TRAINED SPOTTER

            PERSISTENT FUNNEL... STILL PRETTY HIGH IN THE SKY

0306 PM     FUNNEL CLOUD     5 S MINOT               48.16N 101.30W
06/25/2015                   WARD               ND   LAW ENFORCEMENT

            THIN FUNNEL CLOUD REPORTED BY LAW ENFORCEMENT.

0322 PM     FUNNEL CLOUD     10 W NEW ENGLAND        46.54N 103.08W
06/25/2015                   SLOPE              ND   PUBLIC

            FUNNEL CAME ABOUT 100 YARDS FROM THE GROUND.

0327 PM     FUNNEL CLOUD     7 E STANLEY             48.32N 102.24W
06/25/2015                   MOUNTRAIL          ND   PUBLIC

            FUNNEL CLOUD WAS OBSERVED DROPPING FROM A CLOUD TO THE
            WSW... ROTATION OBSERVED BUT HAS RECEDED.

0340 PM     FUNNEL CLOUD     8 SSW HAVELOCK          46.37N 102.80W
06/25/2015                   HETTINGER          ND   PUBLIC

            FUNNEL CLOUD KEEPS FORMING AND DISSIPATING.

0412 PM     HAIL             MINOT                   48.23N 101.30W
06/25/2015  M1.00 INCH       WARD               ND   TRAINED SPOTTER

            PEA AND PENNY SIZE HAIL INCREASED TO QUARTER SIZED
            HAIL. WAS STILL HAILING WHEN THIS REPORT WAS SENT. SOUTH
            SIDE OF MINOT.

0455 PM     HAIL             8 N HALLIDAY            47.47N 102.34W
06/25/2015  M1.00 INCH       DUNN               ND   PUBLIC

            VERY FEW STONES 1 INCH DIAMETER...MOSTLY PEA SIZE HAIL.
            A LITTLE STANDING WATER IN THE YARD. HAIL LASTED ABOUT 4
            MINUTES.

0456 PM     HAIL             1 E BURLINGTON          48.28N 101.41W
06/25/2015  E1.00 INCH       WARD               ND   TRAINED SPOTTER

            HAIL LASTED ABOUT 5 MINUTES BEFORE SPOTTER DROVE OUT OF
            IT.

0528 PM     FUNNEL CLOUD     10 S COTEAU             48.61N 102.32W
06/25/2015                   BURKE              ND   LAW ENFORCEMENT

            FUNNEL CLOUD CAME OUT OF STORM AND RETREATED BACK INTO
            STORM. LASTED A MINUTE OR SO. NO HAIL OR GUSTY WINDS.
            BURKE COUNTY SHERIFF.

0613 PM     HEAVY RAIN       MINOT                   48.23N 101.30W
06/25/2015  M2.20 INCH       WARD               ND   BROADCAST MEDIA

            SOUTHWEST PART OF THE CITY. MINOR STREET FLOODING
            REPORTED.

0615 PM     HEAVY RAIN       MINOT                   48.23N 101.30W
06/25/2015  M1.75 INCH       WARD               ND   BROADCAST MEDIA

            REPORTED NEAR WALMART.

0615 PM     HEAVY RAIN       12 NW HALLIDAY          47.48N 102.52W
06/25/2015  M1.03 INCH       DUNN               ND   TRAINED SPOTTER

            STORM TOTAL RAIN FROM THIS AFTERNOON STORMS. NO
            FLOODING ISSUES. VERY FEW TINY HAIL STONES. NO GUSTY
            WIND.

0621 PM     HEAVY RAIN       MINOT                   48.23N 101.30W
06/25/2015  M2.10 INCH       WARD               ND   BROADCAST MEDIA

            TOTAL REPORTED AT KMOT IN THE SW PART OF THE CITY.

0725 PM     HAIL             BISMARCK                46.81N 100.78W
06/25/2015  E0.25 INCH       BURLEIGH           ND   PUBLIC

            SIGNIFICANT AMOUNT OF PEA SIZE HAIL NORTH SIDE OF
            BISMARCK.

0730 PM     TSTM WND GST     BISMARCK AIRPORT        46.81N 100.78W
06/25/2015  M56 MPH          BURLEIGH           ND   OFFICIAL NWS OBS

0920 PM     HEAVY RAIN       4 SW TRENTON            48.03N 103.90W
06/25/2015  M1.87 INCH       WILLIAMS           ND   TRAINED SPOTTER

            RAINFALL THUS FAR. STILL RAINING.

0942 PM     FLASH FLOOD      TRENTON                 48.07N 103.84W
06/25/2015                   WILLIAMS           ND   LAW ENFORCEMENT

            INTERSECTION OF 147TH AVE NW AND 1804 COMPLETELY UNDER
            WATER. STILL PASSABLE. REPORT OF HOME OWNER UNABLE TO
            LEAVE HOME BECAUSE OF FLOODING.

$$

ZH



000
NOUS45 KBOU 252157
PNSBOU

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE PUEBLO CO
400 PM MDT THU JUN 25 2015

COLORADO LIGHTNING SAFETY WEEK CONTINUES THROUGH SATURDAY. TODAY WE
DISCUSS INDOOR LIGHTNING SAFETY.

STATISTICS TELL US THAT WE ARE MUCH LESS LIKELY TO BECOME A
LIGHTNING STRIKE VICTIM IF WE ARE INSIDE A SUBSTANTIAL STRUCTURE
SUCH AS A HOME OR OFFICE BUILDING WHEN THUNDERSTORMS ARE OCCURRING.
IN 2014...TWENTY SIX PEOPLE IN THE UNITED STATES WERE KILLED BY
LIGHTNING...AND ALL OF THESE FATALITIES OCCURRED OUTDOORS. WHILE
NEARLY ALL PEOPLE WHO ARE INJURED OR KILLED BY LIGHTNING WERE
OUTDOORS...A SMALL PERCENTAGE OF PEOPLE ARE INJURED BY LIGHTNING
WHILE INDOORS.  THEREFORE IT IS IMPORTANT TO DISCUSS LIGHTNING
SAFETY WHILE INDOORS.

THE DANGEROUS ELECTRICAL CURRENT ASSOCIATED WITH A LIGHTNING STRIKE
TYPICALLY ENTERS A STRUCTURE THROUGH WIRES...CABLES OR PIPES THAT
CONNECT TO THE BUILDING FROM THE OUTSIDE. LIGHTNING CAN ALSO
DIRECTLY ENTER INTO A STRUCTURE THROUGH AN OPEN WINDOW...DOOR OR
GARAGE DOOR. ONCE IN A STRUCTURE...THE DANGEROUS CURRENT CAN TRAVEL
THROUGH THE ELECTRICAL...PHONE...CABLE AND PLUMBING SYSTEMS AND
THROUGH METAL WIRES OR BARS IN CONCRETE WALLS OR FLOORING.

CORDED ELECTRONIC DEVICES ARE THE LEADING CAUSE OF INDOOR LIGHTNING
INJURIES IN THE UNITED STATES. THESE INCLUDE PERSONAL COMPUTER
KEYBOARDS...GAME CONSOLES...AND CORDED PHONES. OTHER INJURIES HAVE
OCCURRED WHEN PEOPLE WERE CLOSE BY TO TELEVISIONS WHICH CONNECT TO
AN OUTSIDE CABLE OR SATELLITE SYSTEM.  OPEN WINDOWS...DOORS AND
GARAGE DOORS ALLOW FOR A DIRECT STRIKE TO ENTER A HOME...SO MAKE
SURE ALL WINDOWS AND DOORS ARE CLOSED WHEN LIGHTNING IS OCCURRING.
NEVER WATCH A LIGHTNING STORM FROM A PORCH OR OPEN GARAGE DOOR.
THERE ARE SEVERAL YOU TUBE VIDEOS THAT SHOW PEOPLE BEING INJURED BY
LIGHTNING WHILE THEY WERE RECORDING LIGHTNING FROM THEIR PORCH OR
OPEN GARAGE DOOR.

IT IS VERY IMPORTANT TO STAY AWAY FROM ANY WATER WHEN LIGHTNING IS
OCCURRING OUTSIDE. THIS INCLUDES SINKS, BATHTUBS AND SHOWERS. WHEN
LIGHTNING IS OCCURRING...DO NOT WASH DISHES...DO NOT GIVE KIDS A
BATH...DO NOT TAKE A SHOWER. IT IS BEST TO WAIT TO DO LAUNDRY UNTIL
AFTER THE STORM GOES BY AS WASHERS AND DRYERS ARE CONNECTED TO BOTH
THE ELECTRICAL AND PLUMBING SYSTEMS.

PEOPLE HAVE ALSO BEEN INJURED WHILE LEANING AND STANDING NEAR
CONCRETE IN THEIR HOMES AND OFFICES. THIS IS DUE TO METAL REBAR
WHICH IS IN THE CONCRETE...AND THIS METAL ACTS AS A CONDUCTOR WHEN
LIGHTNING HITS THE BUILDING.

A HOUSE OR OTHER SUBSTANTIAL BUILDING OFFERS THE BEST PROTECTION
FROM LIGHTNING.  IN CONTRAST...MANY SMALL OPEN SHELTERS ON ATHLETIC
FIELDS...GOLF COURSES...PARKS...ROADSIDE PICNIC AREAS...SCHOOLYARDS
AND ELSEWHERE DO NOT OFFER ANY PROTECTION FROM LIGHTNING AND SHOULD
BE AVOIDED AT ALL COST.  SMALL WOOD...VINYL OR METAL SHEDS SHOULD
ALSO BE AVOIDED DURING THUNDERSTORMS. ANY TYPE OF TENT...NO MATTER
HOW LARGE IT IS...DOES NOT OFFER ANY PROTECTION FROM LIGHTNING.

HERE IS A SUMMARY OF LIGHTNING SAFETY TIPS FOR INSIDE THE HOME...

1. AVOID CORDED ELECTRONICS...ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT AND PLUMBING.

2. AVOID CONTACT WITH WATER SUCH AS TAKING A SHOWER...BATH...WASHING
   DISHES OR DOING LAUNDRY.

3. STAY AWAY FROM WINDOWS...DOORS...GARAGES AND PORCHES.

4. DO NOT LIE ON CONCRETE FLOORS OR LEAN AGAINST CONCRETE WALLS.

5. IF A SUBSTANTIAL BUILDING IS NOT NEARBY...AN ENCLOSED AUTOMOBILE
   OFFERS EXCELLENT PROTECTION FROM LIGHTNING.

BELOW ARE A COUPLE OF WEB SITES THAT CONTAIN ADDITIONAL LIGHTNING
INFORMATION.

NOAAS LIGHTNING WEBSITE WHICH CONTAINS ABUNDANT INFORMATION ON
LIGHTNING SAFETY CAN BE FOUND AT...

WWW.LIGHTNINGSAFETY.NOAA.GOV

LIGHTNING INFORMATION SPECIFIC FOR THE STATE OF COLORADO CAN BE
FOUND AT...

WWW.WEATHER.GOV/PUB/LIGHTNING

THE LIGHTNING TOPIC FOR TOMORROW WILL BE LIGHTNING MEDICAL ISSUES
FOR SURVIVORS.



000
NOUS45 KGJT 251918
PNSGJT

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE GRAND JUNCTION CO
114 PM MDT THU JUN 25 2015

THE FOLLOWING ARE PRELIMINARY 24 HOUR PRECIPITATION REPORTS FROM
WESTERN COLORADO AND EASTERN UTAH, ENDING THURSDAY MORNING AT 11
AM. AMOUNTS ARE IN INCHES.

FOLLOWING THE PRELIMINARY 24 HOUR PRECIPITATION REPORTS ARE PRELIMINARY
PEAK WIND GUST DATA FROM WESTERN COLORADO. SHOWERS AND THUNDERSTORMS
MOVING NORTHEAST ACROSS WESTERN COLORADO WEDNESDAY PRODUCED STRONG,
GUSTY OUTFLOW WINDS FOR MUCH OF THE AREA.

**********************24 HOUR PRECIPITATION**********************

LOCATION              24 HOUR     TIME/DATE   COMMENTS
                     PRECIPITATION           OF
                     /INCHES/   MEASUREMENT

COLORADO

...ARCHULETA COUNTY...
   PAGOSA SPRINGS 4.2 W  0.13   706 AM  6/25  COCORAHS
   PAGOSA SPRINGS 1.6 S  0.08   714 AM  6/25  COCORAHS

...DELTA COUNTY...
   HOTCHKISS 7.1 WNW     0.10   633 AM  6/25  COCORAHS
   CRAWFORD 2.3 SW       0.06   842 AM  6/25  COCORAHS
   PAONIA 2.1 SSE        0.04   658 AM  6/25  COCORAHS
   PAONIA 1SW            0.04   800 AM  6/25  W CO COOP SITE
   DELTA 1.6 ESE         0.02   732 AM  6/25  COCORAHS
   ECKERT 1.1 SW         0.02   706 AM  6/25  COCORAHS

...EAGLE COUNTY...
   CARBONDALE 5.7 E      0.01   759 AM  6/25  COCORAHS

...GARFIELD COUNTY...
   CARBONDALE 4.6 NNE    0.24  1000 AM  6/25  COCORAHS
   GLENWOOD SPRINGS 1.4  0.10   735 AM  6/25  COCORAHS
   GLENWOOD SPRINGS 5.3  0.07   700 AM  6/25  COCORAHS
   GLENWOOD SPRINGS .64  0.02   734 AM  6/25  COCORAHS

...GUNNISON COUNTY...
   GOTHIC                0.11   700 AM  6/25  UNOFFICIAL STATION
   CRESTED BUTTE 6.2 N   0.11   735 AM  6/25  COCORAHS
   CRESTED BUTTE         0.10   930 AM  6/25  W CO COOP SITE
   POWDERHORN 4.4 NNE    0.02   846 AM  6/25  COCORAHS

...LA PLATA COUNTY...
   ROCKWOOD 6.9 NNW      0.33   811 AM  6/25  COCORAHS
   ROCKWOOD 6.7 N        0.22   748 AM  6/25  COCORAHS
   BAYFIELD 7N           0.21   800 AM  6/25  UNOFFICIAL STATION
   BAYFIELD 5.6 NNE      0.17   735 AM  6/25  COCORAHS
   BAYFIELD 7.0 N        0.10   659 AM  6/25  COCORAHS
   IGNACIO 6.9 NW        0.03   611 AM  6/25  COCORAHS
   BAYFIELD 0.6 WSW      0.02   806 AM  6/25  COCORAHS
   DURANGO .35 E         0.01   731 AM  6/25  COCORAHS
   DURANGO 2.8 S         0.01   727 AM  6/25  COCORAHS

...MESA COUNTY...
   COLORADO NM           0.02   900 AM  6/25  W CO COOP SITE

...MONTROSE COUNTY...
   MONTROSE 10.1 S       0.39   638 AM  6/25  COCORAHS
   MONTROSE 7.3 ENE      0.34   711 AM  6/25  COCORAHS
   BLACK CANYON NP       0.30   900 AM  6/25  W CO COOP SITE
   MONTROSE 8.1 WNW      0.25   801 AM  6/25  COCORAHS
   MONTROSE 1.2 WSW      0.12   846 AM  6/25  COCORAHS
   MONTROSE 2.0 SSE      0.12   504 AM  6/25  COCORAHS
   MONTROSE 3.9 WNW      0.11   702 AM  6/25  COCORAHS
   OLATHE 3.2 NNE        0.08   700 AM  6/25  COCORAHS
   MONTROSE 1.6 E        0.08   731 AM  6/25  COCORAHS
   MONTROSE 2.3 ENE      0.07   807 AM  6/25  COCORAHS
   MONTROSE 1.9 ESE      0.06   638 AM  6/25  COCORAHS
   MONTROSE 1.2 ESE      0.06   722 AM  6/25  COCORAHS
   MONTROSE 2.9 ESE      0.06   737 AM  6/25  COCORAHS
   MONTROSE 4.0 NW       0.06   641 AM  6/25  COCORAHS
   MONTROSE #2           0.05   900 AM  6/25  W CO COOP SITE

...RIO BLANCO COUNTY...
   MEEKER 14.3 ESE       0.05   643 AM  6/25  COCORAHS

...SAN MIGUEL COUNTY...
   NORWOOD 1.4 W         0.19   923 AM  6/25  COCORAHS

UTAH

...SAN JUAN COUNTY...
   MONTICELLO 2.3 SW     0.30   807 AM  6/25  COCORAHS
   MONTICELLO #2         0.27   800 AM  6/25  E UT COOP SITE


***********************PEAK WIND GUST***********************

LOCATION             MAX WIND     TIME/DATE   COMMENTS
                        GUST            OF
                         MPH    MEASUREMENT

COLORADO

...GARFIELD COUNTY...
   3 E RIFLE               46   620 PM  6/24  ASOS

...MESA COUNTY...
   GRAND JUNCTION          60   626 PM  6/24  TRAINED SPOTTER

...MOFFAT COUNTY...
   1 ESE CRAIG             60   314 PM  6/24  ASOS

$$

MMS



000
NOUS45 KGJT 251918
PNSGJT

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE GRAND JUNCTION CO
114 PM MDT THU JUN 25 2015

THE FOLLOWING ARE PRELIMINARY 24 HOUR PRECIPITATION REPORTS FROM
WESTERN COLORADO AND EASTERN UTAH, ENDING THURSDAY MORNING AT 11
AM. AMOUNTS ARE IN INCHES.

FOLLOWING THE PRELIMINARY 24 HOUR PRECIPITATION REPORTS ARE PRELIMINARY
PEAK WIND GUST DATA FROM WESTERN COLORADO. SHOWERS AND THUNDERSTORMS
MOVING NORTHEAST ACROSS WESTERN COLORADO WEDNESDAY PRODUCED STRONG,
GUSTY OUTFLOW WINDS FOR MUCH OF THE AREA.

**********************24 HOUR PRECIPITATION**********************

LOCATION              24 HOUR     TIME/DATE   COMMENTS
                     PRECIPITATION           OF
                     /INCHES/   MEASUREMENT

COLORADO

...ARCHULETA COUNTY...
   PAGOSA SPRINGS 4.2 W  0.13   706 AM  6/25  COCORAHS
   PAGOSA SPRINGS 1.6 S  0.08   714 AM  6/25  COCORAHS

...DELTA COUNTY...
   HOTCHKISS 7.1 WNW     0.10   633 AM  6/25  COCORAHS
   CRAWFORD 2.3 SW       0.06   842 AM  6/25  COCORAHS
   PAONIA 2.1 SSE        0.04   658 AM  6/25  COCORAHS
   PAONIA 1SW            0.04   800 AM  6/25  W CO COOP SITE
   DELTA 1.6 ESE         0.02   732 AM  6/25  COCORAHS
   ECKERT 1.1 SW         0.02   706 AM  6/25  COCORAHS

...EAGLE COUNTY...
   CARBONDALE 5.7 E      0.01   759 AM  6/25  COCORAHS

...GARFIELD COUNTY...
   CARBONDALE 4.6 NNE    0.24  1000 AM  6/25  COCORAHS
   GLENWOOD SPRINGS 1.4  0.10   735 AM  6/25  COCORAHS
   GLENWOOD SPRINGS 5.3  0.07   700 AM  6/25  COCORAHS
   GLENWOOD SPRINGS .64  0.02   734 AM  6/25  COCORAHS

...GUNNISON COUNTY...
   GOTHIC                0.11   700 AM  6/25  UNOFFICIAL STATION
   CRESTED BUTTE 6.2 N   0.11   735 AM  6/25  COCORAHS
   CRESTED BUTTE         0.10   930 AM  6/25  W CO COOP SITE
   POWDERHORN 4.4 NNE    0.02   846 AM  6/25  COCORAHS

...LA PLATA COUNTY...
   ROCKWOOD 6.9 NNW      0.33   811 AM  6/25  COCORAHS
   ROCKWOOD 6.7 N        0.22   748 AM  6/25  COCORAHS
   BAYFIELD 7N           0.21   800 AM  6/25  UNOFFICIAL STATION
   BAYFIELD 5.6 NNE      0.17   735 AM  6/25  COCORAHS
   BAYFIELD 7.0 N        0.10   659 AM  6/25  COCORAHS
   IGNACIO 6.9 NW        0.03   611 AM  6/25  COCORAHS
   BAYFIELD 0.6 WSW      0.02   806 AM  6/25  COCORAHS
   DURANGO .35 E         0.01   731 AM  6/25  COCORAHS
   DURANGO 2.8 S         0.01   727 AM  6/25  COCORAHS

...MESA COUNTY...
   COLORADO NM           0.02   900 AM  6/25  W CO COOP SITE

...MONTROSE COUNTY...
   MONTROSE 10.1 S       0.39   638 AM  6/25  COCORAHS
   MONTROSE 7.3 ENE      0.34   711 AM  6/25  COCORAHS
   BLACK CANYON NP       0.30   900 AM  6/25  W CO COOP SITE
   MONTROSE 8.1 WNW      0.25   801 AM  6/25  COCORAHS
   MONTROSE 1.2 WSW      0.12   846 AM  6/25  COCORAHS
   MONTROSE 2.0 SSE      0.12   504 AM  6/25  COCORAHS
   MONTROSE 3.9 WNW      0.11   702 AM  6/25  COCORAHS
   OLATHE 3.2 NNE        0.08   700 AM  6/25  COCORAHS
   MONTROSE 1.6 E        0.08   731 AM  6/25  COCORAHS
   MONTROSE 2.3 ENE      0.07   807 AM  6/25  COCORAHS
   MONTROSE 1.9 ESE      0.06   638 AM  6/25  COCORAHS
   MONTROSE 1.2 ESE      0.06   722 AM  6/25  COCORAHS
   MONTROSE 2.9 ESE      0.06   737 AM  6/25  COCORAHS
   MONTROSE 4.0 NW       0.06   641 AM  6/25  COCORAHS
   MONTROSE #2           0.05   900 AM  6/25  W CO COOP SITE

...RIO BLANCO COUNTY...
   MEEKER 14.3 ESE       0.05   643 AM  6/25  COCORAHS

...SAN MIGUEL COUNTY...
   NORWOOD 1.4 W         0.19   923 AM  6/25  COCORAHS

UTAH

...SAN JUAN COUNTY...
   MONTICELLO 2.3 SW     0.30   807 AM  6/25  COCORAHS
   MONTICELLO #2         0.27   800 AM  6/25  E UT COOP SITE


***********************PEAK WIND GUST***********************

LOCATION             MAX WIND     TIME/DATE   COMMENTS
                        GUST            OF
                         MPH    MEASUREMENT

COLORADO

...GARFIELD COUNTY...
   3 E RIFLE               46   620 PM  6/24  ASOS

...MESA COUNTY...
   GRAND JUNCTION          60   626 PM  6/24  TRAINED SPOTTER

...MOFFAT COUNTY...
   1 ESE CRAIG             60   314 PM  6/24  ASOS

$$

MMS



000
NOUS45 KGJT 251918
PNSGJT

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE GRAND JUNCTION CO
114 PM MDT THU JUN 25 2015

THE FOLLOWING ARE PRELIMINARY 24 HOUR PRECIPITATION REPORTS FROM
WESTERN COLORADO AND EASTERN UTAH, ENDING THURSDAY MORNING AT 11
AM. AMOUNTS ARE IN INCHES.

FOLLOWING THE PRELIMINARY 24 HOUR PRECIPITATION REPORTS ARE PRELIMINARY
PEAK WIND GUST DATA FROM WESTERN COLORADO. SHOWERS AND THUNDERSTORMS
MOVING NORTHEAST ACROSS WESTERN COLORADO WEDNESDAY PRODUCED STRONG,
GUSTY OUTFLOW WINDS FOR MUCH OF THE AREA.

**********************24 HOUR PRECIPITATION**********************

LOCATION              24 HOUR     TIME/DATE   COMMENTS
                     PRECIPITATION           OF
                     /INCHES/   MEASUREMENT

COLORADO

...ARCHULETA COUNTY...
   PAGOSA SPRINGS 4.2 W  0.13   706 AM  6/25  COCORAHS
   PAGOSA SPRINGS 1.6 S  0.08   714 AM  6/25  COCORAHS

...DELTA COUNTY...
   HOTCHKISS 7.1 WNW     0.10   633 AM  6/25  COCORAHS
   CRAWFORD 2.3 SW       0.06   842 AM  6/25  COCORAHS
   PAONIA 2.1 SSE        0.04   658 AM  6/25  COCORAHS
   PAONIA 1SW            0.04   800 AM  6/25  W CO COOP SITE
   DELTA 1.6 ESE         0.02   732 AM  6/25  COCORAHS
   ECKERT 1.1 SW         0.02   706 AM  6/25  COCORAHS

...EAGLE COUNTY...
   CARBONDALE 5.7 E      0.01   759 AM  6/25  COCORAHS

...GARFIELD COUNTY...
   CARBONDALE 4.6 NNE    0.24  1000 AM  6/25  COCORAHS
   GLENWOOD SPRINGS 1.4  0.10   735 AM  6/25  COCORAHS
   GLENWOOD SPRINGS 5.3  0.07   700 AM  6/25  COCORAHS
   GLENWOOD SPRINGS .64  0.02   734 AM  6/25  COCORAHS

...GUNNISON COUNTY...
   GOTHIC                0.11   700 AM  6/25  UNOFFICIAL STATION
   CRESTED BUTTE 6.2 N   0.11   735 AM  6/25  COCORAHS
   CRESTED BUTTE         0.10   930 AM  6/25  W CO COOP SITE
   POWDERHORN 4.4 NNE    0.02   846 AM  6/25  COCORAHS

...LA PLATA COUNTY...
   ROCKWOOD 6.9 NNW      0.33   811 AM  6/25  COCORAHS
   ROCKWOOD 6.7 N        0.22   748 AM  6/25  COCORAHS
   BAYFIELD 7N           0.21   800 AM  6/25  UNOFFICIAL STATION
   BAYFIELD 5.6 NNE      0.17   735 AM  6/25  COCORAHS
   BAYFIELD 7.0 N        0.10   659 AM  6/25  COCORAHS
   IGNACIO 6.9 NW        0.03   611 AM  6/25  COCORAHS
   BAYFIELD 0.6 WSW      0.02   806 AM  6/25  COCORAHS
   DURANGO .35 E         0.01   731 AM  6/25  COCORAHS
   DURANGO 2.8 S         0.01   727 AM  6/25  COCORAHS

...MESA COUNTY...
   COLORADO NM           0.02   900 AM  6/25  W CO COOP SITE

...MONTROSE COUNTY...
   MONTROSE 10.1 S       0.39   638 AM  6/25  COCORAHS
   MONTROSE 7.3 ENE      0.34   711 AM  6/25  COCORAHS
   BLACK CANYON NP       0.30   900 AM  6/25  W CO COOP SITE
   MONTROSE 8.1 WNW      0.25   801 AM  6/25  COCORAHS
   MONTROSE 1.2 WSW      0.12   846 AM  6/25  COCORAHS
   MONTROSE 2.0 SSE      0.12   504 AM  6/25  COCORAHS
   MONTROSE 3.9 WNW      0.11   702 AM  6/25  COCORAHS
   OLATHE 3.2 NNE        0.08   700 AM  6/25  COCORAHS
   MONTROSE 1.6 E        0.08   731 AM  6/25  COCORAHS
   MONTROSE 2.3 ENE      0.07   807 AM  6/25  COCORAHS
   MONTROSE 1.9 ESE      0.06   638 AM  6/25  COCORAHS
   MONTROSE 1.2 ESE      0.06   722 AM  6/25  COCORAHS
   MONTROSE 2.9 ESE      0.06   737 AM  6/25  COCORAHS
   MONTROSE 4.0 NW       0.06   641 AM  6/25  COCORAHS
   MONTROSE #2           0.05   900 AM  6/25  W CO COOP SITE

...RIO BLANCO COUNTY...
   MEEKER 14.3 ESE       0.05   643 AM  6/25  COCORAHS

...SAN MIGUEL COUNTY...
   NORWOOD 1.4 W         0.19   923 AM  6/25  COCORAHS

UTAH

...SAN JUAN COUNTY...
   MONTICELLO 2.3 SW     0.30   807 AM  6/25  COCORAHS
   MONTICELLO #2         0.27   800 AM  6/25  E UT COOP SITE


***********************PEAK WIND GUST***********************

LOCATION             MAX WIND     TIME/DATE   COMMENTS
                        GUST            OF
                         MPH    MEASUREMENT

COLORADO

...GARFIELD COUNTY...
   3 E RIFLE               46   620 PM  6/24  ASOS

...MESA COUNTY...
   GRAND JUNCTION          60   626 PM  6/24  TRAINED SPOTTER

...MOFFAT COUNTY...
   1 ESE CRAIG             60   314 PM  6/24  ASOS

$$

MMS



000
NOUS45 KGJT 251918
PNSGJT

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE GRAND JUNCTION CO
114 PM MDT THU JUN 25 2015

THE FOLLOWING ARE PRELIMINARY 24 HOUR PRECIPITATION REPORTS FROM
WESTERN COLORADO AND EASTERN UTAH, ENDING THURSDAY MORNING AT 11
AM. AMOUNTS ARE IN INCHES.

FOLLOWING THE PRELIMINARY 24 HOUR PRECIPITATION REPORTS ARE PRELIMINARY
PEAK WIND GUST DATA FROM WESTERN COLORADO. SHOWERS AND THUNDERSTORMS
MOVING NORTHEAST ACROSS WESTERN COLORADO WEDNESDAY PRODUCED STRONG,
GUSTY OUTFLOW WINDS FOR MUCH OF THE AREA.

**********************24 HOUR PRECIPITATION**********************

LOCATION              24 HOUR     TIME/DATE   COMMENTS
                     PRECIPITATION           OF
                     /INCHES/   MEASUREMENT

COLORADO

...ARCHULETA COUNTY...
   PAGOSA SPRINGS 4.2 W  0.13   706 AM  6/25  COCORAHS
   PAGOSA SPRINGS 1.6 S  0.08   714 AM  6/25  COCORAHS

...DELTA COUNTY...
   HOTCHKISS 7.1 WNW     0.10   633 AM  6/25  COCORAHS
   CRAWFORD 2.3 SW       0.06   842 AM  6/25  COCORAHS
   PAONIA 2.1 SSE        0.04   658 AM  6/25  COCORAHS
   PAONIA 1SW            0.04   800 AM  6/25  W CO COOP SITE
   DELTA 1.6 ESE         0.02   732 AM  6/25  COCORAHS
   ECKERT 1.1 SW         0.02   706 AM  6/25  COCORAHS

...EAGLE COUNTY...
   CARBONDALE 5.7 E      0.01   759 AM  6/25  COCORAHS

...GARFIELD COUNTY...
   CARBONDALE 4.6 NNE    0.24  1000 AM  6/25  COCORAHS
   GLENWOOD SPRINGS 1.4  0.10   735 AM  6/25  COCORAHS
   GLENWOOD SPRINGS 5.3  0.07   700 AM  6/25  COCORAHS
   GLENWOOD SPRINGS .64  0.02   734 AM  6/25  COCORAHS

...GUNNISON COUNTY...
   GOTHIC                0.11   700 AM  6/25  UNOFFICIAL STATION
   CRESTED BUTTE 6.2 N   0.11   735 AM  6/25  COCORAHS
   CRESTED BUTTE         0.10   930 AM  6/25  W CO COOP SITE
   POWDERHORN 4.4 NNE    0.02   846 AM  6/25  COCORAHS

...LA PLATA COUNTY...
   ROCKWOOD 6.9 NNW      0.33   811 AM  6/25  COCORAHS
   ROCKWOOD 6.7 N        0.22   748 AM  6/25  COCORAHS
   BAYFIELD 7N           0.21   800 AM  6/25  UNOFFICIAL STATION
   BAYFIELD 5.6 NNE      0.17   735 AM  6/25  COCORAHS
   BAYFIELD 7.0 N        0.10   659 AM  6/25  COCORAHS
   IGNACIO 6.9 NW        0.03   611 AM  6/25  COCORAHS
   BAYFIELD 0.6 WSW      0.02   806 AM  6/25  COCORAHS
   DURANGO .35 E         0.01   731 AM  6/25  COCORAHS
   DURANGO 2.8 S         0.01   727 AM  6/25  COCORAHS

...MESA COUNTY...
   COLORADO NM           0.02   900 AM  6/25  W CO COOP SITE

...MONTROSE COUNTY...
   MONTROSE 10.1 S       0.39   638 AM  6/25  COCORAHS
   MONTROSE 7.3 ENE      0.34   711 AM  6/25  COCORAHS
   BLACK CANYON NP       0.30   900 AM  6/25  W CO COOP SITE
   MONTROSE 8.1 WNW      0.25   801 AM  6/25  COCORAHS
   MONTROSE 1.2 WSW      0.12   846 AM  6/25  COCORAHS
   MONTROSE 2.0 SSE      0.12   504 AM  6/25  COCORAHS
   MONTROSE 3.9 WNW      0.11   702 AM  6/25  COCORAHS
   OLATHE 3.2 NNE        0.08   700 AM  6/25  COCORAHS
   MONTROSE 1.6 E        0.08   731 AM  6/25  COCORAHS
   MONTROSE 2.3 ENE      0.07   807 AM  6/25  COCORAHS
   MONTROSE 1.9 ESE      0.06   638 AM  6/25  COCORAHS
   MONTROSE 1.2 ESE      0.06   722 AM  6/25  COCORAHS
   MONTROSE 2.9 ESE      0.06   737 AM  6/25  COCORAHS
   MONTROSE 4.0 NW       0.06   641 AM  6/25  COCORAHS
   MONTROSE #2           0.05   900 AM  6/25  W CO COOP SITE

...RIO BLANCO COUNTY...
   MEEKER 14.3 ESE       0.05   643 AM  6/25  COCORAHS

...SAN MIGUEL COUNTY...
   NORWOOD 1.4 W         0.19   923 AM  6/25  COCORAHS

UTAH

...SAN JUAN COUNTY...
   MONTICELLO 2.3 SW     0.30   807 AM  6/25  COCORAHS
   MONTICELLO #2         0.27   800 AM  6/25  E UT COOP SITE


***********************PEAK WIND GUST***********************

LOCATION             MAX WIND     TIME/DATE   COMMENTS
                        GUST            OF
                         MPH    MEASUREMENT

COLORADO

...GARFIELD COUNTY...
   3 E RIFLE               46   620 PM  6/24  ASOS

...MESA COUNTY...
   GRAND JUNCTION          60   626 PM  6/24  TRAINED SPOTTER

...MOFFAT COUNTY...
   1 ESE CRAIG             60   314 PM  6/24  ASOS

$$

MMS



000
NOUS45 KGJT 251914
PNSGJT

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE GRAND JUNCTION CO
114 PM MDT THU JUN 25 2015

THE FOLLOWING ARE PRELIMINARY 24 HOUR PRECIPITATION REPORTS FROM
WESTERN COLORADO AND EASTERN UTAH, ENDING THURSDAY MORNING AT 11
AM. AMOUNTS ARE IN INCHES.

FOLLOWING THE PRELIMINARY 24 HOUR PRECIPITATION REPORTS ARE PRELIMINARY
PEAK WIND GUST DATA FROM WESTERN COLORADO. SHOWERS AND THUNDERSTORMS
MOVING NORTHEAST ACROSS WESTERN COLORADO WEDNESDAY PRODUCED STRONG,
GUSTY OUTFLOW WINDS FOR MUCH OF THE AREA.

**********************24 HOUR PRECIPITATION**********************

LOCATION              24 HOUR     TIME/DATE   COMMENTS
                     PRECIPITATION           OF
                     /INCHES/   MEASUREMENT

COLORADO

...ARCHULETA COUNTY...
   PAGOSA SPRINGS 4.2 W  0.13   706 AM  6/25  COCORAHS
   PAGOSA SPRINGS 1.6 S  0.08   714 AM  6/25  COCORAHS

...DELTA COUNTY...
   HOTCHKISS 7.1 WNW     0.10   633 AM  6/25  COCORAHS
   CRAWFORD 2.3 SW       0.06   842 AM  6/25  COCORAHS
   PAONIA 2.1 SSE        0.04   658 AM  6/25  COCORAHS
   PAONIA 1SW            0.04   800 AM  6/25  W CO COOP SITE
   DELTA 1.6 ESE         0.02   732 AM  6/25  COCORAHS
   ECKERT 1.1 SW         0.02   706 AM  6/25  COCORAHS

...EAGLE COUNTY...
   CARBONDALE 5.7 E      0.01   759 AM  6/25  COCORAHS

...GARFIELD COUNTY...
   CARBONDALE 4.6 NNE    0.24  1000 AM  6/25  COCORAHS
   GLENWOOD SPRINGS 1.4  0.10   735 AM  6/25  COCORAHS
   GLENWOOD SPRINGS 5.3  0.07   700 AM  6/25  COCORAHS
   GLENWOOD SPRINGS .64  0.02   734 AM  6/25  COCORAHS

...GUNNISON COUNTY...
   GOTHIC                0.11   700 AM  6/25  UNOFFICIAL STATION
   CRESTED BUTTE 6.2 N   0.11   735 AM  6/25  COCORAHS
   CRESTED BUTTE         0.10   930 AM  6/25  W CO COOP SITE
   POWDERHORN 4.4 NNE    0.02   846 AM  6/25  COCORAHS

...LA PLATA COUNTY...
   ROCKWOOD 6.9 NNW      0.33   811 AM  6/25  COCORAHS
   ROCKWOOD 6.7 N        0.22   748 AM  6/25  COCORAHS
   BAYFIELD 7N           0.21   800 AM  6/25  UNOFFICIAL STATION
   BAYFIELD 5.6 NNE      0.17   735 AM  6/25  COCORAHS
   BAYFIELD 7.0 N        0.10   659 AM  6/25  COCORAHS
   IGNACIO 6.9 NW        0.03   611 AM  6/25  COCORAHS
   BAYFIELD 0.6 WSW      0.02   806 AM  6/25  COCORAHS
   DURANGO .35 E         0.01   731 AM  6/25  COCORAHS
   DURANGO 2.8 S         0.01   727 AM  6/25  COCORAHS

...MESA COUNTY...
   COLORADO NM           0.02   900 AM  6/25  W CO COOP SITE

...MONTROSE COUNTY...
   MONTROSE 10.1 S       0.39   638 AM  6/25  COCORAHS
   MONTROSE 7.3 ENE      0.34   711 AM  6/25  COCORAHS
   BLACK CANYON NP       0.30   900 AM  6/25  W CO COOP SITE
   MONTROSE 8.1 WNW      0.25   801 AM  6/25  COCORAHS
   MONTROSE 1.2 WSW      0.12   846 AM  6/25  COCORAHS
   MONTROSE 2.0 SSE      0.12   504 AM  6/25  COCORAHS
   MONTROSE 3.9 WNW      0.11   702 AM  6/25  COCORAHS
   OLATHE 3.2 NNE        0.08   700 AM  6/25  COCORAHS
   MONTROSE 1.6 E        0.08   731 AM  6/25  COCORAHS
   MONTROSE 2.3 ENE      0.07   807 AM  6/25  COCORAHS
   MONTROSE 1.9 ESE      0.06   638 AM  6/25  COCORAHS
   MONTROSE 1.2 ESE      0.06   722 AM  6/25  COCORAHS
   MONTROSE 2.9 ESE      0.06   737 AM  6/25  COCORAHS
   MONTROSE 4.0 NW       0.06   641 AM  6/25  COCORAHS
   MONTROSE #2           0.05   900 AM  6/25  W CO COOP SITE

...RIO BLANCO COUNTY...
   MEEKER 14.3 ESE       0.05   643 AM  6/25  COCORAHS

...SAN MIGUEL COUNTY...
   NORWOOD 1.4 W         0.19   923 AM  6/25  COCORAHS

UTAH

...SAN JUAN COUNTY...
   MONTICELLO 2.3 SW     0.30   807 AM  6/25  COCORAHS
   MONTICELLO #2         0.27   800 AM  6/25  E UT COOP SITE


***********************PEAK WIND GUST***********************

LOCATION             MAX WIND     TIME/DATE   COMMENTS
                        GUST            OF
                         MPH    MEASUREMENT

COLORADO

...GARFIELD COUNTY...
   3 E RIFLE               46   620 PM  6/24  ASOS

...MESA COUNTY...
   GRAND JUNCTION          60   626 PM  6/24  TRAINED SPOTTER

...MOFFAT COUNTY...
   1 ESE CRAIG             60   314 PM  6/24  ASOS

$$

MMS


$$



000
NOUS45 KGJT 251914
PNSGJT

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE GRAND JUNCTION CO
114 PM MDT THU JUN 25 2015

THE FOLLOWING ARE PRELIMINARY 24 HOUR PRECIPITATION REPORTS FROM
WESTERN COLORADO AND EASTERN UTAH, ENDING THURSDAY MORNING AT 11
AM. AMOUNTS ARE IN INCHES.

FOLLOWING THE PRELIMINARY 24 HOUR PRECIPITATION REPORTS ARE PRELIMINARY
PEAK WIND GUST DATA FROM WESTERN COLORADO. SHOWERS AND THUNDERSTORMS
MOVING NORTHEAST ACROSS WESTERN COLORADO WEDNESDAY PRODUCED STRONG,
GUSTY OUTFLOW WINDS FOR MUCH OF THE AREA.

**********************24 HOUR PRECIPITATION**********************

LOCATION              24 HOUR     TIME/DATE   COMMENTS
                     PRECIPITATION           OF
                     /INCHES/   MEASUREMENT

COLORADO

...ARCHULETA COUNTY...
   PAGOSA SPRINGS 4.2 W  0.13   706 AM  6/25  COCORAHS
   PAGOSA SPRINGS 1.6 S  0.08   714 AM  6/25  COCORAHS

...DELTA COUNTY...
   HOTCHKISS 7.1 WNW     0.10   633 AM  6/25  COCORAHS
   CRAWFORD 2.3 SW       0.06   842 AM  6/25  COCORAHS
   PAONIA 2.1 SSE        0.04   658 AM  6/25  COCORAHS
   PAONIA 1SW            0.04   800 AM  6/25  W CO COOP SITE
   DELTA 1.6 ESE         0.02   732 AM  6/25  COCORAHS
   ECKERT 1.1 SW         0.02   706 AM  6/25  COCORAHS

...EAGLE COUNTY...
   CARBONDALE 5.7 E      0.01   759 AM  6/25  COCORAHS

...GARFIELD COUNTY...
   CARBONDALE 4.6 NNE    0.24  1000 AM  6/25  COCORAHS
   GLENWOOD SPRINGS 1.4  0.10   735 AM  6/25  COCORAHS
   GLENWOOD SPRINGS 5.3  0.07   700 AM  6/25  COCORAHS
   GLENWOOD SPRINGS .64  0.02   734 AM  6/25  COCORAHS

...GUNNISON COUNTY...
   GOTHIC                0.11   700 AM  6/25  UNOFFICIAL STATION
   CRESTED BUTTE 6.2 N   0.11   735 AM  6/25  COCORAHS
   CRESTED BUTTE         0.10   930 AM  6/25  W CO COOP SITE
   POWDERHORN 4.4 NNE    0.02   846 AM  6/25  COCORAHS

...LA PLATA COUNTY...
   ROCKWOOD 6.9 NNW      0.33   811 AM  6/25  COCORAHS
   ROCKWOOD 6.7 N        0.22   748 AM  6/25  COCORAHS
   BAYFIELD 7N           0.21   800 AM  6/25  UNOFFICIAL STATION
   BAYFIELD 5.6 NNE      0.17   735 AM  6/25  COCORAHS
   BAYFIELD 7.0 N        0.10   659 AM  6/25  COCORAHS
   IGNACIO 6.9 NW        0.03   611 AM  6/25  COCORAHS
   BAYFIELD 0.6 WSW      0.02   806 AM  6/25  COCORAHS
   DURANGO .35 E         0.01   731 AM  6/25  COCORAHS
   DURANGO 2.8 S         0.01   727 AM  6/25  COCORAHS

...MESA COUNTY...
   COLORADO NM           0.02   900 AM  6/25  W CO COOP SITE

...MONTROSE COUNTY...
   MONTROSE 10.1 S       0.39   638 AM  6/25  COCORAHS
   MONTROSE 7.3 ENE      0.34   711 AM  6/25  COCORAHS
   BLACK CANYON NP       0.30   900 AM  6/25  W CO COOP SITE
   MONTROSE 8.1 WNW      0.25   801 AM  6/25  COCORAHS
   MONTROSE 1.2 WSW      0.12   846 AM  6/25  COCORAHS
   MONTROSE 2.0 SSE      0.12   504 AM  6/25  COCORAHS
   MONTROSE 3.9 WNW      0.11   702 AM  6/25  COCORAHS
   OLATHE 3.2 NNE        0.08   700 AM  6/25  COCORAHS
   MONTROSE 1.6 E        0.08   731 AM  6/25  COCORAHS
   MONTROSE 2.3 ENE      0.07   807 AM  6/25  COCORAHS
   MONTROSE 1.9 ESE      0.06   638 AM  6/25  COCORAHS
   MONTROSE 1.2 ESE      0.06   722 AM  6/25  COCORAHS
   MONTROSE 2.9 ESE      0.06   737 AM  6/25  COCORAHS
   MONTROSE 4.0 NW       0.06   641 AM  6/25  COCORAHS
   MONTROSE #2           0.05   900 AM  6/25  W CO COOP SITE

...RIO BLANCO COUNTY...
   MEEKER 14.3 ESE       0.05   643 AM  6/25  COCORAHS

...SAN MIGUEL COUNTY...
   NORWOOD 1.4 W         0.19   923 AM  6/25  COCORAHS

UTAH

...SAN JUAN COUNTY...
   MONTICELLO 2.3 SW     0.30   807 AM  6/25  COCORAHS
   MONTICELLO #2         0.27   800 AM  6/25  E UT COOP SITE


***********************PEAK WIND GUST***********************

LOCATION             MAX WIND     TIME/DATE   COMMENTS
                        GUST            OF
                         MPH    MEASUREMENT

COLORADO

...GARFIELD COUNTY...
   3 E RIFLE               46   620 PM  6/24  ASOS

...MESA COUNTY...
   GRAND JUNCTION          60   626 PM  6/24  TRAINED SPOTTER

...MOFFAT COUNTY...
   1 ESE CRAIG             60   314 PM  6/24  ASOS

$$

MMS


$$


000
NOUS41 KWBC 251658
PNSWSH

Technical Implementation Notice 15-33
National Weather Service Headquarters Washington DC
100 PM EDT Thu Jun 26 2015

To:       Subscribers:
          -Family of Services
          -NOAA Weather Wire Service
          -Emergency Managers Weather Information Network
          -NOAAPORT
          Other NWS Partners, Users and Employees

From:     Tim McClung
          Chief Operating Officer
          NWS Office of Science and Technology Integration

Subject:  Changes to North American Mesoscale Model (NAM)-based
          Model Output Statistics (MOS) Guidance Effective
          September 29, 2015

On or about Tuesday, September 29, 2015, beginning with the 1200
Coordinated Universal Time (UTC) model run, the NWS
Meteorological Development Laboratory (MDL) will implement
updates to the NAM-based MOS guidance. The updates will include
new equations for forecasts of snowfall amount, for 6- and 12-h
thunderstorm probability, and for 6- and 12-h probability of
severe weather. Implementation of the new equations will remove
any remaining influence of data collected from the older eta-
coordinate model on MOS forecasts for these elements. In
addition, NCEP will introduce new NAM MOS probabilistic and
categorical guidance for cool-season precipitation type.

The addition of precipitation type will increase the length of
the cool-season NAM MOS messages by three lines in the body of
text for each station contained in the MOS alphanumeric (MET)
bulletins and by three records for each station in the BUFR
messages. These added lines will contain probabilistic forecasts
for the occurrence of freezing precipitation and snow labeled
POZ, POS, as well as a categorical forecast of the most likely
precipitation type labeled TYP. Due to changes in reporting
frequencies, sufficient data were not available for development
of new precipitation type equations at 14 sites currently in the
NAM MOS system.  Therefore, precipitation type guidance will not
be produced and no additional information will appear in the MET
and BUFR messages for these sites.  These sites are listed in
Table 1 below.

NAM MOS messages for Alaskan sites also will contain an
additional two lines for the new 6- and 12-h thunderstorm
probability forecasts, labeled T06 and T12, during the
convective season, May 1 through September 30; however, since
the observed frequency of severe convective weather events over
Alaska is quite low, it was not possible to obtain stable
statistical relationships for the severe weather probabilities
at those sites. All Alaska severe weather probability forecasts
will be coded as missing, i.e., 99, at their respective
positions within the NAM MOS messages.

Users should take the necessary steps for ingest of this
additional information. Following implementation of these
changes, the format of the cool-season NAM MOS messages will be
identical to those being generated for the companion short-range
GFS MOS text (MAV) and BUFR products.

Table 1:  Sites for which NAM MOS precipitation type guidance
will not be available

     ID        STATION                       LAT      LON

     K3A6      NEWHALL                CA     34.37N   118.57W
     K47A      CHEROKEE CNTY ARPT     GA     34.31N    84.42W
     K48I      SUTTON/BRAXTON CO AP   WV     38.69N    80.65W
     K4BL      BLANDING               UT     37.62N   109.47W
     K4HV      HANKSVILLE             UT     38.37N   110.72W
     KHMS      HANFORD                WA     46.57N   119.60W
     KNHZ      BRUNSWICK NAS          ME     43.89N    69.94W
     KPFN      PANAMA CITY            FL     30.20N    85.80W
     KRZZ      ROANOKE_RAPIDS         NC     36.44N    77.71W
     KTDO      TOLEDO                 WA     46.48N   122.80W
     PADT      SLANA AIRPORT          AK     62.70N   143.98W
     PALV      BIG RIVER LAKE         AK     60.82N   152.30W
     PASP      SHEEP MOUNTAIN         AK     61.82N   147.51W
     PAWR      WHITTIER               AK     60.77N   148.68W

The following public weather alphanumeric messages and BUFR
products are affected by the above changes:

Table 2: Communication identifiers for the NAM-based MOS
Public weather text products

     WMO HEADING    AWIPS ID

     FOAK47 KWNO    METAJK
     FOAK48 KWNO    METAFC
     FOAK49 KWNO    METAFG
     FOPA40 KWNO    METPA0
     FOUS44 KWNO    METNE1
     FOUS45 KWNO    METSE1
     FOUS46 KWNO    METNC1
     FOUS47 KWNO    METSC1
     FOUS48 KWNO    METRM1
     FOUS49 KWNO    METWC1

Table 3: Communication identifiers for the NAM-based MOS BUFR
messages

     WMO HEADING

     JSML10 KWNO
     JSML11 KWNO
     JSML12 KWNO
     JSML13 KWNO
     JSML14 KWNO
     JSML15 KWNO
     JSML16 KWNO
     JSML17 KWNO

For questions regarding the updates to the NAM MOS guidance and
associated message changes please contact:

  Mark Antolik
  MDL/Silver Spring, Maryland
  301-427-9480
  Mark.Antolik@noaa.gov
or
  Matthew Peroutka
  MDL/Silver Spring, Maryland
  301-427-9483
  Matthew.Peroutka@noaa.gov

Links to the MOS products and descriptions are online at:

  http://www.nws.noaa.gov/mdl/synop

NWS National Technical Implementation Notices are online at:

  http://www.weather.gov/os/notif.htm

$$



000
NOUS41 KWBC 251658
PNSWSH

Technical Implementation Notice 15-33
National Weather Service Headquarters Washington DC
100 PM EDT Thu Jun 26 2015

To:       Subscribers:
          -Family of Services
          -NOAA Weather Wire Service
          -Emergency Managers Weather Information Network
          -NOAAPORT
          Other NWS Partners, Users and Employees

From:     Tim McClung
          Chief Operating Officer
          NWS Office of Science and Technology Integration

Subject:  Changes to North American Mesoscale Model (NAM)-based
          Model Output Statistics (MOS) Guidance Effective
          September 29, 2015

On or about Tuesday, September 29, 2015, beginning with the 1200
Coordinated Universal Time (UTC) model run, the NWS
Meteorological Development Laboratory (MDL) will implement
updates to the NAM-based MOS guidance. The updates will include
new equations for forecasts of snowfall amount, for 6- and 12-h
thunderstorm probability, and for 6- and 12-h probability of
severe weather. Implementation of the new equations will remove
any remaining influence of data collected from the older eta-
coordinate model on MOS forecasts for these elements. In
addition, NCEP will introduce new NAM MOS probabilistic and
categorical guidance for cool-season precipitation type.

The addition of precipitation type will increase the length of
the cool-season NAM MOS messages by three lines in the body of
text for each station contained in the MOS alphanumeric (MET)
bulletins and by three records for each station in the BUFR
messages. These added lines will contain probabilistic forecasts
for the occurrence of freezing precipitation and snow labeled
POZ, POS, as well as a categorical forecast of the most likely
precipitation type labeled TYP. Due to changes in reporting
frequencies, sufficient data were not available for development
of new precipitation type equations at 14 sites currently in the
NAM MOS system.  Therefore, precipitation type guidance will not
be produced and no additional information will appear in the MET
and BUFR messages for these sites.  These sites are listed in
Table 1 below.

NAM MOS messages for Alaskan sites also will contain an
additional two lines for the new 6- and 12-h thunderstorm
probability forecasts, labeled T06 and T12, during the
convective season, May 1 through September 30; however, since
the observed frequency of severe convective weather events over
Alaska is quite low, it was not possible to obtain stable
statistical relationships for the severe weather probabilities
at those sites. All Alaska severe weather probability forecasts
will be coded as missing, i.e., 99, at their respective
positions within the NAM MOS messages.

Users should take the necessary steps for ingest of this
additional information. Following implementation of these
changes, the format of the cool-season NAM MOS messages will be
identical to those being generated for the companion short-range
GFS MOS text (MAV) and BUFR products.

Table 1:  Sites for which NAM MOS precipitation type guidance
will not be available

     ID        STATION                       LAT      LON

     K3A6      NEWHALL                CA     34.37N   118.57W
     K47A      CHEROKEE CNTY ARPT     GA     34.31N    84.42W
     K48I      SUTTON/BRAXTON CO AP   WV     38.69N    80.65W
     K4BL      BLANDING               UT     37.62N   109.47W
     K4HV      HANKSVILLE             UT     38.37N   110.72W
     KHMS      HANFORD                WA     46.57N   119.60W
     KNHZ      BRUNSWICK NAS          ME     43.89N    69.94W
     KPFN      PANAMA CITY            FL     30.20N    85.80W
     KRZZ      ROANOKE_RAPIDS         NC     36.44N    77.71W
     KTDO      TOLEDO                 WA     46.48N   122.80W
     PADT      SLANA AIRPORT          AK     62.70N   143.98W
     PALV      BIG RIVER LAKE         AK     60.82N   152.30W
     PASP      SHEEP MOUNTAIN         AK     61.82N   147.51W
     PAWR      WHITTIER               AK     60.77N   148.68W

The following public weather alphanumeric messages and BUFR
products are affected by the above changes:

Table 2: Communication identifiers for the NAM-based MOS
Public weather text products

     WMO HEADING    AWIPS ID

     FOAK47 KWNO    METAJK
     FOAK48 KWNO    METAFC
     FOAK49 KWNO    METAFG
     FOPA40 KWNO    METPA0
     FOUS44 KWNO    METNE1
     FOUS45 KWNO    METSE1
     FOUS46 KWNO    METNC1
     FOUS47 KWNO    METSC1
     FOUS48 KWNO    METRM1
     FOUS49 KWNO    METWC1

Table 3: Communication identifiers for the NAM-based MOS BUFR
messages

     WMO HEADING

     JSML10 KWNO
     JSML11 KWNO
     JSML12 KWNO
     JSML13 KWNO
     JSML14 KWNO
     JSML15 KWNO
     JSML16 KWNO
     JSML17 KWNO

For questions regarding the updates to the NAM MOS guidance and
associated message changes please contact:

  Mark Antolik
  MDL/Silver Spring, Maryland
  301-427-9480
  Mark.Antolik@noaa.gov
or
  Matthew Peroutka
  MDL/Silver Spring, Maryland
  301-427-9483
  Matthew.Peroutka@noaa.gov

Links to the MOS products and descriptions are online at:

  http://www.nws.noaa.gov/mdl/synop

NWS National Technical Implementation Notices are online at:

  http://www.weather.gov/os/notif.htm

$$


000
NOUS41 KWBC 251658
PNSWSH

Technical Implementation Notice 15-33
National Weather Service Headquarters Washington DC
100 PM EDT Thu Jun 26 2015

To:       Subscribers:
          -Family of Services
          -NOAA Weather Wire Service
          -Emergency Managers Weather Information Network
          -NOAAPORT
          Other NWS Partners, Users and Employees

From:     Tim McClung
          Chief Operating Officer
          NWS Office of Science and Technology Integration

Subject:  Changes to North American Mesoscale Model (NAM)-based
          Model Output Statistics (MOS) Guidance Effective
          September 29, 2015

On or about Tuesday, September 29, 2015, beginning with the 1200
Coordinated Universal Time (UTC) model run, the NWS
Meteorological Development Laboratory (MDL) will implement
updates to the NAM-based MOS guidance. The updates will include
new equations for forecasts of snowfall amount, for 6- and 12-h
thunderstorm probability, and for 6- and 12-h probability of
severe weather. Implementation of the new equations will remove
any remaining influence of data collected from the older eta-
coordinate model on MOS forecasts for these elements. In
addition, NCEP will introduce new NAM MOS probabilistic and
categorical guidance for cool-season precipitation type.

The addition of precipitation type will increase the length of
the cool-season NAM MOS messages by three lines in the body of
text for each station contained in the MOS alphanumeric (MET)
bulletins and by three records for each station in the BUFR
messages. These added lines will contain probabilistic forecasts
for the occurrence of freezing precipitation and snow labeled
POZ, POS, as well as a categorical forecast of the most likely
precipitation type labeled TYP. Due to changes in reporting
frequencies, sufficient data were not available for development
of new precipitation type equations at 14 sites currently in the
NAM MOS system.  Therefore, precipitation type guidance will not
be produced and no additional information will appear in the MET
and BUFR messages for these sites.  These sites are listed in
Table 1 below.

NAM MOS messages for Alaskan sites also will contain an
additional two lines for the new 6- and 12-h thunderstorm
probability forecasts, labeled T06 and T12, during the
convective season, May 1 through September 30; however, since
the observed frequency of severe convective weather events over
Alaska is quite low, it was not possible to obtain stable
statistical relationships for the severe weather probabilities
at those sites. All Alaska severe weather probability forecasts
will be coded as missing, i.e., 99, at their respective
positions within the NAM MOS messages.

Users should take the necessary steps for ingest of this
additional information. Following implementation of these
changes, the format of the cool-season NAM MOS messages will be
identical to those being generated for the companion short-range
GFS MOS text (MAV) and BUFR products.

Table 1:  Sites for which NAM MOS precipitation type guidance
will not be available

     ID        STATION                       LAT      LON

     K3A6      NEWHALL                CA     34.37N   118.57W
     K47A      CHEROKEE CNTY ARPT     GA     34.31N    84.42W
     K48I      SUTTON/BRAXTON CO AP   WV     38.69N    80.65W
     K4BL      BLANDING               UT     37.62N   109.47W
     K4HV      HANKSVILLE             UT     38.37N   110.72W
     KHMS      HANFORD                WA     46.57N   119.60W
     KNHZ      BRUNSWICK NAS          ME     43.89N    69.94W
     KPFN      PANAMA CITY            FL     30.20N    85.80W
     KRZZ      ROANOKE_RAPIDS         NC     36.44N    77.71W
     KTDO      TOLEDO                 WA     46.48N   122.80W
     PADT      SLANA AIRPORT          AK     62.70N   143.98W
     PALV      BIG RIVER LAKE         AK     60.82N   152.30W
     PASP      SHEEP MOUNTAIN         AK     61.82N   147.51W
     PAWR      WHITTIER               AK     60.77N   148.68W

The following public weather alphanumeric messages and BUFR
products are affected by the above changes:

Table 2: Communication identifiers for the NAM-based MOS
Public weather text products

     WMO HEADING    AWIPS ID

     FOAK47 KWNO    METAJK
     FOAK48 KWNO    METAFC
     FOAK49 KWNO    METAFG
     FOPA40 KWNO    METPA0
     FOUS44 KWNO    METNE1
     FOUS45 KWNO    METSE1
     FOUS46 KWNO    METNC1
     FOUS47 KWNO    METSC1
     FOUS48 KWNO    METRM1
     FOUS49 KWNO    METWC1

Table 3: Communication identifiers for the NAM-based MOS BUFR
messages

     WMO HEADING

     JSML10 KWNO
     JSML11 KWNO
     JSML12 KWNO
     JSML13 KWNO
     JSML14 KWNO
     JSML15 KWNO
     JSML16 KWNO
     JSML17 KWNO

For questions regarding the updates to the NAM MOS guidance and
associated message changes please contact:

  Mark Antolik
  MDL/Silver Spring, Maryland
  301-427-9480
  Mark.Antolik@noaa.gov
or
  Matthew Peroutka
  MDL/Silver Spring, Maryland
  301-427-9483
  Matthew.Peroutka@noaa.gov

Links to the MOS products and descriptions are online at:

  http://www.nws.noaa.gov/mdl/synop

NWS National Technical Implementation Notices are online at:

  http://www.weather.gov/os/notif.htm

$$



000
NOUS41 KWBC 251658
PNSWSH

Technical Implementation Notice 15-33
National Weather Service Headquarters Washington DC
100 PM EDT Thu Jun 26 2015

To:       Subscribers:
          -Family of Services
          -NOAA Weather Wire Service
          -Emergency Managers Weather Information Network
          -NOAAPORT
          Other NWS Partners, Users and Employees

From:     Tim McClung
          Chief Operating Officer
          NWS Office of Science and Technology Integration

Subject:  Changes to North American Mesoscale Model (NAM)-based
          Model Output Statistics (MOS) Guidance Effective
          September 29, 2015

On or about Tuesday, September 29, 2015, beginning with the 1200
Coordinated Universal Time (UTC) model run, the NWS
Meteorological Development Laboratory (MDL) will implement
updates to the NAM-based MOS guidance. The updates will include
new equations for forecasts of snowfall amount, for 6- and 12-h
thunderstorm probability, and for 6- and 12-h probability of
severe weather. Implementation of the new equations will remove
any remaining influence of data collected from the older eta-
coordinate model on MOS forecasts for these elements. In
addition, NCEP will introduce new NAM MOS probabilistic and
categorical guidance for cool-season precipitation type.

The addition of precipitation type will increase the length of
the cool-season NAM MOS messages by three lines in the body of
text for each station contained in the MOS alphanumeric (MET)
bulletins and by three records for each station in the BUFR
messages. These added lines will contain probabilistic forecasts
for the occurrence of freezing precipitation and snow labeled
POZ, POS, as well as a categorical forecast of the most likely
precipitation type labeled TYP. Due to changes in reporting
frequencies, sufficient data were not available for development
of new precipitation type equations at 14 sites currently in the
NAM MOS system.  Therefore, precipitation type guidance will not
be produced and no additional information will appear in the MET
and BUFR messages for these sites.  These sites are listed in
Table 1 below.

NAM MOS messages for Alaskan sites also will contain an
additional two lines for the new 6- and 12-h thunderstorm
probability forecasts, labeled T06 and T12, during the
convective season, May 1 through September 30; however, since
the observed frequency of severe convective weather events over
Alaska is quite low, it was not possible to obtain stable
statistical relationships for the severe weather probabilities
at those sites. All Alaska severe weather probability forecasts
will be coded as missing, i.e., 99, at their respective
positions within the NAM MOS messages.

Users should take the necessary steps for ingest of this
additional information. Following implementation of these
changes, the format of the cool-season NAM MOS messages will be
identical to those being generated for the companion short-range
GFS MOS text (MAV) and BUFR products.

Table 1:  Sites for which NAM MOS precipitation type guidance
will not be available

     ID        STATION                       LAT      LON

     K3A6      NEWHALL                CA     34.37N   118.57W
     K47A      CHEROKEE CNTY ARPT     GA     34.31N    84.42W
     K48I      SUTTON/BRAXTON CO AP   WV     38.69N    80.65W
     K4BL      BLANDING               UT     37.62N   109.47W
     K4HV      HANKSVILLE             UT     38.37N   110.72W
     KHMS      HANFORD                WA     46.57N   119.60W
     KNHZ      BRUNSWICK NAS          ME     43.89N    69.94W
     KPFN      PANAMA CITY            FL     30.20N    85.80W
     KRZZ      ROANOKE_RAPIDS         NC     36.44N    77.71W
     KTDO      TOLEDO                 WA     46.48N   122.80W
     PADT      SLANA AIRPORT          AK     62.70N   143.98W
     PALV      BIG RIVER LAKE         AK     60.82N   152.30W
     PASP      SHEEP MOUNTAIN         AK     61.82N   147.51W
     PAWR      WHITTIER               AK     60.77N   148.68W

The following public weather alphanumeric messages and BUFR
products are affected by the above changes:

Table 2: Communication identifiers for the NAM-based MOS
Public weather text products

     WMO HEADING    AWIPS ID

     FOAK47 KWNO    METAJK
     FOAK48 KWNO    METAFC
     FOAK49 KWNO    METAFG
     FOPA40 KWNO    METPA0
     FOUS44 KWNO    METNE1
     FOUS45 KWNO    METSE1
     FOUS46 KWNO    METNC1
     FOUS47 KWNO    METSC1
     FOUS48 KWNO    METRM1
     FOUS49 KWNO    METWC1

Table 3: Communication identifiers for the NAM-based MOS BUFR
messages

     WMO HEADING

     JSML10 KWNO
     JSML11 KWNO
     JSML12 KWNO
     JSML13 KWNO
     JSML14 KWNO
     JSML15 KWNO
     JSML16 KWNO
     JSML17 KWNO

For questions regarding the updates to the NAM MOS guidance and
associated message changes please contact:

  Mark Antolik
  MDL/Silver Spring, Maryland
  301-427-9480
  Mark.Antolik@noaa.gov
or
  Matthew Peroutka
  MDL/Silver Spring, Maryland
  301-427-9483
  Matthew.Peroutka@noaa.gov

Links to the MOS products and descriptions are online at:

  http://www.nws.noaa.gov/mdl/synop

NWS National Technical Implementation Notices are online at:

  http://www.weather.gov/os/notif.htm

$$


000
NOUS41 KWBC 251413
PNSWSH

Service Change Notice 15-33 Corrected
National Weather Service Headquarters Washington, DC
1013 AM EDT Thu Jun 25 2015

To:      Subscribers:
         -Family of Services
         -NOAA Weather Wire Service
         -Emergency Managers Weather Information Network
         -NOAAPort
         Other NWS Partners, Users and Employees

From:    Mark Tew
         Acting Chief, Analysis and Mission Support Division
         National Weather Service

         Patrick Burke
         Chief, Oceanographic Division Center for Operational
          Oceanographic Products and Services
         National Ocean Service

Subject: Corrected:  Beach Hazards Statements issued by
         WFO Miami and WFO Key West to include information about
         Harmful Algal Blooms (HAB) when criteria are met,
         effective June 29, 2015

This notice has been corrected to:
-Correct the link to the arears of responsibility for
Florida WFOs (first link)
-Correct typo in the first line of the paragraph following
the tides and currents URL

Effective Monday, June 29, 2015, at 2 pm Eastern Daylight Time
(EDT) or 1800 Coordinated Universal Time (UTC), harmful algal
bloom (HAB) forecast information provided by the National Ocean
Service (NOS) HAB Operational Forecast System (HAB-OFS), which
meets the criteria shown below, will be included in the Beach
Hazards Statements (BHS) being issued by WFO Miami and WFO Key
West during a HAB event when criteria described below are met.

An adjacent NWS office, WFO Tampa Bay Area, has been including
NOS HAB forecasts, when issuance criteria are met, in their BHS
since February 4, 2013. The addition of the two WFOs provides
more complete coverage of HABs affecting southwest Florida.

Starting on the above effective date, an NWS BHS for respiratory
irritation from HAB will be issued by WFOs Miami and Key West
for their areas of responsibility for a HAB of Karenia brevis
(commonly known as Florida Red Tide) if ALL of the following
criteria are met:

  - HAB-OFS team has issued a HAB-OFS public conditions
    report or update.

  - Karenia brevis concentrations, which correlate to
    Respiratory Irritation (>50,000 cells/L) have been confirmed
    by in-situ cell counts in WFO Miami`s and/or WFO Key West`s
    area of responsibility.

  - HAB-OFS team forecasts high respiratory irritation is
    possible in WFO Miami`s or WFO Key West`s area of
    responsibility.

  - If the level of forecasted respiratory irritation from HAB
    decreases before the previously issued BHS for HAB
    irritation expires, WFO Miami and/or WFO Key West will issue
    a cancellation of the Beach Hazards Statement for HAB.

These are the same BHS criteria being used by WFO Tampa Bay Area
respiratory irritation from HAB.

A graphic showing the areas of responsibility for WFO Miami and
WFO Key West is online at (corrected link):

www.weather.gov/mirs/public/prods/maps/map_images/state-
maps/cwfa/fl_cwfa.pdf


NWS issues the BHS under the NWS Coastal Hazard Message (CFW)
with a Valid Time Event Code (VTEC) of BH.S. The Beach Hazards
Statement is issued by many coastal WFOs for a variety of marine
hazards. A subset of the coastal WFOs also includes ecological
hazard information, such as HAB, in the BHS. Beach Hazards
Statements issued by the following WFOs are/will incorporate HAB
content when criteria are met:

  WFO Tampa Bay Area: since February 2013
  WFO Miami: as of June 29, 2015
  WFO Key West: as of June 29, 2015

Table 1:  Communication identifier for the CFW issued by
WFO Miami and WFO Key West for Beach Hazards (BHS):

Issuing WFO                  WMO Header         AWIPS Id
-----------                  -----------        --------
Miami, FL                    WHUS42 KMFL        CFWMFL
Key West, FL                 WHUS42 KKEY        CFWKEY

Routine HAB forecast products prepared by NOS HAB-OFS are
issued via listserve and online once a week, at a minimum, or
twice a week during an active bloom.  By including high
respiratory irritation from HABs in the NWS BHS, critical health
information is disseminated more broadly and in real-time to the
public.  For more information about the HAB-OFS and the services
they provide, refer to:

http://tidesandcurrents.noaa.gov/hab/

(typo corrected in the following sentence)
WFOs Miami and Key West will coordinate with NOS` HAB analysts
concerning harmful algal blooms and potential health impacts on
coastal areas of southwest Florida as does WFO Tampa Bay Area.
The HAB analysts will provide information to WFOs Miami and Key
West on a bloom when high respiratory irritation associated with
a HAB is forecasted by the HAB-OFS. WFOs Miami and Key West will
relay that information in the Beach Hazards Statement for their
areas of responsibility. An HAB-OFS point of contact and other
local sources of red tide information will be included in all
Beach Hazards Statements which include HAB forecasts.

See the following links for an example of the BHS to be issued
by
WFO Miami and WFO Key West for high respiratory irritation from
HAB:

http://www.weather.gov/om/afs/bhs_miami.docx
http://www.weather.gov/om/afs/bhs_keywest.docx

When in effect, Beach Hazard Statements issued by WFOs Miami and
Key West, as well as all of the additional WFOs issuing Beach
Hazards Statements, will be highlighted in turquoise on the NWS
Watch, Warning Advisory map:

http://www.weather.gov

Users interested in the BHS who are not already parsing the
Coastal Hazards Message (CFW) using the BH.S VTEC code (for
Beach
Hazards Statement) may need to make the appropriate changes to
their software and/or systems to do so. Otherwise, no additional
changes are necessary.

The effective date of this change is sooner than specified by
NWS
Instruction 10-1805. The reduction of the normal advance lead
time was approved because this change applies to only two WFOs
and will enable these offices to issue these products starting
July 1 when the need for this product increases. NWS has
coordinated with local partners.
General background information on VTEC can be found online at:

http://www.nws.noaa.gov/os/vtec

If you have questions or comments please contact:

WFO Miami:                          WFO Key West:
Rob Molleda                           Chip Kasper
Warning Coordination Meteorologist    Senior Forecaster
WFO Miami, FL                         WFO Key West, FL
305-229-4520                          305-295-1316 x 241
robert.molleda@noaa.gov               kennard.kasper@noaa.gov


For Harmful Algal Bloom-related questions, contact:

Karen Kavanaugh
Harmful Algal Bloom Product Coordinator
Center for Operational Oceanographic Products and Services
Silver Spring, MD
301-713-2890 x122
Karen.Kavanaugh@noaa.gov

For general questions about the Beach Hazards Statement for
ecological hazards, contact:

Chris Alex
NWS Cross-cut Lead for Ecological Forecasting
NWS Decision Support Integration Branch
Silver Spring, MD
301-427-9344
Christine.Alex@noaa.gov

NWS Service Change Notices are online at:

http://www.weather.gov/os/notif.htm

$$



000
NOUS41 KWBC 251413
PNSWSH

Service Change Notice 15-33 Corrected
National Weather Service Headquarters Washington, DC
1013 AM EDT Thu Jun 25 2015

To:      Subscribers:
         -Family of Services
         -NOAA Weather Wire Service
         -Emergency Managers Weather Information Network
         -NOAAPort
         Other NWS Partners, Users and Employees

From:    Mark Tew
         Acting Chief, Analysis and Mission Support Division
         National Weather Service

         Patrick Burke
         Chief, Oceanographic Division Center for Operational
          Oceanographic Products and Services
         National Ocean Service

Subject: Corrected:  Beach Hazards Statements issued by
         WFO Miami and WFO Key West to include information about
         Harmful Algal Blooms (HAB) when criteria are met,
         effective June 29, 2015

This notice has been corrected to:
-Correct the link to the arears of responsibility for
Florida WFOs (first link)
-Correct typo in the first line of the paragraph following
the tides and currents URL

Effective Monday, June 29, 2015, at 2 pm Eastern Daylight Time
(EDT) or 1800 Coordinated Universal Time (UTC), harmful algal
bloom (HAB) forecast information provided by the National Ocean
Service (NOS) HAB Operational Forecast System (HAB-OFS), which
meets the criteria shown below, will be included in the Beach
Hazards Statements (BHS) being issued by WFO Miami and WFO Key
West during a HAB event when criteria described below are met.

An adjacent NWS office, WFO Tampa Bay Area, has been including
NOS HAB forecasts, when issuance criteria are met, in their BHS
since February 4, 2013. The addition of the two WFOs provides
more complete coverage of HABs affecting southwest Florida.

Starting on the above effective date, an NWS BHS for respiratory
irritation from HAB will be issued by WFOs Miami and Key West
for their areas of responsibility for a HAB of Karenia brevis
(commonly known as Florida Red Tide) if ALL of the following
criteria are met:

  - HAB-OFS team has issued a HAB-OFS public conditions
    report or update.

  - Karenia brevis concentrations, which correlate to
    Respiratory Irritation (>50,000 cells/L) have been confirmed
    by in-situ cell counts in WFO Miami`s and/or WFO Key West`s
    area of responsibility.

  - HAB-OFS team forecasts high respiratory irritation is
    possible in WFO Miami`s or WFO Key West`s area of
    responsibility.

  - If the level of forecasted respiratory irritation from HAB
    decreases before the previously issued BHS for HAB
    irritation expires, WFO Miami and/or WFO Key West will issue
    a cancellation of the Beach Hazards Statement for HAB.

These are the same BHS criteria being used by WFO Tampa Bay Area
respiratory irritation from HAB.

A graphic showing the areas of responsibility for WFO Miami and
WFO Key West is online at (corrected link):

www.weather.gov/mirs/public/prods/maps/map_images/state-
maps/cwfa/fl_cwfa.pdf


NWS issues the BHS under the NWS Coastal Hazard Message (CFW)
with a Valid Time Event Code (VTEC) of BH.S. The Beach Hazards
Statement is issued by many coastal WFOs for a variety of marine
hazards. A subset of the coastal WFOs also includes ecological
hazard information, such as HAB, in the BHS. Beach Hazards
Statements issued by the following WFOs are/will incorporate HAB
content when criteria are met:

  WFO Tampa Bay Area: since February 2013
  WFO Miami: as of June 29, 2015
  WFO Key West: as of June 29, 2015

Table 1:  Communication identifier for the CFW issued by
WFO Miami and WFO Key West for Beach Hazards (BHS):

Issuing WFO                  WMO Header         AWIPS Id
-----------                  -----------        --------
Miami, FL                    WHUS42 KMFL        CFWMFL
Key West, FL                 WHUS42 KKEY        CFWKEY

Routine HAB forecast products prepared by NOS HAB-OFS are
issued via listserve and online once a week, at a minimum, or
twice a week during an active bloom.  By including high
respiratory irritation from HABs in the NWS BHS, critical health
information is disseminated more broadly and in real-time to the
public.  For more information about the HAB-OFS and the services
they provide, refer to:

http://tidesandcurrents.noaa.gov/hab/

(typo corrected in the following sentence)
WFOs Miami and Key West will coordinate with NOS` HAB analysts
concerning harmful algal blooms and potential health impacts on
coastal areas of southwest Florida as does WFO Tampa Bay Area.
The HAB analysts will provide information to WFOs Miami and Key
West on a bloom when high respiratory irritation associated with
a HAB is forecasted by the HAB-OFS. WFOs Miami and Key West will
relay that information in the Beach Hazards Statement for their
areas of responsibility. An HAB-OFS point of contact and other
local sources of red tide information will be included in all
Beach Hazards Statements which include HAB forecasts.

See the following links for an example of the BHS to be issued
by
WFO Miami and WFO Key West for high respiratory irritation from
HAB:

http://www.weather.gov/om/afs/bhs_miami.docx
http://www.weather.gov/om/afs/bhs_keywest.docx

When in effect, Beach Hazard Statements issued by WFOs Miami and
Key West, as well as all of the additional WFOs issuing Beach
Hazards Statements, will be highlighted in turquoise on the NWS
Watch, Warning Advisory map:

http://www.weather.gov

Users interested in the BHS who are not already parsing the
Coastal Hazards Message (CFW) using the BH.S VTEC code (for
Beach
Hazards Statement) may need to make the appropriate changes to
their software and/or systems to do so. Otherwise, no additional
changes are necessary.

The effective date of this change is sooner than specified by
NWS
Instruction 10-1805. The reduction of the normal advance lead
time was approved because this change applies to only two WFOs
and will enable these offices to issue these products starting
July 1 when the need for this product increases. NWS has
coordinated with local partners.
General background information on VTEC can be found online at:

http://www.nws.noaa.gov/os/vtec

If you have questions or comments please contact:

WFO Miami:                          WFO Key West:
Rob Molleda                           Chip Kasper
Warning Coordination Meteorologist    Senior Forecaster
WFO Miami, FL                         WFO Key West, FL
305-229-4520                          305-295-1316 x 241
robert.molleda@noaa.gov               kennard.kasper@noaa.gov


For Harmful Algal Bloom-related questions, contact:

Karen Kavanaugh
Harmful Algal Bloom Product Coordinator
Center for Operational Oceanographic Products and Services
Silver Spring, MD
301-713-2890 x122
Karen.Kavanaugh@noaa.gov

For general questions about the Beach Hazards Statement for
ecological hazards, contact:

Chris Alex
NWS Cross-cut Lead for Ecological Forecasting
NWS Decision Support Integration Branch
Silver Spring, MD
301-427-9344
Christine.Alex@noaa.gov

NWS Service Change Notices are online at:

http://www.weather.gov/os/notif.htm

$$


000
NOUS41 KWBC 251350
PNSWSH

Technical Implementation Notice 15-27: Amended
National Weather Service Headquarters Washington DC
950 AM EDT Tue Jun 25 2015

To:      Subscribers:
         -Family of Services
         -NOAA Weather Wire Service
         -Emergency Managers Weather Information Network
         -NOAAPORT
         Other NWS Partners, Users and Employees

From:    Timothy McClung
         Chief Operating Officer
         NWS Office of Science and Technology Integration

Subject: Amended: Upgrade to HIRES Window and Introduction of
         High-Resolution Ensemble Forecast: Effective
         July 28, 2015

Amended to change the implementation date from June 30, 2015 to
July 28, 2015.  Also amended to include more information about
the production and packing methods of the GRIB2 output files.

Effective July 28, 2015, beginning with the 1200 Coordinated
Universal Time (UTC) run, the National Centers for Environmental
Prediction (NCEP) will upgrade the High-Resolution Window
Forecast System (HIRESW). This upgrade includes:

-Changes to the model components
-Increase in vertical resolution
-Modifications to parameterized physics
-New product fields
-File name changes
-New High-Resolution Ensemble Forecast (HREF) suite of products.

Model Changes:

The HIRESW model will be updated from Weather Research and
Forecasting (WRF) version 3.5 code to 3.6.1 code for the Advanced
Research WRF (ARW) member. The Nonhydrostatic Multiscale Model on
B-grid (NMMB) will be updated from a late 2013 to early 2015
version of the code, but it will retain the microphysics used
with the current HIRESW system.

The number of vertical levels will increase from 40 to 50 in both
the WRF-ARW and NMMB systems.

Physics Changes:

The WRF Single Moment 6-Class (WSM6) microphysics of the WRF-ARW
will be modified to decrease the amount of falling graupel, which
will leave more moisture for snow production in the anvil region.

Post-processing Changes:

Simulated radar reflectivity for the WRF-ARW model will now be
generated by the post-processing code rather than by the model
microphysics.  This change tends to reduce reflectivity at the
melting layer, which primarily impacts the composite
reflectivity.

Simulated reflectivity (instantaneous and hourly maximum) and
echo top height fields will be defined in this upgrade by the
nearest-neighbor value on the model grid rather than through
bilinear interpolation as was done previously.

The bitmapping of echo top heights for which no point in the
column has a sufficient value of reflectivity to define a height
will be removed.  A zero height value will be assigned instead.

Output Product Changes:

This upgrade includes a change to direct production of GRIB2
output rather than producing GRIB1 files that are converted to
GRIB2.  With this change in GRIB production software is a change
in packing precision for most fields, generally in the direction
of more packed precision.  As an example, isobaric temperature is
packed to the nearest 1/16 of a degree Celsius in the upgraded
version rather than the nearest 1/8 of a degree in the previous
version.  This extra precision increases the size of the
resulting GRIB2 files.

Also, the packing of GRIB2 output will switch from Joint
Photographic Experts Group (JPEG) packing to second order complex
packing for all grids except for the legacy CONUS east and west
grids.  The benefit of this packing change for users will be much
faster IO time compared with the existing JPEG packing.  The
second order packing provides good accuracy, but files will be
larger than the previous JPEG packed files.

The changes noted above will result in a change to the order of
records within the GRIB2 output files.

The hourly maximum and minimum temperature and relative humidity
fields at 2 meters above ground will now be labeled in GRIB2 as
temporal maxima and minima.

New fields only for 5 km output grids:

- Cloud ceiling height
- Simulated radar reflectivity at -10 C level

Changes to content of the 2.5-3 km NDFD output grids:

- Duplicate fields of surface height, land-sea mask, and Haines
Index in the three hourly files will be removed.

- A total cloud percentage will be uniformly defined for all
forecast hours.  This replaces a surface total cloud percentage
field that was previously only in three hourly files.

- The one and two hour old 2 m temperature and dew point
temperature fields will be included for forecasts valid at 00Z
and 12Z.  This was previously included for all three hourly
output except at those valid times.

-  A best (4 layer) lifted index field will be added to the three
hourly output.  This field was previously in the non-three hourly
output only.

- Precipitation type and 2 m temperature and dew point
temperature fields will be removed from the non-three hourly
output in the NMMB run over Hawaii.

- A bug that was leading to incomplete Guam output files every
six hours will be corrected.  The following fields will be added
to the incomplete Guam files:

Accumulated precipitation
Probability of wetting rain
Planetary Boundary Layer (PBL) depth
2 m dew point temperature
Surface wind gust
Height of lowest wet bulb 0 C temperature
Surface geopotential height
Surface pressure
Land-sea mask
Maximum and minimum 2 m relative humidity (RH)
Probability of precipitation
Composite reflectivity
Average PBL RH
Snow depth accumulation
2 m specific humidity
Maximum and minimum 2 m temperature
2 m temperatures
10 m U and V winds
Surface visibility
Average PBL wind direction
Average PBL wind speed
Accumulated snow water equivalent

File name changes:

The filenames of existing output files will change to a new
naming convention.  All output files will now have "hiresw" as
the leading character string.  Legacy "awpreg", "awp5km", and
"smart" strings will be discontinued.  For gridded output, the
output file grid spacing in kilometers will be provided in the
file name, with decimals represented by a "p" (2.5 km is 2p5km in
a file name).  Please reference Table 1 for all GRIB2 file name
changes.

The BUFR output file names will also change, generally following
the same rules applied for the gridded output.  Please reference
Table 2 for all BUFR file name changes.

Addition of new BUFR Sounding Products:

BUFR sounding products will be made available for each HIRESW
domain.  The file names for these products will be:

hiresw.tCCz.domain[arw|nmmb].bufrsnd.tar.gz

where CC is the cycle (00 and 12 for CONUS, Guam, and Hawaii and
06 and 18 for Alaska and Puerto Rico)
and domain is conus, ak, guam, hi, or pr

In addition to the single monolithic files for each model run,
the BUFR output will also be split out by individual station.

The individual station files have names of the format:

domain[arw|nmmb]bufr.station.cycle

where domain is conus, ak, guam, hi, or pr
where station is the 6-digit identifier
and where cycle is the YYYYMMDDCC formatted time of the model
initial time (YYYY is the 4-digit year, MM is the month, DD is
the day, and CC is the cycle (00, 06, 12, 18)).

The new HREF products:

The new HREF is a set of probabilistic products generated from
the three most recent HIRESW model runs [both WRF-ARW and NMMB
members] and the five most recent North American Mesoscale (NAM)
model nest runs to create an 11 member time-lagged ensemble.  In
this initial implementation, products will be generated only for
the Contiguous United States (CONUS) domain.  Despite using the
same name, this product has very little in common with the HREF
output previously provided by HIRESW v5.

HREF products will be generated every 6 hours at 00Z, 06Z, 12Z,
and 18Z.  Mean, spread, and probability products will be produced
at 3 hour forecast intervals from 3 h to 36 h.

The file names for the mean, spread, and probability product
files will be:

href.tCCz.mean.fFF.grib2
href.tCCz.sprd.fFF.grib2
href.tCCz.prob.fFF.grib2

where CC is the cycle (00, 06, 12, 18)
and where FF is the forecast hour (03, 06, 09, ..., 30, 33, 36)

The contents of the mean and spread files will be:

Sea level pressure
500 hPa height
850 hPa height, temperature, U and V winds, and wind speed
700 hPa vertical velocity and relative humidity
500 hPa absolute vorticity
Precipitable water (column total)
Surface visibility
3 h accumulated precipitation
Cloud ceiling height
Surface vertical speed shear

The contents of the probability files will be:

1000 m AGL simulated reflectivity > 40 dBZ
Hourly maximum 1000 m AGL simulated reflectivity > 40 dBZ
Hourly maximum 2-5 km AGL updraft helicity > 25 m^2/s^2
Hourly maximum updraft over 400-1000 hPa layer (m/s) > (1, 5, 10)
Hourly maximum downdraft over 400-1000 hPa layer (m/s) >
 (1, 5 10)
Hourly maximum 10 m AGL U wind component > 15.4 m/s
Hourly maximum 10 m AGL V wind component > 15.4 m/s
Precipitable water (column total, kg/m^2) > (25, 37.5, 50)
Surface visibility (m) < (400, 800, 1600, 3200, 6400)
Column maximum (composite) simulated reflectivity (dBZ) > (10,
20, 30, 40, 50)
Echo top height (m) > (1000, 3000, 5000, 7600, 10000)
3 h precipitation (kg/m^2) > (0.24, 6.34, 12.4, 25.1, 50, 75)
Precipitation type: rain, freezing rain, ice pellets, snow
10 m AGL wind speed (m/s) > (10.3, 15.4, 20.6)
80 m AGL wind speed (m/s) > (10.3, 15.4, 20.6)
850 hPa wind speed (m/s) > (10.3, 20.6, 30.9, 41.2, 51.5)
500 hPa wind speed (m/s) > (10.3, 20.6, 30.9, 41.2, 51.5)
250 hPa wind speed (m/s) > (10.3, 20.6, 30.9, 41.2, 51.5)
Flight category (1-4)
Haines Index (2-5, 5-6, 6-7)
Cloud ceiling height (m) < (305, 610, 915, 1372, 1830, 3050)
Surface vertical speed shear (1/s) > 20
Wind speed over 300 to 850 hPa above ground < 5 m/s

Data Availability and Schedule Changes:

During the 2015 hurricane season, NCEP does not plan to reinstate
the preemption of HIRESW runs, but in subsequent years NCEP may
need to resume preemption based on resources in the NCEP
Production Suite.

The HIRESW data is currently available on the NWS FTP server, the
NCEP server, NOMADS, and on NOAAPORT.  The HREF products will
also be available on the NWS FTP server, the NCEP server, and
NOMADS, but they are not available on NOAAPORT.

Product delivery timing of current HIRESW products is not
expected to change as a result of this implementation, although
downscaled (2.5 to 3 km) output from the CONUS and AK domains
will be available somewhat earlier.  Currently it arrives as much
as 30 minutes later than the 5 km gridded output; with this
upgrade that delay will be reduced to about five minutes.

More information regarding the current operational HIRESW and
associated products can be found at:

http://www.emc.ncep.noaa.gov/mmb/mmbpll/nestpage_4km/

A consistent parallel feed of data is currently available on the
NCEP HTTP server at the following URL:

http://para.nomads.ncep.noaa.gov/pub/data/nccf/com/hiresw/para/

Table 1:  GRIB2 File Name Changes

Contiguous United States (CONUS):
conus[arw|nmmb].tCCz.awp5kmfFF.grib2 ->
hiresw.tCCz.[arw|nmmb]_5km.fFF.conus.grib2
conus[arw|nmmb].tCCz.smartconusfFF.grib2 ->
hiresw.tCCz.[arw|nmmb]_2p5km.fFF.conus.grib2

Hawaii:
hi[arw|nmmb].tCCz.awpregfFF.grib2 ->
hiresw.tCCz.[arw|nmmb]_5km.fFF.hi.grib2
hi[arw|nmmb].tCCz.smarthifFF.grib2 ->
hiresw.tCCz.[arw|nmmb]_2p5km.fFF.hi.grib2

Puerto Rico:
pr[arw|nmmb].tCCz.awpregfFF.grib2 ->
hiresw.tCCz.[arw|nmmb]_5km.fFF.pr.grib2
pr[arw|nmmb].tCCz.smartprfFF.grib2 ->
hiresw.tCCz.[arw|nmmb]_2p5km.fFF.pr.grib2

Alaska:
ak[arw|nmmb].tCCz.awpregfFF.grib2 ->
hiresw.tCCz.[arw|nmmb]_5km.fFF.ak.grib2
ak[arw|nmmb].tCCz.smartakfFF.grib2 ->
hiresw.tCCz.[arw|nmmb]_3km.fFF.ak.grib2

Guam:
guam[arw|nmmb].tCCz.awpregfFF.grib2 ->
hiresw.tCCz.[arw|nmmb]_5km.fFF.guam.grib2
guam[arw|nmmb].tCCz.smartguamfFF.grib2 ->
hiresw.tCCz.[arw|nmmb]_2p5km.fFF.guam.grib2

where CC is the model cycle (00 or 12 for CONUS, Alaska, and Guam
domains and 06 or 18 for Hawaii and Puerto Rico domains)
and where FF is the forecast hour (00, 01, 02, ..., 46, 47, 48).

Table 2: BUFR File Name Changes

conusarw.tCCz.class1.bufr  -> hiresw.tCCz.conusarw.class1.bufr
conusnmmb.tCCz.class1.bufr -> hiresw.tCCz.conusnmmb.class1.bufr
hiarw.tCCz.class1.bufr     -> hiresw.tCCz.hiarw.class1.bufr
hinmmb.tCCz.class1.bufr    -> hiresw.tCCz.hinmmb.class1.bufr
prarw.tCCz.class1.bufr     -> hiresw.tCCz.prarw.class1.bufr
prnmmb.tCCz.class1.bufr    -> hiresw.tCCz.prnmmb.class1.bufr
akarw.tCCz.class1.bufr     -> hiresw.tCCz.akarw.class1.bufr
aknmmb.tCCz.class1.bufr    -> hiresw.tCCz.aknmmb.class1.bufr
guamarw.tCCz.class1.bufr   -> hiresw.tCCz.guamarw.class1.bufr
guamnmmb.tCCz.class1.bufr  -> hiresw.tCCz.guamnmmb.class1.bufr

where CC is the model cycle (00 or 12 for CONUS, Alaska, and Guam
domains and 06 or 18 for Hawaii and Puerto Rico domains).

NCEP encourages all users to ensure their decoders are flexible
and are able to adequately handle changes in content order,
changes in the scaling factor component within the product
definition section (PDS) of the GRIB files, and also any volume
changes which may be forthcoming. These elements may change with
future NCEP model implementations. NCEP will make every attempt
to alert users to these changes prior to any implementations.

For questions regarding these changes, please contact:

      Matthew Pyle
      NCEP/EMC, Mesoscale Modeling Branch
      College Park, Maryland
      Phone: 301-683-3687
      Email: Matthew.Pyle@noaa.gov
or
      Geoff DiMego
      NCEP/EMC, Mesoscale Modeling Branch
      College Park, Maryland
      Phone: 301-683-3764
      Email: Geoff.Dimego@noaa.gov

For questions regarding the dataflow aspects of these data sets,
please contact:

     Kelly Kempisty
     NCEP/NCO Dataflow Team
     College Park, Maryland
     Phone:  301-683-0567
     Email:  ncep.list.pmb-dataflow@noaa.gov

NWS National Technical Implementation Notices are online at:

     http://www.weather.gov/os/notif.htm

$$



000
NOUS41 KWBC 251350
PNSWSH

Technical Implementation Notice 15-27: Amended
National Weather Service Headquarters Washington DC
950 AM EDT Tue Jun 25 2015

To:      Subscribers:
         -Family of Services
         -NOAA Weather Wire Service
         -Emergency Managers Weather Information Network
         -NOAAPORT
         Other NWS Partners, Users and Employees

From:    Timothy McClung
         Chief Operating Officer
         NWS Office of Science and Technology Integration

Subject: Amended: Upgrade to HIRES Window and Introduction of
         High-Resolution Ensemble Forecast: Effective
         July 28, 2015

Amended to change the implementation date from June 30, 2015 to
July 28, 2015.  Also amended to include more information about
the production and packing methods of the GRIB2 output files.

Effective July 28, 2015, beginning with the 1200 Coordinated
Universal Time (UTC) run, the National Centers for Environmental
Prediction (NCEP) will upgrade the High-Resolution Window
Forecast System (HIRESW). This upgrade includes:

-Changes to the model components
-Increase in vertical resolution
-Modifications to parameterized physics
-New product fields
-File name changes
-New High-Resolution Ensemble Forecast (HREF) suite of products.

Model Changes:

The HIRESW model will be updated from Weather Research and
Forecasting (WRF) version 3.5 code to 3.6.1 code for the Advanced
Research WRF (ARW) member. The Nonhydrostatic Multiscale Model on
B-grid (NMMB) will be updated from a late 2013 to early 2015
version of the code, but it will retain the microphysics used
with the current HIRESW system.

The number of vertical levels will increase from 40 to 50 in both
the WRF-ARW and NMMB systems.

Physics Changes:

The WRF Single Moment 6-Class (WSM6) microphysics of the WRF-ARW
will be modified to decrease the amount of falling graupel, which
will leave more moisture for snow production in the anvil region.

Post-processing Changes:

Simulated radar reflectivity for the WRF-ARW model will now be
generated by the post-processing code rather than by the model
microphysics.  This change tends to reduce reflectivity at the
melting layer, which primarily impacts the composite
reflectivity.

Simulated reflectivity (instantaneous and hourly maximum) and
echo top height fields will be defined in this upgrade by the
nearest-neighbor value on the model grid rather than through
bilinear interpolation as was done previously.

The bitmapping of echo top heights for which no point in the
column has a sufficient value of reflectivity to define a height
will be removed.  A zero height value will be assigned instead.

Output Product Changes:

This upgrade includes a change to direct production of GRIB2
output rather than producing GRIB1 files that are converted to
GRIB2.  With this change in GRIB production software is a change
in packing precision for most fields, generally in the direction
of more packed precision.  As an example, isobaric temperature is
packed to the nearest 1/16 of a degree Celsius in the upgraded
version rather than the nearest 1/8 of a degree in the previous
version.  This extra precision increases the size of the
resulting GRIB2 files.

Also, the packing of GRIB2 output will switch from Joint
Photographic Experts Group (JPEG) packing to second order complex
packing for all grids except for the legacy CONUS east and west
grids.  The benefit of this packing change for users will be much
faster IO time compared with the existing JPEG packing.  The
second order packing provides good accuracy, but files will be
larger than the previous JPEG packed files.

The changes noted above will result in a change to the order of
records within the GRIB2 output files.

The hourly maximum and minimum temperature and relative humidity
fields at 2 meters above ground will now be labeled in GRIB2 as
temporal maxima and minima.

New fields only for 5 km output grids:

- Cloud ceiling height
- Simulated radar reflectivity at -10 C level

Changes to content of the 2.5-3 km NDFD output grids:

- Duplicate fields of surface height, land-sea mask, and Haines
Index in the three hourly files will be removed.

- A total cloud percentage will be uniformly defined for all
forecast hours.  This replaces a surface total cloud percentage
field that was previously only in three hourly files.

- The one and two hour old 2 m temperature and dew point
temperature fields will be included for forecasts valid at 00Z
and 12Z.  This was previously included for all three hourly
output except at those valid times.

-  A best (4 layer) lifted index field will be added to the three
hourly output.  This field was previously in the non-three hourly
output only.

- Precipitation type and 2 m temperature and dew point
temperature fields will be removed from the non-three hourly
output in the NMMB run over Hawaii.

- A bug that was leading to incomplete Guam output files every
six hours will be corrected.  The following fields will be added
to the incomplete Guam files:

Accumulated precipitation
Probability of wetting rain
Planetary Boundary Layer (PBL) depth
2 m dew point temperature
Surface wind gust
Height of lowest wet bulb 0 C temperature
Surface geopotential height
Surface pressure
Land-sea mask
Maximum and minimum 2 m relative humidity (RH)
Probability of precipitation
Composite reflectivity
Average PBL RH
Snow depth accumulation
2 m specific humidity
Maximum and minimum 2 m temperature
2 m temperatures
10 m U and V winds
Surface visibility
Average PBL wind direction
Average PBL wind speed
Accumulated snow water equivalent

File name changes:

The filenames of existing output files will change to a new
naming convention.  All output files will now have "hiresw" as
the leading character string.  Legacy "awpreg", "awp5km", and
"smart" strings will be discontinued.  For gridded output, the
output file grid spacing in kilometers will be provided in the
file name, with decimals represented by a "p" (2.5 km is 2p5km in
a file name).  Please reference Table 1 for all GRIB2 file name
changes.

The BUFR output file names will also change, generally following
the same rules applied for the gridded output.  Please reference
Table 2 for all BUFR file name changes.

Addition of new BUFR Sounding Products:

BUFR sounding products will be made available for each HIRESW
domain.  The file names for these products will be:

hiresw.tCCz.domain[arw|nmmb].bufrsnd.tar.gz

where CC is the cycle (00 and 12 for CONUS, Guam, and Hawaii and
06 and 18 for Alaska and Puerto Rico)
and domain is conus, ak, guam, hi, or pr

In addition to the single monolithic files for each model run,
the BUFR output will also be split out by individual station.

The individual station files have names of the format:

domain[arw|nmmb]bufr.station.cycle

where domain is conus, ak, guam, hi, or pr
where station is the 6-digit identifier
and where cycle is the YYYYMMDDCC formatted time of the model
initial time (YYYY is the 4-digit year, MM is the month, DD is
the day, and CC is the cycle (00, 06, 12, 18)).

The new HREF products:

The new HREF is a set of probabilistic products generated from
the three most recent HIRESW model runs [both WRF-ARW and NMMB
members] and the five most recent North American Mesoscale (NAM)
model nest runs to create an 11 member time-lagged ensemble.  In
this initial implementation, products will be generated only for
the Contiguous United States (CONUS) domain.  Despite using the
same name, this product has very little in common with the HREF
output previously provided by HIRESW v5.

HREF products will be generated every 6 hours at 00Z, 06Z, 12Z,
and 18Z.  Mean, spread, and probability products will be produced
at 3 hour forecast intervals from 3 h to 36 h.

The file names for the mean, spread, and probability product
files will be:

href.tCCz.mean.fFF.grib2
href.tCCz.sprd.fFF.grib2
href.tCCz.prob.fFF.grib2

where CC is the cycle (00, 06, 12, 18)
and where FF is the forecast hour (03, 06, 09, ..., 30, 33, 36)

The contents of the mean and spread files will be:

Sea level pressure
500 hPa height
850 hPa height, temperature, U and V winds, and wind speed
700 hPa vertical velocity and relative humidity
500 hPa absolute vorticity
Precipitable water (column total)
Surface visibility
3 h accumulated precipitation
Cloud ceiling height
Surface vertical speed shear

The contents of the probability files will be:

1000 m AGL simulated reflectivity > 40 dBZ
Hourly maximum 1000 m AGL simulated reflectivity > 40 dBZ
Hourly maximum 2-5 km AGL updraft helicity > 25 m^2/s^2
Hourly maximum updraft over 400-1000 hPa layer (m/s) > (1, 5, 10)
Hourly maximum downdraft over 400-1000 hPa layer (m/s) >
 (1, 5 10)
Hourly maximum 10 m AGL U wind component > 15.4 m/s
Hourly maximum 10 m AGL V wind component > 15.4 m/s
Precipitable water (column total, kg/m^2) > (25, 37.5, 50)
Surface visibility (m) < (400, 800, 1600, 3200, 6400)
Column maximum (composite) simulated reflectivity (dBZ) > (10,
20, 30, 40, 50)
Echo top height (m) > (1000, 3000, 5000, 7600, 10000)
3 h precipitation (kg/m^2) > (0.24, 6.34, 12.4, 25.1, 50, 75)
Precipitation type: rain, freezing rain, ice pellets, snow
10 m AGL wind speed (m/s) > (10.3, 15.4, 20.6)
80 m AGL wind speed (m/s) > (10.3, 15.4, 20.6)
850 hPa wind speed (m/s) > (10.3, 20.6, 30.9, 41.2, 51.5)
500 hPa wind speed (m/s) > (10.3, 20.6, 30.9, 41.2, 51.5)
250 hPa wind speed (m/s) > (10.3, 20.6, 30.9, 41.2, 51.5)
Flight category (1-4)
Haines Index (2-5, 5-6, 6-7)
Cloud ceiling height (m) < (305, 610, 915, 1372, 1830, 3050)
Surface vertical speed shear (1/s) > 20
Wind speed over 300 to 850 hPa above ground < 5 m/s

Data Availability and Schedule Changes:

During the 2015 hurricane season, NCEP does not plan to reinstate
the preemption of HIRESW runs, but in subsequent years NCEP may
need to resume preemption based on resources in the NCEP
Production Suite.

The HIRESW data is currently available on the NWS FTP server, the
NCEP server, NOMADS, and on NOAAPORT.  The HREF products will
also be available on the NWS FTP server, the NCEP server, and
NOMADS, but they are not available on NOAAPORT.

Product delivery timing of current HIRESW products is not
expected to change as a result of this implementation, although
downscaled (2.5 to 3 km) output from the CONUS and AK domains
will be available somewhat earlier.  Currently it arrives as much
as 30 minutes later than the 5 km gridded output; with this
upgrade that delay will be reduced to about five minutes.

More information regarding the current operational HIRESW and
associated products can be found at:

http://www.emc.ncep.noaa.gov/mmb/mmbpll/nestpage_4km/

A consistent parallel feed of data is currently available on the
NCEP HTTP server at the following URL:

http://para.nomads.ncep.noaa.gov/pub/data/nccf/com/hiresw/para/

Table 1:  GRIB2 File Name Changes

Contiguous United States (CONUS):
conus[arw|nmmb].tCCz.awp5kmfFF.grib2 ->
hiresw.tCCz.[arw|nmmb]_5km.fFF.conus.grib2
conus[arw|nmmb].tCCz.smartconusfFF.grib2 ->
hiresw.tCCz.[arw|nmmb]_2p5km.fFF.conus.grib2

Hawaii:
hi[arw|nmmb].tCCz.awpregfFF.grib2 ->
hiresw.tCCz.[arw|nmmb]_5km.fFF.hi.grib2
hi[arw|nmmb].tCCz.smarthifFF.grib2 ->
hiresw.tCCz.[arw|nmmb]_2p5km.fFF.hi.grib2

Puerto Rico:
pr[arw|nmmb].tCCz.awpregfFF.grib2 ->
hiresw.tCCz.[arw|nmmb]_5km.fFF.pr.grib2
pr[arw|nmmb].tCCz.smartprfFF.grib2 ->
hiresw.tCCz.[arw|nmmb]_2p5km.fFF.pr.grib2

Alaska:
ak[arw|nmmb].tCCz.awpregfFF.grib2 ->
hiresw.tCCz.[arw|nmmb]_5km.fFF.ak.grib2
ak[arw|nmmb].tCCz.smartakfFF.grib2 ->
hiresw.tCCz.[arw|nmmb]_3km.fFF.ak.grib2

Guam:
guam[arw|nmmb].tCCz.awpregfFF.grib2 ->
hiresw.tCCz.[arw|nmmb]_5km.fFF.guam.grib2
guam[arw|nmmb].tCCz.smartguamfFF.grib2 ->
hiresw.tCCz.[arw|nmmb]_2p5km.fFF.guam.grib2

where CC is the model cycle (00 or 12 for CONUS, Alaska, and Guam
domains and 06 or 18 for Hawaii and Puerto Rico domains)
and where FF is the forecast hour (00, 01, 02, ..., 46, 47, 48).

Table 2: BUFR File Name Changes

conusarw.tCCz.class1.bufr  -> hiresw.tCCz.conusarw.class1.bufr
conusnmmb.tCCz.class1.bufr -> hiresw.tCCz.conusnmmb.class1.bufr
hiarw.tCCz.class1.bufr     -> hiresw.tCCz.hiarw.class1.bufr
hinmmb.tCCz.class1.bufr    -> hiresw.tCCz.hinmmb.class1.bufr
prarw.tCCz.class1.bufr     -> hiresw.tCCz.prarw.class1.bufr
prnmmb.tCCz.class1.bufr    -> hiresw.tCCz.prnmmb.class1.bufr
akarw.tCCz.class1.bufr     -> hiresw.tCCz.akarw.class1.bufr
aknmmb.tCCz.class1.bufr    -> hiresw.tCCz.aknmmb.class1.bufr
guamarw.tCCz.class1.bufr   -> hiresw.tCCz.guamarw.class1.bufr
guamnmmb.tCCz.class1.bufr  -> hiresw.tCCz.guamnmmb.class1.bufr

where CC is the model cycle (00 or 12 for CONUS, Alaska, and Guam
domains and 06 or 18 for Hawaii and Puerto Rico domains).

NCEP encourages all users to ensure their decoders are flexible
and are able to adequately handle changes in content order,
changes in the scaling factor component within the product
definition section (PDS) of the GRIB files, and also any volume
changes which may be forthcoming. These elements may change with
future NCEP model implementations. NCEP will make every attempt
to alert users to these changes prior to any implementations.

For questions regarding these changes, please contact:

      Matthew Pyle
      NCEP/EMC, Mesoscale Modeling Branch
      College Park, Maryland
      Phone: 301-683-3687
      Email: Matthew.Pyle@noaa.gov
or
      Geoff DiMego
      NCEP/EMC, Mesoscale Modeling Branch
      College Park, Maryland
      Phone: 301-683-3764
      Email: Geoff.Dimego@noaa.gov

For questions regarding the dataflow aspects of these data sets,
please contact:

     Kelly Kempisty
     NCEP/NCO Dataflow Team
     College Park, Maryland
     Phone:  301-683-0567
     Email:  ncep.list.pmb-dataflow@noaa.gov

NWS National Technical Implementation Notices are online at:

     http://www.weather.gov/os/notif.htm

$$


000
NOUS41 KWBC 251316
PNSWSH

Technical Implementation Notice 15-32
National Weather Service Headquarters Washington DC
915 AM EDT Thu Jun 25 2015

To:       Subscribers:
          -Family of Services
          -NOAA Weather Wire Service
          -Emergency Managers Weather Information Network
          -NOAAPORT
          Other NWS partners and NWS employees

From:     Timothy McClung
          Chief Operating Officer
          NWS Office of Science and Technology Integration

Subject:  Upgrade the Short Range Ensemble Forecast System:
          Effective August 4, 2015

Effective August 4, 2015, at 1500 Coordinated Universal Time
(UTC), the National Centers for Environmental Prediction
(NCEP) will upgrade the Short Range Ensemble Forecast System
(SREF). The SREF model upgrades include the following:

- Eliminate the seven Weather Research and Forecast (WRF)
Nonhydrostatic Mesoscale Model (NMM) members including the
following members: ctl, n1, p1, n2, p2, n3, p3.

- Increase the Nonhydrostatic Multiscale Model on B-Grid
(NMMB) model members from 7 to 13 members. The new NMMB
members will be: n4, p4, n5, p5, n6, p6.

- Increase the Advanced Research WRF (WRF-ARW) members from
7 to 13 members.  The new ARW members will be: n4, p4, n5, p5,
n6, p6.

- Encode each ensemble member ID in the GRIB data for the
26 individual raw SREF members.

- Change cloud ceiling height from Above Ground Level (AGL) to
Above Sea Level (ASL) as requested by the aviation user
community.

- Add more diverse in model initial conditions (IC), IC
perturbation and physics and increase the vertical resolution
of the model from 35 to 40 vertical levels.

The Environmental Modeling Center (EMC) Mesoscale Modeling
Branch (MMB) website offers more information on the SREF
modeling system and other NCEP regional modeling systems:

http://www.emc.ncep.noaa.gov/mmb/mesoscale.html

AWIPS product changes:

Increase the total number of ensemble members from 21 to 26
due to the discontinuation of the NMM member and the increase
of both the NMMB and ARW members from 7 to 13 members.  The
increase in ensemble membership will be reflected in the
following AWIPS products:

- For 2-meter Temperature and 3-hourly Precipitation products
on Grid #221 (32 km North American Lambert Conformal Grid),
the GRIB2 Product Definition Template (PDT) will be modified
to identify the individual ensemble members.

- For the Mean, Probability, and Spread products on Grids #212
(40 km Contiguous United States (CONUS) Lambert Conformal
Grid), #216 (45km Alaska Polar Stereographic Grid), and #243
(Eastern North Pacific Grid), the GRIB2 encoding will reflect
the total increase in ensemble members from 21 to 26.

File name changes:

There will be no changes in the file naming convention for the
NMMB files, where the model core in file names is represented
with the string "nmb"; however, the file naming convention for
all ARW files will be modified by replacing the previous "em"
string with the "arw" string.

Also, the file naming convention for the mean, probability and
spread cluster files on the NCEP FTP server and NOMADS will
change to lead with "sref" and the model cycle:

[mean|prob|spread].sref.cluster[1-6].fHH.grib2 ->
sref.tCCz.[mean|prob|spread]_cluster[1-6].fHH.grib2

where CC is the model cycle (03, 09, 15, 21), HH is the 2-
digit forecast hour (00, 03, 06, ..., 81, 84, 87)

Data delivery timing/volume/content changes:

NCEP expects no changes in delivery times. The GRIB2 product
definition section (PDS) will be modified to identify the
individual SREF members. In combination with the model ID
(111=NMMB and 116=ARW), users will be able to identify each of
the unique SREF members as follows: ctl, p1 (+1), n1 (-1), p2
(+2), n2 (-2), ..., p6 (+6), n6 (-6).

Due to the increase in SREF members from 21 to 26 and the
addition of the member ID to each member`s GRIB2 file, users
can expect approximately a 10 percent increase in the data
volume for each of the raw individual ensemble member`s files.

Output from the SREF is available for North America, the
Contiguous United States, Alaska and Eastern Pacific domains
on the NCEP FTP server, NOMADS and NOAAPORT.

On the NCEP FTP server, data is available in the following
location:

ftp://ftp.ncep.noaa.gov/pub/data/nccf/com/sref/prod/sref.YYYYM
MDD
http://www.ftp.ncep.noaa.gov/data/nccf/com/sref/prod/sref.YYYY
MMDD

where YYYY is the 4-digit year, MM is the month, and DD is the
day.

NOMADS data is available via the following URL:

http://nomads.ncep.noaa.gov

Output from the SREF is available for the CONUS domain on the
NWS FTP server at the following location:

ftp://tgftp.nws.noaa.gov/SL.us008001/ST.opnl/MT.sref_CY.CC/RD.
YYYYMMDD

where CC is the cycle (03, 09, 15, 21) and YYYYMMDD is the
current date.

A consistent parallel feed of data will be made available on
the NCEP HTTP server at the following URL:

http://para.nomads.ncep.noaa.gov/pub/data/nccf/com/sref/para

NCEP encourages all users to ensure their decoders are
flexible and are able to adequately handle changes in content
order, changes in the scaling factor component within the
product definition section (PDS) of the GRIB files, and also
any volume changes which may occur. These elements may change
with future NCEP model implementations. NCEP will make every
attempt to alert users to these changes prior to any
implementations.

For questions regarding the scientific content of the modeling
system, please contact:

     Geoff DiMego
     NCEP/EMC
     College Park, Maryland 20740
     Phone: 301-683-3764
     Geoff.Dimego@noaa.gov
Or
     Jun Du
     NCEP/EMC
     College Park, Maryland 20740
     Phone: 301-763-3704
     Jun.Du@noaa.gov

For questions regarding the dataflow aspects of these data
sets, please contact:

     Kelly Kempisty
     NCEP/NCO Dataflow Team
     College Park, Maryland 20740
     Phone:  301-683-0567
     Email:  ncep.list.pmb-dataflow@noaa.gov

National Technical Implementation Notices are online at:

     http://www.nws.noaa.gov/om/notif.htm

$$



000
NOUS41 KWBC 251316
PNSWSH

Technical Implementation Notice 15-32
National Weather Service Headquarters Washington DC
915 AM EDT Thu Jun 25 2015

To:       Subscribers:
          -Family of Services
          -NOAA Weather Wire Service
          -Emergency Managers Weather Information Network
          -NOAAPORT
          Other NWS partners and NWS employees

From:     Timothy McClung
          Chief Operating Officer
          NWS Office of Science and Technology Integration

Subject:  Upgrade the Short Range Ensemble Forecast System:
          Effective August 4, 2015

Effective August 4, 2015, at 1500 Coordinated Universal Time
(UTC), the National Centers for Environmental Prediction
(NCEP) will upgrade the Short Range Ensemble Forecast System
(SREF). The SREF model upgrades include the following:

- Eliminate the seven Weather Research and Forecast (WRF)
Nonhydrostatic Mesoscale Model (NMM) members including the
following members: ctl, n1, p1, n2, p2, n3, p3.

- Increase the Nonhydrostatic Multiscale Model on B-Grid
(NMMB) model members from 7 to 13 members. The new NMMB
members will be: n4, p4, n5, p5, n6, p6.

- Increase the Advanced Research WRF (WRF-ARW) members from
7 to 13 members.  The new ARW members will be: n4, p4, n5, p5,
n6, p6.

- Encode each ensemble member ID in the GRIB data for the
26 individual raw SREF members.

- Change cloud ceiling height from Above Ground Level (AGL) to
Above Sea Level (ASL) as requested by the aviation user
community.

- Add more diverse in model initial conditions (IC), IC
perturbation and physics and increase the vertical resolution
of the model from 35 to 40 vertical levels.

The Environmental Modeling Center (EMC) Mesoscale Modeling
Branch (MMB) website offers more information on the SREF
modeling system and other NCEP regional modeling systems:

http://www.emc.ncep.noaa.gov/mmb/mesoscale.html

AWIPS product changes:

Increase the total number of ensemble members from 21 to 26
due to the discontinuation of the NMM member and the increase
of both the NMMB and ARW members from 7 to 13 members.  The
increase in ensemble membership will be reflected in the
following AWIPS products:

- For 2-meter Temperature and 3-hourly Precipitation products
on Grid #221 (32 km North American Lambert Conformal Grid),
the GRIB2 Product Definition Template (PDT) will be modified
to identify the individual ensemble members.

- For the Mean, Probability, and Spread products on Grids #212
(40 km Contiguous United States (CONUS) Lambert Conformal
Grid), #216 (45km Alaska Polar Stereographic Grid), and #243
(Eastern North Pacific Grid), the GRIB2 encoding will reflect
the total increase in ensemble members from 21 to 26.

File name changes:

There will be no changes in the file naming convention for the
NMMB files, where the model core in file names is represented
with the string "nmb"; however, the file naming convention for
all ARW files will be modified by replacing the previous "em"
string with the "arw" string.

Also, the file naming convention for the mean, probability and
spread cluster files on the NCEP FTP server and NOMADS will
change to lead with "sref" and the model cycle:

[mean|prob|spread].sref.cluster[1-6].fHH.grib2 ->
sref.tCCz.[mean|prob|spread]_cluster[1-6].fHH.grib2

where CC is the model cycle (03, 09, 15, 21), HH is the 2-
digit forecast hour (00, 03, 06, ..., 81, 84, 87)

Data delivery timing/volume/content changes:

NCEP expects no changes in delivery times. The GRIB2 product
definition section (PDS) will be modified to identify the
individual SREF members. In combination with the model ID
(111=NMMB and 116=ARW), users will be able to identify each of
the unique SREF members as follows: ctl, p1 (+1), n1 (-1), p2
(+2), n2 (-2), ..., p6 (+6), n6 (-6).

Due to the increase in SREF members from 21 to 26 and the
addition of the member ID to each member`s GRIB2 file, users
can expect approximately a 10 percent increase in the data
volume for each of the raw individual ensemble member`s files.

Output from the SREF is available for North America, the
Contiguous United States, Alaska and Eastern Pacific domains
on the NCEP FTP server, NOMADS and NOAAPORT.

On the NCEP FTP server, data is available in the following
location:

ftp://ftp.ncep.noaa.gov/pub/data/nccf/com/sref/prod/sref.YYYYM
MDD
http://www.ftp.ncep.noaa.gov/data/nccf/com/sref/prod/sref.YYYY
MMDD

where YYYY is the 4-digit year, MM is the month, and DD is the
day.

NOMADS data is available via the following URL:

http://nomads.ncep.noaa.gov

Output from the SREF is available for the CONUS domain on the
NWS FTP server at the following location:

ftp://tgftp.nws.noaa.gov/SL.us008001/ST.opnl/MT.sref_CY.CC/RD.
YYYYMMDD

where CC is the cycle (03, 09, 15, 21) and YYYYMMDD is the
current date.

A consistent parallel feed of data will be made available on
the NCEP HTTP server at the following URL:

http://para.nomads.ncep.noaa.gov/pub/data/nccf/com/sref/para

NCEP encourages all users to ensure their decoders are
flexible and are able to adequately handle changes in content
order, changes in the scaling factor component within the
product definition section (PDS) of the GRIB files, and also
any volume changes which may occur. These elements may change
with future NCEP model implementations. NCEP will make every
attempt to alert users to these changes prior to any
implementations.

For questions regarding the scientific content of the modeling
system, please contact:

     Geoff DiMego
     NCEP/EMC
     College Park, Maryland 20740
     Phone: 301-683-3764
     Geoff.Dimego@noaa.gov
Or
     Jun Du
     NCEP/EMC
     College Park, Maryland 20740
     Phone: 301-763-3704
     Jun.Du@noaa.gov

For questions regarding the dataflow aspects of these data
sets, please contact:

     Kelly Kempisty
     NCEP/NCO Dataflow Team
     College Park, Maryland 20740
     Phone:  301-683-0567
     Email:  ncep.list.pmb-dataflow@noaa.gov

National Technical Implementation Notices are online at:

     http://www.nws.noaa.gov/om/notif.htm

$$


000
NOUS43 KGLD 251201
PNSGLD

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE GOODLAND KS
600 AM MDT THU JUN 25 2015

...ON THIS DATE IN WEATHER HISTORY...

IN 1996, RECORD RAINFALL OF UP TO 8.8 INCHES WAS REPORTED IN GOVE
KANSAS. A BRIDGE WAS WASHED OUT AND GRAIN BINS WERE DAMAGED SOUTH
OF GOVE. NUMEROUS FARMSTEADS REPORTED DAMAGE

$$



000
NOUS43 KGLD 251201
PNSGLD

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE GOODLAND KS
600 AM MDT THU JUN 25 2015

...ON THIS DATE IN WEATHER HISTORY...

IN 1996, RECORD RAINFALL OF UP TO 8.8 INCHES WAS REPORTED IN GOVE
KANSAS. A BRIDGE WAS WASHED OUT AND GRAIN BINS WERE DAMAGED SOUTH
OF GOVE. NUMEROUS FARMSTEADS REPORTED DAMAGE

$$


000
NOUS43 KGLD 251201
PNSGLD

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE GOODLAND KS
600 AM MDT THU JUN 25 2015

...ON THIS DATE IN WEATHER HISTORY...

IN 1996, RECORD RAINFALL OF UP TO 8.8 INCHES WAS REPORTED IN GOVE
KANSAS. A BRIDGE WAS WASHED OUT AND GRAIN BINS WERE DAMAGED SOUTH
OF GOVE. NUMEROUS FARMSTEADS REPORTED DAMAGE

$$


000
NOUS45 KBOU 251155
PNSBOU

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE PUEBLO CO
600 AM MDT THU JUN 25 2015

COLORADO LIGHTNING SAFETY WEEK CONTINUES THROUGH SATURDAY. TODAY WE
DISCUSS INDOOR LIGHTNING SAFETY.

STATISTICS TELL US THAT WE ARE MUCH LESS LIKELY TO BECOME A
LIGHTNING STRIKE VICTIM IF WE ARE INSIDE A SUBSTANTIAL STRUCTURE
SUCH AS A HOME OR OFFICE BUILDING WHEN THUNDERSTORMS ARE OCCURRING.
IN 2014...TWENTY SIX PEOPLE IN THE UNITED STATES WERE KILLED BY
LIGHTNING...AND ALL OF THESE FATALITIES OCCURRED OUTDOORS. WHILE
NEARLY ALL PEOPLE WHO ARE INJURED OR KILLED BY LIGHTNING WERE
OUTDOORS...A SMALL PERCENTAGE OF PEOPLE ARE INJURED BY LIGHTNING
WHILE INDOORS.  THEREFORE IT IS IMPORTANT TO DISCUSS LIGHTNING
SAFETY WHILE INDOORS.

THE DANGEROUS ELECTRICAL CURRENT ASSOCIATED WITH A LIGHTNING STRIKE
TYPICALLY ENTERS A STRUCTURE THROUGH WIRES...CABLES OR PIPES THAT
CONNECT TO THE BUILDING FROM THE OUTSIDE. LIGHTNING CAN ALSO
DIRECTLY ENTER INTO A STRUCTURE THROUGH AN OPEN WINDOW...DOOR OR
GARAGE DOOR. ONCE IN A STRUCTURE...THE DANGEROUS CURRENT CAN TRAVEL
THROUGH THE ELECTRICAL...PHONE...CABLE AND PLUMBING SYSTEMS AND
THROUGH METAL WIRES OR BARS IN CONCRETE WALLS OR FLOORING.

CORDED ELECTRONIC DEVICES ARE THE LEADING CAUSE OF INDOOR LIGHTNING
INJURIES IN THE UNITED STATES. THESE INCLUDE PERSONAL COMPUTER
KEYBOARDS...GAME CONSOLES...AND CORDED PHONES. OTHER INJURIES HAVE
OCCURRED WHEN PEOPLE WERE CLOSE BY TO TELEVISIONS WHICH CONNECT TO
AN OUTSIDE CABLE OR SATELLITE SYSTEM.  OPEN WINDOWS...DOORS AND
GARAGE DOORS ALLOW FOR A DIRECT STRIKE TO ENTER A HOME...SO MAKE
SURE ALL WINDOWS AND DOORS ARE CLOSED WHEN LIGHTNING IS OCCURRING.
NEVER WATCH A LIGHTNING STORM FROM A PORCH OR OPEN GARAGE DOOR.
THERE ARE SEVERAL YOU TUBE VIDEOS THAT SHOW PEOPLE BEING INJURED BY
LIGHTNING WHILE THEY WERE RECORDING LIGHTNING FROM THEIR PORCH OR
OPEN GARAGE DOOR.

IT IS VERY IMPORTANT TO STAY AWAY FROM ANY WATER WHEN LIGHTNING IS
OCCURRING OUTSIDE. THIS INCLUDES SINKS, BATHTUBS AND SHOWERS. WHEN
LIGHTNING IS OCCURRING...DO NOT WASH DISHES...DO NOT GIVE KIDS A
BATH...DO NOT TAKE A SHOWER. IT IS BEST TO WAIT TO DO LAUNDRY UNTIL
AFTER THE STORM GOES BY AS WASHERS AND DRYERS ARE CONNECTED TO BOTH
THE ELECTRICAL AND PLUMBING SYSTEMS.

PEOPLE HAVE ALSO BEEN INJURED WHILE LEANING AND STANDING NEAR
CONCRETE IN THEIR HOMES AND OFFICES. THIS IS DUE TO METAL REBAR
WHICH IS IN THE CONCRETE...AND THIS METAL ACTS AS A CONDUCTOR WHEN
LIGHTNING HITS THE BUILDING.

A HOUSE OR OTHER SUBSTANTIAL BUILDING OFFERS THE BEST PROTECTION
FROM LIGHTNING.  IN CONTRAST...MANY SMALL OPEN SHELTERS ON ATHLETIC
FIELDS...GOLF COURSES...PARKS...ROADSIDE PICNIC AREAS...SCHOOLYARDS
AND ELSEWHERE DO NOT OFFER ANY PROTECTION FROM LIGHTNING AND SHOULD
BE AVOIDED AT ALL COST.  SMALL WOOD...VINYL OR METAL SHEDS SHOULD
ALSO BE AVOIDED DURING THUNDERSTORMS. ANY TYPE OF TENT...NO MATTER
HOW LARGE IT IS...DOES NOT OFFER ANY PROTECTION FROM LIGHTNING.

HERE IS A SUMMARY OF LIGHTNING SAFETY TIPS FOR INSIDE THE HOME...

1. AVOID CORDED ELECTRONICS...ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT AND PLUMBING.

2. AVOID CONTACT WITH WATER SUCH AS TAKING A SHOWER...BATH...WASHING
   DISHES OR DOING LAUNDRY.

3. STAY AWAY FROM WINDOWS...DOORS...GARAGES AND PORCHES.

4. DO NOT LIE ON CONCRETE FLOORS OR LEAN AGAINST CONCRETE WALLS.

5. IF A SUBSTANTIAL BUILDING IS NOT NEARBY...AN ENCLOSED AUTOMOBILE
   OFFERS EXCELLENT PROTECTION FROM LIGHTNING.

BELOW ARE A COUPLE OF WEB SITES THAT CONTAIN ADDITIONAL LIGHTNING
INFORMATION.

NOAAS LIGHTNING WEBSITE WHICH CONTAINS ABUNDANT INFORMATION ON
LIGHTNING SAFETY CAN BE FOUND AT...

WWW.LIGHTNINGSAFETY.NOAA.GOV

LIGHTNING INFORMATION SPECIFIC FOR THE STATE OF COLORADO CAN BE
FOUND AT...

WWW.WEATHER.GOV/PUB/LIGHTNING

THE LIGHTNING TOPIC FOR TOMORROW WILL BE LIGHTNING MEDICAL ISSUES
FOR SURVIVORS.



000
NOUS45 KBOU 251155
PNSBOU

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE PUEBLO CO
600 AM MDT THU JUN 25 2015

COLORADO LIGHTNING SAFETY WEEK CONTINUES THROUGH SATURDAY. TODAY WE
DISCUSS INDOOR LIGHTNING SAFETY.

STATISTICS TELL US THAT WE ARE MUCH LESS LIKELY TO BECOME A
LIGHTNING STRIKE VICTIM IF WE ARE INSIDE A SUBSTANTIAL STRUCTURE
SUCH AS A HOME OR OFFICE BUILDING WHEN THUNDERSTORMS ARE OCCURRING.
IN 2014...TWENTY SIX PEOPLE IN THE UNITED STATES WERE KILLED BY
LIGHTNING...AND ALL OF THESE FATALITIES OCCURRED OUTDOORS. WHILE
NEARLY ALL PEOPLE WHO ARE INJURED OR KILLED BY LIGHTNING WERE
OUTDOORS...A SMALL PERCENTAGE OF PEOPLE ARE INJURED BY LIGHTNING
WHILE INDOORS.  THEREFORE IT IS IMPORTANT TO DISCUSS LIGHTNING
SAFETY WHILE INDOORS.

THE DANGEROUS ELECTRICAL CURRENT ASSOCIATED WITH A LIGHTNING STRIKE
TYPICALLY ENTERS A STRUCTURE THROUGH WIRES...CABLES OR PIPES THAT
CONNECT TO THE BUILDING FROM THE OUTSIDE. LIGHTNING CAN ALSO
DIRECTLY ENTER INTO A STRUCTURE THROUGH AN OPEN WINDOW...DOOR OR
GARAGE DOOR. ONCE IN A STRUCTURE...THE DANGEROUS CURRENT CAN TRAVEL
THROUGH THE ELECTRICAL...PHONE...CABLE AND PLUMBING SYSTEMS AND
THROUGH METAL WIRES OR BARS IN CONCRETE WALLS OR FLOORING.

CORDED ELECTRONIC DEVICES ARE THE LEADING CAUSE OF INDOOR LIGHTNING
INJURIES IN THE UNITED STATES. THESE INCLUDE PERSONAL COMPUTER
KEYBOARDS...GAME CONSOLES...AND CORDED PHONES. OTHER INJURIES HAVE
OCCURRED WHEN PEOPLE WERE CLOSE BY TO TELEVISIONS WHICH CONNECT TO
AN OUTSIDE CABLE OR SATELLITE SYSTEM.  OPEN WINDOWS...DOORS AND
GARAGE DOORS ALLOW FOR A DIRECT STRIKE TO ENTER A HOME...SO MAKE
SURE ALL WINDOWS AND DOORS ARE CLOSED WHEN LIGHTNING IS OCCURRING.
NEVER WATCH A LIGHTNING STORM FROM A PORCH OR OPEN GARAGE DOOR.
THERE ARE SEVERAL YOU TUBE VIDEOS THAT SHOW PEOPLE BEING INJURED BY
LIGHTNING WHILE THEY WERE RECORDING LIGHTNING FROM THEIR PORCH OR
OPEN GARAGE DOOR.

IT IS VERY IMPORTANT TO STAY AWAY FROM ANY WATER WHEN LIGHTNING IS
OCCURRING OUTSIDE. THIS INCLUDES SINKS, BATHTUBS AND SHOWERS. WHEN
LIGHTNING IS OCCURRING...DO NOT WASH DISHES...DO NOT GIVE KIDS A
BATH...DO NOT TAKE A SHOWER. IT IS BEST TO WAIT TO DO LAUNDRY UNTIL
AFTER THE STORM GOES BY AS WASHERS AND DRYERS ARE CONNECTED TO BOTH
THE ELECTRICAL AND PLUMBING SYSTEMS.

PEOPLE HAVE ALSO BEEN INJURED WHILE LEANING AND STANDING NEAR
CONCRETE IN THEIR HOMES AND OFFICES. THIS IS DUE TO METAL REBAR
WHICH IS IN THE CONCRETE...AND THIS METAL ACTS AS A CONDUCTOR WHEN
LIGHTNING HITS THE BUILDING.

A HOUSE OR OTHER SUBSTANTIAL BUILDING OFFERS THE BEST PROTECTION
FROM LIGHTNING.  IN CONTRAST...MANY SMALL OPEN SHELTERS ON ATHLETIC
FIELDS...GOLF COURSES...PARKS...ROADSIDE PICNIC AREAS...SCHOOLYARDS
AND ELSEWHERE DO NOT OFFER ANY PROTECTION FROM LIGHTNING AND SHOULD
BE AVOIDED AT ALL COST.  SMALL WOOD...VINYL OR METAL SHEDS SHOULD
ALSO BE AVOIDED DURING THUNDERSTORMS. ANY TYPE OF TENT...NO MATTER
HOW LARGE IT IS...DOES NOT OFFER ANY PROTECTION FROM LIGHTNING.

HERE IS A SUMMARY OF LIGHTNING SAFETY TIPS FOR INSIDE THE HOME...

1. AVOID CORDED ELECTRONICS...ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT AND PLUMBING.

2. AVOID CONTACT WITH WATER SUCH AS TAKING A SHOWER...BATH...WASHING
   DISHES OR DOING LAUNDRY.

3. STAY AWAY FROM WINDOWS...DOORS...GARAGES AND PORCHES.

4. DO NOT LIE ON CONCRETE FLOORS OR LEAN AGAINST CONCRETE WALLS.

5. IF A SUBSTANTIAL BUILDING IS NOT NEARBY...AN ENCLOSED AUTOMOBILE
   OFFERS EXCELLENT PROTECTION FROM LIGHTNING.

BELOW ARE A COUPLE OF WEB SITES THAT CONTAIN ADDITIONAL LIGHTNING
INFORMATION.

NOAAS LIGHTNING WEBSITE WHICH CONTAINS ABUNDANT INFORMATION ON
LIGHTNING SAFETY CAN BE FOUND AT...

WWW.LIGHTNINGSAFETY.NOAA.GOV

LIGHTNING INFORMATION SPECIFIC FOR THE STATE OF COLORADO CAN BE
FOUND AT...

WWW.WEATHER.GOV/PUB/LIGHTNING

THE LIGHTNING TOPIC FOR TOMORROW WILL BE LIGHTNING MEDICAL ISSUES
FOR SURVIVORS.


000
NOUS45 KBOU 251155
PNSBOU

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE PUEBLO CO
600 AM MDT THU JUN 25 2015

COLORADO LIGHTNING SAFETY WEEK CONTINUES THROUGH SATURDAY. TODAY WE
DISCUSS INDOOR LIGHTNING SAFETY.

STATISTICS TELL US THAT WE ARE MUCH LESS LIKELY TO BECOME A
LIGHTNING STRIKE VICTIM IF WE ARE INSIDE A SUBSTANTIAL STRUCTURE
SUCH AS A HOME OR OFFICE BUILDING WHEN THUNDERSTORMS ARE OCCURRING.
IN 2014...TWENTY SIX PEOPLE IN THE UNITED STATES WERE KILLED BY
LIGHTNING...AND ALL OF THESE FATALITIES OCCURRED OUTDOORS. WHILE
NEARLY ALL PEOPLE WHO ARE INJURED OR KILLED BY LIGHTNING WERE
OUTDOORS...A SMALL PERCENTAGE OF PEOPLE ARE INJURED BY LIGHTNING
WHILE INDOORS.  THEREFORE IT IS IMPORTANT TO DISCUSS LIGHTNING
SAFETY WHILE INDOORS.

THE DANGEROUS ELECTRICAL CURRENT ASSOCIATED WITH A LIGHTNING STRIKE
TYPICALLY ENTERS A STRUCTURE THROUGH WIRES...CABLES OR PIPES THAT
CONNECT TO THE BUILDING FROM THE OUTSIDE. LIGHTNING CAN ALSO
DIRECTLY ENTER INTO A STRUCTURE THROUGH AN OPEN WINDOW...DOOR OR
GARAGE DOOR. ONCE IN A STRUCTURE...THE DANGEROUS CURRENT CAN TRAVEL
THROUGH THE ELECTRICAL...PHONE...CABLE AND PLUMBING SYSTEMS AND
THROUGH METAL WIRES OR BARS IN CONCRETE WALLS OR FLOORING.

CORDED ELECTRONIC DEVICES ARE THE LEADING CAUSE OF INDOOR LIGHTNING
INJURIES IN THE UNITED STATES. THESE INCLUDE PERSONAL COMPUTER
KEYBOARDS...GAME CONSOLES...AND CORDED PHONES. OTHER INJURIES HAVE
OCCURRED WHEN PEOPLE WERE CLOSE BY TO TELEVISIONS WHICH CONNECT TO
AN OUTSIDE CABLE OR SATELLITE SYSTEM.  OPEN WINDOWS...DOORS AND
GARAGE DOORS ALLOW FOR A DIRECT STRIKE TO ENTER A HOME...SO MAKE
SURE ALL WINDOWS AND DOORS ARE CLOSED WHEN LIGHTNING IS OCCURRING.
NEVER WATCH A LIGHTNING STORM FROM A PORCH OR OPEN GARAGE DOOR.
THERE ARE SEVERAL YOU TUBE VIDEOS THAT SHOW PEOPLE BEING INJURED BY
LIGHTNING WHILE THEY WERE RECORDING LIGHTNING FROM THEIR PORCH OR
OPEN GARAGE DOOR.

IT IS VERY IMPORTANT TO STAY AWAY FROM ANY WATER WHEN LIGHTNING IS
OCCURRING OUTSIDE. THIS INCLUDES SINKS, BATHTUBS AND SHOWERS. WHEN
LIGHTNING IS OCCURRING...DO NOT WASH DISHES...DO NOT GIVE KIDS A
BATH...DO NOT TAKE A SHOWER. IT IS BEST TO WAIT TO DO LAUNDRY UNTIL
AFTER THE STORM GOES BY AS WASHERS AND DRYERS ARE CONNECTED TO BOTH
THE ELECTRICAL AND PLUMBING SYSTEMS.

PEOPLE HAVE ALSO BEEN INJURED WHILE LEANING AND STANDING NEAR
CONCRETE IN THEIR HOMES AND OFFICES. THIS IS DUE TO METAL REBAR
WHICH IS IN THE CONCRETE...AND THIS METAL ACTS AS A CONDUCTOR WHEN
LIGHTNING HITS THE BUILDING.

A HOUSE OR OTHER SUBSTANTIAL BUILDING OFFERS THE BEST PROTECTION
FROM LIGHTNING.  IN CONTRAST...MANY SMALL OPEN SHELTERS ON ATHLETIC
FIELDS...GOLF COURSES...PARKS...ROADSIDE PICNIC AREAS...SCHOOLYARDS
AND ELSEWHERE DO NOT OFFER ANY PROTECTION FROM LIGHTNING AND SHOULD
BE AVOIDED AT ALL COST.  SMALL WOOD...VINYL OR METAL SHEDS SHOULD
ALSO BE AVOIDED DURING THUNDERSTORMS. ANY TYPE OF TENT...NO MATTER
HOW LARGE IT IS...DOES NOT OFFER ANY PROTECTION FROM LIGHTNING.

HERE IS A SUMMARY OF LIGHTNING SAFETY TIPS FOR INSIDE THE HOME...

1. AVOID CORDED ELECTRONICS...ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT AND PLUMBING.

2. AVOID CONTACT WITH WATER SUCH AS TAKING A SHOWER...BATH...WASHING
   DISHES OR DOING LAUNDRY.

3. STAY AWAY FROM WINDOWS...DOORS...GARAGES AND PORCHES.

4. DO NOT LIE ON CONCRETE FLOORS OR LEAN AGAINST CONCRETE WALLS.

5. IF A SUBSTANTIAL BUILDING IS NOT NEARBY...AN ENCLOSED AUTOMOBILE
   OFFERS EXCELLENT PROTECTION FROM LIGHTNING.

BELOW ARE A COUPLE OF WEB SITES THAT CONTAIN ADDITIONAL LIGHTNING
INFORMATION.

NOAAS LIGHTNING WEBSITE WHICH CONTAINS ABUNDANT INFORMATION ON
LIGHTNING SAFETY CAN BE FOUND AT...

WWW.LIGHTNINGSAFETY.NOAA.GOV

LIGHTNING INFORMATION SPECIFIC FOR THE STATE OF COLORADO CAN BE
FOUND AT...

WWW.WEATHER.GOV/PUB/LIGHTNING

THE LIGHTNING TOPIC FOR TOMORROW WILL BE LIGHTNING MEDICAL ISSUES
FOR SURVIVORS.



000
NOUS41 KLWX 241947
PNSLWX

VERY LARGE HAIL OCCURRED FROM A SUPERCELL THUNDERSTORM IN THE LATE
AFTERNOON OF TUESDAY...JUNE 23 2015 IN CENTRAL BALTIMORE COUNTY.

AROUND 545 PM...A HAILSTONE WAS FOUND IN THE FRONT YARD OF A
RESIDENCE 2 MILES NORTH-NORTHEAST OF TIMONIUM MARYLAND THAT MEASURED
4.0 INCHES IN DIAMETER...GRAPEFRUIT SIZE. THIS IS ONLY THE 4TH CASE
OF HAIL MEASURING 4 OR MORE INCHES IN MARYLAND FROM RECORDS DATING
BACK TO 1950.

THE LARGEST HAIL ON RECORD IN MARYLAND SINCE 1950 IS 4.5 INCHES...
SOFTBALL SIZE. HAIL THIS SIZE HAS BEEN RECORDED TWICE...ONCE ON
APRIL 28 2002 IN CHARLES COUNTY ASSOCIATED WITH THE SUPERCELL THAT
PRODUCED THE LA PLATA EF4 TORNADO. THE OTHER 4.5 INCH HAILSTONE FELL
ON JUNE 18 1970 IN THE PHOENIX-JACKSONVILLE-COCKEYSVILLE AREA OF
BALTIMORE COUNTY.

THE OTHER KNOWN 4.0 INCH DIAMETER HAIL REPORT IN MARYLAND WAS ON
JULY 31 1999 IN NORTHERN BALTIMORE COUNTY NEAR HEREFORD.


000
NOUS41 KLWX 241947
PNSLWX

VERY LARGE HAIL OCCURRED FROM A SUPERCELL THUNDERSTORM IN THE LATE
AFTERNOON OF TUESDAY...JUNE 23 2015 IN CENTRAL BALTIMORE COUNTY.

AROUND 545 PM...A HAILSTONE WAS FOUND IN THE FRONT YARD OF A
RESIDENCE 2 MILES NORTH-NORTHEAST OF TIMONIUM MARYLAND THAT MEASURED
4.0 INCHES IN DIAMETER...GRAPEFRUIT SIZE. THIS IS ONLY THE 4TH CASE
OF HAIL MEASURING 4 OR MORE INCHES IN MARYLAND FROM RECORDS DATING
BACK TO 1950.

THE LARGEST HAIL ON RECORD IN MARYLAND SINCE 1950 IS 4.5 INCHES...
SOFTBALL SIZE. HAIL THIS SIZE HAS BEEN RECORDED TWICE...ONCE ON
APRIL 28 2002 IN CHARLES COUNTY ASSOCIATED WITH THE SUPERCELL THAT
PRODUCED THE LA PLATA EF4 TORNADO. THE OTHER 4.5 INCH HAILSTONE FELL
ON JUNE 18 1970 IN THE PHOENIX-JACKSONVILLE-COCKEYSVILLE AREA OF
BALTIMORE COUNTY.

THE OTHER KNOWN 4.0 INCH DIAMETER HAIL REPORT IN MARYLAND WAS ON
JULY 31 1999 IN NORTHERN BALTIMORE COUNTY NEAR HEREFORD.



000
NOUS41 KLWX 241947
PNSLWX

VERY LARGE HAIL OCCURRED FROM A SUPERCELL THUNDERSTORM IN THE LATE
AFTERNOON OF TUESDAY...JUNE 23 2015 IN CENTRAL BALTIMORE COUNTY.

AROUND 545 PM...A HAILSTONE WAS FOUND IN THE FRONT YARD OF A
RESIDENCE 2 MILES NORTH-NORTHEAST OF TIMONIUM MARYLAND THAT MEASURED
4.0 INCHES IN DIAMETER...GRAPEFRUIT SIZE. THIS IS ONLY THE 4TH CASE
OF HAIL MEASURING 4 OR MORE INCHES IN MARYLAND FROM RECORDS DATING
BACK TO 1950.

THE LARGEST HAIL ON RECORD IN MARYLAND SINCE 1950 IS 4.5 INCHES...
SOFTBALL SIZE. HAIL THIS SIZE HAS BEEN RECORDED TWICE...ONCE ON
APRIL 28 2002 IN CHARLES COUNTY ASSOCIATED WITH THE SUPERCELL THAT
PRODUCED THE LA PLATA EF4 TORNADO. THE OTHER 4.5 INCH HAILSTONE FELL
ON JUNE 18 1970 IN THE PHOENIX-JACKSONVILLE-COCKEYSVILLE AREA OF
BALTIMORE COUNTY.

THE OTHER KNOWN 4.0 INCH DIAMETER HAIL REPORT IN MARYLAND WAS ON
JULY 31 1999 IN NORTHERN BALTIMORE COUNTY NEAR HEREFORD.



000
NOUS44 KJAN 241517
PNSJAN
ARZ074-075-LAZ007>009-015-016-023>026-MSZ018-019-025>066-072>074-
100000-

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE JACKSON MS
1000 AM CDT WED JUN 24 2015

...UNITED STATES ARMY CORPS OF ENGINEERS CLOSES STEELE BAYOU
STRUCTURE DUE TO A RISING MISSISSIPPI RIVER...


THE UNITED STATES ARMY CORPS OF ENGINEERS VICKSBURG DISTRICT CLOSED
THE STEELE BAYOU STRUCTURE NORTH OF VICKSBURG YESTERDAY DUE TO A
RISING MISSISSIPPI RIVER. THE LANDSIDE OF THE YAZOO BACKWATER LEVEE
POOL READING IS 82.37 FEET AT 7AM THIS MORNING WHILE THE RIVERSIDE
TAILWATER READING IS 83.56 FEET.

WITH NORMAL RAINFALL ACROSS THE YAZOO BACKWATER AREA...THE POOL
READING SHOULD RISE TO NEAR 86.0 FEET.

WITH AN EXPECTED MISSISSIPPI RIVER CREST AT VICKSBURG OF 42.0 FEET
ON SUNDAY JULY 5TH...THE RIVERSIDE TAILWATER READING SHOULD RISE TO
BETWEEN 88.0 AND 88.5 FEET.

THE STRUCTURE IS NOT EXPECTED TO REOPEN UNTIL WELL AFTER THE
MISSISSIPPI RIVER AT VICKSBURG CRESTS AND THE LANDSIDE POOL READING
IS HIGHER THAN THE RIVERSIDE TAILWATER READING. REOPENING SHOULD NOT
OCCUR UNTIL AT LEAST THE MIDDLE OF JULY.

$$

MVP


000
NOUS44 KJAN 241517
PNSJAN
ARZ074-075-LAZ007>009-015-016-023>026-MSZ018-019-025>066-072>074-
100000-

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE JACKSON MS
1000 AM CDT WED JUN 24 2015

...UNITED STATES ARMY CORPS OF ENGINEERS CLOSES STEELE BAYOU
STRUCTURE DUE TO A RISING MISSISSIPPI RIVER...


THE UNITED STATES ARMY CORPS OF ENGINEERS VICKSBURG DISTRICT CLOSED
THE STEELE BAYOU STRUCTURE NORTH OF VICKSBURG YESTERDAY DUE TO A
RISING MISSISSIPPI RIVER. THE LANDSIDE OF THE YAZOO BACKWATER LEVEE
POOL READING IS 82.37 FEET AT 7AM THIS MORNING WHILE THE RIVERSIDE
TAILWATER READING IS 83.56 FEET.

WITH NORMAL RAINFALL ACROSS THE YAZOO BACKWATER AREA...THE POOL
READING SHOULD RISE TO NEAR 86.0 FEET.

WITH AN EXPECTED MISSISSIPPI RIVER CREST AT VICKSBURG OF 42.0 FEET
ON SUNDAY JULY 5TH...THE RIVERSIDE TAILWATER READING SHOULD RISE TO
BETWEEN 88.0 AND 88.5 FEET.

THE STRUCTURE IS NOT EXPECTED TO REOPEN UNTIL WELL AFTER THE
MISSISSIPPI RIVER AT VICKSBURG CRESTS AND THE LANDSIDE POOL READING
IS HIGHER THAN THE RIVERSIDE TAILWATER READING. REOPENING SHOULD NOT
OCCUR UNTIL AT LEAST THE MIDDLE OF JULY.

$$

MVP


000
NOUS44 KJAN 241517
PNSJAN
ARZ074-075-LAZ007>009-015-016-023>026-MSZ018-019-025>066-072>074-
100000-

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE JACKSON MS
1000 AM CDT WED JUN 24 2015

...UNITED STATES ARMY CORPS OF ENGINEERS CLOSES STEELE BAYOU
STRUCTURE DUE TO A RISING MISSISSIPPI RIVER...


THE UNITED STATES ARMY CORPS OF ENGINEERS VICKSBURG DISTRICT CLOSED
THE STEELE BAYOU STRUCTURE NORTH OF VICKSBURG YESTERDAY DUE TO A
RISING MISSISSIPPI RIVER. THE LANDSIDE OF THE YAZOO BACKWATER LEVEE
POOL READING IS 82.37 FEET AT 7AM THIS MORNING WHILE THE RIVERSIDE
TAILWATER READING IS 83.56 FEET.

WITH NORMAL RAINFALL ACROSS THE YAZOO BACKWATER AREA...THE POOL
READING SHOULD RISE TO NEAR 86.0 FEET.

WITH AN EXPECTED MISSISSIPPI RIVER CREST AT VICKSBURG OF 42.0 FEET
ON SUNDAY JULY 5TH...THE RIVERSIDE TAILWATER READING SHOULD RISE TO
BETWEEN 88.0 AND 88.5 FEET.

THE STRUCTURE IS NOT EXPECTED TO REOPEN UNTIL WELL AFTER THE
MISSISSIPPI RIVER AT VICKSBURG CRESTS AND THE LANDSIDE POOL READING
IS HIGHER THAN THE RIVERSIDE TAILWATER READING. REOPENING SHOULD NOT
OCCUR UNTIL AT LEAST THE MIDDLE OF JULY.

$$

MVP


000
NOUS44 KJAN 241517
PNSJAN
ARZ074-075-LAZ007>009-015-016-023>026-MSZ018-019-025>066-072>074-
100000-

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE JACKSON MS
1000 AM CDT WED JUN 24 2015

...UNITED STATES ARMY CORPS OF ENGINEERS CLOSES STEELE BAYOU
STRUCTURE DUE TO A RISING MISSISSIPPI RIVER...


THE UNITED STATES ARMY CORPS OF ENGINEERS VICKSBURG DISTRICT CLOSED
THE STEELE BAYOU STRUCTURE NORTH OF VICKSBURG YESTERDAY DUE TO A
RISING MISSISSIPPI RIVER. THE LANDSIDE OF THE YAZOO BACKWATER LEVEE
POOL READING IS 82.37 FEET AT 7AM THIS MORNING WHILE THE RIVERSIDE
TAILWATER READING IS 83.56 FEET.

WITH NORMAL RAINFALL ACROSS THE YAZOO BACKWATER AREA...THE POOL
READING SHOULD RISE TO NEAR 86.0 FEET.

WITH AN EXPECTED MISSISSIPPI RIVER CREST AT VICKSBURG OF 42.0 FEET
ON SUNDAY JULY 5TH...THE RIVERSIDE TAILWATER READING SHOULD RISE TO
BETWEEN 88.0 AND 88.5 FEET.

THE STRUCTURE IS NOT EXPECTED TO REOPEN UNTIL WELL AFTER THE
MISSISSIPPI RIVER AT VICKSBURG CRESTS AND THE LANDSIDE POOL READING
IS HIGHER THAN THE RIVERSIDE TAILWATER READING. REOPENING SHOULD NOT
OCCUR UNTIL AT LEAST THE MIDDLE OF JULY.

$$

MVP


000
NOUS45 KGJT 241354
PNSGJT

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
PRELIMINARY RECORD EVENT REPORT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE GRAND JUNCTION CO
754 AM MDT WED JUN 24 2015

...RECORD HIGH TEMPERATURE TUESDAY...

IN WESTERN COLORADO...

AT RIDGWAY, THE HIGH TEMPERATURE TUESDAY WAS 92. THIS SET A NEW
RECORD HIGH FOR JUNE 23, BREAKING THE PREVIOUS RECORD OF 89, SET IN
2007.

$$


000
NOUS45 KGJT 241354
PNSGJT

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
PRELIMINARY RECORD EVENT REPORT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE GRAND JUNCTION CO
754 AM MDT WED JUN 24 2015

...RECORD HIGH TEMPERATURE TUESDAY...

IN WESTERN COLORADO...

AT RIDGWAY, THE HIGH TEMPERATURE TUESDAY WAS 92. THIS SET A NEW
RECORD HIGH FOR JUNE 23, BREAKING THE PREVIOUS RECORD OF 89, SET IN
2007.

$$


000
NOUS45 KGJT 241354
PNSGJT

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
PRELIMINARY RECORD EVENT REPORT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE GRAND JUNCTION CO
754 AM MDT WED JUN 24 2015

...RECORD HIGH TEMPERATURE TUESDAY...

IN WESTERN COLORADO...

AT RIDGWAY, THE HIGH TEMPERATURE TUESDAY WAS 92. THIS SET A NEW
RECORD HIGH FOR JUNE 23, BREAKING THE PREVIOUS RECORD OF 89, SET IN
2007.

$$


000
NOUS45 KGJT 241354
PNSGJT

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
PRELIMINARY RECORD EVENT REPORT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE GRAND JUNCTION CO
754 AM MDT WED JUN 24 2015

...RECORD HIGH TEMPERATURE TUESDAY...

IN WESTERN COLORADO...

AT RIDGWAY, THE HIGH TEMPERATURE TUESDAY WAS 92. THIS SET A NEW
RECORD HIGH FOR JUNE 23, BREAKING THE PREVIOUS RECORD OF 89, SET IN
2007.

$$


000
NOUS43 KGLD 241200
PNSGLD

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE GOODLAND KS
600 AM MDT WED JUN 24 2015

...ON THIS DATE IN WEATHER HISTORY...

IN 1909, THREE VIOLENT TORNADOES DEVELOPED IN NORTON COUNTY
KANSAS. TWO OF THE TORNADOES WERE RATED F4 ON THE FUJITA SCALE.
IN ONE, A RANCH HOUSE WAS DESTROYED AS THE TORNADO REPORTEDLY
CARRIED AWAY EVERYTHING MOVEABLE. SIXTY THREE CATTLE WERE KILLED
ON TWO RANCHES, SOME REPORTEDLY CARRIED TO THE HEIGHTS OF 500
FEET. THE OTHER VIOLENT TORNADO OCCURRED NEAR THE CITY OF
NORTON, LEVELING FARMS, RANCHES, A SCHOOL, AND A CHURCH. A
DUBIOUS AND UNCONFIRMED NEWSPAPER REPORT NOTED THAT A 1700 POUND
STEER WAS CARRIED FOR A MILE.

IN 1989, THUNDERSTORMS DEVELOPING ALONG A WARM FRONT PRODUCED
SEVERE WEATHER FROM COLORADO AND NEW MEXICO TO KANSAS AND NEBRASKA.
THE THUNDERSTORMS PRODUCED HAIL THREE INCHES IN DIAMETER AT WHEELER.

$$


000
NOUS43 KGLD 241200
PNSGLD

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE GOODLAND KS
600 AM MDT WED JUN 24 2015

...ON THIS DATE IN WEATHER HISTORY...

IN 1909, THREE VIOLENT TORNADOES DEVELOPED IN NORTON COUNTY
KANSAS. TWO OF THE TORNADOES WERE RATED F4 ON THE FUJITA SCALE.
IN ONE, A RANCH HOUSE WAS DESTROYED AS THE TORNADO REPORTEDLY
CARRIED AWAY EVERYTHING MOVEABLE. SIXTY THREE CATTLE WERE KILLED
ON TWO RANCHES, SOME REPORTEDLY CARRIED TO THE HEIGHTS OF 500
FEET. THE OTHER VIOLENT TORNADO OCCURRED NEAR THE CITY OF
NORTON, LEVELING FARMS, RANCHES, A SCHOOL, AND A CHURCH. A
DUBIOUS AND UNCONFIRMED NEWSPAPER REPORT NOTED THAT A 1700 POUND
STEER WAS CARRIED FOR A MILE.

IN 1989, THUNDERSTORMS DEVELOPING ALONG A WARM FRONT PRODUCED
SEVERE WEATHER FROM COLORADO AND NEW MEXICO TO KANSAS AND NEBRASKA.
THE THUNDERSTORMS PRODUCED HAIL THREE INCHES IN DIAMETER AT WHEELER.

$$



000
NOUS43 KGLD 241200
PNSGLD

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE GOODLAND KS
600 AM MDT WED JUN 24 2015

...ON THIS DATE IN WEATHER HISTORY...

IN 1909, THREE VIOLENT TORNADOES DEVELOPED IN NORTON COUNTY
KANSAS. TWO OF THE TORNADOES WERE RATED F4 ON THE FUJITA SCALE.
IN ONE, A RANCH HOUSE WAS DESTROYED AS THE TORNADO REPORTEDLY
CARRIED AWAY EVERYTHING MOVEABLE. SIXTY THREE CATTLE WERE KILLED
ON TWO RANCHES, SOME REPORTEDLY CARRIED TO THE HEIGHTS OF 500
FEET. THE OTHER VIOLENT TORNADO OCCURRED NEAR THE CITY OF
NORTON, LEVELING FARMS, RANCHES, A SCHOOL, AND A CHURCH. A
DUBIOUS AND UNCONFIRMED NEWSPAPER REPORT NOTED THAT A 1700 POUND
STEER WAS CARRIED FOR A MILE.

IN 1989, THUNDERSTORMS DEVELOPING ALONG A WARM FRONT PRODUCED
SEVERE WEATHER FROM COLORADO AND NEW MEXICO TO KANSAS AND NEBRASKA.
THE THUNDERSTORMS PRODUCED HAIL THREE INCHES IN DIAMETER AT WHEELER.

$$



000
NOUS43 KGLD 241200
PNSGLD

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE GOODLAND KS
600 AM MDT WED JUN 24 2015

...ON THIS DATE IN WEATHER HISTORY...

IN 1909, THREE VIOLENT TORNADOES DEVELOPED IN NORTON COUNTY
KANSAS. TWO OF THE TORNADOES WERE RATED F4 ON THE FUJITA SCALE.
IN ONE, A RANCH HOUSE WAS DESTROYED AS THE TORNADO REPORTEDLY
CARRIED AWAY EVERYTHING MOVEABLE. SIXTY THREE CATTLE WERE KILLED
ON TWO RANCHES, SOME REPORTEDLY CARRIED TO THE HEIGHTS OF 500
FEET. THE OTHER VIOLENT TORNADO OCCURRED NEAR THE CITY OF
NORTON, LEVELING FARMS, RANCHES, A SCHOOL, AND A CHURCH. A
DUBIOUS AND UNCONFIRMED NEWSPAPER REPORT NOTED THAT A 1700 POUND
STEER WAS CARRIED FOR A MILE.

IN 1989, THUNDERSTORMS DEVELOPING ALONG A WARM FRONT PRODUCED
SEVERE WEATHER FROM COLORADO AND NEW MEXICO TO KANSAS AND NEBRASKA.
THE THUNDERSTORMS PRODUCED HAIL THREE INCHES IN DIAMETER AT WHEELER.

$$


000
NOUS45 KBOU 241153
PNSBOU

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE PUEBLO CO
600 AM MDT WED JUN 24 2015

COLORADO LIGHTNING SAFETY WEEK CONTINUES THROUGH SATURDAY. TODAY WE
DISCUSS OUTDOOR LIGHTNING RISK REDUCTION.

OUTDOORS IS THE MOST DANGEROUS PLACE TO BE DURING A THUNDERSTORM.
EACH YEAR...NEARLY ALL PEOPLE IN THE UNITED STATES WHO ARE INJURED
OR KILLED BY LIGHTNING WERE INVOLVED IN AN OUTDOOR ACTIVITY. THEY
WERE STRUCK WHILE WORKING OUTSIDE...WERE AT OR PARTICIPATING AT AN
OUTDOOR SPORTING EVENT...WERE BOATING OR FISHING. THEY WERE STRUCK
WHILE HIKING...MOWING THE LAWN OR SIMPLY GOING TO OR FROM THEIR CAR.
QUITE A FEW WERE ON THEIR OWN PROPERTY WHEN THEY WERE STRUCK.

UNFORTUNATELY...THERE IS NO PLACE OUTSIDE THAT IS SAFE FROM
LIGHTNING. THE ONLY SAFE PLACE TO BE WHEN LIGHTNING IS OCCURRING IS
EITHER INSIDE A SUBSTANTIAL BUILDING...OR AN ENCLOSED AUTOMOBILE.

HERE ARE SOME IMPORTANT THINGS TO REMEMBER BEFORE VENTURING
OUTDOORS...

AN INFORMED DECISION WILL HELP YOU AVOID BEING IN AN AREA WHERE
LIGHTNING IS EXPECTED TO OCCUR.  BEFORE HEADING OUT...GET AN UPDATED
FORECAST. STAY TUNED TO NOAA WEATHER RADIO...CHECK NATIONAL WEATHER
SERVICE WEB SITES...OR ACCESS YOUR FAVORITE WEATHER APPS ON YOUR
CELL PHONE FOR THE LATEST FORECAST.

IN COLORADO...IT IS IMPORTANT TO REMEMBER THAT THUNDERSTORMS
TYPICALLY DEVELOP IN THE MOUNTAINS AFTER 11 AM.  SO IT IS BEST TO
PLAN YOUR CLIMBING OR HIKING TRIP SO THAT YOU ARE COMING DOWN THE
MOUNTAIN BY LATE MORNING.

IF THUNDERSTORMS ARE IN THE FORECAST...CONSIDER PLANNING AN
ALTERNATE INDOOR ACTIVITY OR MAKE PLANS WHICH WILL ALLOW YOU TO
QUICKLY GET INTO A SAFE SHELTER.

ONCE YOU ARE OUTSIDE...KEEP UP-TO-DATE ON THE WEATHER VIA YOUR SMART
PHONE OR PORTABLE NOAA WEATHER RADIO RECEIVER. CHECK FOR UPDATED
FORECASTS. CHECK IF STORMS ARE NEAR YOU BY CHECKING THE LATEST RADAR
IMAGERY ON YOUR CELL PHONE. THERE ARE NOW SEVERAL SMART PHONE APPS
YOU CAN PURCHASE THAT SHOW YOU REAL-TIME LIGHTNING ACTIVITY IN YOUR
AREA. DO NOT FORGET TO SIMPLY LOOK AROUND YOU TO MAKE SURE STORMS
ARE NOT DEVELOPING IN YOUR VICINITY.

WE WILL NOW DISCUSS TWO OUTDOOR SCENARIOS. THE FIRST IS WHAT TO DO
IF YOU ARE OUTDOORS AND A SAFE LOCATION IS NEARBY...WHILE THE SECOND
SCENARIO IS WHAT TO DO IF YOU ARE OUTDOORS AND NO SAFE LOCATION IS
NEARBY.

IF YOU ARE OUTSIDE...SUCH AS A PARK...A LAKE...OR AN OUTDOOR
SPORTING EVENT...KNOW WHERE THE NEAREST SAFE LOCATION IS LOCATED AT.
A SAFE LOCATION IS ANY SUBSTANTIAL BUILDING...SUCH AS A BUSINESS...A
HOME...OR A CHURCH. ANY ENCLOSED HARD TOPPED AUTOMOBILE ALSO OFFERS
EXCELLENT PROTECTION FROM LIGHTNING. ONCE YOU HEAR THUNDER OR SEE
LIGHTNING...IMMEDIATELY STOP WHAT YOU ARE DOING AND QUICKLY GET TO
THE SAFE SHELTER. DO NOT WAIT UNTIL THE RAIN STARTS TO SEEK SAFE
SHELTER. ONCE INSIDE A SAFE SHELTER...IT IS RECOMMENDED YOU STAY
THERE FOR 30 MINUTES AFTER THE LAST RUMBLE OF THUNDER.

PAST HISTORY HAS SHOWN THAT MOST PEOPLE WHO WERE OUTDOORS AND WERE
INJURED OR KILLED BY LIGHTNING HAD ACCESS TO A SAFE SHELTER NEARBY.
DO NOT WAIT TO SEEK SAFE SHELTER WHEN LIGHTNING THREATENS. WHEN YOU
HEAR THUNDER OR SEE LIGHTNING...IT IS IMPORTANT FOR YOU...AND YOUR
FAMILY...TO ACT QUICKLY.

IT IS CRITICALLY IMPORTANT TO AVOID SHELTERS THAT ARE NOT SAFE FROM
LIGHTNING...INCLUDING PICNIC SHELTERS...BULLPENS...TENTS AND ANY
OTHER SMALL BUILDINGS THAT ARE OPEN TO THE ELEMENTS.
NEVER...NEVER...GET UNDER A TREE TO SEEK SHELTER FROM LIGHTNING.

IT IS IMPORTANT THAT ALL SPORTS LEAGUES AND OTHER OUTDOOR GROUPS
HAVE A LIGHTNING RESPONSE PLAN THAT IS UNDERSTOOD AND CONSISTENTLY
APPLIED FOR THE SAFETY OF THE PARTICIPANTS. PART OF THE PLAN WOULD
INCLUDE A DESIGNATED WEATHER WATCHER AT EACH OUTDOOR EVENT WITH THE
AUTHORITY TO POSTPONE OR CANCEL THE EVENT DUE TO THE THREAT OF
LIGHTNING. IT IS ALSO IMPORTANT THAT PEOPLE KNOW WHERE TO SEEK SAFE
SHELTER IF A STORM THREATENS. AS WE HAVE SEEN RECENTLY...THE
NCAA...THE NFL AND MLB NOW DELAY GAMES WHEN LIGHTNING IS IN THE
AREA.

OUR SECOND SCENARIO INVOLVES WHAT YOU CAN DO TO REDUCE YOUR CHANCES
OF BEING INJURED OR KILLED BY LIGHTING IF NO SAFE SHELTER IS NEARBY.
THIS SITUATION TYPICALLY OCCURS TO PEOPLE WHO ARE HIKING OR CAMPING
IN THE BACKCOUNTRY. UNFORTUNATELY...IN THIS SCENARIO...THERE IS NOT
MUCH YOU CAN DO TO REDUCE YOUR RISK FROM BEING STRUCK BY LIGHTNING.
THE BEST THING TO DO IS MOVE AWAY FROM TALL ISOLATED OBJECTS...SUCH
AS TREES. STAY AWAY FROM WIDE OPEN AREAS. STAY AS LOW AS POSSIBLE
WITH YOUR FEET CLOSE TOGETHER IF LIGHTNING IS NEARBY. IF YOU ARE
WITH A GROUP OF PEOPLE...SPREAD OUT...THAT WAY IF SOMEONE IS STRUCK
BY LIGHTNING...THE OTHERS CAN OFFER FIRST AID. IF CAMPING IN THE
BACKCOUNTRY...PLACE YOUR TENT IN A LOW AREA AWAY FROM TALL ISOLATED
TREES.

REMEMBER...WHEN THUNDER ROARS...GO INDOORS!

THERE ARE A COUPLE OF WEB SITES THAT CONTAIN ADDITIONAL LIGHTNING
INFORMATION.

NOAAS LIGHTNING WEBSITE WHICH CONTAINS ABUNDANT INFORMATION ON
LIGHTNING SAFETY CAN BE FOUND AT...

WWW.LIGHTNINGSAFETY.NOAA.GOV

LIGHTNING INFORMATION SPECIFIC FOR THE STATE OF COLORADO CAN BE FOUND AT...

WWW.WEATHER.GOV/PUB/LIGHTNING

THE LIGHTNING TOPIC FOR TOMORROW WILL BE ON INDOOR LIGHTNING SAFETY.



000
NOUS45 KBOU 241153
PNSBOU

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE PUEBLO CO
600 AM MDT WED JUN 24 2015

COLORADO LIGHTNING SAFETY WEEK CONTINUES THROUGH SATURDAY. TODAY WE
DISCUSS OUTDOOR LIGHTNING RISK REDUCTION.

OUTDOORS IS THE MOST DANGEROUS PLACE TO BE DURING A THUNDERSTORM.
EACH YEAR...NEARLY ALL PEOPLE IN THE UNITED STATES WHO ARE INJURED
OR KILLED BY LIGHTNING WERE INVOLVED IN AN OUTDOOR ACTIVITY. THEY
WERE STRUCK WHILE WORKING OUTSIDE...WERE AT OR PARTICIPATING AT AN
OUTDOOR SPORTING EVENT...WERE BOATING OR FISHING. THEY WERE STRUCK
WHILE HIKING...MOWING THE LAWN OR SIMPLY GOING TO OR FROM THEIR CAR.
QUITE A FEW WERE ON THEIR OWN PROPERTY WHEN THEY WERE STRUCK.

UNFORTUNATELY...THERE IS NO PLACE OUTSIDE THAT IS SAFE FROM
LIGHTNING. THE ONLY SAFE PLACE TO BE WHEN LIGHTNING IS OCCURRING IS
EITHER INSIDE A SUBSTANTIAL BUILDING...OR AN ENCLOSED AUTOMOBILE.

HERE ARE SOME IMPORTANT THINGS TO REMEMBER BEFORE VENTURING
OUTDOORS...

AN INFORMED DECISION WILL HELP YOU AVOID BEING IN AN AREA WHERE
LIGHTNING IS EXPECTED TO OCCUR.  BEFORE HEADING OUT...GET AN UPDATED
FORECAST. STAY TUNED TO NOAA WEATHER RADIO...CHECK NATIONAL WEATHER
SERVICE WEB SITES...OR ACCESS YOUR FAVORITE WEATHER APPS ON YOUR
CELL PHONE FOR THE LATEST FORECAST.

IN COLORADO...IT IS IMPORTANT TO REMEMBER THAT THUNDERSTORMS
TYPICALLY DEVELOP IN THE MOUNTAINS AFTER 11 AM.  SO IT IS BEST TO
PLAN YOUR CLIMBING OR HIKING TRIP SO THAT YOU ARE COMING DOWN THE
MOUNTAIN BY LATE MORNING.

IF THUNDERSTORMS ARE IN THE FORECAST...CONSIDER PLANNING AN
ALTERNATE INDOOR ACTIVITY OR MAKE PLANS WHICH WILL ALLOW YOU TO
QUICKLY GET INTO A SAFE SHELTER.

ONCE YOU ARE OUTSIDE...KEEP UP-TO-DATE ON THE WEATHER VIA YOUR SMART
PHONE OR PORTABLE NOAA WEATHER RADIO RECEIVER. CHECK FOR UPDATED
FORECASTS. CHECK IF STORMS ARE NEAR YOU BY CHECKING THE LATEST RADAR
IMAGERY ON YOUR CELL PHONE. THERE ARE NOW SEVERAL SMART PHONE APPS
YOU CAN PURCHASE THAT SHOW YOU REAL-TIME LIGHTNING ACTIVITY IN YOUR
AREA. DO NOT FORGET TO SIMPLY LOOK AROUND YOU TO MAKE SURE STORMS
ARE NOT DEVELOPING IN YOUR VICINITY.

WE WILL NOW DISCUSS TWO OUTDOOR SCENARIOS. THE FIRST IS WHAT TO DO
IF YOU ARE OUTDOORS AND A SAFE LOCATION IS NEARBY...WHILE THE SECOND
SCENARIO IS WHAT TO DO IF YOU ARE OUTDOORS AND NO SAFE LOCATION IS
NEARBY.

IF YOU ARE OUTSIDE...SUCH AS A PARK...A LAKE...OR AN OUTDOOR
SPORTING EVENT...KNOW WHERE THE NEAREST SAFE LOCATION IS LOCATED AT.
A SAFE LOCATION IS ANY SUBSTANTIAL BUILDING...SUCH AS A BUSINESS...A
HOME...OR A CHURCH. ANY ENCLOSED HARD TOPPED AUTOMOBILE ALSO OFFERS
EXCELLENT PROTECTION FROM LIGHTNING. ONCE YOU HEAR THUNDER OR SEE
LIGHTNING...IMMEDIATELY STOP WHAT YOU ARE DOING AND QUICKLY GET TO
THE SAFE SHELTER. DO NOT WAIT UNTIL THE RAIN STARTS TO SEEK SAFE
SHELTER. ONCE INSIDE A SAFE SHELTER...IT IS RECOMMENDED YOU STAY
THERE FOR 30 MINUTES AFTER THE LAST RUMBLE OF THUNDER.

PAST HISTORY HAS SHOWN THAT MOST PEOPLE WHO WERE OUTDOORS AND WERE
INJURED OR KILLED BY LIGHTNING HAD ACCESS TO A SAFE SHELTER NEARBY.
DO NOT WAIT TO SEEK SAFE SHELTER WHEN LIGHTNING THREATENS. WHEN YOU
HEAR THUNDER OR SEE LIGHTNING...IT IS IMPORTANT FOR YOU...AND YOUR
FAMILY...TO ACT QUICKLY.

IT IS CRITICALLY IMPORTANT TO AVOID SHELTERS THAT ARE NOT SAFE FROM
LIGHTNING...INCLUDING PICNIC SHELTERS...BULLPENS...TENTS AND ANY
OTHER SMALL BUILDINGS THAT ARE OPEN TO THE ELEMENTS.
NEVER...NEVER...GET UNDER A TREE TO SEEK SHELTER FROM LIGHTNING.

IT IS IMPORTANT THAT ALL SPORTS LEAGUES AND OTHER OUTDOOR GROUPS
HAVE A LIGHTNING RESPONSE PLAN THAT IS UNDERSTOOD AND CONSISTENTLY
APPLIED FOR THE SAFETY OF THE PARTICIPANTS. PART OF THE PLAN WOULD
INCLUDE A DESIGNATED WEATHER WATCHER AT EACH OUTDOOR EVENT WITH THE
AUTHORITY TO POSTPONE OR CANCEL THE EVENT DUE TO THE THREAT OF
LIGHTNING. IT IS ALSO IMPORTANT THAT PEOPLE KNOW WHERE TO SEEK SAFE
SHELTER IF A STORM THREATENS. AS WE HAVE SEEN RECENTLY...THE
NCAA...THE NFL AND MLB NOW DELAY GAMES WHEN LIGHTNING IS IN THE
AREA.

OUR SECOND SCENARIO INVOLVES WHAT YOU CAN DO TO REDUCE YOUR CHANCES
OF BEING INJURED OR KILLED BY LIGHTING IF NO SAFE SHELTER IS NEARBY.
THIS SITUATION TYPICALLY OCCURS TO PEOPLE WHO ARE HIKING OR CAMPING
IN THE BACKCOUNTRY. UNFORTUNATELY...IN THIS SCENARIO...THERE IS NOT
MUCH YOU CAN DO TO REDUCE YOUR RISK FROM BEING STRUCK BY LIGHTNING.
THE BEST THING TO DO IS MOVE AWAY FROM TALL ISOLATED OBJECTS...SUCH
AS TREES. STAY AWAY FROM WIDE OPEN AREAS. STAY AS LOW AS POSSIBLE
WITH YOUR FEET CLOSE TOGETHER IF LIGHTNING IS NEARBY. IF YOU ARE
WITH A GROUP OF PEOPLE...SPREAD OUT...THAT WAY IF SOMEONE IS STRUCK
BY LIGHTNING...THE OTHERS CAN OFFER FIRST AID. IF CAMPING IN THE
BACKCOUNTRY...PLACE YOUR TENT IN A LOW AREA AWAY FROM TALL ISOLATED
TREES.

REMEMBER...WHEN THUNDER ROARS...GO INDOORS!

THERE ARE A COUPLE OF WEB SITES THAT CONTAIN ADDITIONAL LIGHTNING
INFORMATION.

NOAAS LIGHTNING WEBSITE WHICH CONTAINS ABUNDANT INFORMATION ON
LIGHTNING SAFETY CAN BE FOUND AT...

WWW.LIGHTNINGSAFETY.NOAA.GOV

LIGHTNING INFORMATION SPECIFIC FOR THE STATE OF COLORADO CAN BE FOUND AT...

WWW.WEATHER.GOV/PUB/LIGHTNING

THE LIGHTNING TOPIC FOR TOMORROW WILL BE ON INDOOR LIGHTNING SAFETY.



000
NOUS45 KBOU 241153
PNSBOU

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE PUEBLO CO
600 AM MDT WED JUN 24 2015

COLORADO LIGHTNING SAFETY WEEK CONTINUES THROUGH SATURDAY. TODAY WE
DISCUSS OUTDOOR LIGHTNING RISK REDUCTION.

OUTDOORS IS THE MOST DANGEROUS PLACE TO BE DURING A THUNDERSTORM.
EACH YEAR...NEARLY ALL PEOPLE IN THE UNITED STATES WHO ARE INJURED
OR KILLED BY LIGHTNING WERE INVOLVED IN AN OUTDOOR ACTIVITY. THEY
WERE STRUCK WHILE WORKING OUTSIDE...WERE AT OR PARTICIPATING AT AN
OUTDOOR SPORTING EVENT...WERE BOATING OR FISHING. THEY WERE STRUCK
WHILE HIKING...MOWING THE LAWN OR SIMPLY GOING TO OR FROM THEIR CAR.
QUITE A FEW WERE ON THEIR OWN PROPERTY WHEN THEY WERE STRUCK.

UNFORTUNATELY...THERE IS NO PLACE OUTSIDE THAT IS SAFE FROM
LIGHTNING. THE ONLY SAFE PLACE TO BE WHEN LIGHTNING IS OCCURRING IS
EITHER INSIDE A SUBSTANTIAL BUILDING...OR AN ENCLOSED AUTOMOBILE.

HERE ARE SOME IMPORTANT THINGS TO REMEMBER BEFORE VENTURING
OUTDOORS...

AN INFORMED DECISION WILL HELP YOU AVOID BEING IN AN AREA WHERE
LIGHTNING IS EXPECTED TO OCCUR.  BEFORE HEADING OUT...GET AN UPDATED
FORECAST. STAY TUNED TO NOAA WEATHER RADIO...CHECK NATIONAL WEATHER
SERVICE WEB SITES...OR ACCESS YOUR FAVORITE WEATHER APPS ON YOUR
CELL PHONE FOR THE LATEST FORECAST.

IN COLORADO...IT IS IMPORTANT TO REMEMBER THAT THUNDERSTORMS
TYPICALLY DEVELOP IN THE MOUNTAINS AFTER 11 AM.  SO IT IS BEST TO
PLAN YOUR CLIMBING OR HIKING TRIP SO THAT YOU ARE COMING DOWN THE
MOUNTAIN BY LATE MORNING.

IF THUNDERSTORMS ARE IN THE FORECAST...CONSIDER PLANNING AN
ALTERNATE INDOOR ACTIVITY OR MAKE PLANS WHICH WILL ALLOW YOU TO
QUICKLY GET INTO A SAFE SHELTER.

ONCE YOU ARE OUTSIDE...KEEP UP-TO-DATE ON THE WEATHER VIA YOUR SMART
PHONE OR PORTABLE NOAA WEATHER RADIO RECEIVER. CHECK FOR UPDATED
FORECASTS. CHECK IF STORMS ARE NEAR YOU BY CHECKING THE LATEST RADAR
IMAGERY ON YOUR CELL PHONE. THERE ARE NOW SEVERAL SMART PHONE APPS
YOU CAN PURCHASE THAT SHOW YOU REAL-TIME LIGHTNING ACTIVITY IN YOUR
AREA. DO NOT FORGET TO SIMPLY LOOK AROUND YOU TO MAKE SURE STORMS
ARE NOT DEVELOPING IN YOUR VICINITY.

WE WILL NOW DISCUSS TWO OUTDOOR SCENARIOS. THE FIRST IS WHAT TO DO
IF YOU ARE OUTDOORS AND A SAFE LOCATION IS NEARBY...WHILE THE SECOND
SCENARIO IS WHAT TO DO IF YOU ARE OUTDOORS AND NO SAFE LOCATION IS
NEARBY.

IF YOU ARE OUTSIDE...SUCH AS A PARK...A LAKE...OR AN OUTDOOR
SPORTING EVENT...KNOW WHERE THE NEAREST SAFE LOCATION IS LOCATED AT.
A SAFE LOCATION IS ANY SUBSTANTIAL BUILDING...SUCH AS A BUSINESS...A
HOME...OR A CHURCH. ANY ENCLOSED HARD TOPPED AUTOMOBILE ALSO OFFERS
EXCELLENT PROTECTION FROM LIGHTNING. ONCE YOU HEAR THUNDER OR SEE
LIGHTNING...IMMEDIATELY STOP WHAT YOU ARE DOING AND QUICKLY GET TO
THE SAFE SHELTER. DO NOT WAIT UNTIL THE RAIN STARTS TO SEEK SAFE
SHELTER. ONCE INSIDE A SAFE SHELTER...IT IS RECOMMENDED YOU STAY
THERE FOR 30 MINUTES AFTER THE LAST RUMBLE OF THUNDER.

PAST HISTORY HAS SHOWN THAT MOST PEOPLE WHO WERE OUTDOORS AND WERE
INJURED OR KILLED BY LIGHTNING HAD ACCESS TO A SAFE SHELTER NEARBY.
DO NOT WAIT TO SEEK SAFE SHELTER WHEN LIGHTNING THREATENS. WHEN YOU
HEAR THUNDER OR SEE LIGHTNING...IT IS IMPORTANT FOR YOU...AND YOUR
FAMILY...TO ACT QUICKLY.

IT IS CRITICALLY IMPORTANT TO AVOID SHELTERS THAT ARE NOT SAFE FROM
LIGHTNING...INCLUDING PICNIC SHELTERS...BULLPENS...TENTS AND ANY
OTHER SMALL BUILDINGS THAT ARE OPEN TO THE ELEMENTS.
NEVER...NEVER...GET UNDER A TREE TO SEEK SHELTER FROM LIGHTNING.

IT IS IMPORTANT THAT ALL SPORTS LEAGUES AND OTHER OUTDOOR GROUPS
HAVE A LIGHTNING RESPONSE PLAN THAT IS UNDERSTOOD AND CONSISTENTLY
APPLIED FOR THE SAFETY OF THE PARTICIPANTS. PART OF THE PLAN WOULD
INCLUDE A DESIGNATED WEATHER WATCHER AT EACH OUTDOOR EVENT WITH THE
AUTHORITY TO POSTPONE OR CANCEL THE EVENT DUE TO THE THREAT OF
LIGHTNING. IT IS ALSO IMPORTANT THAT PEOPLE KNOW WHERE TO SEEK SAFE
SHELTER IF A STORM THREATENS. AS WE HAVE SEEN RECENTLY...THE
NCAA...THE NFL AND MLB NOW DELAY GAMES WHEN LIGHTNING IS IN THE
AREA.

OUR SECOND SCENARIO INVOLVES WHAT YOU CAN DO TO REDUCE YOUR CHANCES
OF BEING INJURED OR KILLED BY LIGHTING IF NO SAFE SHELTER IS NEARBY.
THIS SITUATION TYPICALLY OCCURS TO PEOPLE WHO ARE HIKING OR CAMPING
IN THE BACKCOUNTRY. UNFORTUNATELY...IN THIS SCENARIO...THERE IS NOT
MUCH YOU CAN DO TO REDUCE YOUR RISK FROM BEING STRUCK BY LIGHTNING.
THE BEST THING TO DO IS MOVE AWAY FROM TALL ISOLATED OBJECTS...SUCH
AS TREES. STAY AWAY FROM WIDE OPEN AREAS. STAY AS LOW AS POSSIBLE
WITH YOUR FEET CLOSE TOGETHER IF LIGHTNING IS NEARBY. IF YOU ARE
WITH A GROUP OF PEOPLE...SPREAD OUT...THAT WAY IF SOMEONE IS STRUCK
BY LIGHTNING...THE OTHERS CAN OFFER FIRST AID. IF CAMPING IN THE
BACKCOUNTRY...PLACE YOUR TENT IN A LOW AREA AWAY FROM TALL ISOLATED
TREES.

REMEMBER...WHEN THUNDER ROARS...GO INDOORS!

THERE ARE A COUPLE OF WEB SITES THAT CONTAIN ADDITIONAL LIGHTNING
INFORMATION.

NOAAS LIGHTNING WEBSITE WHICH CONTAINS ABUNDANT INFORMATION ON
LIGHTNING SAFETY CAN BE FOUND AT...

WWW.LIGHTNINGSAFETY.NOAA.GOV

LIGHTNING INFORMATION SPECIFIC FOR THE STATE OF COLORADO CAN BE FOUND AT...

WWW.WEATHER.GOV/PUB/LIGHTNING

THE LIGHTNING TOPIC FOR TOMORROW WILL BE ON INDOOR LIGHTNING SAFETY.



000
NOUS45 KBOU 241153
PNSBOU

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE PUEBLO CO
600 AM MDT WED JUN 24 2015

COLORADO LIGHTNING SAFETY WEEK CONTINUES THROUGH SATURDAY. TODAY WE
DISCUSS OUTDOOR LIGHTNING RISK REDUCTION.

OUTDOORS IS THE MOST DANGEROUS PLACE TO BE DURING A THUNDERSTORM.
EACH YEAR...NEARLY ALL PEOPLE IN THE UNITED STATES WHO ARE INJURED
OR KILLED BY LIGHTNING WERE INVOLVED IN AN OUTDOOR ACTIVITY. THEY
WERE STRUCK WHILE WORKING OUTSIDE...WERE AT OR PARTICIPATING AT AN
OUTDOOR SPORTING EVENT...WERE BOATING OR FISHING. THEY WERE STRUCK
WHILE HIKING...MOWING THE LAWN OR SIMPLY GOING TO OR FROM THEIR CAR.
QUITE A FEW WERE ON THEIR OWN PROPERTY WHEN THEY WERE STRUCK.

UNFORTUNATELY...THERE IS NO PLACE OUTSIDE THAT IS SAFE FROM
LIGHTNING. THE ONLY SAFE PLACE TO BE WHEN LIGHTNING IS OCCURRING IS
EITHER INSIDE A SUBSTANTIAL BUILDING...OR AN ENCLOSED AUTOMOBILE.

HERE ARE SOME IMPORTANT THINGS TO REMEMBER BEFORE VENTURING
OUTDOORS...

AN INFORMED DECISION WILL HELP YOU AVOID BEING IN AN AREA WHERE
LIGHTNING IS EXPECTED TO OCCUR.  BEFORE HEADING OUT...GET AN UPDATED
FORECAST. STAY TUNED TO NOAA WEATHER RADIO...CHECK NATIONAL WEATHER
SERVICE WEB SITES...OR ACCESS YOUR FAVORITE WEATHER APPS ON YOUR
CELL PHONE FOR THE LATEST FORECAST.

IN COLORADO...IT IS IMPORTANT TO REMEMBER THAT THUNDERSTORMS
TYPICALLY DEVELOP IN THE MOUNTAINS AFTER 11 AM.  SO IT IS BEST TO
PLAN YOUR CLIMBING OR HIKING TRIP SO THAT YOU ARE COMING DOWN THE
MOUNTAIN BY LATE MORNING.

IF THUNDERSTORMS ARE IN THE FORECAST...CONSIDER PLANNING AN
ALTERNATE INDOOR ACTIVITY OR MAKE PLANS WHICH WILL ALLOW YOU TO
QUICKLY GET INTO A SAFE SHELTER.

ONCE YOU ARE OUTSIDE...KEEP UP-TO-DATE ON THE WEATHER VIA YOUR SMART
PHONE OR PORTABLE NOAA WEATHER RADIO RECEIVER. CHECK FOR UPDATED
FORECASTS. CHECK IF STORMS ARE NEAR YOU BY CHECKING THE LATEST RADAR
IMAGERY ON YOUR CELL PHONE. THERE ARE NOW SEVERAL SMART PHONE APPS
YOU CAN PURCHASE THAT SHOW YOU REAL-TIME LIGHTNING ACTIVITY IN YOUR
AREA. DO NOT FORGET TO SIMPLY LOOK AROUND YOU TO MAKE SURE STORMS
ARE NOT DEVELOPING IN YOUR VICINITY.

WE WILL NOW DISCUSS TWO OUTDOOR SCENARIOS. THE FIRST IS WHAT TO DO
IF YOU ARE OUTDOORS AND A SAFE LOCATION IS NEARBY...WHILE THE SECOND
SCENARIO IS WHAT TO DO IF YOU ARE OUTDOORS AND NO SAFE LOCATION IS
NEARBY.

IF YOU ARE OUTSIDE...SUCH AS A PARK...A LAKE...OR AN OUTDOOR
SPORTING EVENT...KNOW WHERE THE NEAREST SAFE LOCATION IS LOCATED AT.
A SAFE LOCATION IS ANY SUBSTANTIAL BUILDING...SUCH AS A BUSINESS...A
HOME...OR A CHURCH. ANY ENCLOSED HARD TOPPED AUTOMOBILE ALSO OFFERS
EXCELLENT PROTECTION FROM LIGHTNING. ONCE YOU HEAR THUNDER OR SEE
LIGHTNING...IMMEDIATELY STOP WHAT YOU ARE DOING AND QUICKLY GET TO
THE SAFE SHELTER. DO NOT WAIT UNTIL THE RAIN STARTS TO SEEK SAFE
SHELTER. ONCE INSIDE A SAFE SHELTER...IT IS RECOMMENDED YOU STAY
THERE FOR 30 MINUTES AFTER THE LAST RUMBLE OF THUNDER.

PAST HISTORY HAS SHOWN THAT MOST PEOPLE WHO WERE OUTDOORS AND WERE
INJURED OR KILLED BY LIGHTNING HAD ACCESS TO A SAFE SHELTER NEARBY.
DO NOT WAIT TO SEEK SAFE SHELTER WHEN LIGHTNING THREATENS. WHEN YOU
HEAR THUNDER OR SEE LIGHTNING...IT IS IMPORTANT FOR YOU...AND YOUR
FAMILY...TO ACT QUICKLY.

IT IS CRITICALLY IMPORTANT TO AVOID SHELTERS THAT ARE NOT SAFE FROM
LIGHTNING...INCLUDING PICNIC SHELTERS...BULLPENS...TENTS AND ANY
OTHER SMALL BUILDINGS THAT ARE OPEN TO THE ELEMENTS.
NEVER...NEVER...GET UNDER A TREE TO SEEK SHELTER FROM LIGHTNING.

IT IS IMPORTANT THAT ALL SPORTS LEAGUES AND OTHER OUTDOOR GROUPS
HAVE A LIGHTNING RESPONSE PLAN THAT IS UNDERSTOOD AND CONSISTENTLY
APPLIED FOR THE SAFETY OF THE PARTICIPANTS. PART OF THE PLAN WOULD
INCLUDE A DESIGNATED WEATHER WATCHER AT EACH OUTDOOR EVENT WITH THE
AUTHORITY TO POSTPONE OR CANCEL THE EVENT DUE TO THE THREAT OF
LIGHTNING. IT IS ALSO IMPORTANT THAT PEOPLE KNOW WHERE TO SEEK SAFE
SHELTER IF A STORM THREATENS. AS WE HAVE SEEN RECENTLY...THE
NCAA...THE NFL AND MLB NOW DELAY GAMES WHEN LIGHTNING IS IN THE
AREA.

OUR SECOND SCENARIO INVOLVES WHAT YOU CAN DO TO REDUCE YOUR CHANCES
OF BEING INJURED OR KILLED BY LIGHTING IF NO SAFE SHELTER IS NEARBY.
THIS SITUATION TYPICALLY OCCURS TO PEOPLE WHO ARE HIKING OR CAMPING
IN THE BACKCOUNTRY. UNFORTUNATELY...IN THIS SCENARIO...THERE IS NOT
MUCH YOU CAN DO TO REDUCE YOUR RISK FROM BEING STRUCK BY LIGHTNING.
THE BEST THING TO DO IS MOVE AWAY FROM TALL ISOLATED OBJECTS...SUCH
AS TREES. STAY AWAY FROM WIDE OPEN AREAS. STAY AS LOW AS POSSIBLE
WITH YOUR FEET CLOSE TOGETHER IF LIGHTNING IS NEARBY. IF YOU ARE
WITH A GROUP OF PEOPLE...SPREAD OUT...THAT WAY IF SOMEONE IS STRUCK
BY LIGHTNING...THE OTHERS CAN OFFER FIRST AID. IF CAMPING IN THE
BACKCOUNTRY...PLACE YOUR TENT IN A LOW AREA AWAY FROM TALL ISOLATED
TREES.

REMEMBER...WHEN THUNDER ROARS...GO INDOORS!

THERE ARE A COUPLE OF WEB SITES THAT CONTAIN ADDITIONAL LIGHTNING
INFORMATION.

NOAAS LIGHTNING WEBSITE WHICH CONTAINS ABUNDANT INFORMATION ON
LIGHTNING SAFETY CAN BE FOUND AT...

WWW.LIGHTNINGSAFETY.NOAA.GOV

LIGHTNING INFORMATION SPECIFIC FOR THE STATE OF COLORADO CAN BE FOUND AT...

WWW.WEATHER.GOV/PUB/LIGHTNING

THE LIGHTNING TOPIC FOR TOMORROW WILL BE ON INDOOR LIGHTNING SAFETY.



000
NOUS45 KBOU 241153
PNSBOU

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE PUEBLO CO
600 AM MDT WED JUN 24 2015

COLORADO LIGHTNING SAFETY WEEK CONTINUES THROUGH SATURDAY. TODAY WE
DISCUSS OUTDOOR LIGHTNING RISK REDUCTION.

OUTDOORS IS THE MOST DANGEROUS PLACE TO BE DURING A THUNDERSTORM.
EACH YEAR...NEARLY ALL PEOPLE IN THE UNITED STATES WHO ARE INJURED
OR KILLED BY LIGHTNING WERE INVOLVED IN AN OUTDOOR ACTIVITY. THEY
WERE STRUCK WHILE WORKING OUTSIDE...WERE AT OR PARTICIPATING AT AN
OUTDOOR SPORTING EVENT...WERE BOATING OR FISHING. THEY WERE STRUCK
WHILE HIKING...MOWING THE LAWN OR SIMPLY GOING TO OR FROM THEIR CAR.
QUITE A FEW WERE ON THEIR OWN PROPERTY WHEN THEY WERE STRUCK.

UNFORTUNATELY...THERE IS NO PLACE OUTSIDE THAT IS SAFE FROM
LIGHTNING. THE ONLY SAFE PLACE TO BE WHEN LIGHTNING IS OCCURRING IS
EITHER INSIDE A SUBSTANTIAL BUILDING...OR AN ENCLOSED AUTOMOBILE.

HERE ARE SOME IMPORTANT THINGS TO REMEMBER BEFORE VENTURING
OUTDOORS...

AN INFORMED DECISION WILL HELP YOU AVOID BEING IN AN AREA WHERE
LIGHTNING IS EXPECTED TO OCCUR.  BEFORE HEADING OUT...GET AN UPDATED
FORECAST. STAY TUNED TO NOAA WEATHER RADIO...CHECK NATIONAL WEATHER
SERVICE WEB SITES...OR ACCESS YOUR FAVORITE WEATHER APPS ON YOUR
CELL PHONE FOR THE LATEST FORECAST.

IN COLORADO...IT IS IMPORTANT TO REMEMBER THAT THUNDERSTORMS
TYPICALLY DEVELOP IN THE MOUNTAINS AFTER 11 AM.  SO IT IS BEST TO
PLAN YOUR CLIMBING OR HIKING TRIP SO THAT YOU ARE COMING DOWN THE
MOUNTAIN BY LATE MORNING.

IF THUNDERSTORMS ARE IN THE FORECAST...CONSIDER PLANNING AN
ALTERNATE INDOOR ACTIVITY OR MAKE PLANS WHICH WILL ALLOW YOU TO
QUICKLY GET INTO A SAFE SHELTER.

ONCE YOU ARE OUTSIDE...KEEP UP-TO-DATE ON THE WEATHER VIA YOUR SMART
PHONE OR PORTABLE NOAA WEATHER RADIO RECEIVER. CHECK FOR UPDATED
FORECASTS. CHECK IF STORMS ARE NEAR YOU BY CHECKING THE LATEST RADAR
IMAGERY ON YOUR CELL PHONE. THERE ARE NOW SEVERAL SMART PHONE APPS
YOU CAN PURCHASE THAT SHOW YOU REAL-TIME LIGHTNING ACTIVITY IN YOUR
AREA. DO NOT FORGET TO SIMPLY LOOK AROUND YOU TO MAKE SURE STORMS
ARE NOT DEVELOPING IN YOUR VICINITY.

WE WILL NOW DISCUSS TWO OUTDOOR SCENARIOS. THE FIRST IS WHAT TO DO
IF YOU ARE OUTDOORS AND A SAFE LOCATION IS NEARBY...WHILE THE SECOND
SCENARIO IS WHAT TO DO IF YOU ARE OUTDOORS AND NO SAFE LOCATION IS
NEARBY.

IF YOU ARE OUTSIDE...SUCH AS A PARK...A LAKE...OR AN OUTDOOR
SPORTING EVENT...KNOW WHERE THE NEAREST SAFE LOCATION IS LOCATED AT.
A SAFE LOCATION IS ANY SUBSTANTIAL BUILDING...SUCH AS A BUSINESS...A
HOME...OR A CHURCH. ANY ENCLOSED HARD TOPPED AUTOMOBILE ALSO OFFERS
EXCELLENT PROTECTION FROM LIGHTNING. ONCE YOU HEAR THUNDER OR SEE
LIGHTNING...IMMEDIATELY STOP WHAT YOU ARE DOING AND QUICKLY GET TO
THE SAFE SHELTER. DO NOT WAIT UNTIL THE RAIN STARTS TO SEEK SAFE
SHELTER. ONCE INSIDE A SAFE SHELTER...IT IS RECOMMENDED YOU STAY
THERE FOR 30 MINUTES AFTER THE LAST RUMBLE OF THUNDER.

PAST HISTORY HAS SHOWN THAT MOST PEOPLE WHO WERE OUTDOORS AND WERE
INJURED OR KILLED BY LIGHTNING HAD ACCESS TO A SAFE SHELTER NEARBY.
DO NOT WAIT TO SEEK SAFE SHELTER WHEN LIGHTNING THREATENS. WHEN YOU
HEAR THUNDER OR SEE LIGHTNING...IT IS IMPORTANT FOR YOU...AND YOUR
FAMILY...TO ACT QUICKLY.

IT IS CRITICALLY IMPORTANT TO AVOID SHELTERS THAT ARE NOT SAFE FROM
LIGHTNING...INCLUDING PICNIC SHELTERS...BULLPENS...TENTS AND ANY
OTHER SMALL BUILDINGS THAT ARE OPEN TO THE ELEMENTS.
NEVER...NEVER...GET UNDER A TREE TO SEEK SHELTER FROM LIGHTNING.

IT IS IMPORTANT THAT ALL SPORTS LEAGUES AND OTHER OUTDOOR GROUPS
HAVE A LIGHTNING RESPONSE PLAN THAT IS UNDERSTOOD AND CONSISTENTLY
APPLIED FOR THE SAFETY OF THE PARTICIPANTS. PART OF THE PLAN WOULD
INCLUDE A DESIGNATED WEATHER WATCHER AT EACH OUTDOOR EVENT WITH THE
AUTHORITY TO POSTPONE OR CANCEL THE EVENT DUE TO THE THREAT OF
LIGHTNING. IT IS ALSO IMPORTANT THAT PEOPLE KNOW WHERE TO SEEK SAFE
SHELTER IF A STORM THREATENS. AS WE HAVE SEEN RECENTLY...THE
NCAA...THE NFL AND MLB NOW DELAY GAMES WHEN LIGHTNING IS IN THE
AREA.

OUR SECOND SCENARIO INVOLVES WHAT YOU CAN DO TO REDUCE YOUR CHANCES
OF BEING INJURED OR KILLED BY LIGHTING IF NO SAFE SHELTER IS NEARBY.
THIS SITUATION TYPICALLY OCCURS TO PEOPLE WHO ARE HIKING OR CAMPING
IN THE BACKCOUNTRY. UNFORTUNATELY...IN THIS SCENARIO...THERE IS NOT
MUCH YOU CAN DO TO REDUCE YOUR RISK FROM BEING STRUCK BY LIGHTNING.
THE BEST THING TO DO IS MOVE AWAY FROM TALL ISOLATED OBJECTS...SUCH
AS TREES. STAY AWAY FROM WIDE OPEN AREAS. STAY AS LOW AS POSSIBLE
WITH YOUR FEET CLOSE TOGETHER IF LIGHTNING IS NEARBY. IF YOU ARE
WITH A GROUP OF PEOPLE...SPREAD OUT...THAT WAY IF SOMEONE IS STRUCK
BY LIGHTNING...THE OTHERS CAN OFFER FIRST AID. IF CAMPING IN THE
BACKCOUNTRY...PLACE YOUR TENT IN A LOW AREA AWAY FROM TALL ISOLATED
TREES.

REMEMBER...WHEN THUNDER ROARS...GO INDOORS!

THERE ARE A COUPLE OF WEB SITES THAT CONTAIN ADDITIONAL LIGHTNING
INFORMATION.

NOAAS LIGHTNING WEBSITE WHICH CONTAINS ABUNDANT INFORMATION ON
LIGHTNING SAFETY CAN BE FOUND AT...

WWW.LIGHTNINGSAFETY.NOAA.GOV

LIGHTNING INFORMATION SPECIFIC FOR THE STATE OF COLORADO CAN BE FOUND AT...

WWW.WEATHER.GOV/PUB/LIGHTNING

THE LIGHTNING TOPIC FOR TOMORROW WILL BE ON INDOOR LIGHTNING SAFETY.



000
NOUS45 KBOU 241153
PNSBOU

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE PUEBLO CO
600 AM MDT WED JUN 24 2015

COLORADO LIGHTNING SAFETY WEEK CONTINUES THROUGH SATURDAY. TODAY WE
DISCUSS OUTDOOR LIGHTNING RISK REDUCTION.

OUTDOORS IS THE MOST DANGEROUS PLACE TO BE DURING A THUNDERSTORM.
EACH YEAR...NEARLY ALL PEOPLE IN THE UNITED STATES WHO ARE INJURED
OR KILLED BY LIGHTNING WERE INVOLVED IN AN OUTDOOR ACTIVITY. THEY
WERE STRUCK WHILE WORKING OUTSIDE...WERE AT OR PARTICIPATING AT AN
OUTDOOR SPORTING EVENT...WERE BOATING OR FISHING. THEY WERE STRUCK
WHILE HIKING...MOWING THE LAWN OR SIMPLY GOING TO OR FROM THEIR CAR.
QUITE A FEW WERE ON THEIR OWN PROPERTY WHEN THEY WERE STRUCK.

UNFORTUNATELY...THERE IS NO PLACE OUTSIDE THAT IS SAFE FROM
LIGHTNING. THE ONLY SAFE PLACE TO BE WHEN LIGHTNING IS OCCURRING IS
EITHER INSIDE A SUBSTANTIAL BUILDING...OR AN ENCLOSED AUTOMOBILE.

HERE ARE SOME IMPORTANT THINGS TO REMEMBER BEFORE VENTURING
OUTDOORS...

AN INFORMED DECISION WILL HELP YOU AVOID BEING IN AN AREA WHERE
LIGHTNING IS EXPECTED TO OCCUR.  BEFORE HEADING OUT...GET AN UPDATED
FORECAST. STAY TUNED TO NOAA WEATHER RADIO...CHECK NATIONAL WEATHER
SERVICE WEB SITES...OR ACCESS YOUR FAVORITE WEATHER APPS ON YOUR
CELL PHONE FOR THE LATEST FORECAST.

IN COLORADO...IT IS IMPORTANT TO REMEMBER THAT THUNDERSTORMS
TYPICALLY DEVELOP IN THE MOUNTAINS AFTER 11 AM.  SO IT IS BEST TO
PLAN YOUR CLIMBING OR HIKING TRIP SO THAT YOU ARE COMING DOWN THE
MOUNTAIN BY LATE MORNING.

IF THUNDERSTORMS ARE IN THE FORECAST...CONSIDER PLANNING AN
ALTERNATE INDOOR ACTIVITY OR MAKE PLANS WHICH WILL ALLOW YOU TO
QUICKLY GET INTO A SAFE SHELTER.

ONCE YOU ARE OUTSIDE...KEEP UP-TO-DATE ON THE WEATHER VIA YOUR SMART
PHONE OR PORTABLE NOAA WEATHER RADIO RECEIVER. CHECK FOR UPDATED
FORECASTS. CHECK IF STORMS ARE NEAR YOU BY CHECKING THE LATEST RADAR
IMAGERY ON YOUR CELL PHONE. THERE ARE NOW SEVERAL SMART PHONE APPS
YOU CAN PURCHASE THAT SHOW YOU REAL-TIME LIGHTNING ACTIVITY IN YOUR
AREA. DO NOT FORGET TO SIMPLY LOOK AROUND YOU TO MAKE SURE STORMS
ARE NOT DEVELOPING IN YOUR VICINITY.

WE WILL NOW DISCUSS TWO OUTDOOR SCENARIOS. THE FIRST IS WHAT TO DO
IF YOU ARE OUTDOORS AND A SAFE LOCATION IS NEARBY...WHILE THE SECOND
SCENARIO IS WHAT TO DO IF YOU ARE OUTDOORS AND NO SAFE LOCATION IS
NEARBY.

IF YOU ARE OUTSIDE...SUCH AS A PARK...A LAKE...OR AN OUTDOOR
SPORTING EVENT...KNOW WHERE THE NEAREST SAFE LOCATION IS LOCATED AT.
A SAFE LOCATION IS ANY SUBSTANTIAL BUILDING...SUCH AS A BUSINESS...A
HOME...OR A CHURCH. ANY ENCLOSED HARD TOPPED AUTOMOBILE ALSO OFFERS
EXCELLENT PROTECTION FROM LIGHTNING. ONCE YOU HEAR THUNDER OR SEE
LIGHTNING...IMMEDIATELY STOP WHAT YOU ARE DOING AND QUICKLY GET TO
THE SAFE SHELTER. DO NOT WAIT UNTIL THE RAIN STARTS TO SEEK SAFE
SHELTER. ONCE INSIDE A SAFE SHELTER...IT IS RECOMMENDED YOU STAY
THERE FOR 30 MINUTES AFTER THE LAST RUMBLE OF THUNDER.

PAST HISTORY HAS SHOWN THAT MOST PEOPLE WHO WERE OUTDOORS AND WERE
INJURED OR KILLED BY LIGHTNING HAD ACCESS TO A SAFE SHELTER NEARBY.
DO NOT WAIT TO SEEK SAFE SHELTER WHEN LIGHTNING THREATENS. WHEN YOU
HEAR THUNDER OR SEE LIGHTNING...IT IS IMPORTANT FOR YOU...AND YOUR
FAMILY...TO ACT QUICKLY.

IT IS CRITICALLY IMPORTANT TO AVOID SHELTERS THAT ARE NOT SAFE FROM
LIGHTNING...INCLUDING PICNIC SHELTERS...BULLPENS...TENTS AND ANY
OTHER SMALL BUILDINGS THAT ARE OPEN TO THE ELEMENTS.
NEVER...NEVER...GET UNDER A TREE TO SEEK SHELTER FROM LIGHTNING.

IT IS IMPORTANT THAT ALL SPORTS LEAGUES AND OTHER OUTDOOR GROUPS
HAVE A LIGHTNING RESPONSE PLAN THAT IS UNDERSTOOD AND CONSISTENTLY
APPLIED FOR THE SAFETY OF THE PARTICIPANTS. PART OF THE PLAN WOULD
INCLUDE A DESIGNATED WEATHER WATCHER AT EACH OUTDOOR EVENT WITH THE
AUTHORITY TO POSTPONE OR CANCEL THE EVENT DUE TO THE THREAT OF
LIGHTNING. IT IS ALSO IMPORTANT THAT PEOPLE KNOW WHERE TO SEEK SAFE
SHELTER IF A STORM THREATENS. AS WE HAVE SEEN RECENTLY...THE
NCAA...THE NFL AND MLB NOW DELAY GAMES WHEN LIGHTNING IS IN THE
AREA.

OUR SECOND SCENARIO INVOLVES WHAT YOU CAN DO TO REDUCE YOUR CHANCES
OF BEING INJURED OR KILLED BY LIGHTING IF NO SAFE SHELTER IS NEARBY.
THIS SITUATION TYPICALLY OCCURS TO PEOPLE WHO ARE HIKING OR CAMPING
IN THE BACKCOUNTRY. UNFORTUNATELY...IN THIS SCENARIO...THERE IS NOT
MUCH YOU CAN DO TO REDUCE YOUR RISK FROM BEING STRUCK BY LIGHTNING.
THE BEST THING TO DO IS MOVE AWAY FROM TALL ISOLATED OBJECTS...SUCH
AS TREES. STAY AWAY FROM WIDE OPEN AREAS. STAY AS LOW AS POSSIBLE
WITH YOUR FEET CLOSE TOGETHER IF LIGHTNING IS NEARBY. IF YOU ARE
WITH A GROUP OF PEOPLE...SPREAD OUT...THAT WAY IF SOMEONE IS STRUCK
BY LIGHTNING...THE OTHERS CAN OFFER FIRST AID. IF CAMPING IN THE
BACKCOUNTRY...PLACE YOUR TENT IN A LOW AREA AWAY FROM TALL ISOLATED
TREES.

REMEMBER...WHEN THUNDER ROARS...GO INDOORS!

THERE ARE A COUPLE OF WEB SITES THAT CONTAIN ADDITIONAL LIGHTNING
INFORMATION.

NOAAS LIGHTNING WEBSITE WHICH CONTAINS ABUNDANT INFORMATION ON
LIGHTNING SAFETY CAN BE FOUND AT...

WWW.LIGHTNINGSAFETY.NOAA.GOV

LIGHTNING INFORMATION SPECIFIC FOR THE STATE OF COLORADO CAN BE FOUND AT...

WWW.WEATHER.GOV/PUB/LIGHTNING

THE LIGHTNING TOPIC FOR TOMORROW WILL BE ON INDOOR LIGHTNING SAFETY.



000
NOUS45 KBOU 241153
PNSBOU

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE PUEBLO CO
600 AM MDT WED JUN 24 2015

COLORADO LIGHTNING SAFETY WEEK CONTINUES THROUGH SATURDAY. TODAY WE
DISCUSS OUTDOOR LIGHTNING RISK REDUCTION.

OUTDOORS IS THE MOST DANGEROUS PLACE TO BE DURING A THUNDERSTORM.
EACH YEAR...NEARLY ALL PEOPLE IN THE UNITED STATES WHO ARE INJURED
OR KILLED BY LIGHTNING WERE INVOLVED IN AN OUTDOOR ACTIVITY. THEY
WERE STRUCK WHILE WORKING OUTSIDE...WERE AT OR PARTICIPATING AT AN
OUTDOOR SPORTING EVENT...WERE BOATING OR FISHING. THEY WERE STRUCK
WHILE HIKING...MOWING THE LAWN OR SIMPLY GOING TO OR FROM THEIR CAR.
QUITE A FEW WERE ON THEIR OWN PROPERTY WHEN THEY WERE STRUCK.

UNFORTUNATELY...THERE IS NO PLACE OUTSIDE THAT IS SAFE FROM
LIGHTNING. THE ONLY SAFE PLACE TO BE WHEN LIGHTNING IS OCCURRING IS
EITHER INSIDE A SUBSTANTIAL BUILDING...OR AN ENCLOSED AUTOMOBILE.

HERE ARE SOME IMPORTANT THINGS TO REMEMBER BEFORE VENTURING
OUTDOORS...

AN INFORMED DECISION WILL HELP YOU AVOID BEING IN AN AREA WHERE
LIGHTNING IS EXPECTED TO OCCUR.  BEFORE HEADING OUT...GET AN UPDATED
FORECAST. STAY TUNED TO NOAA WEATHER RADIO...CHECK NATIONAL WEATHER
SERVICE WEB SITES...OR ACCESS YOUR FAVORITE WEATHER APPS ON YOUR
CELL PHONE FOR THE LATEST FORECAST.

IN COLORADO...IT IS IMPORTANT TO REMEMBER THAT THUNDERSTORMS
TYPICALLY DEVELOP IN THE MOUNTAINS AFTER 11 AM.  SO IT IS BEST TO
PLAN YOUR CLIMBING OR HIKING TRIP SO THAT YOU ARE COMING DOWN THE
MOUNTAIN BY LATE MORNING.

IF THUNDERSTORMS ARE IN THE FORECAST...CONSIDER PLANNING AN
ALTERNATE INDOOR ACTIVITY OR MAKE PLANS WHICH WILL ALLOW YOU TO
QUICKLY GET INTO A SAFE SHELTER.

ONCE YOU ARE OUTSIDE...KEEP UP-TO-DATE ON THE WEATHER VIA YOUR SMART
PHONE OR PORTABLE NOAA WEATHER RADIO RECEIVER. CHECK FOR UPDATED
FORECASTS. CHECK IF STORMS ARE NEAR YOU BY CHECKING THE LATEST RADAR
IMAGERY ON YOUR CELL PHONE. THERE ARE NOW SEVERAL SMART PHONE APPS
YOU CAN PURCHASE THAT SHOW YOU REAL-TIME LIGHTNING ACTIVITY IN YOUR
AREA. DO NOT FORGET TO SIMPLY LOOK AROUND YOU TO MAKE SURE STORMS
ARE NOT DEVELOPING IN YOUR VICINITY.

WE WILL NOW DISCUSS TWO OUTDOOR SCENARIOS. THE FIRST IS WHAT TO DO
IF YOU ARE OUTDOORS AND A SAFE LOCATION IS NEARBY...WHILE THE SECOND
SCENARIO IS WHAT TO DO IF YOU ARE OUTDOORS AND NO SAFE LOCATION IS
NEARBY.

IF YOU ARE OUTSIDE...SUCH AS A PARK...A LAKE...OR AN OUTDOOR
SPORTING EVENT...KNOW WHERE THE NEAREST SAFE LOCATION IS LOCATED AT.
A SAFE LOCATION IS ANY SUBSTANTIAL BUILDING...SUCH AS A BUSINESS...A
HOME...OR A CHURCH. ANY ENCLOSED HARD TOPPED AUTOMOBILE ALSO OFFERS
EXCELLENT PROTECTION FROM LIGHTNING. ONCE YOU HEAR THUNDER OR SEE
LIGHTNING...IMMEDIATELY STOP WHAT YOU ARE DOING AND QUICKLY GET TO
THE SAFE SHELTER. DO NOT WAIT UNTIL THE RAIN STARTS TO SEEK SAFE
SHELTER. ONCE INSIDE A SAFE SHELTER...IT IS RECOMMENDED YOU STAY
THERE FOR 30 MINUTES AFTER THE LAST RUMBLE OF THUNDER.

PAST HISTORY HAS SHOWN THAT MOST PEOPLE WHO WERE OUTDOORS AND WERE
INJURED OR KILLED BY LIGHTNING HAD ACCESS TO A SAFE SHELTER NEARBY.
DO NOT WAIT TO SEEK SAFE SHELTER WHEN LIGHTNING THREATENS. WHEN YOU
HEAR THUNDER OR SEE LIGHTNING...IT IS IMPORTANT FOR YOU...AND YOUR
FAMILY...TO ACT QUICKLY.

IT IS CRITICALLY IMPORTANT TO AVOID SHELTERS THAT ARE NOT SAFE FROM
LIGHTNING...INCLUDING PICNIC SHELTERS...BULLPENS...TENTS AND ANY
OTHER SMALL BUILDINGS THAT ARE OPEN TO THE ELEMENTS.
NEVER...NEVER...GET UNDER A TREE TO SEEK SHELTER FROM LIGHTNING.

IT IS IMPORTANT THAT ALL SPORTS LEAGUES AND OTHER OUTDOOR GROUPS
HAVE A LIGHTNING RESPONSE PLAN THAT IS UNDERSTOOD AND CONSISTENTLY
APPLIED FOR THE SAFETY OF THE PARTICIPANTS. PART OF THE PLAN WOULD
INCLUDE A DESIGNATED WEATHER WATCHER AT EACH OUTDOOR EVENT WITH THE
AUTHORITY TO POSTPONE OR CANCEL THE EVENT DUE TO THE THREAT OF
LIGHTNING. IT IS ALSO IMPORTANT THAT PEOPLE KNOW WHERE TO SEEK SAFE
SHELTER IF A STORM THREATENS. AS WE HAVE SEEN RECENTLY...THE
NCAA...THE NFL AND MLB NOW DELAY GAMES WHEN LIGHTNING IS IN THE
AREA.

OUR SECOND SCENARIO INVOLVES WHAT YOU CAN DO TO REDUCE YOUR CHANCES
OF BEING INJURED OR KILLED BY LIGHTING IF NO SAFE SHELTER IS NEARBY.
THIS SITUATION TYPICALLY OCCURS TO PEOPLE WHO ARE HIKING OR CAMPING
IN THE BACKCOUNTRY. UNFORTUNATELY...IN THIS SCENARIO...THERE IS NOT
MUCH YOU CAN DO TO REDUCE YOUR RISK FROM BEING STRUCK BY LIGHTNING.
THE BEST THING TO DO IS MOVE AWAY FROM TALL ISOLATED OBJECTS...SUCH
AS TREES. STAY AWAY FROM WIDE OPEN AREAS. STAY AS LOW AS POSSIBLE
WITH YOUR FEET CLOSE TOGETHER IF LIGHTNING IS NEARBY. IF YOU ARE
WITH A GROUP OF PEOPLE...SPREAD OUT...THAT WAY IF SOMEONE IS STRUCK
BY LIGHTNING...THE OTHERS CAN OFFER FIRST AID. IF CAMPING IN THE
BACKCOUNTRY...PLACE YOUR TENT IN A LOW AREA AWAY FROM TALL ISOLATED
TREES.

REMEMBER...WHEN THUNDER ROARS...GO INDOORS!

THERE ARE A COUPLE OF WEB SITES THAT CONTAIN ADDITIONAL LIGHTNING
INFORMATION.

NOAAS LIGHTNING WEBSITE WHICH CONTAINS ABUNDANT INFORMATION ON
LIGHTNING SAFETY CAN BE FOUND AT...

WWW.LIGHTNINGSAFETY.NOAA.GOV

LIGHTNING INFORMATION SPECIFIC FOR THE STATE OF COLORADO CAN BE FOUND AT...

WWW.WEATHER.GOV/PUB/LIGHTNING

THE LIGHTNING TOPIC FOR TOMORROW WILL BE ON INDOOR LIGHTNING SAFETY.



000
NOUS45 KBOU 241153
PNSBOU

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE PUEBLO CO
600 AM MDT WED JUN 24 2015

COLORADO LIGHTNING SAFETY WEEK CONTINUES THROUGH SATURDAY. TODAY WE
DISCUSS OUTDOOR LIGHTNING RISK REDUCTION.

OUTDOORS IS THE MOST DANGEROUS PLACE TO BE DURING A THUNDERSTORM.
EACH YEAR...NEARLY ALL PEOPLE IN THE UNITED STATES WHO ARE INJURED
OR KILLED BY LIGHTNING WERE INVOLVED IN AN OUTDOOR ACTIVITY. THEY
WERE STRUCK WHILE WORKING OUTSIDE...WERE AT OR PARTICIPATING AT AN
OUTDOOR SPORTING EVENT...WERE BOATING OR FISHING. THEY WERE STRUCK
WHILE HIKING...MOWING THE LAWN OR SIMPLY GOING TO OR FROM THEIR CAR.
QUITE A FEW WERE ON THEIR OWN PROPERTY WHEN THEY WERE STRUCK.

UNFORTUNATELY...THERE IS NO PLACE OUTSIDE THAT IS SAFE FROM
LIGHTNING. THE ONLY SAFE PLACE TO BE WHEN LIGHTNING IS OCCURRING IS
EITHER INSIDE A SUBSTANTIAL BUILDING...OR AN ENCLOSED AUTOMOBILE.

HERE ARE SOME IMPORTANT THINGS TO REMEMBER BEFORE VENTURING
OUTDOORS...

AN INFORMED DECISION WILL HELP YOU AVOID BEING IN AN AREA WHERE
LIGHTNING IS EXPECTED TO OCCUR.  BEFORE HEADING OUT...GET AN UPDATED
FORECAST. STAY TUNED TO NOAA WEATHER RADIO...CHECK NATIONAL WEATHER
SERVICE WEB SITES...OR ACCESS YOUR FAVORITE WEATHER APPS ON YOUR
CELL PHONE FOR THE LATEST FORECAST.

IN COLORADO...IT IS IMPORTANT TO REMEMBER THAT THUNDERSTORMS
TYPICALLY DEVELOP IN THE MOUNTAINS AFTER 11 AM.  SO IT IS BEST TO
PLAN YOUR CLIMBING OR HIKING TRIP SO THAT YOU ARE COMING DOWN THE
MOUNTAIN BY LATE MORNING.

IF THUNDERSTORMS ARE IN THE FORECAST...CONSIDER PLANNING AN
ALTERNATE INDOOR ACTIVITY OR MAKE PLANS WHICH WILL ALLOW YOU TO
QUICKLY GET INTO A SAFE SHELTER.

ONCE YOU ARE OUTSIDE...KEEP UP-TO-DATE ON THE WEATHER VIA YOUR SMART
PHONE OR PORTABLE NOAA WEATHER RADIO RECEIVER. CHECK FOR UPDATED
FORECASTS. CHECK IF STORMS ARE NEAR YOU BY CHECKING THE LATEST RADAR
IMAGERY ON YOUR CELL PHONE. THERE ARE NOW SEVERAL SMART PHONE APPS
YOU CAN PURCHASE THAT SHOW YOU REAL-TIME LIGHTNING ACTIVITY IN YOUR
AREA. DO NOT FORGET TO SIMPLY LOOK AROUND YOU TO MAKE SURE STORMS
ARE NOT DEVELOPING IN YOUR VICINITY.

WE WILL NOW DISCUSS TWO OUTDOOR SCENARIOS. THE FIRST IS WHAT TO DO
IF YOU ARE OUTDOORS AND A SAFE LOCATION IS NEARBY...WHILE THE SECOND
SCENARIO IS WHAT TO DO IF YOU ARE OUTDOORS AND NO SAFE LOCATION IS
NEARBY.

IF YOU ARE OUTSIDE...SUCH AS A PARK...A LAKE...OR AN OUTDOOR
SPORTING EVENT...KNOW WHERE THE NEAREST SAFE LOCATION IS LOCATED AT.
A SAFE LOCATION IS ANY SUBSTANTIAL BUILDING...SUCH AS A BUSINESS...A
HOME...OR A CHURCH. ANY ENCLOSED HARD TOPPED AUTOMOBILE ALSO OFFERS
EXCELLENT PROTECTION FROM LIGHTNING. ONCE YOU HEAR THUNDER OR SEE
LIGHTNING...IMMEDIATELY STOP WHAT YOU ARE DOING AND QUICKLY GET TO
THE SAFE SHELTER. DO NOT WAIT UNTIL THE RAIN STARTS TO SEEK SAFE
SHELTER. ONCE INSIDE A SAFE SHELTER...IT IS RECOMMENDED YOU STAY
THERE FOR 30 MINUTES AFTER THE LAST RUMBLE OF THUNDER.

PAST HISTORY HAS SHOWN THAT MOST PEOPLE WHO WERE OUTDOORS AND WERE
INJURED OR KILLED BY LIGHTNING HAD ACCESS TO A SAFE SHELTER NEARBY.
DO NOT WAIT TO SEEK SAFE SHELTER WHEN LIGHTNING THREATENS. WHEN YOU
HEAR THUNDER OR SEE LIGHTNING...IT IS IMPORTANT FOR YOU...AND YOUR
FAMILY...TO ACT QUICKLY.

IT IS CRITICALLY IMPORTANT TO AVOID SHELTERS THAT ARE NOT SAFE FROM
LIGHTNING...INCLUDING PICNIC SHELTERS...BULLPENS...TENTS AND ANY
OTHER SMALL BUILDINGS THAT ARE OPEN TO THE ELEMENTS.
NEVER...NEVER...GET UNDER A TREE TO SEEK SHELTER FROM LIGHTNING.

IT IS IMPORTANT THAT ALL SPORTS LEAGUES AND OTHER OUTDOOR GROUPS
HAVE A LIGHTNING RESPONSE PLAN THAT IS UNDERSTOOD AND CONSISTENTLY
APPLIED FOR THE SAFETY OF THE PARTICIPANTS. PART OF THE PLAN WOULD
INCLUDE A DESIGNATED WEATHER WATCHER AT EACH OUTDOOR EVENT WITH THE
AUTHORITY TO POSTPONE OR CANCEL THE EVENT DUE TO THE THREAT OF
LIGHTNING. IT IS ALSO IMPORTANT THAT PEOPLE KNOW WHERE TO SEEK SAFE
SHELTER IF A STORM THREATENS. AS WE HAVE SEEN RECENTLY...THE
NCAA...THE NFL AND MLB NOW DELAY GAMES WHEN LIGHTNING IS IN THE
AREA.

OUR SECOND SCENARIO INVOLVES WHAT YOU CAN DO TO REDUCE YOUR CHANCES
OF BEING INJURED OR KILLED BY LIGHTING IF NO SAFE SHELTER IS NEARBY.
THIS SITUATION TYPICALLY OCCURS TO PEOPLE WHO ARE HIKING OR CAMPING
IN THE BACKCOUNTRY. UNFORTUNATELY...IN THIS SCENARIO...THERE IS NOT
MUCH YOU CAN DO TO REDUCE YOUR RISK FROM BEING STRUCK BY LIGHTNING.
THE BEST THING TO DO IS MOVE AWAY FROM TALL ISOLATED OBJECTS...SUCH
AS TREES. STAY AWAY FROM WIDE OPEN AREAS. STAY AS LOW AS POSSIBLE
WITH YOUR FEET CLOSE TOGETHER IF LIGHTNING IS NEARBY. IF YOU ARE
WITH A GROUP OF PEOPLE...SPREAD OUT...THAT WAY IF SOMEONE IS STRUCK
BY LIGHTNING...THE OTHERS CAN OFFER FIRST AID. IF CAMPING IN THE
BACKCOUNTRY...PLACE YOUR TENT IN A LOW AREA AWAY FROM TALL ISOLATED
TREES.

REMEMBER...WHEN THUNDER ROARS...GO INDOORS!

THERE ARE A COUPLE OF WEB SITES THAT CONTAIN ADDITIONAL LIGHTNING
INFORMATION.

NOAAS LIGHTNING WEBSITE WHICH CONTAINS ABUNDANT INFORMATION ON
LIGHTNING SAFETY CAN BE FOUND AT...

WWW.LIGHTNINGSAFETY.NOAA.GOV

LIGHTNING INFORMATION SPECIFIC FOR THE STATE OF COLORADO CAN BE FOUND AT...

WWW.WEATHER.GOV/PUB/LIGHTNING

THE LIGHTNING TOPIC FOR TOMORROW WILL BE ON INDOOR LIGHTNING SAFETY.



000
NOUS42 KMFL 240125
PNSMFL

NOUS42 KMFL 101658
PNSMFL

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT...UPDATED
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE MIAMI FL
925 PM EDT TUE JUN 23 2015

...NAPLES NOAA WEATHER RADIO TRANSMITTER IS BACK IN SERVICE BUT
STILL COULD STILL HAVE LOW AUDIO...

WE APOLOGIZE FOR ANY ISSUES THIS MAY CAUSE. TECHNICIANS HAVE BROUGHT
THE TRANSMITTER BACK UP, BUT THE TRANSMITTER CAN STILL HAVE LOW
AUDIO THROUGH TONIGHT. THE TECHNICIANS WILL BE BACK AT THE SITE ON
WEDNESDAY JUNE 24, 2015 TO CONTINUE WORKING ON THE PROBLEM.

THE AFFECTED TRANSMITTER WAS:

TRANSMITTER   STATION   FREQUENCY
NAPLES        WWG92     162.525 MHZ

REMEMBER THAT THE LATEST WEATHER INFORMATION IS ALSO AVAILABLE ON
OUR WEBSITE AT WWW.WEATHER.GOV/SOUTHFLORIDA

$$



000
NOUS42 KMFL 240125
PNSMFL

NOUS42 KMFL 101658
PNSMFL

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT...UPDATED
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE MIAMI FL
925 PM EDT TUE JUN 23 2015

...NAPLES NOAA WEATHER RADIO TRANSMITTER IS BACK IN SERVICE BUT
STILL COULD STILL HAVE LOW AUDIO...

WE APOLOGIZE FOR ANY ISSUES THIS MAY CAUSE. TECHNICIANS HAVE BROUGHT
THE TRANSMITTER BACK UP, BUT THE TRANSMITTER CAN STILL HAVE LOW
AUDIO THROUGH TONIGHT. THE TECHNICIANS WILL BE BACK AT THE SITE ON
WEDNESDAY JUNE 24, 2015 TO CONTINUE WORKING ON THE PROBLEM.

THE AFFECTED TRANSMITTER WAS:

TRANSMITTER   STATION   FREQUENCY
NAPLES        WWG92     162.525 MHZ

REMEMBER THAT THE LATEST WEATHER INFORMATION IS ALSO AVAILABLE ON
OUR WEBSITE AT WWW.WEATHER.GOV/SOUTHFLORIDA

$$


000
NOUS42 KMFL 240125
PNSMFL

NOUS42 KMFL 101658
PNSMFL

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT...UPDATED
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE MIAMI FL
925 PM EDT TUE JUN 23 2015

...NAPLES NOAA WEATHER RADIO TRANSMITTER IS BACK IN SERVICE BUT
STILL COULD STILL HAVE LOW AUDIO...

WE APOLOGIZE FOR ANY ISSUES THIS MAY CAUSE. TECHNICIANS HAVE BROUGHT
THE TRANSMITTER BACK UP, BUT THE TRANSMITTER CAN STILL HAVE LOW
AUDIO THROUGH TONIGHT. THE TECHNICIANS WILL BE BACK AT THE SITE ON
WEDNESDAY JUNE 24, 2015 TO CONTINUE WORKING ON THE PROBLEM.

THE AFFECTED TRANSMITTER WAS:

TRANSMITTER   STATION   FREQUENCY
NAPLES        WWG92     162.525 MHZ

REMEMBER THAT THE LATEST WEATHER INFORMATION IS ALSO AVAILABLE ON
OUR WEBSITE AT WWW.WEATHER.GOV/SOUTHFLORIDA

$$


000
NOUS42 KMFL 240125
PNSMFL

NOUS42 KMFL 101658
PNSMFL

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT...UPDATED
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE MIAMI FL
925 PM EDT TUE JUN 23 2015

...NAPLES NOAA WEATHER RADIO TRANSMITTER IS BACK IN SERVICE BUT
STILL COULD STILL HAVE LOW AUDIO...

WE APOLOGIZE FOR ANY ISSUES THIS MAY CAUSE. TECHNICIANS HAVE BROUGHT
THE TRANSMITTER BACK UP, BUT THE TRANSMITTER CAN STILL HAVE LOW
AUDIO THROUGH TONIGHT. THE TECHNICIANS WILL BE BACK AT THE SITE ON
WEDNESDAY JUNE 24, 2015 TO CONTINUE WORKING ON THE PROBLEM.

THE AFFECTED TRANSMITTER WAS:

TRANSMITTER   STATION   FREQUENCY
NAPLES        WWG92     162.525 MHZ

REMEMBER THAT THE LATEST WEATHER INFORMATION IS ALSO AVAILABLE ON
OUR WEBSITE AT WWW.WEATHER.GOV/SOUTHFLORIDA

$$



000
NOUS46 KSEW 232351 AAA
PNSSEW

WASHINGTON PRECIPITATION SUMMARY...AMENDED
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE SEATTLE WA
450 PM PDT TUE JUN 23 2015

MAY BROUGHT BELOW NORMAL PRECIPITATION TO WESTERN WASHINGTON WITH
BELOW TO ABOVE NORMAL PRECIPITATION TO EASTERN WASHINGTON. NEARLY
ALL OF THE REGIONS ARE SEEING NEAR TO ABOVE NORMAL PRECIPITATION FOR
THE WATER YEAR THUS FAR.

IN WESTERN WASHINGTON...THE MONTHLY PERCENTAGE OF NORMAL FOR
PRECIPITATION RANGED FROM 12 PERCENT FOR THE COAST TO 36 PERCENT OF
NORMAL IN THE SOUTHWEST INTERIOR AND WESTERN CASCADES. THE GREATEST
AMOUNT OF PRECIPITATION AT THE CLIMATE STATIONS FOR THE
MOUNTAINS...COAST...AND INTERIOR LOWLANDS WAS 3.37 INCHES AT
PACKWOOD IN THE CASCADE FOOTHILLS...0.82 AT CLEARWATER...AND 1.88
INCHES AT THE MAYFIELD IN THE SOUTHWEST INTERIOR.

FOR EASTERN WASHINGTON...THE PERCENTAGE OF NORMAL FOR PRECIPITATION
RANGED FROM 73 PERCENT FOR THE NORTHEAST TO 173 PERCENT IN THE
CENTRAL BASIN. THE GREATEST AMOUNT OF PRECIPITATION AT CLIMATE
STATIONS FOR THE MOUNTAINS AND LOWLANDS WAS 1.96 INCHES AT PULLMAN
IN THE PALOUSE AND BLUE MOUNTAIN REGION...AND 2.52 INCHES AT
CONCONULLY IN THE OKANOGAN BIG BEND REGION.

THE OUTLOOK FOR JUNE AND BEYOND...FOR THE NEXT TWO WEEKS THE
OUTLOOK IS FOR BELOW NORMAL PRECIPITATION FOR WASHINGTON STATE. THE
MONTHLY OUTLOOK FOR JUNE IS CALLING FOR BELOW NORMAL PRECIPITATION
FOR WESTERN WASHINGTON AND EQUAL CHANCES OF ABOVE...BELOW...OR NEAR
NORMAL PRECIPITATION FOR EASTERN WASHINGTON. THE THREE MONTH OUTLOOK
FROM JUNE TO AUGUST IS CALLING FOR BELOW NORMAL PRECIPITATION FOR
WESTERN TWO THIRDS OF WASHINGTON...WITH EQUAL CHANCES OF
ABOVE...BELOW...OR NEAR NORMAL PRECIPITATION FOR THE EASTERN THIRD.

THE TABLE BELOW GIVES PRECIPITATION FIGURES AS A PERCENT OF NORMAL
FOR REGIONS OF WASHINGTON.  THE CURRENT WATER YEAR BEGAN 1 OCTOBER
2014 AND ENDS 30 SEPTEMBER 2015.

                         MAY       WATER YEAR     PAST 3       PAST 12
                         2015       TO DATE       MONTHS        MONTHS
WESTERN WASHINGTON
  COAST                    12           97           80            95
  OLYMPICS                 28           96           75            94
  NORTHWEST INTERIOR       26          108           81           107
  PUGET SOUND LOWLANDS     28           94           71            97
  SOUTHWEST INTERIOR       36           86           67            87
  WEST FOOTHILLS CASCA     35           95           74            97
  CASCADES WEST            36           97           76            99

EASTERN WASHINGTON
  EAST SLOPES CASCADES     80           96           65            97
  OKANOGAN                106          101           80           102
  CENTRAL BASIN           173          100          103            99
  NORTHEAST                73           86           81            91
  PALOUSE AND BLUE MTN     74           98           89            94



THE TABLE BELOW EXPRESSES PRECIPITATION IN INCHES AND AS A PERCENT OF
NORMAL FOR A VARIETY OF LOCATIONS AROUND THE STATE.  OCCASIONALLY
MISSING DATA AT A SITE ARE ESTIMATED USING OBSERVED DATA FROM
SURROUNDING STATIONS.

                      MAY             WATER YEAR       PAST 12 MONTHS
                INCHES    PCT       INCHES    PCT       INCHES    PCT

QUILLAYUTE        0.67     13        86.15     98        94.36     99
HOQUIAM           0.28      9        57.53     95        64.93    103
BELLINGHAM        0.69     28        32.05    109        38.46    119
SEATTLE           0.58     30        32.39     99        37.93    110
OLYMPIA           0.67     29        39.52     88        45.19     97
LONGVIEW          1.08     34        36.23     87        41.71     93

CONCRETE          1.02     26        60.86    100        71.44    108
SNOQUALMIE FALL   1.09     27        50.17     94        60.81    105
RANDLE*           1.15     35        47.05     96        55.74    104
DIABLO DAM        0.99     31        72.01    105        80.44    108
STAMPEDE PASS     1.70     39        61.30     87        73.38     94
PARADISE          2.48     42       106.41    101       120.45    107

WINTHROP          1.44    129        13.15    111        16.82    117
STEHEKIN          0.49     43        33.92    103        37.90    105
LEAVENWORTH       0.64     60        22.50    100        24.64     99
MOUNT ADAMS       1.65    100        37.74     89        40.76     94
WENATCHEE         1.21    175         6.87     91         8.68     98
YAKIMA            1.80    310         6.32     93         7.82     96

COULEE DAM        0.91     79         8.56    102        12.12    120
LIND              0.55     67         7.55     93         9.32     98
REPUBLIC          1.67     85        11.89     99        16.79    111
SPOKANE           0.85     52        11.49     86        14.35     90
PULLMAN           1.96    297        15.64    105        17.84     92
DAYTON            0.60     34        13.74     86        16.65     91

* = ESTIMATED

$$















000
NOUS46 KSEW 232351 AAA
PNSSEW

WASHINGTON PRECIPITATION SUMMARY...AMENDED
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE SEATTLE WA
450 PM PDT TUE JUN 23 2015

MAY BROUGHT BELOW NORMAL PRECIPITATION TO WESTERN WASHINGTON WITH
BELOW TO ABOVE NORMAL PRECIPITATION TO EASTERN WASHINGTON. NEARLY
ALL OF THE REGIONS ARE SEEING NEAR TO ABOVE NORMAL PRECIPITATION FOR
THE WATER YEAR THUS FAR.

IN WESTERN WASHINGTON...THE MONTHLY PERCENTAGE OF NORMAL FOR
PRECIPITATION RANGED FROM 12 PERCENT FOR THE COAST TO 36 PERCENT OF
NORMAL IN THE SOUTHWEST INTERIOR AND WESTERN CASCADES. THE GREATEST
AMOUNT OF PRECIPITATION AT THE CLIMATE STATIONS FOR THE
MOUNTAINS...COAST...AND INTERIOR LOWLANDS WAS 3.37 INCHES AT
PACKWOOD IN THE CASCADE FOOTHILLS...0.82 AT CLEARWATER...AND 1.88
INCHES AT THE MAYFIELD IN THE SOUTHWEST INTERIOR.

FOR EASTERN WASHINGTON...THE PERCENTAGE OF NORMAL FOR PRECIPITATION
RANGED FROM 73 PERCENT FOR THE NORTHEAST TO 173 PERCENT IN THE
CENTRAL BASIN. THE GREATEST AMOUNT OF PRECIPITATION AT CLIMATE
STATIONS FOR THE MOUNTAINS AND LOWLANDS WAS 1.96 INCHES AT PULLMAN
IN THE PALOUSE AND BLUE MOUNTAIN REGION...AND 2.52 INCHES AT
CONCONULLY IN THE OKANOGAN BIG BEND REGION.

THE OUTLOOK FOR JUNE AND BEYOND...FOR THE NEXT TWO WEEKS THE
OUTLOOK IS FOR BELOW NORMAL PRECIPITATION FOR WASHINGTON STATE. THE
MONTHLY OUTLOOK FOR JUNE IS CALLING FOR BELOW NORMAL PRECIPITATION
FOR WESTERN WASHINGTON AND EQUAL CHANCES OF ABOVE...BELOW...OR NEAR
NORMAL PRECIPITATION FOR EASTERN WASHINGTON. THE THREE MONTH OUTLOOK
FROM JUNE TO AUGUST IS CALLING FOR BELOW NORMAL PRECIPITATION FOR
WESTERN TWO THIRDS OF WASHINGTON...WITH EQUAL CHANCES OF
ABOVE...BELOW...OR NEAR NORMAL PRECIPITATION FOR THE EASTERN THIRD.

THE TABLE BELOW GIVES PRECIPITATION FIGURES AS A PERCENT OF NORMAL
FOR REGIONS OF WASHINGTON.  THE CURRENT WATER YEAR BEGAN 1 OCTOBER
2014 AND ENDS 30 SEPTEMBER 2015.

                         MAY       WATER YEAR     PAST 3       PAST 12
                         2015       TO DATE       MONTHS        MONTHS
WESTERN WASHINGTON
  COAST                    12           97           80            95
  OLYMPICS                 28           96           75            94
  NORTHWEST INTERIOR       26          108           81           107
  PUGET SOUND LOWLANDS     28           94           71            97
  SOUTHWEST INTERIOR       36           86           67            87
  WEST FOOTHILLS CASCA     35           95           74            97
  CASCADES WEST            36           97           76            99

EASTERN WASHINGTON
  EAST SLOPES CASCADES     80           96           65            97
  OKANOGAN                106          101           80           102
  CENTRAL BASIN           173          100          103            99
  NORTHEAST                73           86           81            91
  PALOUSE AND BLUE MTN     74           98           89            94



THE TABLE BELOW EXPRESSES PRECIPITATION IN INCHES AND AS A PERCENT OF
NORMAL FOR A VARIETY OF LOCATIONS AROUND THE STATE.  OCCASIONALLY
MISSING DATA AT A SITE ARE ESTIMATED USING OBSERVED DATA FROM
SURROUNDING STATIONS.

                      MAY             WATER YEAR       PAST 12 MONTHS
                INCHES    PCT       INCHES    PCT       INCHES    PCT

QUILLAYUTE        0.67     13        86.15     98        94.36     99
HOQUIAM           0.28      9        57.53     95        64.93    103
BELLINGHAM        0.69     28        32.05    109        38.46    119
SEATTLE           0.58     30        32.39     99        37.93    110
OLYMPIA           0.67     29        39.52     88        45.19     97
LONGVIEW          1.08     34        36.23     87        41.71     93

CONCRETE          1.02     26        60.86    100        71.44    108
SNOQUALMIE FALL   1.09     27        50.17     94        60.81    105
RANDLE*           1.15     35        47.05     96        55.74    104
DIABLO DAM        0.99     31        72.01    105        80.44    108
STAMPEDE PASS     1.70     39        61.30     87        73.38     94
PARADISE          2.48     42       106.41    101       120.45    107

WINTHROP          1.44    129        13.15    111        16.82    117
STEHEKIN          0.49     43        33.92    103        37.90    105
LEAVENWORTH       0.64     60        22.50    100        24.64     99
MOUNT ADAMS       1.65    100        37.74     89        40.76     94
WENATCHEE         1.21    175         6.87     91         8.68     98
YAKIMA            1.80    310         6.32     93         7.82     96

COULEE DAM        0.91     79         8.56    102        12.12    120
LIND              0.55     67         7.55     93         9.32     98
REPUBLIC          1.67     85        11.89     99        16.79    111
SPOKANE           0.85     52        11.49     86        14.35     90
PULLMAN           1.96    297        15.64    105        17.84     92
DAYTON            0.60     34        13.74     86        16.65     91

* = ESTIMATED

$$
















000
NOUS46 KSEW 232351 AAA
PNSSEW

WASHINGTON PRECIPITATION SUMMARY...AMENDED
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE SEATTLE WA
450 PM PDT TUE JUN 23 2015

MAY BROUGHT BELOW NORMAL PRECIPITATION TO WESTERN WASHINGTON WITH
BELOW TO ABOVE NORMAL PRECIPITATION TO EASTERN WASHINGTON. NEARLY
ALL OF THE REGIONS ARE SEEING NEAR TO ABOVE NORMAL PRECIPITATION FOR
THE WATER YEAR THUS FAR.

IN WESTERN WASHINGTON...THE MONTHLY PERCENTAGE OF NORMAL FOR
PRECIPITATION RANGED FROM 12 PERCENT FOR THE COAST TO 36 PERCENT OF
NORMAL IN THE SOUTHWEST INTERIOR AND WESTERN CASCADES. THE GREATEST
AMOUNT OF PRECIPITATION AT THE CLIMATE STATIONS FOR THE
MOUNTAINS...COAST...AND INTERIOR LOWLANDS WAS 3.37 INCHES AT
PACKWOOD IN THE CASCADE FOOTHILLS...0.82 AT CLEARWATER...AND 1.88
INCHES AT THE MAYFIELD IN THE SOUTHWEST INTERIOR.

FOR EASTERN WASHINGTON...THE PERCENTAGE OF NORMAL FOR PRECIPITATION
RANGED FROM 73 PERCENT FOR THE NORTHEAST TO 173 PERCENT IN THE
CENTRAL BASIN. THE GREATEST AMOUNT OF PRECIPITATION AT CLIMATE
STATIONS FOR THE MOUNTAINS AND LOWLANDS WAS 1.96 INCHES AT PULLMAN
IN THE PALOUSE AND BLUE MOUNTAIN REGION...AND 2.52 INCHES AT
CONCONULLY IN THE OKANOGAN BIG BEND REGION.

THE OUTLOOK FOR JUNE AND BEYOND...FOR THE NEXT TWO WEEKS THE
OUTLOOK IS FOR BELOW NORMAL PRECIPITATION FOR WASHINGTON STATE. THE
MONTHLY OUTLOOK FOR JUNE IS CALLING FOR BELOW NORMAL PRECIPITATION
FOR WESTERN WASHINGTON AND EQUAL CHANCES OF ABOVE...BELOW...OR NEAR
NORMAL PRECIPITATION FOR EASTERN WASHINGTON. THE THREE MONTH OUTLOOK
FROM JUNE TO AUGUST IS CALLING FOR BELOW NORMAL PRECIPITATION FOR
WESTERN TWO THIRDS OF WASHINGTON...WITH EQUAL CHANCES OF
ABOVE...BELOW...OR NEAR NORMAL PRECIPITATION FOR THE EASTERN THIRD.

THE TABLE BELOW GIVES PRECIPITATION FIGURES AS A PERCENT OF NORMAL
FOR REGIONS OF WASHINGTON.  THE CURRENT WATER YEAR BEGAN 1 OCTOBER
2014 AND ENDS 30 SEPTEMBER 2015.

                         MAY       WATER YEAR     PAST 3       PAST 12
                         2015       TO DATE       MONTHS        MONTHS
WESTERN WASHINGTON
  COAST                    12           97           80            95
  OLYMPICS                 28           96           75            94
  NORTHWEST INTERIOR       26          108           81           107
  PUGET SOUND LOWLANDS     28           94           71            97
  SOUTHWEST INTERIOR       36           86           67            87
  WEST FOOTHILLS CASCA     35           95           74            97
  CASCADES WEST            36           97           76            99

EASTERN WASHINGTON
  EAST SLOPES CASCADES     80           96           65            97
  OKANOGAN                106          101           80           102
  CENTRAL BASIN           173          100          103            99
  NORTHEAST                73           86           81            91
  PALOUSE AND BLUE MTN     74           98           89            94



THE TABLE BELOW EXPRESSES PRECIPITATION IN INCHES AND AS A PERCENT OF
NORMAL FOR A VARIETY OF LOCATIONS AROUND THE STATE.  OCCASIONALLY
MISSING DATA AT A SITE ARE ESTIMATED USING OBSERVED DATA FROM
SURROUNDING STATIONS.

                      MAY             WATER YEAR       PAST 12 MONTHS
                INCHES    PCT       INCHES    PCT       INCHES    PCT

QUILLAYUTE        0.67     13        86.15     98        94.36     99
HOQUIAM           0.28      9        57.53     95        64.93    103
BELLINGHAM        0.69     28        32.05    109        38.46    119
SEATTLE           0.58     30        32.39     99        37.93    110
OLYMPIA           0.67     29        39.52     88        45.19     97
LONGVIEW          1.08     34        36.23     87        41.71     93

CONCRETE          1.02     26        60.86    100        71.44    108
SNOQUALMIE FALL   1.09     27        50.17     94        60.81    105
RANDLE*           1.15     35        47.05     96        55.74    104
DIABLO DAM        0.99     31        72.01    105        80.44    108
STAMPEDE PASS     1.70     39        61.30     87        73.38     94
PARADISE          2.48     42       106.41    101       120.45    107

WINTHROP          1.44    129        13.15    111        16.82    117
STEHEKIN          0.49     43        33.92    103        37.90    105
LEAVENWORTH       0.64     60        22.50    100        24.64     99
MOUNT ADAMS       1.65    100        37.74     89        40.76     94
WENATCHEE         1.21    175         6.87     91         8.68     98
YAKIMA            1.80    310         6.32     93         7.82     96

COULEE DAM        0.91     79         8.56    102        12.12    120
LIND              0.55     67         7.55     93         9.32     98
REPUBLIC          1.67     85        11.89     99        16.79    111
SPOKANE           0.85     52        11.49     86        14.35     90
PULLMAN           1.96    297        15.64    105        17.84     92
DAYTON            0.60     34        13.74     86        16.65     91

* = ESTIMATED

$$
















000
NOUS46 KSEW 232351 AAA
PNSSEW

WASHINGTON PRECIPITATION SUMMARY...AMENDED
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE SEATTLE WA
450 PM PDT TUE JUN 23 2015

MAY BROUGHT BELOW NORMAL PRECIPITATION TO WESTERN WASHINGTON WITH
BELOW TO ABOVE NORMAL PRECIPITATION TO EASTERN WASHINGTON. NEARLY
ALL OF THE REGIONS ARE SEEING NEAR TO ABOVE NORMAL PRECIPITATION FOR
THE WATER YEAR THUS FAR.

IN WESTERN WASHINGTON...THE MONTHLY PERCENTAGE OF NORMAL FOR
PRECIPITATION RANGED FROM 12 PERCENT FOR THE COAST TO 36 PERCENT OF
NORMAL IN THE SOUTHWEST INTERIOR AND WESTERN CASCADES. THE GREATEST
AMOUNT OF PRECIPITATION AT THE CLIMATE STATIONS FOR THE
MOUNTAINS...COAST...AND INTERIOR LOWLANDS WAS 3.37 INCHES AT
PACKWOOD IN THE CASCADE FOOTHILLS...0.82 AT CLEARWATER...AND 1.88
INCHES AT THE MAYFIELD IN THE SOUTHWEST INTERIOR.

FOR EASTERN WASHINGTON...THE PERCENTAGE OF NORMAL FOR PRECIPITATION
RANGED FROM 73 PERCENT FOR THE NORTHEAST TO 173 PERCENT IN THE
CENTRAL BASIN. THE GREATEST AMOUNT OF PRECIPITATION AT CLIMATE
STATIONS FOR THE MOUNTAINS AND LOWLANDS WAS 1.96 INCHES AT PULLMAN
IN THE PALOUSE AND BLUE MOUNTAIN REGION...AND 2.52 INCHES AT
CONCONULLY IN THE OKANOGAN BIG BEND REGION.

THE OUTLOOK FOR JUNE AND BEYOND...FOR THE NEXT TWO WEEKS THE
OUTLOOK IS FOR BELOW NORMAL PRECIPITATION FOR WASHINGTON STATE. THE
MONTHLY OUTLOOK FOR JUNE IS CALLING FOR BELOW NORMAL PRECIPITATION
FOR WESTERN WASHINGTON AND EQUAL CHANCES OF ABOVE...BELOW...OR NEAR
NORMAL PRECIPITATION FOR EASTERN WASHINGTON. THE THREE MONTH OUTLOOK
FROM JUNE TO AUGUST IS CALLING FOR BELOW NORMAL PRECIPITATION FOR
WESTERN TWO THIRDS OF WASHINGTON...WITH EQUAL CHANCES OF
ABOVE...BELOW...OR NEAR NORMAL PRECIPITATION FOR THE EASTERN THIRD.

THE TABLE BELOW GIVES PRECIPITATION FIGURES AS A PERCENT OF NORMAL
FOR REGIONS OF WASHINGTON.  THE CURRENT WATER YEAR BEGAN 1 OCTOBER
2014 AND ENDS 30 SEPTEMBER 2015.

                         MAY       WATER YEAR     PAST 3       PAST 12
                         2015       TO DATE       MONTHS        MONTHS
WESTERN WASHINGTON
  COAST                    12           97           80            95
  OLYMPICS                 28           96           75            94
  NORTHWEST INTERIOR       26          108           81           107
  PUGET SOUND LOWLANDS     28           94           71            97
  SOUTHWEST INTERIOR       36           86           67            87
  WEST FOOTHILLS CASCA     35           95           74            97
  CASCADES WEST            36           97           76            99

EASTERN WASHINGTON
  EAST SLOPES CASCADES     80           96           65            97
  OKANOGAN                106          101           80           102
  CENTRAL BASIN           173          100          103            99
  NORTHEAST                73           86           81            91
  PALOUSE AND BLUE MTN     74           98           89            94



THE TABLE BELOW EXPRESSES PRECIPITATION IN INCHES AND AS A PERCENT OF
NORMAL FOR A VARIETY OF LOCATIONS AROUND THE STATE.  OCCASIONALLY
MISSING DATA AT A SITE ARE ESTIMATED USING OBSERVED DATA FROM
SURROUNDING STATIONS.

                      MAY             WATER YEAR       PAST 12 MONTHS
                INCHES    PCT       INCHES    PCT       INCHES    PCT

QUILLAYUTE        0.67     13        86.15     98        94.36     99
HOQUIAM           0.28      9        57.53     95        64.93    103
BELLINGHAM        0.69     28        32.05    109        38.46    119
SEATTLE           0.58     30        32.39     99        37.93    110
OLYMPIA           0.67     29        39.52     88        45.19     97
LONGVIEW          1.08     34        36.23     87        41.71     93

CONCRETE          1.02     26        60.86    100        71.44    108
SNOQUALMIE FALL   1.09     27        50.17     94        60.81    105
RANDLE*           1.15     35        47.05     96        55.74    104
DIABLO DAM        0.99     31        72.01    105        80.44    108
STAMPEDE PASS     1.70     39        61.30     87        73.38     94
PARADISE          2.48     42       106.41    101       120.45    107

WINTHROP          1.44    129        13.15    111        16.82    117
STEHEKIN          0.49     43        33.92    103        37.90    105
LEAVENWORTH       0.64     60        22.50    100        24.64     99
MOUNT ADAMS       1.65    100        37.74     89        40.76     94
WENATCHEE         1.21    175         6.87     91         8.68     98
YAKIMA            1.80    310         6.32     93         7.82     96

COULEE DAM        0.91     79         8.56    102        12.12    120
LIND              0.55     67         7.55     93         9.32     98
REPUBLIC          1.67     85        11.89     99        16.79    111
SPOKANE           0.85     52        11.49     86        14.35     90
PULLMAN           1.96    297        15.64    105        17.84     92
DAYTON            0.60     34        13.74     86        16.65     91

* = ESTIMATED

$$
















000
NOUS46 KSEW 232351 AAA
PNSSEW

WASHINGTON PRECIPITATION SUMMARY...AMENDED
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE SEATTLE WA
450 PM PDT TUE JUN 23 2015

MAY BROUGHT BELOW NORMAL PRECIPITATION TO WESTERN WASHINGTON WITH
BELOW TO ABOVE NORMAL PRECIPITATION TO EASTERN WASHINGTON. NEARLY
ALL OF THE REGIONS ARE SEEING NEAR TO ABOVE NORMAL PRECIPITATION FOR
THE WATER YEAR THUS FAR.

IN WESTERN WASHINGTON...THE MONTHLY PERCENTAGE OF NORMAL FOR
PRECIPITATION RANGED FROM 12 PERCENT FOR THE COAST TO 36 PERCENT OF
NORMAL IN THE SOUTHWEST INTERIOR AND WESTERN CASCADES. THE GREATEST
AMOUNT OF PRECIPITATION AT THE CLIMATE STATIONS FOR THE
MOUNTAINS...COAST...AND INTERIOR LOWLANDS WAS 3.37 INCHES AT
PACKWOOD IN THE CASCADE FOOTHILLS...0.82 AT CLEARWATER...AND 1.88
INCHES AT THE MAYFIELD IN THE SOUTHWEST INTERIOR.

FOR EASTERN WASHINGTON...THE PERCENTAGE OF NORMAL FOR PRECIPITATION
RANGED FROM 73 PERCENT FOR THE NORTHEAST TO 173 PERCENT IN THE
CENTRAL BASIN. THE GREATEST AMOUNT OF PRECIPITATION AT CLIMATE
STATIONS FOR THE MOUNTAINS AND LOWLANDS WAS 1.96 INCHES AT PULLMAN
IN THE PALOUSE AND BLUE MOUNTAIN REGION...AND 2.52 INCHES AT
CONCONULLY IN THE OKANOGAN BIG BEND REGION.

THE OUTLOOK FOR JUNE AND BEYOND...FOR THE NEXT TWO WEEKS THE
OUTLOOK IS FOR BELOW NORMAL PRECIPITATION FOR WASHINGTON STATE. THE
MONTHLY OUTLOOK FOR JUNE IS CALLING FOR BELOW NORMAL PRECIPITATION
FOR WESTERN WASHINGTON AND EQUAL CHANCES OF ABOVE...BELOW...OR NEAR
NORMAL PRECIPITATION FOR EASTERN WASHINGTON. THE THREE MONTH OUTLOOK
FROM JUNE TO AUGUST IS CALLING FOR BELOW NORMAL PRECIPITATION FOR
WESTERN TWO THIRDS OF WASHINGTON...WITH EQUAL CHANCES OF
ABOVE...BELOW...OR NEAR NORMAL PRECIPITATION FOR THE EASTERN THIRD.

THE TABLE BELOW GIVES PRECIPITATION FIGURES AS A PERCENT OF NORMAL
FOR REGIONS OF WASHINGTON.  THE CURRENT WATER YEAR BEGAN 1 OCTOBER
2014 AND ENDS 30 SEPTEMBER 2015.

                         MAY       WATER YEAR     PAST 3       PAST 12
                         2015       TO DATE       MONTHS        MONTHS
WESTERN WASHINGTON
  COAST                    12           97           80            95
  OLYMPICS                 28           96           75            94
  NORTHWEST INTERIOR       26          108           81           107
  PUGET SOUND LOWLANDS     28           94           71            97
  SOUTHWEST INTERIOR       36           86           67            87
  WEST FOOTHILLS CASCA     35           95           74            97
  CASCADES WEST            36           97           76            99

EASTERN WASHINGTON
  EAST SLOPES CASCADES     80           96           65            97
  OKANOGAN                106          101           80           102
  CENTRAL BASIN           173          100          103            99
  NORTHEAST                73           86           81            91
  PALOUSE AND BLUE MTN     74           98           89            94



THE TABLE BELOW EXPRESSES PRECIPITATION IN INCHES AND AS A PERCENT OF
NORMAL FOR A VARIETY OF LOCATIONS AROUND THE STATE.  OCCASIONALLY
MISSING DATA AT A SITE ARE ESTIMATED USING OBSERVED DATA FROM
SURROUNDING STATIONS.

                      MAY             WATER YEAR       PAST 12 MONTHS
                INCHES    PCT       INCHES    PCT       INCHES    PCT

QUILLAYUTE        0.67     13        86.15     98        94.36     99
HOQUIAM           0.28      9        57.53     95        64.93    103
BELLINGHAM        0.69     28        32.05    109        38.46    119
SEATTLE           0.58     30        32.39     99        37.93    110
OLYMPIA           0.67     29        39.52     88        45.19     97
LONGVIEW          1.08     34        36.23     87        41.71     93

CONCRETE          1.02     26        60.86    100        71.44    108
SNOQUALMIE FALL   1.09     27        50.17     94        60.81    105
RANDLE*           1.15     35        47.05     96        55.74    104
DIABLO DAM        0.99     31        72.01    105        80.44    108
STAMPEDE PASS     1.70     39        61.30     87        73.38     94
PARADISE          2.48     42       106.41    101       120.45    107

WINTHROP          1.44    129        13.15    111        16.82    117
STEHEKIN          0.49     43        33.92    103        37.90    105
LEAVENWORTH       0.64     60        22.50    100        24.64     99
MOUNT ADAMS       1.65    100        37.74     89        40.76     94
WENATCHEE         1.21    175         6.87     91         8.68     98
YAKIMA            1.80    310         6.32     93         7.82     96

COULEE DAM        0.91     79         8.56    102        12.12    120
LIND              0.55     67         7.55     93         9.32     98
REPUBLIC          1.67     85        11.89     99        16.79    111
SPOKANE           0.85     52        11.49     86        14.35     90
PULLMAN           1.96    297        15.64    105        17.84     92
DAYTON            0.60     34        13.74     86        16.65     91

* = ESTIMATED

$$
















000
NOUS46 KSEW 232351 AAA
PNSSEW

WASHINGTON PRECIPITATION SUMMARY...AMENDED
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE SEATTLE WA
450 PM PDT TUE JUN 23 2015

MAY BROUGHT BELOW NORMAL PRECIPITATION TO WESTERN WASHINGTON WITH
BELOW TO ABOVE NORMAL PRECIPITATION TO EASTERN WASHINGTON. NEARLY
ALL OF THE REGIONS ARE SEEING NEAR TO ABOVE NORMAL PRECIPITATION FOR
THE WATER YEAR THUS FAR.

IN WESTERN WASHINGTON...THE MONTHLY PERCENTAGE OF NORMAL FOR
PRECIPITATION RANGED FROM 12 PERCENT FOR THE COAST TO 36 PERCENT OF
NORMAL IN THE SOUTHWEST INTERIOR AND WESTERN CASCADES. THE GREATEST
AMOUNT OF PRECIPITATION AT THE CLIMATE STATIONS FOR THE
MOUNTAINS...COAST...AND INTERIOR LOWLANDS WAS 3.37 INCHES AT
PACKWOOD IN THE CASCADE FOOTHILLS...0.82 AT CLEARWATER...AND 1.88
INCHES AT THE MAYFIELD IN THE SOUTHWEST INTERIOR.

FOR EASTERN WASHINGTON...THE PERCENTAGE OF NORMAL FOR PRECIPITATION
RANGED FROM 73 PERCENT FOR THE NORTHEAST TO 173 PERCENT IN THE
CENTRAL BASIN. THE GREATEST AMOUNT OF PRECIPITATION AT CLIMATE
STATIONS FOR THE MOUNTAINS AND LOWLANDS WAS 1.96 INCHES AT PULLMAN
IN THE PALOUSE AND BLUE MOUNTAIN REGION...AND 2.52 INCHES AT
CONCONULLY IN THE OKANOGAN BIG BEND REGION.

THE OUTLOOK FOR JUNE AND BEYOND...FOR THE NEXT TWO WEEKS THE
OUTLOOK IS FOR BELOW NORMAL PRECIPITATION FOR WASHINGTON STATE. THE
MONTHLY OUTLOOK FOR JUNE IS CALLING FOR BELOW NORMAL PRECIPITATION
FOR WESTERN WASHINGTON AND EQUAL CHANCES OF ABOVE...BELOW...OR NEAR
NORMAL PRECIPITATION FOR EASTERN WASHINGTON. THE THREE MONTH OUTLOOK
FROM JUNE TO AUGUST IS CALLING FOR BELOW NORMAL PRECIPITATION FOR
WESTERN TWO THIRDS OF WASHINGTON...WITH EQUAL CHANCES OF
ABOVE...BELOW...OR NEAR NORMAL PRECIPITATION FOR THE EASTERN THIRD.

THE TABLE BELOW GIVES PRECIPITATION FIGURES AS A PERCENT OF NORMAL
FOR REGIONS OF WASHINGTON.  THE CURRENT WATER YEAR BEGAN 1 OCTOBER
2014 AND ENDS 30 SEPTEMBER 2015.

                         MAY       WATER YEAR     PAST 3       PAST 12
                         2015       TO DATE       MONTHS        MONTHS
WESTERN WASHINGTON
  COAST                    12           97           80            95
  OLYMPICS                 28           96           75            94
  NORTHWEST INTERIOR       26          108           81           107
  PUGET SOUND LOWLANDS     28           94           71            97
  SOUTHWEST INTERIOR       36           86           67            87
  WEST FOOTHILLS CASCA     35           95           74            97
  CASCADES WEST            36           97           76            99

EASTERN WASHINGTON
  EAST SLOPES CASCADES     80           96           65            97
  OKANOGAN                106          101           80           102
  CENTRAL BASIN           173          100          103            99
  NORTHEAST                73           86           81            91
  PALOUSE AND BLUE MTN     74           98           89            94



THE TABLE BELOW EXPRESSES PRECIPITATION IN INCHES AND AS A PERCENT OF
NORMAL FOR A VARIETY OF LOCATIONS AROUND THE STATE.  OCCASIONALLY
MISSING DATA AT A SITE ARE ESTIMATED USING OBSERVED DATA FROM
SURROUNDING STATIONS.

                      MAY             WATER YEAR       PAST 12 MONTHS
                INCHES    PCT       INCHES    PCT       INCHES    PCT

QUILLAYUTE        0.67     13        86.15     98        94.36     99
HOQUIAM           0.28      9        57.53     95        64.93    103
BELLINGHAM        0.69     28        32.05    109        38.46    119
SEATTLE           0.58     30        32.39     99        37.93    110
OLYMPIA           0.67     29        39.52     88        45.19     97
LONGVIEW          1.08     34        36.23     87        41.71     93

CONCRETE          1.02     26        60.86    100        71.44    108
SNOQUALMIE FALL   1.09     27        50.17     94        60.81    105
RANDLE*           1.15     35        47.05     96        55.74    104
DIABLO DAM        0.99     31        72.01    105        80.44    108
STAMPEDE PASS     1.70     39        61.30     87        73.38     94
PARADISE          2.48     42       106.41    101       120.45    107

WINTHROP          1.44    129        13.15    111        16.82    117
STEHEKIN          0.49     43        33.92    103        37.90    105
LEAVENWORTH       0.64     60        22.50    100        24.64     99
MOUNT ADAMS       1.65    100        37.74     89        40.76     94
WENATCHEE         1.21    175         6.87     91         8.68     98
YAKIMA            1.80    310         6.32     93         7.82     96

COULEE DAM        0.91     79         8.56    102        12.12    120
LIND              0.55     67         7.55     93         9.32     98
REPUBLIC          1.67     85        11.89     99        16.79    111
SPOKANE           0.85     52        11.49     86        14.35     90
PULLMAN           1.96    297        15.64    105        17.84     92
DAYTON            0.60     34        13.74     86        16.65     91

* = ESTIMATED

$$
















000
NOUS46 KSEW 232345
PNSSEW

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE SEATTLE WA
445 PM PST TUE JUN 23 2015

...LATEST SUMMER WEATHER OUTLOOK...

THE NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICES CLIMATE PREDICTION CENTER (CPC)
RELEASED THEIR LATEST SEASONAL WEATHER OUTLOOK AND FOR WESTERN
WASHINGTON...IT CONTINUES THE GOOD LIKELIHOOD OF WARMER THAN AVERAGE
TEMPERATURES AND BELOW NORMAL PRECIPITATION THIS SUMMER. IN FACT...
THE TREND IS ANTICIPATED TO CONTINUE INTO THIS FALL AND WINTER...
THANKS TO A STRONGER EL NINO THAT PLAYS A KEY ROLE IN OUR WINTER
WEATHER SEASON.

UNLESS THERE IS AT LEAST ONE SIGNIFICANT PRECIPITATION EVENT...FIRE
DANGER IS GOING TO BE A MAJOR CONCERN STATEWIDE THANKS TO THE
ONGOING DRY CONDITIONS. THIS YEARS FIRE SEASON IS OFF TO AN EARLY
START AND MAY EXTEND INTO EARLY FALL.

IT IS IMPORTANT THAT EVERYONE AVOIDS ANY OUTDOOR BURNING THIS SUMMER
UNLESS IT IS IN DESIGNATED LOCATIONS. IN ADDITION...AVOID TOSSING
ANY BURNING MATERIALS OUT OF VEHICLES. THERE HAVE ALREADY BEEN A
NUMBER OF ROADSIDE FIRES THIS MONTH. ANOTHER FIRE STARTING CONCERN
IS FIREWORKS. THE BEST ADVICE IS TO AVOID USING FIREWORKS THIS YEAR
AND ENJOY YOUR LOCAL COMMUNITY FIREWORKS SHOW ON THE FOURTH OF JULY.

FOR THE LATEST WEATHER FORECASTS AND SEASONAL OUTLOOKS...VISIT THE
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE WEB SITE AT WWW.WEATHER.GOV/SEATTLE/  HAVE
A SAFE AND ENJOYABLE SUMMER!

BUEHNER









000
NOUS46 KSEW 232345
PNSSEW

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE SEATTLE WA
445 PM PST TUE JUN 23 2015

...LATEST SUMMER WEATHER OUTLOOK...

THE NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICES CLIMATE PREDICTION CENTER (CPC)
RELEASED THEIR LATEST SEASONAL WEATHER OUTLOOK AND FOR WESTERN
WASHINGTON...IT CONTINUES THE GOOD LIKELIHOOD OF WARMER THAN AVERAGE
TEMPERATURES AND BELOW NORMAL PRECIPITATION THIS SUMMER. IN FACT...
THE TREND IS ANTICIPATED TO CONTINUE INTO THIS FALL AND WINTER...
THANKS TO A STRONGER EL NINO THAT PLAYS A KEY ROLE IN OUR WINTER
WEATHER SEASON.

UNLESS THERE IS AT LEAST ONE SIGNIFICANT PRECIPITATION EVENT...FIRE
DANGER IS GOING TO BE A MAJOR CONCERN STATEWIDE THANKS TO THE
ONGOING DRY CONDITIONS. THIS YEARS FIRE SEASON IS OFF TO AN EARLY
START AND MAY EXTEND INTO EARLY FALL.

IT IS IMPORTANT THAT EVERYONE AVOIDS ANY OUTDOOR BURNING THIS SUMMER
UNLESS IT IS IN DESIGNATED LOCATIONS. IN ADDITION...AVOID TOSSING
ANY BURNING MATERIALS OUT OF VEHICLES. THERE HAVE ALREADY BEEN A
NUMBER OF ROADSIDE FIRES THIS MONTH. ANOTHER FIRE STARTING CONCERN
IS FIREWORKS. THE BEST ADVICE IS TO AVOID USING FIREWORKS THIS YEAR
AND ENJOY YOUR LOCAL COMMUNITY FIREWORKS SHOW ON THE FOURTH OF JULY.

FOR THE LATEST WEATHER FORECASTS AND SEASONAL OUTLOOKS...VISIT THE
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE WEB SITE AT WWW.WEATHER.GOV/SEATTLE/  HAVE
A SAFE AND ENJOYABLE SUMMER!

BUEHNER










000
NOUS46 KOTX 232150
PNSOTX

Public Information Statement
National Weather Service Spokane WA
300 PM PDT TUE JUN 23 2015


       ***RECORD LOW STREAMFLOWS FOR LATE JUNE***

Early melt off of our of below average snowpack in the Pacific
Northwest, combined with below average precipitation since April,
has pushed streamflows to record low levels for this time of the
year. The Inland Northwest generally sees its lowest streamflows
of the year in late September or early October. The table below
shows the latest observed streamflow and the previous record low
streamflow for June 23rd. Many more streams that are not listed
in this table are in their lowest 10th percentile of flow on
record for June 23rd. The data comes from the USGS WaterWatch
service.

Some gages may have gaps in the historical record that could include
historic low flows. Gage with an asterisk denotes a significant dam
upstream.

                     June 23rd       June 23rd
USGS Streamgage    New Low Flow | Old Low Flow (Yr) | Yrs of Record

NORTHERN IDAHO AND EASTERN WASHINGTON
Boundary Creek        58cfs          83cfs(1940)         87
NF Coeur d Alene R   115cfs         149cfs(1992)         64
Coeur d Alene River  576cfs         667cfs(1940)         82
St Joe River         681cfs         940cfs(1926)         96
St Maries River       67cfs          73cfs(1992)         49
Spokane River*       993cfs        1580cfs(1992)        124

EAST CASCADES
Similkameen River   1580cfs        1720cfs(1940)         86
Andrews Creek         17cfs          24cfs(1992)         47
Methow River        1350cfs        1390cfs(2001)         56
Stehekin River      1320cfs        1550cfs(2005)         93
Entiat River         352cfs         377cfs(2005)         57
Wenatchee River     1210cfs        1410cfs(2005)         91
Chiwawa River        401cfs         566cfs(1941)         41
Icicle Creek         235cfs         439cfs(2005)         56

Statistical data for historic streamflow comparison can be found on
the USGS WaterWatch website at www.waterwatch.usgs.gov

River and lake level forecasts and observations can be found on the
Advanced Hydrologic Predicition Service website at
http://water.weather.gov/ahps2/index.php?wfo=otx

Water supply forecasts can be found on the Northwest River Forecast
Center website at www.nwrfc.noaa.gov

$$



000
NOUS46 KOTX 232150
PNSOTX

Public Information Statement
National Weather Service Spokane WA
300 PM PDT TUE JUN 23 2015


       ***RECORD LOW STREAMFLOWS FOR LATE JUNE***

Early melt off of our of below average snowpack in the Pacific
Northwest, combined with below average precipitation since April,
has pushed streamflows to record low levels for this time of the
year. The Inland Northwest generally sees its lowest streamflows
of the year in late September or early October. The table below
shows the latest observed streamflow and the previous record low
streamflow for June 23rd. Many more streams that are not listed
in this table are in their lowest 10th percentile of flow on
record for June 23rd. The data comes from the USGS WaterWatch
service.

Some gages may have gaps in the historical record that could include
historic low flows. Gage with an asterisk denotes a significant dam
upstream.

                     June 23rd       June 23rd
USGS Streamgage    New Low Flow | Old Low Flow (Yr) | Yrs of Record

NORTHERN IDAHO AND EASTERN WASHINGTON
Boundary Creek        58cfs          83cfs(1940)         87
NF Coeur d Alene R   115cfs         149cfs(1992)         64
Coeur d Alene River  576cfs         667cfs(1940)         82
St Joe River         681cfs         940cfs(1926)         96
St Maries River       67cfs          73cfs(1992)         49
Spokane River*       993cfs        1580cfs(1992)        124

EAST CASCADES
Similkameen River   1580cfs        1720cfs(1940)         86
Andrews Creek         17cfs          24cfs(1992)         47
Methow River        1350cfs        1390cfs(2001)         56
Stehekin River      1320cfs        1550cfs(2005)         93
Entiat River         352cfs         377cfs(2005)         57
Wenatchee River     1210cfs        1410cfs(2005)         91
Chiwawa River        401cfs         566cfs(1941)         41
Icicle Creek         235cfs         439cfs(2005)         56

Statistical data for historic streamflow comparison can be found on
the USGS WaterWatch website at www.waterwatch.usgs.gov

River and lake level forecasts and observations can be found on the
Advanced Hydrologic Predicition Service website at
http://water.weather.gov/ahps2/index.php?wfo=otx

Water supply forecasts can be found on the Northwest River Forecast
Center website at www.nwrfc.noaa.gov

$$



000
NOUS46 KOTX 232150
PNSOTX

Public Information Statement
National Weather Service Spokane WA
300 PM PDT TUE JUN 23 2015


       ***RECORD LOW STREAMFLOWS FOR LATE JUNE***

Early melt off of our of below average snowpack in the Pacific
Northwest, combined with below average precipitation since April,
has pushed streamflows to record low levels for this time of the
year. The Inland Northwest generally sees its lowest streamflows
of the year in late September or early October. The table below
shows the latest observed streamflow and the previous record low
streamflow for June 23rd. Many more streams that are not listed
in this table are in their lowest 10th percentile of flow on
record for June 23rd. The data comes from the USGS WaterWatch
service.

Some gages may have gaps in the historical record that could include
historic low flows. Gage with an asterisk denotes a significant dam
upstream.

                     June 23rd       June 23rd
USGS Streamgage    New Low Flow | Old Low Flow (Yr) | Yrs of Record

NORTHERN IDAHO AND EASTERN WASHINGTON
Boundary Creek        58cfs          83cfs(1940)         87
NF Coeur d Alene R   115cfs         149cfs(1992)         64
Coeur d Alene River  576cfs         667cfs(1940)         82
St Joe River         681cfs         940cfs(1926)         96
St Maries River       67cfs          73cfs(1992)         49
Spokane River*       993cfs        1580cfs(1992)        124

EAST CASCADES
Similkameen River   1580cfs        1720cfs(1940)         86
Andrews Creek         17cfs          24cfs(1992)         47
Methow River        1350cfs        1390cfs(2001)         56
Stehekin River      1320cfs        1550cfs(2005)         93
Entiat River         352cfs         377cfs(2005)         57
Wenatchee River     1210cfs        1410cfs(2005)         91
Chiwawa River        401cfs         566cfs(1941)         41
Icicle Creek         235cfs         439cfs(2005)         56

Statistical data for historic streamflow comparison can be found on
the USGS WaterWatch website at www.waterwatch.usgs.gov

River and lake level forecasts and observations can be found on the
Advanced Hydrologic Predicition Service website at
http://water.weather.gov/ahps2/index.php?wfo=otx

Water supply forecasts can be found on the Northwest River Forecast
Center website at www.nwrfc.noaa.gov

$$



000
NOUS46 KOTX 232150
PNSOTX

Public Information Statement
National Weather Service Spokane WA
300 PM PDT TUE JUN 23 2015


       ***RECORD LOW STREAMFLOWS FOR LATE JUNE***

Early melt off of our of below average snowpack in the Pacific
Northwest, combined with below average precipitation since April,
has pushed streamflows to record low levels for this time of the
year. The Inland Northwest generally sees its lowest streamflows
of the year in late September or early October. The table below
shows the latest observed streamflow and the previous record low
streamflow for June 23rd. Many more streams that are not listed
in this table are in their lowest 10th percentile of flow on
record for June 23rd. The data comes from the USGS WaterWatch
service.

Some gages may have gaps in the historical record that could include
historic low flows. Gage with an asterisk denotes a significant dam
upstream.

                     June 23rd       June 23rd
USGS Streamgage    New Low Flow | Old Low Flow (Yr) | Yrs of Record

NORTHERN IDAHO AND EASTERN WASHINGTON
Boundary Creek        58cfs          83cfs(1940)         87
NF Coeur d Alene R   115cfs         149cfs(1992)         64
Coeur d Alene River  576cfs         667cfs(1940)         82
St Joe River         681cfs         940cfs(1926)         96
St Maries River       67cfs          73cfs(1992)         49
Spokane River*       993cfs        1580cfs(1992)        124

EAST CASCADES
Similkameen River   1580cfs        1720cfs(1940)         86
Andrews Creek         17cfs          24cfs(1992)         47
Methow River        1350cfs        1390cfs(2001)         56
Stehekin River      1320cfs        1550cfs(2005)         93
Entiat River         352cfs         377cfs(2005)         57
Wenatchee River     1210cfs        1410cfs(2005)         91
Chiwawa River        401cfs         566cfs(1941)         41
Icicle Creek         235cfs         439cfs(2005)         56

Statistical data for historic streamflow comparison can be found on
the USGS WaterWatch website at www.waterwatch.usgs.gov

River and lake level forecasts and observations can be found on the
Advanced Hydrologic Predicition Service website at
http://water.weather.gov/ahps2/index.php?wfo=otx

Water supply forecasts can be found on the Northwest River Forecast
Center website at www.nwrfc.noaa.gov

$$



000
NOUS42 KMFL 231847
PNSMFL

NOUS42 KMFL 101658
PNSMFL

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT...UPDATED
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE MIAMI FL
245 PM EDT TUE JUN 23 2015

...NAPLES NOAA WEATHER RADIO TRANSMITTER OFF THE AIR...

WE APOLOGIZE FOR ANY ISSUES THIS MAY CAUSE. TECHNICIANS HAVE TAKEN
DOWN THE NAPLES TRANSMITTER TO WORK ON THE LOW POWER. RESTORE TIME
IS NOT KNOWN AT THIS TIME.

THE AFFECTED TRANSMITTER WAS:

TRANSMITTER   STATION   FREQUENCY
NAPLES        WWG92     162.525 MHZ

REMEMBER THAT THE LATEST WEATHER INFORMATION IS ALSO AVAILABLE ON
OUR WEBSITE AT WWW.WEATHER.GOV/SOUTHFLORIDA

$$


000
NOUS42 KMFL 231847
PNSMFL

NOUS42 KMFL 101658
PNSMFL

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT...UPDATED
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE MIAMI FL
245 PM EDT TUE JUN 23 2015

...NAPLES NOAA WEATHER RADIO TRANSMITTER OFF THE AIR...

WE APOLOGIZE FOR ANY ISSUES THIS MAY CAUSE. TECHNICIANS HAVE TAKEN
DOWN THE NAPLES TRANSMITTER TO WORK ON THE LOW POWER. RESTORE TIME
IS NOT KNOWN AT THIS TIME.

THE AFFECTED TRANSMITTER WAS:

TRANSMITTER   STATION   FREQUENCY
NAPLES        WWG92     162.525 MHZ

REMEMBER THAT THE LATEST WEATHER INFORMATION IS ALSO AVAILABLE ON
OUR WEBSITE AT WWW.WEATHER.GOV/SOUTHFLORIDA

$$



000
NOUS42 KMFL 231847
PNSMFL

NOUS42 KMFL 101658
PNSMFL

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT...UPDATED
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE MIAMI FL
245 PM EDT TUE JUN 23 2015

...NAPLES NOAA WEATHER RADIO TRANSMITTER OFF THE AIR...

WE APOLOGIZE FOR ANY ISSUES THIS MAY CAUSE. TECHNICIANS HAVE TAKEN
DOWN THE NAPLES TRANSMITTER TO WORK ON THE LOW POWER. RESTORE TIME
IS NOT KNOWN AT THIS TIME.

THE AFFECTED TRANSMITTER WAS:

TRANSMITTER   STATION   FREQUENCY
NAPLES        WWG92     162.525 MHZ

REMEMBER THAT THE LATEST WEATHER INFORMATION IS ALSO AVAILABLE ON
OUR WEBSITE AT WWW.WEATHER.GOV/SOUTHFLORIDA

$$



000
NOUS42 KMFL 231847
PNSMFL

NOUS42 KMFL 101658
PNSMFL

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT...UPDATED
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE MIAMI FL
245 PM EDT TUE JUN 23 2015

...NAPLES NOAA WEATHER RADIO TRANSMITTER OFF THE AIR...

WE APOLOGIZE FOR ANY ISSUES THIS MAY CAUSE. TECHNICIANS HAVE TAKEN
DOWN THE NAPLES TRANSMITTER TO WORK ON THE LOW POWER. RESTORE TIME
IS NOT KNOWN AT THIS TIME.

THE AFFECTED TRANSMITTER WAS:

TRANSMITTER   STATION   FREQUENCY
NAPLES        WWG92     162.525 MHZ

REMEMBER THAT THE LATEST WEATHER INFORMATION IS ALSO AVAILABLE ON
OUR WEBSITE AT WWW.WEATHER.GOV/SOUTHFLORIDA

$$


000
NOUS42 KMFL 231826
PNSMFL

NOUS42 KMFL 101658
PNSMFL

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE MIAMI FL
225 PM EDT TUE JUN 23 2015

...NAPLES NOAA WEATHER RADIO TRANSMITTER HAS VERY LOW POWER...

WE APOLOGIZE FOR ANY ISSUES THIS MAY CAUSE. TECHNICIANS ARE
INVESTIGATING THE ISSUE.

THE AFFECTED TRANSMITTER WAS:

TRANSMITTER   STATION   FREQUENCY
NAPLES        WWG92     162.525 MHZ

REMEMBER THAT THE LATEST WEATHER INFORMATION IS ALSO AVAILABLE ON
OUR WEBSITE AT WWW.WEATHER.GOV/SOUTHFLORIDA

$$



000
NOUS42 KMFL 231826
PNSMFL

NOUS42 KMFL 101658
PNSMFL

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE MIAMI FL
225 PM EDT TUE JUN 23 2015

...NAPLES NOAA WEATHER RADIO TRANSMITTER HAS VERY LOW POWER...

WE APOLOGIZE FOR ANY ISSUES THIS MAY CAUSE. TECHNICIANS ARE
INVESTIGATING THE ISSUE.

THE AFFECTED TRANSMITTER WAS:

TRANSMITTER   STATION   FREQUENCY
NAPLES        WWG92     162.525 MHZ

REMEMBER THAT THE LATEST WEATHER INFORMATION IS ALSO AVAILABLE ON
OUR WEBSITE AT WWW.WEATHER.GOV/SOUTHFLORIDA

$$


000
NOUS41 KCAR 231608
PNSCAR

ZCZC PWMWRKTUE 192002
TTAA00 KPWM DDHHMM

...LIGHTNING SAFETY AWARENESS WEEK...

THE NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE HAS DECLARED THE WEEK OF JUNE 21ST
THROUGH 27TH, LIGHTNING SAFETY AWARENESS WEEK.  THIS IS THE SECOND
IN A SERIES OF FIVE PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENTS TO BE ISSUED BY
THE NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE OFFICE IN CARIBOUT, ME CONTAINING
INFORMATION ON LIGHTNING AND LIGHTNING SAFETY.

LIGHTNING`S MOST DEADLY ACTIVITIES

IF YOU`RE OUTSIDE WHEN A THUNDERSTORM IS IN THE AREA, YOU`RE AT RISK
OF BEING STRUCK AND POTENTIALLY KILLED OR SERIOUSLY INJURED BY
LIGHTNING.  HOWEVER, THERE ARE SOME ACTIVITIES THAT LEAD TO MORE
LIGHTNING DEATHS AND INJURIES THAN OTHERS.  IN THE PAST NINE YEARS,
LEISURE ACTIVITIES LED TO ALMOST TWO THIRDS OF THE LIGHTNING
FATALITIES IN THE UNITED STATES. WATER-RELATED ACTIVITIES, AND
PARTICULARLY FISHING, CONTRIBUTED MOST TO THE FATALITIES. SINCE
2006, 33 PEOPLE WHO HAD BEEN FISHING DIED AS A RESULT OF LIGHTNING.
BOATING AND BEACH ACTIVITIES ALSO CONTRIBUTED SIGNIFICANTLY TO THE
DEATH TOLL.  IN MOST CASES, VICTIMS SIMPLY WAITED FAR TOO LONG
BEFORE STARTING TO SEEK SHELTER.

WHEN IT COMES TO WATER-RELATED ACTIVITIES, THERE ARE SEVERAL
IMPORTANT THINGS TO REMEMBER.

  * ALWAYS HAVE A PLAN SO THAT YOU CAN GET TO A SAFE PLACE BEFORE
THE STORM ARRIVES.

  * HEAD TO THAT SAFE PLACE IMMEDIATELY IF YOU SEE ANY SIGNS OF A
DEVELOPING OR APPROACHING THUNDERSTORM.  DON`T HESITATE.

QUESTION OF THE DAY  IF WATER ACTIVITIES ARE SO DANGEROUS, WHY
DON`T ALL THE FISH IN A POND OR LAKE GET KILLED WHEN LIGHTNING
STRIKES THE WATER?

WHEN LIGHTNING STRIKES WATER, MOST OF THE DISCHARGE OCCURS ALONG THE
SURFACE OF THE WATER.  SINCE MOST FISH SWIM WELL BELOW THE WATER
SURFACE, THEY ARE SAFE.  HOWEVER, PEOPLE NORMALLY SWIM ALONG THE
SURFACE OF THE WATER AND CAN EASILY KILLED BY A LIGHTNING DISCHARGE.

FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION ABOUT LIGHTNING OR LIGHTNING SAFETY,
VISIT NOAA`S LIGHTNING SAFETY AWARENESS WEB SITE AT:

HTTP://WWW.LIGHTNINGSAFETY.NOAA.GOV

$$


000
NOUS41 KCAR 231608
PNSCAR

ZCZC PWMWRKTUE 192002
TTAA00 KPWM DDHHMM

...LIGHTNING SAFETY AWARENESS WEEK...

THE NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE HAS DECLARED THE WEEK OF JUNE 21ST
THROUGH 27TH, LIGHTNING SAFETY AWARENESS WEEK.  THIS IS THE SECOND
IN A SERIES OF FIVE PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENTS TO BE ISSUED BY
THE NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE OFFICE IN CARIBOUT, ME CONTAINING
INFORMATION ON LIGHTNING AND LIGHTNING SAFETY.

LIGHTNING`S MOST DEADLY ACTIVITIES

IF YOU`RE OUTSIDE WHEN A THUNDERSTORM IS IN THE AREA, YOU`RE AT RISK
OF BEING STRUCK AND POTENTIALLY KILLED OR SERIOUSLY INJURED BY
LIGHTNING.  HOWEVER, THERE ARE SOME ACTIVITIES THAT LEAD TO MORE
LIGHTNING DEATHS AND INJURIES THAN OTHERS.  IN THE PAST NINE YEARS,
LEISURE ACTIVITIES LED TO ALMOST TWO THIRDS OF THE LIGHTNING
FATALITIES IN THE UNITED STATES. WATER-RELATED ACTIVITIES, AND
PARTICULARLY FISHING, CONTRIBUTED MOST TO THE FATALITIES. SINCE
2006, 33 PEOPLE WHO HAD BEEN FISHING DIED AS A RESULT OF LIGHTNING.
BOATING AND BEACH ACTIVITIES ALSO CONTRIBUTED SIGNIFICANTLY TO THE
DEATH TOLL.  IN MOST CASES, VICTIMS SIMPLY WAITED FAR TOO LONG
BEFORE STARTING TO SEEK SHELTER.

WHEN IT COMES TO WATER-RELATED ACTIVITIES, THERE ARE SEVERAL
IMPORTANT THINGS TO REMEMBER.

  * ALWAYS HAVE A PLAN SO THAT YOU CAN GET TO A SAFE PLACE BEFORE
THE STORM ARRIVES.

  * HEAD TO THAT SAFE PLACE IMMEDIATELY IF YOU SEE ANY SIGNS OF A
DEVELOPING OR APPROACHING THUNDERSTORM.  DON`T HESITATE.

QUESTION OF THE DAY  IF WATER ACTIVITIES ARE SO DANGEROUS, WHY
DON`T ALL THE FISH IN A POND OR LAKE GET KILLED WHEN LIGHTNING
STRIKES THE WATER?

WHEN LIGHTNING STRIKES WATER, MOST OF THE DISCHARGE OCCURS ALONG THE
SURFACE OF THE WATER.  SINCE MOST FISH SWIM WELL BELOW THE WATER
SURFACE, THEY ARE SAFE.  HOWEVER, PEOPLE NORMALLY SWIM ALONG THE
SURFACE OF THE WATER AND CAN EASILY KILLED BY A LIGHTNING DISCHARGE.

FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION ABOUT LIGHTNING OR LIGHTNING SAFETY,
VISIT NOAA`S LIGHTNING SAFETY AWARENESS WEB SITE AT:

HTTP://WWW.LIGHTNINGSAFETY.NOAA.GOV

$$



000
NOUS41 KCAR 231608
PNSCAR

ZCZC PWMWRKTUE 192002
TTAA00 KPWM DDHHMM

...LIGHTNING SAFETY AWARENESS WEEK...

THE NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE HAS DECLARED THE WEEK OF JUNE 21ST
THROUGH 27TH, LIGHTNING SAFETY AWARENESS WEEK.  THIS IS THE SECOND
IN A SERIES OF FIVE PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENTS TO BE ISSUED BY
THE NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE OFFICE IN CARIBOUT, ME CONTAINING
INFORMATION ON LIGHTNING AND LIGHTNING SAFETY.

LIGHTNING`S MOST DEADLY ACTIVITIES

IF YOU`RE OUTSIDE WHEN A THUNDERSTORM IS IN THE AREA, YOU`RE AT RISK
OF BEING STRUCK AND POTENTIALLY KILLED OR SERIOUSLY INJURED BY
LIGHTNING.  HOWEVER, THERE ARE SOME ACTIVITIES THAT LEAD TO MORE
LIGHTNING DEATHS AND INJURIES THAN OTHERS.  IN THE PAST NINE YEARS,
LEISURE ACTIVITIES LED TO ALMOST TWO THIRDS OF THE LIGHTNING
FATALITIES IN THE UNITED STATES. WATER-RELATED ACTIVITIES, AND
PARTICULARLY FISHING, CONTRIBUTED MOST TO THE FATALITIES. SINCE
2006, 33 PEOPLE WHO HAD BEEN FISHING DIED AS A RESULT OF LIGHTNING.
BOATING AND BEACH ACTIVITIES ALSO CONTRIBUTED SIGNIFICANTLY TO THE
DEATH TOLL.  IN MOST CASES, VICTIMS SIMPLY WAITED FAR TOO LONG
BEFORE STARTING TO SEEK SHELTER.

WHEN IT COMES TO WATER-RELATED ACTIVITIES, THERE ARE SEVERAL
IMPORTANT THINGS TO REMEMBER.

  * ALWAYS HAVE A PLAN SO THAT YOU CAN GET TO A SAFE PLACE BEFORE
THE STORM ARRIVES.

  * HEAD TO THAT SAFE PLACE IMMEDIATELY IF YOU SEE ANY SIGNS OF A
DEVELOPING OR APPROACHING THUNDERSTORM.  DON`T HESITATE.

QUESTION OF THE DAY  IF WATER ACTIVITIES ARE SO DANGEROUS, WHY
DON`T ALL THE FISH IN A POND OR LAKE GET KILLED WHEN LIGHTNING
STRIKES THE WATER?

WHEN LIGHTNING STRIKES WATER, MOST OF THE DISCHARGE OCCURS ALONG THE
SURFACE OF THE WATER.  SINCE MOST FISH SWIM WELL BELOW THE WATER
SURFACE, THEY ARE SAFE.  HOWEVER, PEOPLE NORMALLY SWIM ALONG THE
SURFACE OF THE WATER AND CAN EASILY KILLED BY A LIGHTNING DISCHARGE.

FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION ABOUT LIGHTNING OR LIGHTNING SAFETY,
VISIT NOAA`S LIGHTNING SAFETY AWARENESS WEB SITE AT:

HTTP://WWW.LIGHTNINGSAFETY.NOAA.GOV

$$



000
NOUS41 KCAR 231608
PNSCAR

ZCZC PWMWRKTUE 192002
TTAA00 KPWM DDHHMM

...LIGHTNING SAFETY AWARENESS WEEK...

THE NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE HAS DECLARED THE WEEK OF JUNE 21ST
THROUGH 27TH, LIGHTNING SAFETY AWARENESS WEEK.  THIS IS THE SECOND
IN A SERIES OF FIVE PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENTS TO BE ISSUED BY
THE NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE OFFICE IN CARIBOUT, ME CONTAINING
INFORMATION ON LIGHTNING AND LIGHTNING SAFETY.

LIGHTNING`S MOST DEADLY ACTIVITIES

IF YOU`RE OUTSIDE WHEN A THUNDERSTORM IS IN THE AREA, YOU`RE AT RISK
OF BEING STRUCK AND POTENTIALLY KILLED OR SERIOUSLY INJURED BY
LIGHTNING.  HOWEVER, THERE ARE SOME ACTIVITIES THAT LEAD TO MORE
LIGHTNING DEATHS AND INJURIES THAN OTHERS.  IN THE PAST NINE YEARS,
LEISURE ACTIVITIES LED TO ALMOST TWO THIRDS OF THE LIGHTNING
FATALITIES IN THE UNITED STATES. WATER-RELATED ACTIVITIES, AND
PARTICULARLY FISHING, CONTRIBUTED MOST TO THE FATALITIES. SINCE
2006, 33 PEOPLE WHO HAD BEEN FISHING DIED AS A RESULT OF LIGHTNING.
BOATING AND BEACH ACTIVITIES ALSO CONTRIBUTED SIGNIFICANTLY TO THE
DEATH TOLL.  IN MOST CASES, VICTIMS SIMPLY WAITED FAR TOO LONG
BEFORE STARTING TO SEEK SHELTER.

WHEN IT COMES TO WATER-RELATED ACTIVITIES, THERE ARE SEVERAL
IMPORTANT THINGS TO REMEMBER.

  * ALWAYS HAVE A PLAN SO THAT YOU CAN GET TO A SAFE PLACE BEFORE
THE STORM ARRIVES.

  * HEAD TO THAT SAFE PLACE IMMEDIATELY IF YOU SEE ANY SIGNS OF A
DEVELOPING OR APPROACHING THUNDERSTORM.  DON`T HESITATE.

QUESTION OF THE DAY  IF WATER ACTIVITIES ARE SO DANGEROUS, WHY
DON`T ALL THE FISH IN A POND OR LAKE GET KILLED WHEN LIGHTNING
STRIKES THE WATER?

WHEN LIGHTNING STRIKES WATER, MOST OF THE DISCHARGE OCCURS ALONG THE
SURFACE OF THE WATER.  SINCE MOST FISH SWIM WELL BELOW THE WATER
SURFACE, THEY ARE SAFE.  HOWEVER, PEOPLE NORMALLY SWIM ALONG THE
SURFACE OF THE WATER AND CAN EASILY KILLED BY A LIGHTNING DISCHARGE.

FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION ABOUT LIGHTNING OR LIGHTNING SAFETY,
VISIT NOAA`S LIGHTNING SAFETY AWARENESS WEB SITE AT:

HTTP://WWW.LIGHTNINGSAFETY.NOAA.GOV

$$



000
NOUS41 KCAR 231608
PNSCAR

ZCZC PWMWRKTUE 192002
TTAA00 KPWM DDHHMM

...LIGHTNING SAFETY AWARENESS WEEK...

THE NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE HAS DECLARED THE WEEK OF JUNE 21ST
THROUGH 27TH, LIGHTNING SAFETY AWARENESS WEEK.  THIS IS THE SECOND
IN A SERIES OF FIVE PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENTS TO BE ISSUED BY
THE NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE OFFICE IN CARIBOUT, ME CONTAINING
INFORMATION ON LIGHTNING AND LIGHTNING SAFETY.

LIGHTNING`S MOST DEADLY ACTIVITIES

IF YOU`RE OUTSIDE WHEN A THUNDERSTORM IS IN THE AREA, YOU`RE AT RISK
OF BEING STRUCK AND POTENTIALLY KILLED OR SERIOUSLY INJURED BY
LIGHTNING.  HOWEVER, THERE ARE SOME ACTIVITIES THAT LEAD TO MORE
LIGHTNING DEATHS AND INJURIES THAN OTHERS.  IN THE PAST NINE YEARS,
LEISURE ACTIVITIES LED TO ALMOST TWO THIRDS OF THE LIGHTNING
FATALITIES IN THE UNITED STATES. WATER-RELATED ACTIVITIES, AND
PARTICULARLY FISHING, CONTRIBUTED MOST TO THE FATALITIES. SINCE
2006, 33 PEOPLE WHO HAD BEEN FISHING DIED AS A RESULT OF LIGHTNING.
BOATING AND BEACH ACTIVITIES ALSO CONTRIBUTED SIGNIFICANTLY TO THE
DEATH TOLL.  IN MOST CASES, VICTIMS SIMPLY WAITED FAR TOO LONG
BEFORE STARTING TO SEEK SHELTER.

WHEN IT COMES TO WATER-RELATED ACTIVITIES, THERE ARE SEVERAL
IMPORTANT THINGS TO REMEMBER.

  * ALWAYS HAVE A PLAN SO THAT YOU CAN GET TO A SAFE PLACE BEFORE
THE STORM ARRIVES.

  * HEAD TO THAT SAFE PLACE IMMEDIATELY IF YOU SEE ANY SIGNS OF A
DEVELOPING OR APPROACHING THUNDERSTORM.  DON`T HESITATE.

QUESTION OF THE DAY  IF WATER ACTIVITIES ARE SO DANGEROUS, WHY
DON`T ALL THE FISH IN A POND OR LAKE GET KILLED WHEN LIGHTNING
STRIKES THE WATER?

WHEN LIGHTNING STRIKES WATER, MOST OF THE DISCHARGE OCCURS ALONG THE
SURFACE OF THE WATER.  SINCE MOST FISH SWIM WELL BELOW THE WATER
SURFACE, THEY ARE SAFE.  HOWEVER, PEOPLE NORMALLY SWIM ALONG THE
SURFACE OF THE WATER AND CAN EASILY KILLED BY A LIGHTNING DISCHARGE.

FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION ABOUT LIGHTNING OR LIGHTNING SAFETY,
VISIT NOAA`S LIGHTNING SAFETY AWARENESS WEB SITE AT:

HTTP://WWW.LIGHTNINGSAFETY.NOAA.GOV

$$



000
NOUS41 KCAR 231608
PNSCAR

ZCZC PWMWRKTUE 192002
TTAA00 KPWM DDHHMM

...LIGHTNING SAFETY AWARENESS WEEK...

THE NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE HAS DECLARED THE WEEK OF JUNE 21ST
THROUGH 27TH, LIGHTNING SAFETY AWARENESS WEEK.  THIS IS THE SECOND
IN A SERIES OF FIVE PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENTS TO BE ISSUED BY
THE NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE OFFICE IN CARIBOUT, ME CONTAINING
INFORMATION ON LIGHTNING AND LIGHTNING SAFETY.

LIGHTNING`S MOST DEADLY ACTIVITIES

IF YOU`RE OUTSIDE WHEN A THUNDERSTORM IS IN THE AREA, YOU`RE AT RISK
OF BEING STRUCK AND POTENTIALLY KILLED OR SERIOUSLY INJURED BY
LIGHTNING.  HOWEVER, THERE ARE SOME ACTIVITIES THAT LEAD TO MORE
LIGHTNING DEATHS AND INJURIES THAN OTHERS.  IN THE PAST NINE YEARS,
LEISURE ACTIVITIES LED TO ALMOST TWO THIRDS OF THE LIGHTNING
FATALITIES IN THE UNITED STATES. WATER-RELATED ACTIVITIES, AND
PARTICULARLY FISHING, CONTRIBUTED MOST TO THE FATALITIES. SINCE
2006, 33 PEOPLE WHO HAD BEEN FISHING DIED AS A RESULT OF LIGHTNING.
BOATING AND BEACH ACTIVITIES ALSO CONTRIBUTED SIGNIFICANTLY TO THE
DEATH TOLL.  IN MOST CASES, VICTIMS SIMPLY WAITED FAR TOO LONG
BEFORE STARTING TO SEEK SHELTER.

WHEN IT COMES TO WATER-RELATED ACTIVITIES, THERE ARE SEVERAL
IMPORTANT THINGS TO REMEMBER.

  * ALWAYS HAVE A PLAN SO THAT YOU CAN GET TO A SAFE PLACE BEFORE
THE STORM ARRIVES.

  * HEAD TO THAT SAFE PLACE IMMEDIATELY IF YOU SEE ANY SIGNS OF A
DEVELOPING OR APPROACHING THUNDERSTORM.  DON`T HESITATE.

QUESTION OF THE DAY  IF WATER ACTIVITIES ARE SO DANGEROUS, WHY
DON`T ALL THE FISH IN A POND OR LAKE GET KILLED WHEN LIGHTNING
STRIKES THE WATER?

WHEN LIGHTNING STRIKES WATER, MOST OF THE DISCHARGE OCCURS ALONG THE
SURFACE OF THE WATER.  SINCE MOST FISH SWIM WELL BELOW THE WATER
SURFACE, THEY ARE SAFE.  HOWEVER, PEOPLE NORMALLY SWIM ALONG THE
SURFACE OF THE WATER AND CAN EASILY KILLED BY A LIGHTNING DISCHARGE.

FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION ABOUT LIGHTNING OR LIGHTNING SAFETY,
VISIT NOAA`S LIGHTNING SAFETY AWARENESS WEB SITE AT:

HTTP://WWW.LIGHTNINGSAFETY.NOAA.GOV

$$



000
NOUS45 KGJT 231355
PNSGJT

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
PRELIMINARY RECORD EVENT REPORT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE GRAND JUNCTION CO
755 AM MDT TUE JUN 23 2015

...RECORD HIGH TEMPERATURE MONDAY...

IN WESTERN COLORADO...

AT RIDGWAY, THE HIGH TEMPERATURE MONDAY WAS 92. THIS SET A NEW
RECORD HIGH FOR JUNE 22, BREAKING THE PREVIOUS RECORD OF 89, SET IN
2007.

$$


000
NOUS45 KGJT 231355
PNSGJT

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
PRELIMINARY RECORD EVENT REPORT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE GRAND JUNCTION CO
755 AM MDT TUE JUN 23 2015

...RECORD HIGH TEMPERATURE MONDAY...

IN WESTERN COLORADO...

AT RIDGWAY, THE HIGH TEMPERATURE MONDAY WAS 92. THIS SET A NEW
RECORD HIGH FOR JUNE 22, BREAKING THE PREVIOUS RECORD OF 89, SET IN
2007.

$$



000
NOUS45 KGJT 231355
PNSGJT

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
PRELIMINARY RECORD EVENT REPORT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE GRAND JUNCTION CO
755 AM MDT TUE JUN 23 2015

...RECORD HIGH TEMPERATURE MONDAY...

IN WESTERN COLORADO...

AT RIDGWAY, THE HIGH TEMPERATURE MONDAY WAS 92. THIS SET A NEW
RECORD HIGH FOR JUNE 22, BREAKING THE PREVIOUS RECORD OF 89, SET IN
2007.

$$



000
NOUS45 KGJT 231355
PNSGJT

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
PRELIMINARY RECORD EVENT REPORT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE GRAND JUNCTION CO
755 AM MDT TUE JUN 23 2015

...RECORD HIGH TEMPERATURE MONDAY...

IN WESTERN COLORADO...

AT RIDGWAY, THE HIGH TEMPERATURE MONDAY WAS 92. THIS SET A NEW
RECORD HIGH FOR JUNE 22, BREAKING THE PREVIOUS RECORD OF 89, SET IN
2007.

$$


000
NOUS43 KGLD 231200
PNSGLD

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE GOODLAND KS
600 AM MDT TUE JUN 23 2015

...ON THIS DATE IN WEATHER HISTORY...

IN 2003, SEVERE THUNDERSTORMS DEVELOPED ACROSS NORTHWEST KANSAS
AND SOUTHWEST NEBRASKA DURING THE LATE AFTERNOON AND EARLY EVENING HOURS.
LARGE HAIL UP TO TENNIS BALLS AND STRONG WINDS UP TO 75 MPH WERE REPORTED
ACROSS GRAHAM, WICHITA, DECATUR, RED WILLOW AND HITCHCOCK COUNTIES.
BROKEN WINDOWS AND POWER OUTAGES DUE TO SEVERE WEATHER WERE REPORTED
ACROSS PARTS OF RED WILLOW COUNTY.

$$



000
NOUS43 KGLD 231200
PNSGLD

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE GOODLAND KS
600 AM MDT TUE JUN 23 2015

...ON THIS DATE IN WEATHER HISTORY...

IN 2003, SEVERE THUNDERSTORMS DEVELOPED ACROSS NORTHWEST KANSAS
AND SOUTHWEST NEBRASKA DURING THE LATE AFTERNOON AND EARLY EVENING HOURS.
LARGE HAIL UP TO TENNIS BALLS AND STRONG WINDS UP TO 75 MPH WERE REPORTED
ACROSS GRAHAM, WICHITA, DECATUR, RED WILLOW AND HITCHCOCK COUNTIES.
BROKEN WINDOWS AND POWER OUTAGES DUE TO SEVERE WEATHER WERE REPORTED
ACROSS PARTS OF RED WILLOW COUNTY.

$$


000
NOUS45 KBOU 231156
PNSBOU

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE PUEBLO CO
600 AM MDT TUE JUN 23 2015

COLORADO LIGHTNING SAFETY WEEK CONTINUES THROUGH THIS SATURDAY.
TODAY WE DISCUSS THE SCIENCE OF LIGHTNING.

EVERY THUNDERSTORM PRODUCES LIGHTNING.  LIGHTNING IS A GIANT SPARK
THAT MOVES WITHIN THE CLOUD...BETWEEN CLOUDS...OR BETWEEN THE CLOUD
AND THE GROUND.  AS LIGHTNING PASSES THROUGH THE AIR...IT HEATS THE
AIR RAPIDLY TO A TEMPERATURE OF ABOUT FIFTY THOUSAND DEGREES
FAHRENHEIT.  THIS CAUSES A RAPID EXPANSION OF THE AIR NEAR THE
LIGHTNING CHANNEL.  THIS RAPID EXPANSION CAUSES A SHOCK WAVE THAT WE
HEAR AS THUNDER.

THUNDERSTORMS WILL FORM IF THERE IS SUFFICIENT MOISTURE AND
INSTABILITY IN THE ATMOSPHERE. AS THE SUN WARMS THE AIR NEAR THE
GROUND...POCKETS OF WARMER AIR BEGIN TO RISE AND COOL.  CONDENSATION
OF WATER VAPOR CAUSES CUMULUS CLOUDS TO FORM.  CONTINUED HEATING CAN
CAUSE THESE CLOUDS TO CONTINUE TO GROW UPWARD INTO THE ATMOSPHERE.
TOWERING CUMULUS CLOUDS MAY BE ONE OF THE FIRST INDICATIONS OF A
DEVELOPING THUNDERSTORM.  THE MATURE THUNDERSTORM HAS BOTH AN
UPDRAFT OF RISING MOTION AND A DOWNDRAFT OF SINKING COOL AIR
ACCOMPANIED BY RAIN AND SOMETIMES HAIL.

THUNDERSTORMS GROW TENS OF THOUSANDS OF FEET INTO THE ATMOSPHERE. IN
THE CLOUD...PRECIPITATION FORMS AS ICE CRYSTALS...GRAUPEL...AND
RAIN. COLLISIONS BETWEEN THESE PARTICLES CAUSE A CHARGE SEPARATION,
WITH THE POSITIVELY CHARGED ICE CRYSTALS CARRIED UP INTO THE
UPDRAFT...WHILE THE NEGATIVELY CHARGED HEAVIER GRAUPEL FALLS DOWN
TOWARDS THE LOWER PART OF THE STORM. WITH TIME...THE TOP OF THE
CLOUD BECOMES POSITIVELY CHARGED AND THE LOWER PART OF THE STORM
BECOMES NEGATIVELY CHARGED.

DUE TO THE POOL OF NEGATIVE CHARGES IN THE LOWER PART OF THE
STORM...A POOL OF POSITIVE CHARGES WILL DEVELOP ALONG THE GROUND AND
FOLLOW THE CLOUD LIKE A SHADOW.  FARTHER AWAY FROM THE CLOUD
BASE...BUT UNDER THE POSITIVELY CHARGED ANVIL...A STRONG NEGATIVE
CHARGE MAY BE INDUCED.

CLOUD-TO-GROUND LIGHTNING CAN EITHER BE A NEGATIVELY CHARGED FLASH
OR A POSITIVELY CHARGED FLASH.  THE NEGATIVE FLASH USUALLY OCCURS
BETWEEN THE NEGATIVE CHARGES IN THE LOWER PART OF THE STORM AND THE
POSITIVE CHARGES ON THE GROUND UNDER AND NEAR THE CLOUD BASE.
POSITIVE FLASHES USUALLY OCCUR BETWEEN THE POSITIVELY-CHARGED UPPER
LEVELS OF THE STORM AND THE NEGATIVELY CHARGED AREA SURROUNDING THE
STORM.

IN THE NEGATIVE CLOUD-TO-GROUND FLASH...A NEGATIVELY-CHARGED STEP
LEADER FORMS AND BEGINS TO MOVE DOWN TOWARD THE GROUND.  AS THIS
STEP LEADER APPROACHES THE GROUND...STREAMERS OF POSITIVE CHARGE
MOVE UPWARD FROM THE EARTHS SURFACE.  WHEN THESE UPWARD STREAMERS
MEET THE STEP LEADER...THE CONNECTION IS COMPLETED...AND THE RESULT
IS A CLOUD-TO-GROUND LIGHTNING FLASH.  THE ENTIRE PROCESS TAKES
PLACE IN FRACTIONS OF A SECOND.  IF YOU ARE UNDER A THUNDERSTORM AND
YOUR HAIR RISES...YOU ARE IN AN AREA WHERE THE POSITIVE ELECTRICAL
CHARGES ARE RISING UP OBJECTS TOWARDS THE STORM. YOU ARE IN A
DANGEROUS LOCATION...BECAUSE LIGHTNING MAY BE ABOUT TO STRIKE!

THE PROCESS FOR A POSITIVE FLASH IS SIMILAR EXCEPT THAT A POSITIVE
CHANNEL USUALLY ORIGINATES IN THE ANVIL OF THE STORM AND SURGES
DOWNWARD.  IN THIS CASE...STREAMERS OF NEGATIVE CHARGE SHOOT UP TO
MEET THE POSITIVELY-CHARGED CHANNEL AS IT APPROACHES THE GROUND.
WHEN A CONNECTION IS MADE...A POSITIVE FLASH OF LIGHTNING OCCURS.

WHILE BOTH NEGATIVE AND POSITIVE FLASHES OF LIGHTNING CAN BE
DEADLY...THE POSITIVE FLASHES GENERALLY ARE MORE DESTRUCTIVE AS THEY
TYPICALLY DELIVER MORE OVERALL ELECTRICAL CHARGE TO THE GROUND...AND
THEY REMAIN IN CONTACT WITH THE GROUND SURFACE FOR A LONGER PERIOD
OF TIME AS COMPARED TO A NEGATIVE CLOUD-TO-GROUND FLASH.

THE BEST ADVICE IN ORDER TO MINIMIZE YOUR RISK OF BECOMING A
LIGHTNING STRIKE VICTIM IS TO GET INDOORS INTO A SUBSTANTIAL SHELTER
THE SECOND YOU HEAR THUNDER...AND TO REMAIN THERE FOR AT LEAST 30
MINUTES AFTER THE LAST RUMBLE OF THUNDER.  IN GENERAL...WHEN THUNDER
ROARS...GO INDOORS. AN ENCLOSED HARD TOPPED AUTOMOBILE IS ALSO A
SAFE PLACE TO BE DURING THUNDERSTORMS.

NOAAS LIGHTNING WEBSITE WHICH CONTAINS ABUNDANT INFORMATION ON
LIGHTNING SAFETY CAN BE FOUND AT...

LIGHTNINGSAFETY.NOAA.GOV

LIGHTNING INFORMATION SPECIFIC FOR THE STATE OF COLORADO CAN BE
FOUND AT...

WEATHER.GOV/PUB/LIGHTNING

THE LIGHTNING TOPIC FOR TOMORROW WILL BE OUTDOOR LIGHTNING RISK REDUCTION.


000
NOUS45 KBOU 231156
PNSBOU

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE PUEBLO CO
600 AM MDT TUE JUN 23 2015

COLORADO LIGHTNING SAFETY WEEK CONTINUES THROUGH THIS SATURDAY.
TODAY WE DISCUSS THE SCIENCE OF LIGHTNING.

EVERY THUNDERSTORM PRODUCES LIGHTNING.  LIGHTNING IS A GIANT SPARK
THAT MOVES WITHIN THE CLOUD...BETWEEN CLOUDS...OR BETWEEN THE CLOUD
AND THE GROUND.  AS LIGHTNING PASSES THROUGH THE AIR...IT HEATS THE
AIR RAPIDLY TO A TEMPERATURE OF ABOUT FIFTY THOUSAND DEGREES
FAHRENHEIT.  THIS CAUSES A RAPID EXPANSION OF THE AIR NEAR THE
LIGHTNING CHANNEL.  THIS RAPID EXPANSION CAUSES A SHOCK WAVE THAT WE
HEAR AS THUNDER.

THUNDERSTORMS WILL FORM IF THERE IS SUFFICIENT MOISTURE AND
INSTABILITY IN THE ATMOSPHERE. AS THE SUN WARMS THE AIR NEAR THE
GROUND...POCKETS OF WARMER AIR BEGIN TO RISE AND COOL.  CONDENSATION
OF WATER VAPOR CAUSES CUMULUS CLOUDS TO FORM.  CONTINUED HEATING CAN
CAUSE THESE CLOUDS TO CONTINUE TO GROW UPWARD INTO THE ATMOSPHERE.
TOWERING CUMULUS CLOUDS MAY BE ONE OF THE FIRST INDICATIONS OF A
DEVELOPING THUNDERSTORM.  THE MATURE THUNDERSTORM HAS BOTH AN
UPDRAFT OF RISING MOTION AND A DOWNDRAFT OF SINKING COOL AIR
ACCOMPANIED BY RAIN AND SOMETIMES HAIL.

THUNDERSTORMS GROW TENS OF THOUSANDS OF FEET INTO THE ATMOSPHERE. IN
THE CLOUD...PRECIPITATION FORMS AS ICE CRYSTALS...GRAUPEL...AND
RAIN. COLLISIONS BETWEEN THESE PARTICLES CAUSE A CHARGE SEPARATION,
WITH THE POSITIVELY CHARGED ICE CRYSTALS CARRIED UP INTO THE
UPDRAFT...WHILE THE NEGATIVELY CHARGED HEAVIER GRAUPEL FALLS DOWN
TOWARDS THE LOWER PART OF THE STORM. WITH TIME...THE TOP OF THE
CLOUD BECOMES POSITIVELY CHARGED AND THE LOWER PART OF THE STORM
BECOMES NEGATIVELY CHARGED.

DUE TO THE POOL OF NEGATIVE CHARGES IN THE LOWER PART OF THE
STORM...A POOL OF POSITIVE CHARGES WILL DEVELOP ALONG THE GROUND AND
FOLLOW THE CLOUD LIKE A SHADOW.  FARTHER AWAY FROM THE CLOUD
BASE...BUT UNDER THE POSITIVELY CHARGED ANVIL...A STRONG NEGATIVE
CHARGE MAY BE INDUCED.

CLOUD-TO-GROUND LIGHTNING CAN EITHER BE A NEGATIVELY CHARGED FLASH
OR A POSITIVELY CHARGED FLASH.  THE NEGATIVE FLASH USUALLY OCCURS
BETWEEN THE NEGATIVE CHARGES IN THE LOWER PART OF THE STORM AND THE
POSITIVE CHARGES ON THE GROUND UNDER AND NEAR THE CLOUD BASE.
POSITIVE FLASHES USUALLY OCCUR BETWEEN THE POSITIVELY-CHARGED UPPER
LEVELS OF THE STORM AND THE NEGATIVELY CHARGED AREA SURROUNDING THE
STORM.

IN THE NEGATIVE CLOUD-TO-GROUND FLASH...A NEGATIVELY-CHARGED STEP
LEADER FORMS AND BEGINS TO MOVE DOWN TOWARD THE GROUND.  AS THIS
STEP LEADER APPROACHES THE GROUND...STREAMERS OF POSITIVE CHARGE
MOVE UPWARD FROM THE EARTHS SURFACE.  WHEN THESE UPWARD STREAMERS
MEET THE STEP LEADER...THE CONNECTION IS COMPLETED...AND THE RESULT
IS A CLOUD-TO-GROUND LIGHTNING FLASH.  THE ENTIRE PROCESS TAKES
PLACE IN FRACTIONS OF A SECOND.  IF YOU ARE UNDER A THUNDERSTORM AND
YOUR HAIR RISES...YOU ARE IN AN AREA WHERE THE POSITIVE ELECTRICAL
CHARGES ARE RISING UP OBJECTS TOWARDS THE STORM. YOU ARE IN A
DANGEROUS LOCATION...BECAUSE LIGHTNING MAY BE ABOUT TO STRIKE!

THE PROCESS FOR A POSITIVE FLASH IS SIMILAR EXCEPT THAT A POSITIVE
CHANNEL USUALLY ORIGINATES IN THE ANVIL OF THE STORM AND SURGES
DOWNWARD.  IN THIS CASE...STREAMERS OF NEGATIVE CHARGE SHOOT UP TO
MEET THE POSITIVELY-CHARGED CHANNEL AS IT APPROACHES THE GROUND.
WHEN A CONNECTION IS MADE...A POSITIVE FLASH OF LIGHTNING OCCURS.

WHILE BOTH NEGATIVE AND POSITIVE FLASHES OF LIGHTNING CAN BE
DEADLY...THE POSITIVE FLASHES GENERALLY ARE MORE DESTRUCTIVE AS THEY
TYPICALLY DELIVER MORE OVERALL ELECTRICAL CHARGE TO THE GROUND...AND
THEY REMAIN IN CONTACT WITH THE GROUND SURFACE FOR A LONGER PERIOD
OF TIME AS COMPARED TO A NEGATIVE CLOUD-TO-GROUND FLASH.

THE BEST ADVICE IN ORDER TO MINIMIZE YOUR RISK OF BECOMING A
LIGHTNING STRIKE VICTIM IS TO GET INDOORS INTO A SUBSTANTIAL SHELTER
THE SECOND YOU HEAR THUNDER...AND TO REMAIN THERE FOR AT LEAST 30
MINUTES AFTER THE LAST RUMBLE OF THUNDER.  IN GENERAL...WHEN THUNDER
ROARS...GO INDOORS. AN ENCLOSED HARD TOPPED AUTOMOBILE IS ALSO A
SAFE PLACE TO BE DURING THUNDERSTORMS.

NOAAS LIGHTNING WEBSITE WHICH CONTAINS ABUNDANT INFORMATION ON
LIGHTNING SAFETY CAN BE FOUND AT...

LIGHTNINGSAFETY.NOAA.GOV

LIGHTNING INFORMATION SPECIFIC FOR THE STATE OF COLORADO CAN BE
FOUND AT...

WEATHER.GOV/PUB/LIGHTNING

THE LIGHTNING TOPIC FOR TOMORROW WILL BE OUTDOOR LIGHTNING RISK REDUCTION.



000
NOUS42 KMLB 231005
PNSMLB
FLZ041-044>047-053-054-058-059-064-141-144-147-221600-

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE CITY, ST
600 AM EDT TUE JUN 23 2015

JUNE 21ST TO 27TH MARKS THE 15TH ANNUAL LIGHTNING SAFETY AWARENESS
WEEK IN THE UNITED STATES. EACH DAY DURING THE AWARENESS WEEK THE
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE IN MELBOURNE WILL FEATURE INFORMATION ABOUT
A DIFFERENT LIGHTNING RELATED TOPIC.

LIGHTNING SAFETY IN YOUR HOME OR BUSINESS

LIGHTNING CLAIMS 30-40 LIVES EACH YEAR AND HUNDREDS MORE ARE LEFT
WITH LIFELONG DISABILITIES.

LIGHTNING CAN STRIKE WELL BEYOND THE AUDIBLE RANGE OF THUNDER. IF
YOU CAN HEAR THUNDER, YOU ARE WITHIN STRIKING RANGE OF A
THUNDERSTORM. IF OUTDOORS, IMMEDIATELY HEAD TO A FULLY ENCLOSED
BUILDING WITH ELECTRICITY AND/OR PLUMBING OR TO A HARD TOPPED
VEHICLE. BASEBALL DUGOUTS, PICNIC SHELTERS AND OPEN GARAGES ARE NOT
SAFE, NEITHER ARE MOTORCYCLES, GOLF CARTS, OR CONSTRUCTION VEHICLES
THAT ARE NOT FULLY ENCLOSED.

RUBBER WILL NOT "INSULATE" YOU FROM A LIGHTNING STRIKE! THE ENERGY
DENSITY WITHIN A LIGHTNING BOLT CAN EXCEED EVEN THE WORLD`S MOST
POWERFUL NUCLEAR REACTORS AND IS CAPABLE OF BURNING THROUGH ANY
INSULATOR.

ONCE INSIDE A BUILDING OR VEHICLE, CLOSE ALL THE WINDOWS AND DO NOT
TOUCH ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT OR PLUMBING. STAY OFF CORDED PHONES (CELL
PHONES AND CORDLESS PHONES ARE OK TO USE). TURN OFF YOUR COMPUTER
AND STOP COOKING. IT IS SAFE TO USE REMOTES BUT DO NOT TOUCH
TELEVISIONS OR OTHER APPLIANCES DIRECTLY. DON`T TAKE A SHOWER OR
BATH DURING A THUNDERSTORM. TRY TO STAY AWAY FROM WINDOWS AS
LIGHTNING IS CAPABLE OF PENETRATING GLASS.

BE A FORCE OF NATURE. WHEN THUNDER ROARS, STAY INDOORS!  FIND OUT
TIPS FOR SAFETY INDOORS AND OUTDOORS NEAR AND FAR FROM HOME AT OUR
WEBSITE: WEATHER.GOV/LIGHTNING

$$



000
NOUS45 KGJT 230641
PNSGJT

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
PRELIMINARY RECORD EVENT REPORT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE GRAND JUNCTION CO
1240 AM MDT TUE JUN 23 2015

...RECORD HIGH TEMPERATURE MONDAY IN NORTHEAST UTAH...

IN EASTERN UTAH...

AT ROOSEVELT RADIO IN BALLARD, THE HIGH TEMPERATURE MONDAY WAS 97
DEGREES. THIS TIES THE RECORD HIGH FOR JUNE 22, LAST SET IN 2012.

$$



000
NOUS45 KGJT 230641
PNSGJT

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
PRELIMINARY RECORD EVENT REPORT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE GRAND JUNCTION CO
1240 AM MDT TUE JUN 23 2015

...RECORD HIGH TEMPERATURE MONDAY IN NORTHEAST UTAH...

IN EASTERN UTAH...

AT ROOSEVELT RADIO IN BALLARD, THE HIGH TEMPERATURE MONDAY WAS 97
DEGREES. THIS TIES THE RECORD HIGH FOR JUNE 22, LAST SET IN 2012.

$$



000
NOUS45 KGJT 230641
PNSGJT

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
PRELIMINARY RECORD EVENT REPORT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE GRAND JUNCTION CO
1240 AM MDT TUE JUN 23 2015

...RECORD HIGH TEMPERATURE MONDAY IN NORTHEAST UTAH...

IN EASTERN UTAH...

AT ROOSEVELT RADIO IN BALLARD, THE HIGH TEMPERATURE MONDAY WAS 97
DEGREES. THIS TIES THE RECORD HIGH FOR JUNE 22, LAST SET IN 2012.

$$



000
NOUS45 KGJT 230641
PNSGJT

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
PRELIMINARY RECORD EVENT REPORT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE GRAND JUNCTION CO
1240 AM MDT TUE JUN 23 2015

...RECORD HIGH TEMPERATURE MONDAY IN NORTHEAST UTAH...

IN EASTERN UTAH...

AT ROOSEVELT RADIO IN BALLARD, THE HIGH TEMPERATURE MONDAY WAS 97
DEGREES. THIS TIES THE RECORD HIGH FOR JUNE 22, LAST SET IN 2012.

$$



000
NOUS45 KSLC 230121
PNSSLC

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE SALT LAKE CITY UT
721 PM MDT MON JUN 22 2015

...KICX RADAR OUTAGE CONTINUES...

KICX DOPPLER RADAR OUTAGE WILL CONTINUE THROUGH WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON
AS PARTS ARE ORDERED AND INSTALLED.

$$

ROGOWSKI



000
NOUS45 KSLC 230121
PNSSLC

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE SALT LAKE CITY UT
721 PM MDT MON JUN 22 2015

...KICX RADAR OUTAGE CONTINUES...

KICX DOPPLER RADAR OUTAGE WILL CONTINUE THROUGH WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON
AS PARTS ARE ORDERED AND INSTALLED.

$$

ROGOWSKI


000
NOUS45 KSLC 230121
PNSSLC

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE SALT LAKE CITY UT
721 PM MDT MON JUN 22 2015

...KICX RADAR OUTAGE CONTINUES...

KICX DOPPLER RADAR OUTAGE WILL CONTINUE THROUGH WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON
AS PARTS ARE ORDERED AND INSTALLED.

$$

ROGOWSKI



000
NOUS45 KSLC 230121
PNSSLC

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE SALT LAKE CITY UT
721 PM MDT MON JUN 22 2015

...KICX RADAR OUTAGE CONTINUES...

KICX DOPPLER RADAR OUTAGE WILL CONTINUE THROUGH WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON
AS PARTS ARE ORDERED AND INSTALLED.

$$

ROGOWSKI



000
NOUS45 KSLC 230121
PNSSLC

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE SALT LAKE CITY UT
721 PM MDT MON JUN 22 2015

...KICX RADAR OUTAGE CONTINUES...

KICX DOPPLER RADAR OUTAGE WILL CONTINUE THROUGH WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON
AS PARTS ARE ORDERED AND INSTALLED.

$$

ROGOWSKI



000
NOUS45 KSLC 230121
PNSSLC

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE SALT LAKE CITY UT
721 PM MDT MON JUN 22 2015

...KICX RADAR OUTAGE CONTINUES...

KICX DOPPLER RADAR OUTAGE WILL CONTINUE THROUGH WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON
AS PARTS ARE ORDERED AND INSTALLED.

$$

ROGOWSKI



000
NOUS45 KBOU 230033
PNSBOU

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE PUEBLO CO
633 PM MDT MON JUN 22 2015

COLORADO LIGHTNING SAFETY WEEK CONTINUES THROUGH SATURDAY. TODAY WE
DISCUSS THE LIGHTNING THREAT ACROSS THE CENTENNIAL STATE.

IN THE UNITED STATES...THERE ARE AN ESTIMATED 25 MILLION CLOUD-TO-
GROUND LIGHTNING FLASHES PER YEAR...AND EACH ONE IS A POTENTIAL
THREAT TO LIFE AND PROPERTY.  THE 30-YEAR AVERAGE OF HUMAN LIGHTNING
FATALITIES IS 49. THE AVERAGE NUMBER OF PEOPLE KILLED DURING THE
LAST 10 YEARS IS 32. LAST YEAR...26 PEOPLE WERE KILLED BY
LIGHTNING...WHILE MANY OTHERS WERE PERMANENTLY INJURED.

STATISTICALLY...THOSE WHO WERE KILLED IN 2014...

100 PERCENT WERE OUTDOORS.
81 PERCENT WERE MALE.
23 PERCENT WERE UNDER A TREE.
23 PERCENT OCCURRED ON OR NEAR THE WATER.

IN COLORADO...LIGHTNING KILLED 2 PEOPLE LAST YEAR...AND INJURED 14.
DURING THE PAST 35 YEARS...ON AVERAGE...COLORADO HAS HAD 3 LIGHTNING
FATALITIES AND 13 INJURIES. SINCE 1980...EL PASO COUNTY...INCLUDING
THE COLORADO SPRINGS METRO AREA...HAS HAD THE DUBIOUS DISTINCTION OF
HAVING THE MOST LIGHTNING CASUALTIES...WITH 10 FATALITIES AND 76
INJURIES. LARIMER COUNTY HAS HAD 9 FATALITIES AND 74 INJURIES...AND
JEFFERSON COUNTY HAS HAD 8 FATALITIES AND 37 INJURIES.

BECAUSE IT USUALLY AFFECTS ONE OR TWO VICTIMS AT A TIME...AND DOES
NOT CAUSE THE DESTRUCTION LEFT IN THE WAKE OF TORNADOES OR
HURRICANES...LIGHTNING GENERALLY RECEIVES LESS ATTENTION.

MANY PEOPLE DO NOT ACT IN A TIMELY MANNER TO PROTECT THEIR
LIVES...AND THE LIVES OF OTHERS...SIMPLY BECAUSE THEY DO NOT
UNDERSTAND ALL THE DANGERS ASSOCIATED WITH THUNDERSTORMS AND
LIGHTNING.

YOU NEED TO BECOME AWARE OF THE SITUATIONS THAT PUT YOU
AT A GREATER RISK OF BEING STRUCK BY LIGHTNING...AND WHAT YOU CAN DO
TO REDUCE THAT RISK. WHILE NEARLY ALL PEOPLE TAKE SOME PROTECTIVE
ACTIONS WHEN RAIN...HAIL AND WIND ARE OCCURRING WITH
THUNDERSTORMS...MANY LEAVE THEMSELVES VULNERABLE TO BEING STRUCK BY
LIGHTNING AS THUNDERSTORMS APPROACH...MOVE OVERHEAD AND MOVE AWAY.

LIGHTNING CAN STRIKE MORE THAN 10 MILES FROM THE RAIN AREA OF A
THUNDERSTORM.  THAT DISTANCE IS ABOUT AS FAR AS YOU CAN HEAR
THUNDER.  IF YOU CAN HEAR THUNDER...YOU COULD BE IN DANGER OF BEING
STRUCK BY LIGHTNING. WHEN THUNDER ROARS...GO INDOORS.

MOST LIGHTNING DEATHS AND INJURIES IN COLORADO OCCUR DURING THE
AFTERNOON...WHEN LIGHTNING IS MOST LIKELY TO OCCUR AND WHEN PEOPLE
ARE MORE LIKELY TO BE OUTSIDE. QUITE A FEW LIGHTNING FATALITIES HAVE
OCCURRED WHEN LITTLE OR NO RAIN WAS FALLING.

THE CHANCE THAT YOU WILL BE STRUCK BY LIGHTNING IN THE UNITED STATES
IS ABOUT 1 IN 960 THOUSAND FOR EACH YEAR OF YOUR LIFE.
HOWEVER...YOUR CHANCE OF BEING STRUCK WILL DEPEND ON WHETHER YOU
CONSISTENTLY PRACTICE ALL THE LIGHTNING SAFETY RULES.

LIGHTNING STARTS AROUND HALF OF THE FOREST AND RANGELAND WILDFIRES
ACROSS THE STATE.  COLORADO AVERAGES AROUND 2500 WILDFIRES EACH
YEAR.  MANY OF THESE LIGHTNING CAUSED FIRES OCCUR WITH VERY LITTLE
OR NO RAIN.  THESE STORMS OFTEN GENERATE GUSTY WINDS...WHICH CAN FAN
THE FLAMES OF THE FIRE.

DURING THIS LIGHTNING SAFETY AWARENESS WEEK, THE NATIONAL WEATHER
SERVICE WILL PROVIDE A VARIETY OF INFORMATION ON LIGHTNING IN
COLORADO.

ON TUESDAY...THE SCIENCE OF LIGHTNING WILL BE DISCUSSED.

ON WEDNESDAY...THE TOPIC OF THE DAY IS OUTDOOR LIGHTNING RISK REDUCTION.

ON THURSDAY...WE WILL HAVE INFORMATION ON INDOOR LIGHTNING SAFETY.

ON FRIDAY...INFORMATION FOR LIGHTNING STRIKE SURVIVORS WILL BE PROVIDED.

ON SATURDAY...LIGHTNING AND WILDFIRE INFORMATION WILL BE AVAILABLE.

WHEN PLANNING OUTDOOR ACTIVITIES...CHECK OUT THE HAZARDOUS WEATHER
OUTLOOK AND THE LATEST FORECAST...WHICH INCLUDE THUNDERSTORM AND
LIGHTNING POTENTIAL.  MAKE SURE YOU GET THE SPECIFIC FORECAST
INFORMATION OF THE LOCATION YOU WILL BE VISITING. THE WEB SITES FOR
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE OFFICES WHICH COVER COLORADO AND ISSUE
THESE PRODUCTS ARE...

DENVER/BOULDER   WEATHER.GOV/DEN
GRAND JUNCTION   WEATHER.GOV/GJT
PUEBLO           WEATHER.GOV/PUB
GOODLAND         WEATHER.GOV/GLD

NOAAS LIGHTNING WEBSITE WHICH CONTAINS ABUNDANT INFORMATION ON
LIGHTNING SAFETY CAN BE FOUND AT...

LIGHTNINGSAFETY.NOAA.GOV

LIGHTNING INFORMATION SPECIFIC FOR THE STATE OF COLORADO CAN BE FOUND AT...

WEATHER.GOV/PUB/LIGHTNING

THE LIGHTNING TOPIC FOR TOMORROW WILL BE THE SCIENCE OF LIGHTNING.


000
NOUS45 KBOU 230033
PNSBOU

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE PUEBLO CO
633 PM MDT MON JUN 22 2015

COLORADO LIGHTNING SAFETY WEEK CONTINUES THROUGH SATURDAY. TODAY WE
DISCUSS THE LIGHTNING THREAT ACROSS THE CENTENNIAL STATE.

IN THE UNITED STATES...THERE ARE AN ESTIMATED 25 MILLION CLOUD-TO-
GROUND LIGHTNING FLASHES PER YEAR...AND EACH ONE IS A POTENTIAL
THREAT TO LIFE AND PROPERTY.  THE 30-YEAR AVERAGE OF HUMAN LIGHTNING
FATALITIES IS 49. THE AVERAGE NUMBER OF PEOPLE KILLED DURING THE
LAST 10 YEARS IS 32. LAST YEAR...26 PEOPLE WERE KILLED BY
LIGHTNING...WHILE MANY OTHERS WERE PERMANENTLY INJURED.

STATISTICALLY...THOSE WHO WERE KILLED IN 2014...

100 PERCENT WERE OUTDOORS.
81 PERCENT WERE MALE.
23 PERCENT WERE UNDER A TREE.
23 PERCENT OCCURRED ON OR NEAR THE WATER.

IN COLORADO...LIGHTNING KILLED 2 PEOPLE LAST YEAR...AND INJURED 14.
DURING THE PAST 35 YEARS...ON AVERAGE...COLORADO HAS HAD 3 LIGHTNING
FATALITIES AND 13 INJURIES. SINCE 1980...EL PASO COUNTY...INCLUDING
THE COLORADO SPRINGS METRO AREA...HAS HAD THE DUBIOUS DISTINCTION OF
HAVING THE MOST LIGHTNING CASUALTIES...WITH 10 FATALITIES AND 76
INJURIES. LARIMER COUNTY HAS HAD 9 FATALITIES AND 74 INJURIES...AND
JEFFERSON COUNTY HAS HAD 8 FATALITIES AND 37 INJURIES.

BECAUSE IT USUALLY AFFECTS ONE OR TWO VICTIMS AT A TIME...AND DOES
NOT CAUSE THE DESTRUCTION LEFT IN THE WAKE OF TORNADOES OR
HURRICANES...LIGHTNING GENERALLY RECEIVES LESS ATTENTION.

MANY PEOPLE DO NOT ACT IN A TIMELY MANNER TO PROTECT THEIR
LIVES...AND THE LIVES OF OTHERS...SIMPLY BECAUSE THEY DO NOT
UNDERSTAND ALL THE DANGERS ASSOCIATED WITH THUNDERSTORMS AND
LIGHTNING.

YOU NEED TO BECOME AWARE OF THE SITUATIONS THAT PUT YOU
AT A GREATER RISK OF BEING STRUCK BY LIGHTNING...AND WHAT YOU CAN DO
TO REDUCE THAT RISK. WHILE NEARLY ALL PEOPLE TAKE SOME PROTECTIVE
ACTIONS WHEN RAIN...HAIL AND WIND ARE OCCURRING WITH
THUNDERSTORMS...MANY LEAVE THEMSELVES VULNERABLE TO BEING STRUCK BY
LIGHTNING AS THUNDERSTORMS APPROACH...MOVE OVERHEAD AND MOVE AWAY.

LIGHTNING CAN STRIKE MORE THAN 10 MILES FROM THE RAIN AREA OF A
THUNDERSTORM.  THAT DISTANCE IS ABOUT AS FAR AS YOU CAN HEAR
THUNDER.  IF YOU CAN HEAR THUNDER...YOU COULD BE IN DANGER OF BEING
STRUCK BY LIGHTNING. WHEN THUNDER ROARS...GO INDOORS.

MOST LIGHTNING DEATHS AND INJURIES IN COLORADO OCCUR DURING THE
AFTERNOON...WHEN LIGHTNING IS MOST LIKELY TO OCCUR AND WHEN PEOPLE
ARE MORE LIKELY TO BE OUTSIDE. QUITE A FEW LIGHTNING FATALITIES HAVE
OCCURRED WHEN LITTLE OR NO RAIN WAS FALLING.

THE CHANCE THAT YOU WILL BE STRUCK BY LIGHTNING IN THE UNITED STATES
IS ABOUT 1 IN 960 THOUSAND FOR EACH YEAR OF YOUR LIFE.
HOWEVER...YOUR CHANCE OF BEING STRUCK WILL DEPEND ON WHETHER YOU
CONSISTENTLY PRACTICE ALL THE LIGHTNING SAFETY RULES.

LIGHTNING STARTS AROUND HALF OF THE FOREST AND RANGELAND WILDFIRES
ACROSS THE STATE.  COLORADO AVERAGES AROUND 2500 WILDFIRES EACH
YEAR.  MANY OF THESE LIGHTNING CAUSED FIRES OCCUR WITH VERY LITTLE
OR NO RAIN.  THESE STORMS OFTEN GENERATE GUSTY WINDS...WHICH CAN FAN
THE FLAMES OF THE FIRE.

DURING THIS LIGHTNING SAFETY AWARENESS WEEK, THE NATIONAL WEATHER
SERVICE WILL PROVIDE A VARIETY OF INFORMATION ON LIGHTNING IN
COLORADO.

ON TUESDAY...THE SCIENCE OF LIGHTNING WILL BE DISCUSSED.

ON WEDNESDAY...THE TOPIC OF THE DAY IS OUTDOOR LIGHTNING RISK REDUCTION.

ON THURSDAY...WE WILL HAVE INFORMATION ON INDOOR LIGHTNING SAFETY.

ON FRIDAY...INFORMATION FOR LIGHTNING STRIKE SURVIVORS WILL BE PROVIDED.

ON SATURDAY...LIGHTNING AND WILDFIRE INFORMATION WILL BE AVAILABLE.

WHEN PLANNING OUTDOOR ACTIVITIES...CHECK OUT THE HAZARDOUS WEATHER
OUTLOOK AND THE LATEST FORECAST...WHICH INCLUDE THUNDERSTORM AND
LIGHTNING POTENTIAL.  MAKE SURE YOU GET THE SPECIFIC FORECAST
INFORMATION OF THE LOCATION YOU WILL BE VISITING. THE WEB SITES FOR
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE OFFICES WHICH COVER COLORADO AND ISSUE
THESE PRODUCTS ARE...

DENVER/BOULDER   WEATHER.GOV/DEN
GRAND JUNCTION   WEATHER.GOV/GJT
PUEBLO           WEATHER.GOV/PUB
GOODLAND         WEATHER.GOV/GLD

NOAAS LIGHTNING WEBSITE WHICH CONTAINS ABUNDANT INFORMATION ON
LIGHTNING SAFETY CAN BE FOUND AT...

LIGHTNINGSAFETY.NOAA.GOV

LIGHTNING INFORMATION SPECIFIC FOR THE STATE OF COLORADO CAN BE FOUND AT...

WEATHER.GOV/PUB/LIGHTNING

THE LIGHTNING TOPIC FOR TOMORROW WILL BE THE SCIENCE OF LIGHTNING.



000
NOUS45 KBOU 230033
PNSBOU

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE PUEBLO CO
633 PM MDT MON JUN 22 2015

COLORADO LIGHTNING SAFETY WEEK CONTINUES THROUGH SATURDAY. TODAY WE
DISCUSS THE LIGHTNING THREAT ACROSS THE CENTENNIAL STATE.

IN THE UNITED STATES...THERE ARE AN ESTIMATED 25 MILLION CLOUD-TO-
GROUND LIGHTNING FLASHES PER YEAR...AND EACH ONE IS A POTENTIAL
THREAT TO LIFE AND PROPERTY.  THE 30-YEAR AVERAGE OF HUMAN LIGHTNING
FATALITIES IS 49. THE AVERAGE NUMBER OF PEOPLE KILLED DURING THE
LAST 10 YEARS IS 32. LAST YEAR...26 PEOPLE WERE KILLED BY
LIGHTNING...WHILE MANY OTHERS WERE PERMANENTLY INJURED.

STATISTICALLY...THOSE WHO WERE KILLED IN 2014...

100 PERCENT WERE OUTDOORS.
81 PERCENT WERE MALE.
23 PERCENT WERE UNDER A TREE.
23 PERCENT OCCURRED ON OR NEAR THE WATER.

IN COLORADO...LIGHTNING KILLED 2 PEOPLE LAST YEAR...AND INJURED 14.
DURING THE PAST 35 YEARS...ON AVERAGE...COLORADO HAS HAD 3 LIGHTNING
FATALITIES AND 13 INJURIES. SINCE 1980...EL PASO COUNTY...INCLUDING
THE COLORADO SPRINGS METRO AREA...HAS HAD THE DUBIOUS DISTINCTION OF
HAVING THE MOST LIGHTNING CASUALTIES...WITH 10 FATALITIES AND 76
INJURIES. LARIMER COUNTY HAS HAD 9 FATALITIES AND 74 INJURIES...AND
JEFFERSON COUNTY HAS HAD 8 FATALITIES AND 37 INJURIES.

BECAUSE IT USUALLY AFFECTS ONE OR TWO VICTIMS AT A TIME...AND DOES
NOT CAUSE THE DESTRUCTION LEFT IN THE WAKE OF TORNADOES OR
HURRICANES...LIGHTNING GENERALLY RECEIVES LESS ATTENTION.

MANY PEOPLE DO NOT ACT IN A TIMELY MANNER TO PROTECT THEIR
LIVES...AND THE LIVES OF OTHERS...SIMPLY BECAUSE THEY DO NOT
UNDERSTAND ALL THE DANGERS ASSOCIATED WITH THUNDERSTORMS AND
LIGHTNING.

YOU NEED TO BECOME AWARE OF THE SITUATIONS THAT PUT YOU
AT A GREATER RISK OF BEING STRUCK BY LIGHTNING...AND WHAT YOU CAN DO
TO REDUCE THAT RISK. WHILE NEARLY ALL PEOPLE TAKE SOME PROTECTIVE
ACTIONS WHEN RAIN...HAIL AND WIND ARE OCCURRING WITH
THUNDERSTORMS...MANY LEAVE THEMSELVES VULNERABLE TO BEING STRUCK BY
LIGHTNING AS THUNDERSTORMS APPROACH...MOVE OVERHEAD AND MOVE AWAY.

LIGHTNING CAN STRIKE MORE THAN 10 MILES FROM THE RAIN AREA OF A
THUNDERSTORM.  THAT DISTANCE IS ABOUT AS FAR AS YOU CAN HEAR
THUNDER.  IF YOU CAN HEAR THUNDER...YOU COULD BE IN DANGER OF BEING
STRUCK BY LIGHTNING. WHEN THUNDER ROARS...GO INDOORS.

MOST LIGHTNING DEATHS AND INJURIES IN COLORADO OCCUR DURING THE
AFTERNOON...WHEN LIGHTNING IS MOST LIKELY TO OCCUR AND WHEN PEOPLE
ARE MORE LIKELY TO BE OUTSIDE. QUITE A FEW LIGHTNING FATALITIES HAVE
OCCURRED WHEN LITTLE OR NO RAIN WAS FALLING.

THE CHANCE THAT YOU WILL BE STRUCK BY LIGHTNING IN THE UNITED STATES
IS ABOUT 1 IN 960 THOUSAND FOR EACH YEAR OF YOUR LIFE.
HOWEVER...YOUR CHANCE OF BEING STRUCK WILL DEPEND ON WHETHER YOU
CONSISTENTLY PRACTICE ALL THE LIGHTNING SAFETY RULES.

LIGHTNING STARTS AROUND HALF OF THE FOREST AND RANGELAND WILDFIRES
ACROSS THE STATE.  COLORADO AVERAGES AROUND 2500 WILDFIRES EACH
YEAR.  MANY OF THESE LIGHTNING CAUSED FIRES OCCUR WITH VERY LITTLE
OR NO RAIN.  THESE STORMS OFTEN GENERATE GUSTY WINDS...WHICH CAN FAN
THE FLAMES OF THE FIRE.

DURING THIS LIGHTNING SAFETY AWARENESS WEEK, THE NATIONAL WEATHER
SERVICE WILL PROVIDE A VARIETY OF INFORMATION ON LIGHTNING IN
COLORADO.

ON TUESDAY...THE SCIENCE OF LIGHTNING WILL BE DISCUSSED.

ON WEDNESDAY...THE TOPIC OF THE DAY IS OUTDOOR LIGHTNING RISK REDUCTION.

ON THURSDAY...WE WILL HAVE INFORMATION ON INDOOR LIGHTNING SAFETY.

ON FRIDAY...INFORMATION FOR LIGHTNING STRIKE SURVIVORS WILL BE PROVIDED.

ON SATURDAY...LIGHTNING AND WILDFIRE INFORMATION WILL BE AVAILABLE.

WHEN PLANNING OUTDOOR ACTIVITIES...CHECK OUT THE HAZARDOUS WEATHER
OUTLOOK AND THE LATEST FORECAST...WHICH INCLUDE THUNDERSTORM AND
LIGHTNING POTENTIAL.  MAKE SURE YOU GET THE SPECIFIC FORECAST
INFORMATION OF THE LOCATION YOU WILL BE VISITING. THE WEB SITES FOR
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE OFFICES WHICH COVER COLORADO AND ISSUE
THESE PRODUCTS ARE...

DENVER/BOULDER   WEATHER.GOV/DEN
GRAND JUNCTION   WEATHER.GOV/GJT
PUEBLO           WEATHER.GOV/PUB
GOODLAND         WEATHER.GOV/GLD

NOAAS LIGHTNING WEBSITE WHICH CONTAINS ABUNDANT INFORMATION ON
LIGHTNING SAFETY CAN BE FOUND AT...

LIGHTNINGSAFETY.NOAA.GOV

LIGHTNING INFORMATION SPECIFIC FOR THE STATE OF COLORADO CAN BE FOUND AT...

WEATHER.GOV/PUB/LIGHTNING

THE LIGHTNING TOPIC FOR TOMORROW WILL BE THE SCIENCE OF LIGHTNING.


000
NOAK48 PAFC 222359
PNSAFC
AKZ145-210030-

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE ANCHORAGE AK
458 PM AKDT MON JUN 22 2015

...NOAA WEATHER RADIO WILL BE UNAVAILABLE WED 8AM-10AM IN SEWARD...

A PLANNED POWER OUTAGE IN SEWARD WILL CAUSE THE NOAA WEATHER RADIO
TO BE UNAVAILABLE IN SEWARD FROM 8 AM UNTIL 10 AM ON WEDNESDAY JUNE
24 2015.

$$


000
NOAK48 PAFC 222359
PNSAFC
AKZ145-210030-

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE ANCHORAGE AK
458 PM AKDT MON JUN 22 2015

...NOAA WEATHER RADIO WILL BE UNAVAILABLE WED 8AM-10AM IN SEWARD...

A PLANNED POWER OUTAGE IN SEWARD WILL CAUSE THE NOAA WEATHER RADIO
TO BE UNAVAILABLE IN SEWARD FROM 8 AM UNTIL 10 AM ON WEDNESDAY JUNE
24 2015.

$$



000
NOAK48 PAFC 222359
PNSAFC
AKZ145-210030-

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE ANCHORAGE AK
458 PM AKDT MON JUN 22 2015

...NOAA WEATHER RADIO WILL BE UNAVAILABLE WED 8AM-10AM IN SEWARD...

A PLANNED POWER OUTAGE IN SEWARD WILL CAUSE THE NOAA WEATHER RADIO
TO BE UNAVAILABLE IN SEWARD FROM 8 AM UNTIL 10 AM ON WEDNESDAY JUNE
24 2015.

$$


000
NOUS41 KWBC 221951
PNSWSH

Service Change Notice 15-37
National Weather Service Headquarters Washington DC
352 PM EDT Mon Jun 15, 2015

TO:      Subscribers:
         -Family of Services
         -NOAA Weather Wire Service
         -Emergency Managers Weather Information Network
         -NOAAPORT
         Other NWS Partners and NWS employees

FROM:    David Novak
         Director, Weather Prediction Center

SUBJECT: Addition of Probabilistic Quantitative Precipitation
         Forecast (PQPF) Grids Effective July 15, 2015

Effective Wednesday, July 15, 2015 at 1800 Coordinated Universal
Time (UTC), the National Centers for Environmental Predictions
(NCEP) Weather Prediction Center (WPC) will begin creating
Probabilistic Quantitative Precipitation Forecast (PQPF) grids.

The PQPF provides a probabilistic forecast of rainfall over the
continental United States in 6-, 24- and 72-hour increments. The
probabilistic quantitative precipitation forecast (PQPF) guidance
is used by forecasters and hydrologists to determine the
probability of any rainfall amount at a given location. NCEP/WPC
will generate the PQPF grids at 5 km resolution.

The probabilistic QPF forecasts provide information in two
different forms:

1. Probabilities of exceeding a threshold show probability that
the 6-, 24- or 72-hour accumulation of precipitation will equal
or exceed the given threshold. As an example, consider the 0.50
inch threshold. If a point of interest falls within the 40
percent contour on the probability map, then the chance of
precipitation exceeding 0.50 inch is 40% or greater. As the
threshold values increase, the probabilities of exceeding them
decrease.

2. Percentile accumulations show the precipitation amount
associated with a given percentile in the distribution. The
percentile value is the percent chance of precipitation
accumulating less than the depicted amount. From the opposite
perspective, 100 minus the percentile is the chance of
precipitation exceeding the depicted amount. For example, there
is a 10 percent chance of precipitation accumulating less than
the amounts shown on the 10th percentile accumulation map; while,
there is a 90% chance that precipitation will exceed the 10th
percentile accumulations. Thus, lower percentile values are
associated with smaller accumulations than are higher percentile
values.

The product headers may be constructed as follows:

T1 T2 A1 A2 ii CCCC

T1 = H
T2 = E
A1 = N
CCCC = KWNH

Threshold Values
A2 specifies the following parameters:
B - F006
C - F012
D - F018
E - F024
F - F030
G - F036
H - F042
I - F048
X - F054
J - F060
Y - F066
K - F072

ii specifies the following parameters
11 - 6-hour precipitation >= 0.01 inch threshold
12 - 6-hour precipitation >= 0.25 inch threshold
13 - 6-hour precipitation >= 0.50 inch threshold
14 - 6-hour precipitation >= 1.00 inch threshold
15 - 6-hour precipitation >= 2.00 inch threshold
16 - 6-hour precipitation >= 4.00 inch threshold
17 - 24-hour precipitation >= 1.00 inch threshold
18 - 24-hour precipitation >= 2.00 inch threshold
19 - 24-hour precipitation >= 4.00 inch threshold
20 - 24-hour precipitation >= 8.00 inch threshold
21 - 24-hour precipitation >= 16.00 inch threshold
22 - 72-hour precipitation >= 1.00 inch threshold
23 - 72-hour precipitation >= 2.00 inch threshold
24 - 72-hour precipitation >= 4.00 inch threshold
25 - 72-hour precipitation >= 8.00 inch threshold
26 - 72-hour precipitation >= 16.00 inch threshold

Percentiles
A2 specifies the following parameters:
B - F006
C - F012
D - F018
E - F024
F - F030
G - F036
H - F042
I - F048
X - F054
J - F060
Y - F066
K - F072

ii specifies the following parameters
51 - 6-hour precipitation 10th percentile
52 - 6-hour precipitation 50th percentile
53 - 6-hour precipitation 90th percentile
54 - 24-hour precipitation 10th percentile
55 - 24-hour precipitation 50th percentile
56 - 24-hour precipitation 90th percentile
57 - 72-hour precipitation 10th percentile
58 - 72-hour precipitation 50th percentile
59 - 72-hour precipitation 90th percentile

Table 1: Sample products headers

ProductWMO Header
6h >=0.25 in at F12HENC12 KWNH
24h 50th pcnt at F48HENI55 KWNH

For more information, please contact

  David Novak
  5830 University Research Ct
  Building: NCWCP
  College Park, MD  20740
  301-683-1484
  David.Novak@noaa.gov

National Service Change Notices are online at:

  http://www.weather.gov/os/notif.htm

$$








000
NOUS41 KWBC 221951
PNSWSH

Service Change Notice 15-37
National Weather Service Headquarters Washington DC
352 PM EDT Mon Jun 15, 2015

TO:      Subscribers:
         -Family of Services
         -NOAA Weather Wire Service
         -Emergency Managers Weather Information Network
         -NOAAPORT
         Other NWS Partners and NWS employees

FROM:    David Novak
         Director, Weather Prediction Center

SUBJECT: Addition of Probabilistic Quantitative Precipitation
         Forecast (PQPF) Grids Effective July 15, 2015

Effective Wednesday, July 15, 2015 at 1800 Coordinated Universal
Time (UTC), the National Centers for Environmental Predictions
(NCEP) Weather Prediction Center (WPC) will begin creating
Probabilistic Quantitative Precipitation Forecast (PQPF) grids.

The PQPF provides a probabilistic forecast of rainfall over the
continental United States in 6-, 24- and 72-hour increments. The
probabilistic quantitative precipitation forecast (PQPF) guidance
is used by forecasters and hydrologists to determine the
probability of any rainfall amount at a given location. NCEP/WPC
will generate the PQPF grids at 5 km resolution.

The probabilistic QPF forecasts provide information in two
different forms:

1. Probabilities of exceeding a threshold show probability that
the 6-, 24- or 72-hour accumulation of precipitation will equal
or exceed the given threshold. As an example, consider the 0.50
inch threshold. If a point of interest falls within the 40
percent contour on the probability map, then the chance of
precipitation exceeding 0.50 inch is 40% or greater. As the
threshold values increase, the probabilities of exceeding them
decrease.

2. Percentile accumulations show the precipitation amount
associated with a given percentile in the distribution. The
percentile value is the percent chance of precipitation
accumulating less than the depicted amount. From the opposite
perspective, 100 minus the percentile is the chance of
precipitation exceeding the depicted amount. For example, there
is a 10 percent chance of precipitation accumulating less than
the amounts shown on the 10th percentile accumulation map; while,
there is a 90% chance that precipitation will exceed the 10th
percentile accumulations. Thus, lower percentile values are
associated with smaller accumulations than are higher percentile
values.

The product headers may be constructed as follows:

T1 T2 A1 A2 ii CCCC

T1 = H
T2 = E
A1 = N
CCCC = KWNH

Threshold Values
A2 specifies the following parameters:
B - F006
C - F012
D - F018
E - F024
F - F030
G - F036
H - F042
I - F048
X - F054
J - F060
Y - F066
K - F072

ii specifies the following parameters
11 - 6-hour precipitation >= 0.01 inch threshold
12 - 6-hour precipitation >= 0.25 inch threshold
13 - 6-hour precipitation >= 0.50 inch threshold
14 - 6-hour precipitation >= 1.00 inch threshold
15 - 6-hour precipitation >= 2.00 inch threshold
16 - 6-hour precipitation >= 4.00 inch threshold
17 - 24-hour precipitation >= 1.00 inch threshold
18 - 24-hour precipitation >= 2.00 inch threshold
19 - 24-hour precipitation >= 4.00 inch threshold
20 - 24-hour precipitation >= 8.00 inch threshold
21 - 24-hour precipitation >= 16.00 inch threshold
22 - 72-hour precipitation >= 1.00 inch threshold
23 - 72-hour precipitation >= 2.00 inch threshold
24 - 72-hour precipitation >= 4.00 inch threshold
25 - 72-hour precipitation >= 8.00 inch threshold
26 - 72-hour precipitation >= 16.00 inch threshold

Percentiles
A2 specifies the following parameters:
B - F006
C - F012
D - F018
E - F024
F - F030
G - F036
H - F042
I - F048
X - F054
J - F060
Y - F066
K - F072

ii specifies the following parameters
51 - 6-hour precipitation 10th percentile
52 - 6-hour precipitation 50th percentile
53 - 6-hour precipitation 90th percentile
54 - 24-hour precipitation 10th percentile
55 - 24-hour precipitation 50th percentile
56 - 24-hour precipitation 90th percentile
57 - 72-hour precipitation 10th percentile
58 - 72-hour precipitation 50th percentile
59 - 72-hour precipitation 90th percentile

Table 1: Sample products headers

ProductWMO Header
6h >=0.25 in at F12HENC12 KWNH
24h 50th pcnt at F48HENI55 KWNH

For more information, please contact

  David Novak
  5830 University Research Ct
  Building: NCWCP
  College Park, MD  20740
  301-683-1484
  David.Novak@noaa.gov

National Service Change Notices are online at:

  http://www.weather.gov/os/notif.htm

$$









000
NOUS45 KGJT 221400
PNSGJT

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
PRELIMINARY RECORD EVENT REPORT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE GRAND JUNCTION CO
800 AM MDT MON JUN 22 2015

...ADDITIONAL RECORD HIGH TEMPERATURE SUNDAY...

IN WESTERN COLORADO...

AT 4 MILES SOUTHWEST OF CRAIG, THE HIGH TEMPERATURE SUNDAY WAS 91
DEGREES. THIS SET A NEW RECORD HIGH FOR JUNE 21, BREAKING THE
PREVIOUS RECORD OF 90, SET IN 2012.

$$



000
NOUS45 KGJT 221400
PNSGJT

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
PRELIMINARY RECORD EVENT REPORT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE GRAND JUNCTION CO
800 AM MDT MON JUN 22 2015

...ADDITIONAL RECORD HIGH TEMPERATURE SUNDAY...

IN WESTERN COLORADO...

AT 4 MILES SOUTHWEST OF CRAIG, THE HIGH TEMPERATURE SUNDAY WAS 91
DEGREES. THIS SET A NEW RECORD HIGH FOR JUNE 21, BREAKING THE
PREVIOUS RECORD OF 90, SET IN 2012.

$$


000
NOUS45 KBOU 221202
PNSBOU

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE PUEBLO CO
600 AM MDT MON JUN 22 2015

COLORADO LIGHTNING SAFETY WEEK CONTINUES THROUGH SATURDAY. TODAY WE
DISCUSS THE LIGHTNING THREAT ACROSS THE CENTENNIAL STATE.

IN THE UNITED STATES...THERE ARE AN ESTIMATED 25 MILLION CLOUD-TO-
GROUND LIGHTNING FLASHES PER YEAR...AND EACH ONE IS A POTENTIAL
THREAT TO LIFE AND PROPERTY.  THE 30-YEAR AVERAGE OF HUMAN LIGHTNING
FATALITIES IS 49. THE AVERAGE NUMBER OF PEOPLE KILLED DURING THE
LAST 10 YEARS IS 32. LAST YEAR...26 PEOPLE WERE KILLED BY
LIGHTNING...WHILE MANY OTHERS WERE PERMANENTLY INJURED.

STATISTICALLY...THOSE WHO WERE KILLED IN 2014...

100 PERCENT WERE OUTDOORS.
81 PERCENT WERE MALE.
23 PERCENT WERE UNDER A TREE.
23 PERCENT OCCURRED ON OR NEAR THE WATER.

IN COLORADO...LIGHTNING KILLED 2 PEOPLE LAST YEAR...AND INJURED 14.
DURING THE PAST 35 YEARS...ON AVERAGE...COLORADO HAS HAD 3 LIGHTNING
FATALITIES AND 13 INJURIES. SINCE 1980...EL PASO COUNTY...INCLUDING
THE COLORADO SPRINGS METRO AREA...HAS HAD THE DUBIOUS DISTINCTION OF
HAVING THE MOST LIGHTNING CASUALTIES...WITH 10 FATALITIES AND 76
INJURIES. LARIMER COUNTY HAS HAD 9 FATALITIES AND 74 INJURIES...AND
JEFFERSON COUNTY HAS HAD 8 FATALITIES AND 37 INJURIES.

BECAUSE IT USUALLY AFFECTS ONE OR TWO VICTIMS AT A TIME...AND DOES
NOT CAUSE THE DESTRUCTION LEFT IN THE WAKE OF TORNADOES OR
HURRICANES...LIGHTNING GENERALLY RECEIVES LESS ATTENTION.

MANY PEOPLE DO NOT ACT IN A TIMELY MANNER TO PROTECT THEIR
LIVES...AND THE LIVES OF OTHERS...SIMPLY BECAUSE THEY DO NOT
UNDERSTAND ALL THE DANGERS ASSOCIATED WITH THUNDERSTORMS AND
LIGHTNING.

YOU NEED TO BECOME AWARE OF THE SITUATIONS THAT PUT YOU
AT A GREATER RISK OF BEING STRUCK BY LIGHTNING...AND WHAT YOU CAN DO
TO REDUCE THAT RISK. WHILE NEARLY ALL PEOPLE TAKE SOME PROTECTIVE
ACTIONS WHEN RAIN...HAIL AND WIND ARE OCCURRING WITH
THUNDERSTORMS...MANY LEAVE THEMSELVES VULNERABLE TO BEING STRUCK BY
LIGHTNING AS THUNDERSTORMS APPROACH...MOVE OVERHEAD AND MOVE AWAY.

LIGHTNING CAN STRIKE MORE THAN 10 MILES FROM THE RAIN AREA OF A
THUNDERSTORM.  THAT DISTANCE IS ABOUT AS FAR AS YOU CAN HEAR
THUNDER.  IF YOU CAN HEAR THUNDER...YOU COULD BE IN DANGER OF BEING
STRUCK BY LIGHTNING. WHEN THUNDER ROARS...GO INDOORS.

MOST LIGHTNING DEATHS AND INJURIES IN COLORADO OCCUR DURING THE
AFTERNOON...WHEN LIGHTNING IS MOST LIKELY TO OCCUR AND WHEN PEOPLE
ARE MORE LIKELY TO BE OUTSIDE. QUITE A FEW LIGHTNING FATALITIES HAVE
OCCURRED WHEN LITTLE OR NO RAIN WAS FALLING.

THE CHANCE THAT YOU WILL BE STRUCK BY LIGHTNING IN THE UNITED STATES
IS ABOUT 1 IN 960 THOUSAND FOR EACH YEAR OF YOUR LIFE.
HOWEVER...YOUR CHANCE OF BEING STRUCK WILL DEPEND ON WHETHER YOU
CONSISTENTLY PRACTICE ALL THE LIGHTNING SAFETY RULES.

LIGHTNING STARTS AROUND HALF OF THE FOREST AND RANGELAND WILDFIRES
ACROSS THE STATE.  COLORADO AVERAGES AROUND 2500 WILDFIRES EACH
YEAR.  MANY OF THESE LIGHTNING CAUSED FIRES OCCUR WITH VERY LITTLE
OR NO RAIN.  THESE STORMS OFTEN GENERATE GUSTY WINDS...WHICH CAN FAN
THE FLAMES OF THE FIRE.

DURING THIS LIGHTNING SAFETY AWARENESS WEEK, THE NATIONAL WEATHER
SERVICE WILL PROVIDE A VARIETY OF INFORMATION ON LIGHTNING IN
COLORADO.

ON TUESDAY...THE SCIENCE OF LIGHTNING WILL BE DISCUSSED.

ON WEDNESDAY...THE TOPIC OF THE DAY IS OUTDOOR LIGHTNING RISK REDUCTION.

ON THURSDAY...WE WILL HAVE INFORMATION ON INDOOR LIGHTNING SAFETY.

ON FRIDAY...INFORMATION FOR LIGHTNING STRIKE SURVIVORS WILL BE PROVIDED.

ON SATURDAY...LIGHTNING AND WILDFIRE INFORMATION WILL BE AVAILABLE.

WHEN PLANNING OUTDOOR ACTIVITIES...CHECK OUT THE HAZARDOUS WEATHER
OUTLOOK AND THE LATEST FORECAST...WHICH INCLUDE THUNDERSTORM AND
LIGHTNING POTENTIAL.  MAKE SURE YOU GET THE SPECIFIC FORECAST
INFORMATION OF THE LOCATION YOU WILL BE VISITING. THE WEB SITES FOR
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE OFFICES WHICH COVER COLORADO AND ISSUE
THESE PRODUCTS ARE...

DENVER/BOULDER   WEATHER.GOV/DEN
GRAND JUNCTION   WEATHER.GOV/GJT
PUEBLO           WEATHER.GOV/PUB
GOODLAND         WEATHER.GOV/GLD

NOAAS LIGHTNING WEBSITE WHICH CONTAINS ABUNDANT INFORMATION ON
LIGHTNING SAFETY CAN BE FOUND AT...

LIGHTNINGSAFETY.NOAA.GOV

LIGHTNING INFORMATION SPECIFIC FOR THE STATE OF COLORADO CAN BE FOUND AT...

WEATHER.GOV/PUB/LIGHTNING

THE LIGHTNING TOPIC FOR TOMORROW WILL BE THE SCIENCE OF LIGHTNING.


000
NOUS43 KGLD 221201
PNSGLD

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE GOODLAND KS
600 AM MDT MON JUN 22 2015

...ON THIS DATE IN WEATHER HISTORY...

IN 1996, IN DECATUR COUNTY KANSAS LIGHTNING CAUSED A FIRE WHICH
DESTROYED NORCATURS ONLY GROCERY STORE.

IN 1999, A LARGE F3 TORNADO DESTROYED A FARMSTEAD 12 MILES SOUTH
OF LEOTI KANSAS IN WICHITA COUNTY. THE HOUSE WAS NEARLY FLATTENED
BY THE TORNADO, AND A TRACTOR AND GRAIN COMBINE WERE ROLLED
SEVERAL HUNDRED FEET. THE TORNADO MOVED FROM EAST TO WEST.

$$


000
NOUS43 KGLD 221201
PNSGLD

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE GOODLAND KS
600 AM MDT MON JUN 22 2015

...ON THIS DATE IN WEATHER HISTORY...

IN 1996, IN DECATUR COUNTY KANSAS LIGHTNING CAUSED A FIRE WHICH
DESTROYED NORCATURS ONLY GROCERY STORE.

IN 1999, A LARGE F3 TORNADO DESTROYED A FARMSTEAD 12 MILES SOUTH
OF LEOTI KANSAS IN WICHITA COUNTY. THE HOUSE WAS NEARLY FLATTENED
BY THE TORNADO, AND A TRACTOR AND GRAIN COMBINE WERE ROLLED
SEVERAL HUNDRED FEET. THE TORNADO MOVED FROM EAST TO WEST.

$$



000
NOUS45 KGJT 220112
PNSGJT

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
PRELIMINARY RECORD EVENT REPORT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE GRAND JUNCTION CO
712 PM MDT SUN JUN 21 2015

...RECORD HIGH TEMPERATURE AT GATEWAY SUNDAY...

IN WESTERN COLORADO...

AT GATEWAY, THE HIGH TEMPERATURE TODAY WAS 101 DEGREES. THIS SET A
NEW RECORD HIGH FOR JUNE 21, BREAKING THE PREVIOUS RECORD OF 100,
SET IN 1961.


$$


000
NOUS45 KGJT 220112
PNSGJT

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
PRELIMINARY RECORD EVENT REPORT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE GRAND JUNCTION CO
712 PM MDT SUN JUN 21 2015

...RECORD HIGH TEMPERATURE AT GATEWAY SUNDAY...

IN WESTERN COLORADO...

AT GATEWAY, THE HIGH TEMPERATURE TODAY WAS 101 DEGREES. THIS SET A
NEW RECORD HIGH FOR JUNE 21, BREAKING THE PREVIOUS RECORD OF 100,
SET IN 1961.


$$


000
NOUS45 KGJT 220112
PNSGJT

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
PRELIMINARY RECORD EVENT REPORT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE GRAND JUNCTION CO
712 PM MDT SUN JUN 21 2015

...RECORD HIGH TEMPERATURE AT GATEWAY SUNDAY...

IN WESTERN COLORADO...

AT GATEWAY, THE HIGH TEMPERATURE TODAY WAS 101 DEGREES. THIS SET A
NEW RECORD HIGH FOR JUNE 21, BREAKING THE PREVIOUS RECORD OF 100,
SET IN 1961.


$$


000
NOUS45 KGJT 220112
PNSGJT

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
PRELIMINARY RECORD EVENT REPORT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE GRAND JUNCTION CO
712 PM MDT SUN JUN 21 2015

...RECORD HIGH TEMPERATURE AT GATEWAY SUNDAY...

IN WESTERN COLORADO...

AT GATEWAY, THE HIGH TEMPERATURE TODAY WAS 101 DEGREES. THIS SET A
NEW RECORD HIGH FOR JUNE 21, BREAKING THE PREVIOUS RECORD OF 100,
SET IN 1961.


$$


000
NOUS45 KGJT 220112
PNSGJT

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
PRELIMINARY RECORD EVENT REPORT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE GRAND JUNCTION CO
712 PM MDT SUN JUN 21 2015

...RECORD HIGH TEMPERATURE AT GATEWAY SUNDAY...

IN WESTERN COLORADO...

AT GATEWAY, THE HIGH TEMPERATURE TODAY WAS 101 DEGREES. THIS SET A
NEW RECORD HIGH FOR JUNE 21, BREAKING THE PREVIOUS RECORD OF 100,
SET IN 1961.


$$



000
NOUS45 KGJT 220112
PNSGJT

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
PRELIMINARY RECORD EVENT REPORT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE GRAND JUNCTION CO
712 PM MDT SUN JUN 21 2015

...RECORD HIGH TEMPERATURE AT GATEWAY SUNDAY...

IN WESTERN COLORADO...

AT GATEWAY, THE HIGH TEMPERATURE TODAY WAS 101 DEGREES. THIS SET A
NEW RECORD HIGH FOR JUNE 21, BREAKING THE PREVIOUS RECORD OF 100,
SET IN 1961.


$$


000
NOUS45 KGJT 220050
PNSGJT

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
PRELIMINARY RECORD EVENT REPORT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE GRAND JUNCTION CO
650 PM MDT SUN JUN 21 2015

...RECORD HIGH TEMPERATURE AT RIDGWAY SATURDAY...

IN WESTERN COLORADO...

AT RIDGWAY, THE HIGH TEMPERATURE SATURDAY WAS 92 DEGREES. THIS SET A
NEW RECORD HIGH FOR JUNE 20, BREAKING THE PREVIOUS RECORD OF 89, SET
IN 2007.


$$


000
NOUS45 KGJT 220050
PNSGJT

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
PRELIMINARY RECORD EVENT REPORT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE GRAND JUNCTION CO
650 PM MDT SUN JUN 21 2015

...RECORD HIGH TEMPERATURE AT RIDGWAY SATURDAY...

IN WESTERN COLORADO...

AT RIDGWAY, THE HIGH TEMPERATURE SATURDAY WAS 92 DEGREES. THIS SET A
NEW RECORD HIGH FOR JUNE 20, BREAKING THE PREVIOUS RECORD OF 89, SET
IN 2007.


$$



000
NOUS45 KGJT 220050
PNSGJT

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
PRELIMINARY RECORD EVENT REPORT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE GRAND JUNCTION CO
650 PM MDT SUN JUN 21 2015

...RECORD HIGH TEMPERATURE AT RIDGWAY SATURDAY...

IN WESTERN COLORADO...

AT RIDGWAY, THE HIGH TEMPERATURE SATURDAY WAS 92 DEGREES. THIS SET A
NEW RECORD HIGH FOR JUNE 20, BREAKING THE PREVIOUS RECORD OF 89, SET
IN 2007.


$$


000
NOUS45 KGJT 220050
PNSGJT

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
PRELIMINARY RECORD EVENT REPORT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE GRAND JUNCTION CO
650 PM MDT SUN JUN 21 2015

...RECORD HIGH TEMPERATURE AT RIDGWAY SATURDAY...

IN WESTERN COLORADO...

AT RIDGWAY, THE HIGH TEMPERATURE SATURDAY WAS 92 DEGREES. THIS SET A
NEW RECORD HIGH FOR JUNE 20, BREAKING THE PREVIOUS RECORD OF 89, SET
IN 2007.


$$



000
NOUS45 KBOU 212157
PNSBOU

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE PUEBLO CO
400 PM MDT SUN JUN 21 2015

THIS WEEK IS COLORADO LIGHTNING SAFETY WEEK.  LIGHTNING STRIKES THE
GROUND IN OUR STATE OVER A HALF MILLION TIMES EACH YEAR AND WITH
MANY OF US PARTICIPATING IN OUTDOOR ACTIVITIES...WE NEED TO LEARN
HOW TO PROTECT OURSELVES FROM LIGHTNING HAZARDS.

LIGHTNING IS ALSO RESPONSIBLE FOR ABOUT HALF OF THE WILDFIRES IN
COLORADO EACH YEAR. WHEN LIGHTNING OR OTHER CONDITIONS ARE CONDUCIVE
TO A HIGH WILDFIRE THREAT...THE NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE WILL ISSUE
FIRE WEATHER WATCHES OR RED FLAG WARNINGS.

DURING THIS WEEK A SERIES OF STATEMENTS WILL COVER A VARIETY OF
TOPICS RELATED TO LIGHTNING AND WILDFIRES.

MONDAY......LIGHTNING OVERVIEW FOR COLORADO
TUESDAY.....THE SCIENCE OF LIGHTNING
WEDNESDAY...OUTDOOR LIGHTNING RISK REDUCTION
THURSDAY....INDOOR LIGHTNING SAFETY
FRIDAY......LIGHTNING MEDICAL ISSUES FOR SURVIVORS
SATURDAY....LIGHTNING AND WILDFIRES

HERE ARE A COUPLE OF WEB SITES THAT CONTAIN ADDITIONAL LIGHTNING
INFORMATION.

NOAAS LIGHTNING WEBSITE WHICH CONTAINS ABUNDANT INFORMATION ON
LIGHTNING SAFETY CAN BE FOUND AT...

LIGHTNINGSAFETY.NOAA.GOV

LIGHTNING INFORMATION SPECIFIC FOR THE STATE OF COLORADO CAN BE FOUND AT...

WEATHER.GOV/PUB/LIGHTNING



000
NOUS45 KBOU 212157
PNSBOU

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE PUEBLO CO
400 PM MDT SUN JUN 21 2015

THIS WEEK IS COLORADO LIGHTNING SAFETY WEEK.  LIGHTNING STRIKES THE
GROUND IN OUR STATE OVER A HALF MILLION TIMES EACH YEAR AND WITH
MANY OF US PARTICIPATING IN OUTDOOR ACTIVITIES...WE NEED TO LEARN
HOW TO PROTECT OURSELVES FROM LIGHTNING HAZARDS.

LIGHTNING IS ALSO RESPONSIBLE FOR ABOUT HALF OF THE WILDFIRES IN
COLORADO EACH YEAR. WHEN LIGHTNING OR OTHER CONDITIONS ARE CONDUCIVE
TO A HIGH WILDFIRE THREAT...THE NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE WILL ISSUE
FIRE WEATHER WATCHES OR RED FLAG WARNINGS.

DURING THIS WEEK A SERIES OF STATEMENTS WILL COVER A VARIETY OF
TOPICS RELATED TO LIGHTNING AND WILDFIRES.

MONDAY......LIGHTNING OVERVIEW FOR COLORADO
TUESDAY.....THE SCIENCE OF LIGHTNING
WEDNESDAY...OUTDOOR LIGHTNING RISK REDUCTION
THURSDAY....INDOOR LIGHTNING SAFETY
FRIDAY......LIGHTNING MEDICAL ISSUES FOR SURVIVORS
SATURDAY....LIGHTNING AND WILDFIRES

HERE ARE A COUPLE OF WEB SITES THAT CONTAIN ADDITIONAL LIGHTNING
INFORMATION.

NOAAS LIGHTNING WEBSITE WHICH CONTAINS ABUNDANT INFORMATION ON
LIGHTNING SAFETY CAN BE FOUND AT...

LIGHTNINGSAFETY.NOAA.GOV

LIGHTNING INFORMATION SPECIFIC FOR THE STATE OF COLORADO CAN BE FOUND AT...

WEATHER.GOV/PUB/LIGHTNING



000
NOUS45 KBOU 212157
PNSBOU

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE PUEBLO CO
400 PM MDT SUN JUN 21 2015

THIS WEEK IS COLORADO LIGHTNING SAFETY WEEK.  LIGHTNING STRIKES THE
GROUND IN OUR STATE OVER A HALF MILLION TIMES EACH YEAR AND WITH
MANY OF US PARTICIPATING IN OUTDOOR ACTIVITIES...WE NEED TO LEARN
HOW TO PROTECT OURSELVES FROM LIGHTNING HAZARDS.

LIGHTNING IS ALSO RESPONSIBLE FOR ABOUT HALF OF THE WILDFIRES IN
COLORADO EACH YEAR. WHEN LIGHTNING OR OTHER CONDITIONS ARE CONDUCIVE
TO A HIGH WILDFIRE THREAT...THE NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE WILL ISSUE
FIRE WEATHER WATCHES OR RED FLAG WARNINGS.

DURING THIS WEEK A SERIES OF STATEMENTS WILL COVER A VARIETY OF
TOPICS RELATED TO LIGHTNING AND WILDFIRES.

MONDAY......LIGHTNING OVERVIEW FOR COLORADO
TUESDAY.....THE SCIENCE OF LIGHTNING
WEDNESDAY...OUTDOOR LIGHTNING RISK REDUCTION
THURSDAY....INDOOR LIGHTNING SAFETY
FRIDAY......LIGHTNING MEDICAL ISSUES FOR SURVIVORS
SATURDAY....LIGHTNING AND WILDFIRES

HERE ARE A COUPLE OF WEB SITES THAT CONTAIN ADDITIONAL LIGHTNING
INFORMATION.

NOAAS LIGHTNING WEBSITE WHICH CONTAINS ABUNDANT INFORMATION ON
LIGHTNING SAFETY CAN BE FOUND AT...

LIGHTNINGSAFETY.NOAA.GOV

LIGHTNING INFORMATION SPECIFIC FOR THE STATE OF COLORADO CAN BE FOUND AT...

WEATHER.GOV/PUB/LIGHTNING



000
NOUS45 KBOU 212157
PNSBOU

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE PUEBLO CO
400 PM MDT SUN JUN 21 2015

THIS WEEK IS COLORADO LIGHTNING SAFETY WEEK.  LIGHTNING STRIKES THE
GROUND IN OUR STATE OVER A HALF MILLION TIMES EACH YEAR AND WITH
MANY OF US PARTICIPATING IN OUTDOOR ACTIVITIES...WE NEED TO LEARN
HOW TO PROTECT OURSELVES FROM LIGHTNING HAZARDS.

LIGHTNING IS ALSO RESPONSIBLE FOR ABOUT HALF OF THE WILDFIRES IN
COLORADO EACH YEAR. WHEN LIGHTNING OR OTHER CONDITIONS ARE CONDUCIVE
TO A HIGH WILDFIRE THREAT...THE NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE WILL ISSUE
FIRE WEATHER WATCHES OR RED FLAG WARNINGS.

DURING THIS WEEK A SERIES OF STATEMENTS WILL COVER A VARIETY OF
TOPICS RELATED TO LIGHTNING AND WILDFIRES.

MONDAY......LIGHTNING OVERVIEW FOR COLORADO
TUESDAY.....THE SCIENCE OF LIGHTNING
WEDNESDAY...OUTDOOR LIGHTNING RISK REDUCTION
THURSDAY....INDOOR LIGHTNING SAFETY
FRIDAY......LIGHTNING MEDICAL ISSUES FOR SURVIVORS
SATURDAY....LIGHTNING AND WILDFIRES

HERE ARE A COUPLE OF WEB SITES THAT CONTAIN ADDITIONAL LIGHTNING
INFORMATION.

NOAAS LIGHTNING WEBSITE WHICH CONTAINS ABUNDANT INFORMATION ON
LIGHTNING SAFETY CAN BE FOUND AT...

LIGHTNINGSAFETY.NOAA.GOV

LIGHTNING INFORMATION SPECIFIC FOR THE STATE OF COLORADO CAN BE FOUND AT...

WEATHER.GOV/PUB/LIGHTNING



000
NOUS45 KBOU 211824
PNSBOU

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE PUEBLO CO
1224 PM MDT SUN JUN 21 2015

THIS WEEK IS COLORADO LIGHTNING SAFETY WEEK.  LIGHTNING STRIKES THE
GROUND IN OUR STATE OVER A HALF MILLION TIMES EACH YEAR AND WITH
MANY OF US PARTICIPATING IN OUTDOOR ACTIVITIES...WE NEED TO LEARN
HOW TO PROTECT OURSELVES FROM LIGHTNING HAZARDS.

LIGHTNING IS ALSO RESPONSIBLE FOR ABOUT HALF OF THE WILDFIRES IN
COLORADO EACH YEAR. WHEN LIGHTNING OR OTHER CONDITIONS ARE CONDUCIVE
TO A HIGH WILDFIRE THREAT...THE NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE WILL ISSUE
FIRE WEATHER WATCHES OR RED FLAG WARNINGS.

DURING THIS WEEK A SERIES OF STATEMENTS WILL COVER A VARIETY OF
TOPICS RELATED TO LIGHTNING AND WILDFIRES.

MONDAY......LIGHTNING OVERVIEW FOR COLORADO
TUESDAY.....THE SCIENCE OF LIGHTNING
WEDNESDAY...OUTDOOR LIGHTNING RISK REDUCTION
THURSDAY....INDOOR LIGHTNING SAFETY
FRIDAY......LIGHTNING MEDICAL ISSUES FOR SURVIVORS
SATURDAY....LIGHTNING AND WILDFIRES

HERE ARE A COUPLE OF WEB SITES THAT CONTAIN ADDITIONAL LIGHTNING
INFORMATION.

NOAAS LIGHTNING WEBSITE WHICH CONTAINS ABUNDANT INFORMATION ON
LIGHTNING SAFETY CAN BE FOUND AT...

LIGHTNINGSAFETY.NOAA.GOV

LIGHTNING INFORMATION SPECIFIC FOR THE STATE OF COLORADO CAN BE FOUND AT...

WEATHER.GOV/PUB/LIGHTNING



000
NOUS45 KBOU 211824
PNSBOU

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE PUEBLO CO
1224 PM MDT SUN JUN 21 2015

THIS WEEK IS COLORADO LIGHTNING SAFETY WEEK.  LIGHTNING STRIKES THE
GROUND IN OUR STATE OVER A HALF MILLION TIMES EACH YEAR AND WITH
MANY OF US PARTICIPATING IN OUTDOOR ACTIVITIES...WE NEED TO LEARN
HOW TO PROTECT OURSELVES FROM LIGHTNING HAZARDS.

LIGHTNING IS ALSO RESPONSIBLE FOR ABOUT HALF OF THE WILDFIRES IN
COLORADO EACH YEAR. WHEN LIGHTNING OR OTHER CONDITIONS ARE CONDUCIVE
TO A HIGH WILDFIRE THREAT...THE NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE WILL ISSUE
FIRE WEATHER WATCHES OR RED FLAG WARNINGS.

DURING THIS WEEK A SERIES OF STATEMENTS WILL COVER A VARIETY OF
TOPICS RELATED TO LIGHTNING AND WILDFIRES.

MONDAY......LIGHTNING OVERVIEW FOR COLORADO
TUESDAY.....THE SCIENCE OF LIGHTNING
WEDNESDAY...OUTDOOR LIGHTNING RISK REDUCTION
THURSDAY....INDOOR LIGHTNING SAFETY
FRIDAY......LIGHTNING MEDICAL ISSUES FOR SURVIVORS
SATURDAY....LIGHTNING AND WILDFIRES

HERE ARE A COUPLE OF WEB SITES THAT CONTAIN ADDITIONAL LIGHTNING
INFORMATION.

NOAAS LIGHTNING WEBSITE WHICH CONTAINS ABUNDANT INFORMATION ON
LIGHTNING SAFETY CAN BE FOUND AT...

LIGHTNINGSAFETY.NOAA.GOV

LIGHTNING INFORMATION SPECIFIC FOR THE STATE OF COLORADO CAN BE FOUND AT...

WEATHER.GOV/PUB/LIGHTNING


000
NOUS43 KGLD 211203
PNSGLD

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE GOODLAND KS
600 AM MDT SUN JUN 21 2015

...ON THIS DATE IN WEATHER HISTORY...

IN 1947, A VIOLENT F4 TORNADO DEVELOPED TWO MILES NORTHEAST OF
DENSMORE IN NORTON COUNTY KANSAS, PASSED THREE MILES EAST OF
ALMENA, AND LIFTED TWO MILES NORTHEAST OF STANFORD NEBRASKA.
TWENTY FARMS LOST BUILDINGS. THE F4 DAMAGE OCCURRED IN NORTON
COUNTY, AS FIVE FARMS LOST EVERY BUILDING, INCLUDING THE MAIN
HOUSE. ONE DEATH AND TWENTY TWO INJURIES WERE ATTRIBUTED TO THE
TWISTER.

IN 2007, WIND GUSTS ESTIMATED AT 75 MPH DOWNED LARGE TREE LIMBS
AND REMOVED PORTIONS OF A BARN ROOF SOUTH OF BENKELMAN,  NEBRASKA.

$$


000
NOUS45 KBOU 211203
PNSBOU

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE DENVER/BOULDER CO
600 AM MDT SUN APR 12 2015

THUNDERSTORM SEASON IS APPROACHING...ARE YOU READY?

THE NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE WANTS EVERYONE TO BE PART OF A WEATHER READY
NATION. COLORADO IS AN ANNUAL HOST FOR TORNADOES...FLASH FLOODS... TORNADOES...DAMAGING
HAIL...KILLER LIGHTNING...AND WIND DAMAGE. ARE YOU WEATHER READY...NOW IS THE TIME TO MAKE
SURE YOU KNOW HOW TO STAY SAFE WHEN SEVERE WEATHER THREATENS. THIS WEEK...APRIL 12TH TO
18TH IS COLORADO SEVERE WEATHER PREPAREDNESS WEEK.

EACH YEAR FOR THE PAST 20 YEARS THERE HAVE BEEN AN AVERAGE OF 50 TORNADOES IN COLORADO...3
PEOPLE ARE KILLED BY LIGHTNING...AND OTHER 13 PEOPLE ARE INJURED BY LIGHTNING. SOME OF THE
BIGGEST INSURANCE LOSSES EACH YEAR ARE DUE TO LARGE HAIL.

THE NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE OFFICES WHICH COVER COLORADO WILL ISSUE A SERIES OF PUBLIC
INFORMATION STATEMENTS DURING THE WEEK COVERING THE FOLLOWING TOPICS:

...ON MONDAY...WATCHES AND WARNINGS
...ON TUESDAY...TORNADOES AND TORNADO SAFETY
...ON WEDNESDAY...FLOOD AND FLASH FLOOD SAFETY
...ON THURSDAY DOWNBURST WIND AND HAIL
...ON FRIDAY LIGHTNING AND LIGHTNING SAFETY
...ON SATURDAY...A REVIEW OF THE WEEK

WARNINGS ARE ISSUED BY THE NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE FOR A VARIETY OF THUNDERSTORM HAZARDS.
MAKE SURE YOU HAVE A WAY TO RECEIVE WARNINGS. IF YOU LIVE IN A COMMUNITY WITH A
SIREN...UNDERSTAND THE PROTOCOL FOR SOUNDING THOSE SIRENS. IF YOU HAVE A RELATIVELY NEW CELL
PHONE YOU WILL RECEIVE TORNADO AND FLASH FLOOD WARNINGS ON YOUR PHONE IF YOU ARE IN THE AREA
OF THE WARNING. NOAA WEATHER RADIOS ARE ANOTHER GREAT WAY TO MONITOR THE WEATHER AND
RECEIVE WARNINGS...AND THEY CAN BE FOUND AND MOST
HARDWARE OR ELECTRONICS STORES.

SAFETY INFORMATION...WATCHES...WARNINGS...FORECASTS...CURRENT CONDITIONS...RADAR...AND MUCH
MORE INFORMATION IS AVAILABLE AT YOUR LOCAL NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE WEB SITES:

WWW.WEATHER.GOV/BOULDER NWS BOULDER WEB SITE
WWW.WEATHER.GOV/PUEBLO NWS PUEBLO WEB SITE
WWW.WEATHER.GOV/GOODLAND NWS GOODLAND WEB SITE
WWW.WEATHER.GOV/GJT NWS GRAND JUNCTION WEB SITE



000
NOUS45 KBOU 211203
PNSBOU

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE DENVER/BOULDER CO
600 AM MDT SUN APR 12 2015

THUNDERSTORM SEASON IS APPROACHING...ARE YOU READY?

THE NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE WANTS EVERYONE TO BE PART OF A WEATHER READY
NATION. COLORADO IS AN ANNUAL HOST FOR TORNADOES...FLASH FLOODS... TORNADOES...DAMAGING
HAIL...KILLER LIGHTNING...AND WIND DAMAGE. ARE YOU WEATHER READY...NOW IS THE TIME TO MAKE
SURE YOU KNOW HOW TO STAY SAFE WHEN SEVERE WEATHER THREATENS. THIS WEEK...APRIL 12TH TO
18TH IS COLORADO SEVERE WEATHER PREPAREDNESS WEEK.

EACH YEAR FOR THE PAST 20 YEARS THERE HAVE BEEN AN AVERAGE OF 50 TORNADOES IN COLORADO...3
PEOPLE ARE KILLED BY LIGHTNING...AND OTHER 13 PEOPLE ARE INJURED BY LIGHTNING. SOME OF THE
BIGGEST INSURANCE LOSSES EACH YEAR ARE DUE TO LARGE HAIL.

THE NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE OFFICES WHICH COVER COLORADO WILL ISSUE A SERIES OF PUBLIC
INFORMATION STATEMENTS DURING THE WEEK COVERING THE FOLLOWING TOPICS:

...ON MONDAY...WATCHES AND WARNINGS
...ON TUESDAY...TORNADOES AND TORNADO SAFETY
...ON WEDNESDAY...FLOOD AND FLASH FLOOD SAFETY
...ON THURSDAY DOWNBURST WIND AND HAIL
...ON FRIDAY LIGHTNING AND LIGHTNING SAFETY
...ON SATURDAY...A REVIEW OF THE WEEK

WARNINGS ARE ISSUED BY THE NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE FOR A VARIETY OF THUNDERSTORM HAZARDS.
MAKE SURE YOU HAVE A WAY TO RECEIVE WARNINGS. IF YOU LIVE IN A COMMUNITY WITH A
SIREN...UNDERSTAND THE PROTOCOL FOR SOUNDING THOSE SIRENS. IF YOU HAVE A RELATIVELY NEW CELL
PHONE YOU WILL RECEIVE TORNADO AND FLASH FLOOD WARNINGS ON YOUR PHONE IF YOU ARE IN THE AREA
OF THE WARNING. NOAA WEATHER RADIOS ARE ANOTHER GREAT WAY TO MONITOR THE WEATHER AND
RECEIVE WARNINGS...AND THEY CAN BE FOUND AND MOST
HARDWARE OR ELECTRONICS STORES.

SAFETY INFORMATION...WATCHES...WARNINGS...FORECASTS...CURRENT CONDITIONS...RADAR...AND MUCH
MORE INFORMATION IS AVAILABLE AT YOUR LOCAL NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE WEB SITES:

WWW.WEATHER.GOV/BOULDER NWS BOULDER WEB SITE
WWW.WEATHER.GOV/PUEBLO NWS PUEBLO WEB SITE
WWW.WEATHER.GOV/GOODLAND NWS GOODLAND WEB SITE
WWW.WEATHER.GOV/GJT NWS GRAND JUNCTION WEB SITE


000
NOUS45 KBOU 211203
PNSBOU

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE DENVER/BOULDER CO
600 AM MDT SUN APR 12 2015

THUNDERSTORM SEASON IS APPROACHING...ARE YOU READY?

THE NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE WANTS EVERYONE TO BE PART OF A WEATHER READY
NATION. COLORADO IS AN ANNUAL HOST FOR TORNADOES...FLASH FLOODS... TORNADOES...DAMAGING
HAIL...KILLER LIGHTNING...AND WIND DAMAGE. ARE YOU WEATHER READY...NOW IS THE TIME TO MAKE
SURE YOU KNOW HOW TO STAY SAFE WHEN SEVERE WEATHER THREATENS. THIS WEEK...APRIL 12TH TO
18TH IS COLORADO SEVERE WEATHER PREPAREDNESS WEEK.

EACH YEAR FOR THE PAST 20 YEARS THERE HAVE BEEN AN AVERAGE OF 50 TORNADOES IN COLORADO...3
PEOPLE ARE KILLED BY LIGHTNING...AND OTHER 13 PEOPLE ARE INJURED BY LIGHTNING. SOME OF THE
BIGGEST INSURANCE LOSSES EACH YEAR ARE DUE TO LARGE HAIL.

THE NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE OFFICES WHICH COVER COLORADO WILL ISSUE A SERIES OF PUBLIC
INFORMATION STATEMENTS DURING THE WEEK COVERING THE FOLLOWING TOPICS:

...ON MONDAY...WATCHES AND WARNINGS
...ON TUESDAY...TORNADOES AND TORNADO SAFETY
...ON WEDNESDAY...FLOOD AND FLASH FLOOD SAFETY
...ON THURSDAY DOWNBURST WIND AND HAIL
...ON FRIDAY LIGHTNING AND LIGHTNING SAFETY
...ON SATURDAY...A REVIEW OF THE WEEK

WARNINGS ARE ISSUED BY THE NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE FOR A VARIETY OF THUNDERSTORM HAZARDS.
MAKE SURE YOU HAVE A WAY TO RECEIVE WARNINGS. IF YOU LIVE IN A COMMUNITY WITH A
SIREN...UNDERSTAND THE PROTOCOL FOR SOUNDING THOSE SIRENS. IF YOU HAVE A RELATIVELY NEW CELL
PHONE YOU WILL RECEIVE TORNADO AND FLASH FLOOD WARNINGS ON YOUR PHONE IF YOU ARE IN THE AREA
OF THE WARNING. NOAA WEATHER RADIOS ARE ANOTHER GREAT WAY TO MONITOR THE WEATHER AND
RECEIVE WARNINGS...AND THEY CAN BE FOUND AND MOST
HARDWARE OR ELECTRONICS STORES.

SAFETY INFORMATION...WATCHES...WARNINGS...FORECASTS...CURRENT CONDITIONS...RADAR...AND MUCH
MORE INFORMATION IS AVAILABLE AT YOUR LOCAL NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE WEB SITES:

WWW.WEATHER.GOV/BOULDER NWS BOULDER WEB SITE
WWW.WEATHER.GOV/PUEBLO NWS PUEBLO WEB SITE
WWW.WEATHER.GOV/GOODLAND NWS GOODLAND WEB SITE
WWW.WEATHER.GOV/GJT NWS GRAND JUNCTION WEB SITE


000
NOUS43 KGLD 211203
PNSGLD

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE GOODLAND KS
600 AM MDT SUN JUN 21 2015

...ON THIS DATE IN WEATHER HISTORY...

IN 1947, A VIOLENT F4 TORNADO DEVELOPED TWO MILES NORTHEAST OF
DENSMORE IN NORTON COUNTY KANSAS, PASSED THREE MILES EAST OF
ALMENA, AND LIFTED TWO MILES NORTHEAST OF STANFORD NEBRASKA.
TWENTY FARMS LOST BUILDINGS. THE F4 DAMAGE OCCURRED IN NORTON
COUNTY, AS FIVE FARMS LOST EVERY BUILDING, INCLUDING THE MAIN
HOUSE. ONE DEATH AND TWENTY TWO INJURIES WERE ATTRIBUTED TO THE
TWISTER.

IN 2007, WIND GUSTS ESTIMATED AT 75 MPH DOWNED LARGE TREE LIMBS
AND REMOVED PORTIONS OF A BARN ROOF SOUTH OF BENKELMAN,  NEBRASKA.

$$



000
NOUS43 KGLD 211203
PNSGLD

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE GOODLAND KS
600 AM MDT SUN JUN 21 2015

...ON THIS DATE IN WEATHER HISTORY...

IN 1947, A VIOLENT F4 TORNADO DEVELOPED TWO MILES NORTHEAST OF
DENSMORE IN NORTON COUNTY KANSAS, PASSED THREE MILES EAST OF
ALMENA, AND LIFTED TWO MILES NORTHEAST OF STANFORD NEBRASKA.
TWENTY FARMS LOST BUILDINGS. THE F4 DAMAGE OCCURRED IN NORTON
COUNTY, AS FIVE FARMS LOST EVERY BUILDING, INCLUDING THE MAIN
HOUSE. ONE DEATH AND TWENTY TWO INJURIES WERE ATTRIBUTED TO THE
TWISTER.

IN 2007, WIND GUSTS ESTIMATED AT 75 MPH DOWNED LARGE TREE LIMBS
AND REMOVED PORTIONS OF A BARN ROOF SOUTH OF BENKELMAN,  NEBRASKA.

$$


000
NOUS45 KBOU 211158
PNSBOU

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE PUEBLO CO
600 AM MDT SUN JUN 21 2015

THIS WEEK IS COLORADO LIGHTNING SAFETY WEEK.  LIGHTNING STRIKES THE
GROUND IN OUR STATE OVER A HALF MILLION TIMES EACH YEAR AND WITH
MANY OF US PARTICIPATING IN OUTDOOR ACTIVITIES...WE NEED TO LEARN
HOW TO PROTECT OURSELVES FROM LIGHTNING HAZARDS.

LIGHTNING IS ALSO RESPONSIBLE FOR ABOUT HALF OF THE WILDFIRES IN
COLORADO EACH YEAR. WHEN LIGHTNING OR OTHER CONDITIONS ARE CONDUCIVE
TO A HIGH WILDFIRE THREAT...THE NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE WILL ISSUE
FIRE WEATHER WATCHES OR RED FLAG WARNINGS.

DURING THIS WEEK A SERIES OF STATEMENTS WILL COVER A VARIETY OF
TOPICS RELATED TO LIGHTNING AND WILDFIRES.

MONDAY......LIGHTNING OVERVIEW FOR COLORADO
TUESDAY.....THE SCIENCE OF LIGHTNING
WEDNESDAY...OUTDOOR LIGHTNING RISK REDUCTION
THURSDAY....INDOOR LIGHTNING SAFETY
FRIDAY......LIGHTNING MEDICAL ISSUES FOR SURVIVORS
SATURDAY....LIGHTNING AND WILDFIRES

HERE ARE A COUPLE OF WEB SITES THAT CONTAIN ADDITIONAL LIGHTNING
INFORMATION.

NOAAS LIGHTNING WEBSITE WHICH CONTAINS ABUNDANT INFORMATION ON
LIGHTNING SAFETY CAN BE FOUND AT...

LIGHTNINGSAFETY.NOAA.GOV

LIGHTNING INFORMATION SPECIFIC FOR THE STATE OF COLORADO CAN BE FOUND AT...

WEATHER.GOV/PUB/LIGHTNING


000
NOUS45 KBOU 211158
PNSBOU

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE PUEBLO CO
600 AM MDT SUN JUN 21 2015

THIS WEEK IS COLORADO LIGHTNING SAFETY WEEK.  LIGHTNING STRIKES THE
GROUND IN OUR STATE OVER A HALF MILLION TIMES EACH YEAR AND WITH
MANY OF US PARTICIPATING IN OUTDOOR ACTIVITIES...WE NEED TO LEARN
HOW TO PROTECT OURSELVES FROM LIGHTNING HAZARDS.

LIGHTNING IS ALSO RESPONSIBLE FOR ABOUT HALF OF THE WILDFIRES IN
COLORADO EACH YEAR. WHEN LIGHTNING OR OTHER CONDITIONS ARE CONDUCIVE
TO A HIGH WILDFIRE THREAT...THE NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE WILL ISSUE
FIRE WEATHER WATCHES OR RED FLAG WARNINGS.

DURING THIS WEEK A SERIES OF STATEMENTS WILL COVER A VARIETY OF
TOPICS RELATED TO LIGHTNING AND WILDFIRES.

MONDAY......LIGHTNING OVERVIEW FOR COLORADO
TUESDAY.....THE SCIENCE OF LIGHTNING
WEDNESDAY...OUTDOOR LIGHTNING RISK REDUCTION
THURSDAY....INDOOR LIGHTNING SAFETY
FRIDAY......LIGHTNING MEDICAL ISSUES FOR SURVIVORS
SATURDAY....LIGHTNING AND WILDFIRES

HERE ARE A COUPLE OF WEB SITES THAT CONTAIN ADDITIONAL LIGHTNING
INFORMATION.

NOAAS LIGHTNING WEBSITE WHICH CONTAINS ABUNDANT INFORMATION ON
LIGHTNING SAFETY CAN BE FOUND AT...

LIGHTNINGSAFETY.NOAA.GOV

LIGHTNING INFORMATION SPECIFIC FOR THE STATE OF COLORADO CAN BE FOUND AT...

WEATHER.GOV/PUB/LIGHTNING



000
NOUS45 KBOU 211158
PNSBOU

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE PUEBLO CO
600 AM MDT SUN JUN 21 2015

THIS WEEK IS COLORADO LIGHTNING SAFETY WEEK.  LIGHTNING STRIKES THE
GROUND IN OUR STATE OVER A HALF MILLION TIMES EACH YEAR AND WITH
MANY OF US PARTICIPATING IN OUTDOOR ACTIVITIES...WE NEED TO LEARN
HOW TO PROTECT OURSELVES FROM LIGHTNING HAZARDS.

LIGHTNING IS ALSO RESPONSIBLE FOR ABOUT HALF OF THE WILDFIRES IN
COLORADO EACH YEAR. WHEN LIGHTNING OR OTHER CONDITIONS ARE CONDUCIVE
TO A HIGH WILDFIRE THREAT...THE NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE WILL ISSUE
FIRE WEATHER WATCHES OR RED FLAG WARNINGS.

DURING THIS WEEK A SERIES OF STATEMENTS WILL COVER A VARIETY OF
TOPICS RELATED TO LIGHTNING AND WILDFIRES.

MONDAY......LIGHTNING OVERVIEW FOR COLORADO
TUESDAY.....THE SCIENCE OF LIGHTNING
WEDNESDAY...OUTDOOR LIGHTNING RISK REDUCTION
THURSDAY....INDOOR LIGHTNING SAFETY
FRIDAY......LIGHTNING MEDICAL ISSUES FOR SURVIVORS
SATURDAY....LIGHTNING AND WILDFIRES

HERE ARE A COUPLE OF WEB SITES THAT CONTAIN ADDITIONAL LIGHTNING
INFORMATION.

NOAAS LIGHTNING WEBSITE WHICH CONTAINS ABUNDANT INFORMATION ON
LIGHTNING SAFETY CAN BE FOUND AT...

LIGHTNINGSAFETY.NOAA.GOV

LIGHTNING INFORMATION SPECIFIC FOR THE STATE OF COLORADO CAN BE FOUND AT...

WEATHER.GOV/PUB/LIGHTNING


000
NOUS45 KBOU 211158
PNSBOU

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE PUEBLO CO
600 AM MDT SUN JUN 21 2015

THIS WEEK IS COLORADO LIGHTNING SAFETY WEEK.  LIGHTNING STRIKES THE
GROUND IN OUR STATE OVER A HALF MILLION TIMES EACH YEAR AND WITH
MANY OF US PARTICIPATING IN OUTDOOR ACTIVITIES...WE NEED TO LEARN
HOW TO PROTECT OURSELVES FROM LIGHTNING HAZARDS.

LIGHTNING IS ALSO RESPONSIBLE FOR ABOUT HALF OF THE WILDFIRES IN
COLORADO EACH YEAR. WHEN LIGHTNING OR OTHER CONDITIONS ARE CONDUCIVE
TO A HIGH WILDFIRE THREAT...THE NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE WILL ISSUE
FIRE WEATHER WATCHES OR RED FLAG WARNINGS.

DURING THIS WEEK A SERIES OF STATEMENTS WILL COVER A VARIETY OF
TOPICS RELATED TO LIGHTNING AND WILDFIRES.

MONDAY......LIGHTNING OVERVIEW FOR COLORADO
TUESDAY.....THE SCIENCE OF LIGHTNING
WEDNESDAY...OUTDOOR LIGHTNING RISK REDUCTION
THURSDAY....INDOOR LIGHTNING SAFETY
FRIDAY......LIGHTNING MEDICAL ISSUES FOR SURVIVORS
SATURDAY....LIGHTNING AND WILDFIRES

HERE ARE A COUPLE OF WEB SITES THAT CONTAIN ADDITIONAL LIGHTNING
INFORMATION.

NOAAS LIGHTNING WEBSITE WHICH CONTAINS ABUNDANT INFORMATION ON
LIGHTNING SAFETY CAN BE FOUND AT...

LIGHTNINGSAFETY.NOAA.GOV

LIGHTNING INFORMATION SPECIFIC FOR THE STATE OF COLORADO CAN BE FOUND AT...

WEATHER.GOV/PUB/LIGHTNING


000
NOUS45 KBOU 211158
PNSBOU

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE PUEBLO CO
600 AM MDT SUN JUN 21 2015

THIS WEEK IS COLORADO LIGHTNING SAFETY WEEK.  LIGHTNING STRIKES THE
GROUND IN OUR STATE OVER A HALF MILLION TIMES EACH YEAR AND WITH
MANY OF US PARTICIPATING IN OUTDOOR ACTIVITIES...WE NEED TO LEARN
HOW TO PROTECT OURSELVES FROM LIGHTNING HAZARDS.

LIGHTNING IS ALSO RESPONSIBLE FOR ABOUT HALF OF THE WILDFIRES IN
COLORADO EACH YEAR. WHEN LIGHTNING OR OTHER CONDITIONS ARE CONDUCIVE
TO A HIGH WILDFIRE THREAT...THE NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE WILL ISSUE
FIRE WEATHER WATCHES OR RED FLAG WARNINGS.

DURING THIS WEEK A SERIES OF STATEMENTS WILL COVER A VARIETY OF
TOPICS RELATED TO LIGHTNING AND WILDFIRES.

MONDAY......LIGHTNING OVERVIEW FOR COLORADO
TUESDAY.....THE SCIENCE OF LIGHTNING
WEDNESDAY...OUTDOOR LIGHTNING RISK REDUCTION
THURSDAY....INDOOR LIGHTNING SAFETY
FRIDAY......LIGHTNING MEDICAL ISSUES FOR SURVIVORS
SATURDAY....LIGHTNING AND WILDFIRES

HERE ARE A COUPLE OF WEB SITES THAT CONTAIN ADDITIONAL LIGHTNING
INFORMATION.

NOAAS LIGHTNING WEBSITE WHICH CONTAINS ABUNDANT INFORMATION ON
LIGHTNING SAFETY CAN BE FOUND AT...

LIGHTNINGSAFETY.NOAA.GOV

LIGHTNING INFORMATION SPECIFIC FOR THE STATE OF COLORADO CAN BE FOUND AT...

WEATHER.GOV/PUB/LIGHTNING


000
NOUS45 KBOU 211158
PNSBOU

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE PUEBLO CO
600 AM MDT SUN JUN 21 2015

THIS WEEK IS COLORADO LIGHTNING SAFETY WEEK.  LIGHTNING STRIKES THE
GROUND IN OUR STATE OVER A HALF MILLION TIMES EACH YEAR AND WITH
MANY OF US PARTICIPATING IN OUTDOOR ACTIVITIES...WE NEED TO LEARN
HOW TO PROTECT OURSELVES FROM LIGHTNING HAZARDS.

LIGHTNING IS ALSO RESPONSIBLE FOR ABOUT HALF OF THE WILDFIRES IN
COLORADO EACH YEAR. WHEN LIGHTNING OR OTHER CONDITIONS ARE CONDUCIVE
TO A HIGH WILDFIRE THREAT...THE NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE WILL ISSUE
FIRE WEATHER WATCHES OR RED FLAG WARNINGS.

DURING THIS WEEK A SERIES OF STATEMENTS WILL COVER A VARIETY OF
TOPICS RELATED TO LIGHTNING AND WILDFIRES.

MONDAY......LIGHTNING OVERVIEW FOR COLORADO
TUESDAY.....THE SCIENCE OF LIGHTNING
WEDNESDAY...OUTDOOR LIGHTNING RISK REDUCTION
THURSDAY....INDOOR LIGHTNING SAFETY
FRIDAY......LIGHTNING MEDICAL ISSUES FOR SURVIVORS
SATURDAY....LIGHTNING AND WILDFIRES

HERE ARE A COUPLE OF WEB SITES THAT CONTAIN ADDITIONAL LIGHTNING
INFORMATION.

NOAAS LIGHTNING WEBSITE WHICH CONTAINS ABUNDANT INFORMATION ON
LIGHTNING SAFETY CAN BE FOUND AT...

LIGHTNINGSAFETY.NOAA.GOV

LIGHTNING INFORMATION SPECIFIC FOR THE STATE OF COLORADO CAN BE FOUND AT...

WEATHER.GOV/PUB/LIGHTNING


000
NOUS45 KGJT 210158
PNSGJT

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
PRELIMINARY RECORD EVENT REPORT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE GRAND JUNCTION CO
755 PM MDT SAT JUN 20 2015

...RECORD HIGH TEMPERATURE AT GATEWAY SATURDAY ...

IN WESTERN COLORADO...

AT GATEWAY, THE HIGH TEMPERATURE TODAY WAS 100 DEGREES. THIS SET A
NEW RECORD HIGH FOR JUNE 20, BREAKING THE PREVIOUS RECORD OF 99, SET
IN 2007.


$$


000
NOUS45 KGJT 210158
PNSGJT

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
PRELIMINARY RECORD EVENT REPORT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE GRAND JUNCTION CO
755 PM MDT SAT JUN 20 2015

...RECORD HIGH TEMPERATURE AT GATEWAY SATURDAY ...

IN WESTERN COLORADO...

AT GATEWAY, THE HIGH TEMPERATURE TODAY WAS 100 DEGREES. THIS SET A
NEW RECORD HIGH FOR JUNE 20, BREAKING THE PREVIOUS RECORD OF 99, SET
IN 2007.


$$



000
NOUS41 KLWX 201858
PNSLWX

...SEVERE WEATHER SAFETY RULES...

DAMAGING THUNDERSTORMS ARE POSSIBLE THIS AFTERNOON INTO THE
OVERNIGHT. RESIDENTS ALL ACROSS THE BALTIMORE AND WASHINGTON DC
METRO AREAS...NORTH AND CENTRAL VIRGINIA...MUCH OF MARYLAND AND THE
EASTERN WEST VIRGINIA PANHANDLE SHOULD MONITOR THIS SITUATION VERY
CLOSELY AND ENSURE YOUR NOAA WEATHER RADIOS ARE SET TO ALERT MODE.
SEVERE WEATHER WARNINGS MAY BECOME NECESSARY. HERE ARE SOME SAFETY
RULES TO KEEP IN MIND WHEN SEVERE WEATHER IS EXPECTED OR IS
OCCURRING.

IF A WARNING IS ISSUED...SEEK SHELTER INDOORS IMMEDIATELY. A SEVERE
THUNDERSTORM IS DEFINED AS PRODUCING QUARTER SIZE OR GREATER HAIL
AND WIND GUSTS OF 58 MPH OR MORE.

TORNADOES OFTEN FORM VERY RAPIDLY FROM SEVERE THUNDERSTORMS. IF
YOU ARE IN A TORNADO WATCH...AND A SEVERE THUNDERSTORM WARNING IS
ISSUED FOR YOUR AREA...MONITOR LOCAL CONDITIONS CLOSELY AND BE
READY TO TAKE QUICK ACTION TO SAVE YOUR LIFE.

STAY TUNED TO NOAA WEATHER RADIO...COMMERCIAL RADIO OR TELEVISION
FOR THE LATEST ON THIS POTENTIAL SEVERE WEATHER EVENT. ADDITIONAL
WEATHER INFORMATION...CAN BE FOUND AT WEATHER.GOV/WASHINGTON OR
WEATHER.GOV/BALTIMORE.



000
NOUS41 KLWX 201858
PNSLWX

...SEVERE WEATHER SAFETY RULES...

DAMAGING THUNDERSTORMS ARE POSSIBLE THIS AFTERNOON INTO THE
OVERNIGHT. RESIDENTS ALL ACROSS THE BALTIMORE AND WASHINGTON DC
METRO AREAS...NORTH AND CENTRAL VIRGINIA...MUCH OF MARYLAND AND THE
EASTERN WEST VIRGINIA PANHANDLE SHOULD MONITOR THIS SITUATION VERY
CLOSELY AND ENSURE YOUR NOAA WEATHER RADIOS ARE SET TO ALERT MODE.
SEVERE WEATHER WARNINGS MAY BECOME NECESSARY. HERE ARE SOME SAFETY
RULES TO KEEP IN MIND WHEN SEVERE WEATHER IS EXPECTED OR IS
OCCURRING.

IF A WARNING IS ISSUED...SEEK SHELTER INDOORS IMMEDIATELY. A SEVERE
THUNDERSTORM IS DEFINED AS PRODUCING QUARTER SIZE OR GREATER HAIL
AND WIND GUSTS OF 58 MPH OR MORE.

TORNADOES OFTEN FORM VERY RAPIDLY FROM SEVERE THUNDERSTORMS. IF
YOU ARE IN A TORNADO WATCH...AND A SEVERE THUNDERSTORM WARNING IS
ISSUED FOR YOUR AREA...MONITOR LOCAL CONDITIONS CLOSELY AND BE
READY TO TAKE QUICK ACTION TO SAVE YOUR LIFE.

STAY TUNED TO NOAA WEATHER RADIO...COMMERCIAL RADIO OR TELEVISION
FOR THE LATEST ON THIS POTENTIAL SEVERE WEATHER EVENT. ADDITIONAL
WEATHER INFORMATION...CAN BE FOUND AT WEATHER.GOV/WASHINGTON OR
WEATHER.GOV/BALTIMORE.


000
NOUS41 KLWX 201858
PNSLWX

...SEVERE WEATHER SAFETY RULES...

DAMAGING THUNDERSTORMS ARE POSSIBLE THIS AFTERNOON INTO THE
OVERNIGHT. RESIDENTS ALL ACROSS THE BALTIMORE AND WASHINGTON DC
METRO AREAS...NORTH AND CENTRAL VIRGINIA...MUCH OF MARYLAND AND THE
EASTERN WEST VIRGINIA PANHANDLE SHOULD MONITOR THIS SITUATION VERY
CLOSELY AND ENSURE YOUR NOAA WEATHER RADIOS ARE SET TO ALERT MODE.
SEVERE WEATHER WARNINGS MAY BECOME NECESSARY. HERE ARE SOME SAFETY
RULES TO KEEP IN MIND WHEN SEVERE WEATHER IS EXPECTED OR IS
OCCURRING.

IF A WARNING IS ISSUED...SEEK SHELTER INDOORS IMMEDIATELY. A SEVERE
THUNDERSTORM IS DEFINED AS PRODUCING QUARTER SIZE OR GREATER HAIL
AND WIND GUSTS OF 58 MPH OR MORE.

TORNADOES OFTEN FORM VERY RAPIDLY FROM SEVERE THUNDERSTORMS. IF
YOU ARE IN A TORNADO WATCH...AND A SEVERE THUNDERSTORM WARNING IS
ISSUED FOR YOUR AREA...MONITOR LOCAL CONDITIONS CLOSELY AND BE
READY TO TAKE QUICK ACTION TO SAVE YOUR LIFE.

STAY TUNED TO NOAA WEATHER RADIO...COMMERCIAL RADIO OR TELEVISION
FOR THE LATEST ON THIS POTENTIAL SEVERE WEATHER EVENT. ADDITIONAL
WEATHER INFORMATION...CAN BE FOUND AT WEATHER.GOV/WASHINGTON OR
WEATHER.GOV/BALTIMORE.


000
NOUS41 KLWX 201858
PNSLWX

...SEVERE WEATHER SAFETY RULES...

DAMAGING THUNDERSTORMS ARE POSSIBLE THIS AFTERNOON INTO THE
OVERNIGHT. RESIDENTS ALL ACROSS THE BALTIMORE AND WASHINGTON DC
METRO AREAS...NORTH AND CENTRAL VIRGINIA...MUCH OF MARYLAND AND THE
EASTERN WEST VIRGINIA PANHANDLE SHOULD MONITOR THIS SITUATION VERY
CLOSELY AND ENSURE YOUR NOAA WEATHER RADIOS ARE SET TO ALERT MODE.
SEVERE WEATHER WARNINGS MAY BECOME NECESSARY. HERE ARE SOME SAFETY
RULES TO KEEP IN MIND WHEN SEVERE WEATHER IS EXPECTED OR IS
OCCURRING.

IF A WARNING IS ISSUED...SEEK SHELTER INDOORS IMMEDIATELY. A SEVERE
THUNDERSTORM IS DEFINED AS PRODUCING QUARTER SIZE OR GREATER HAIL
AND WIND GUSTS OF 58 MPH OR MORE.

TORNADOES OFTEN FORM VERY RAPIDLY FROM SEVERE THUNDERSTORMS. IF
YOU ARE IN A TORNADO WATCH...AND A SEVERE THUNDERSTORM WARNING IS
ISSUED FOR YOUR AREA...MONITOR LOCAL CONDITIONS CLOSELY AND BE
READY TO TAKE QUICK ACTION TO SAVE YOUR LIFE.

STAY TUNED TO NOAA WEATHER RADIO...COMMERCIAL RADIO OR TELEVISION
FOR THE LATEST ON THIS POTENTIAL SEVERE WEATHER EVENT. ADDITIONAL
WEATHER INFORMATION...CAN BE FOUND AT WEATHER.GOV/WASHINGTON OR
WEATHER.GOV/BALTIMORE.


000
NOUS41 KLWX 201858
PNSLWX

...SEVERE WEATHER SAFETY RULES...

DAMAGING THUNDERSTORMS ARE POSSIBLE THIS AFTERNOON INTO THE
OVERNIGHT. RESIDENTS ALL ACROSS THE BALTIMORE AND WASHINGTON DC
METRO AREAS...NORTH AND CENTRAL VIRGINIA...MUCH OF MARYLAND AND THE
EASTERN WEST VIRGINIA PANHANDLE SHOULD MONITOR THIS SITUATION VERY
CLOSELY AND ENSURE YOUR NOAA WEATHER RADIOS ARE SET TO ALERT MODE.
SEVERE WEATHER WARNINGS MAY BECOME NECESSARY. HERE ARE SOME SAFETY
RULES TO KEEP IN MIND WHEN SEVERE WEATHER IS EXPECTED OR IS
OCCURRING.

IF A WARNING IS ISSUED...SEEK SHELTER INDOORS IMMEDIATELY. A SEVERE
THUNDERSTORM IS DEFINED AS PRODUCING QUARTER SIZE OR GREATER HAIL
AND WIND GUSTS OF 58 MPH OR MORE.

TORNADOES OFTEN FORM VERY RAPIDLY FROM SEVERE THUNDERSTORMS. IF
YOU ARE IN A TORNADO WATCH...AND A SEVERE THUNDERSTORM WARNING IS
ISSUED FOR YOUR AREA...MONITOR LOCAL CONDITIONS CLOSELY AND BE
READY TO TAKE QUICK ACTION TO SAVE YOUR LIFE.

STAY TUNED TO NOAA WEATHER RADIO...COMMERCIAL RADIO OR TELEVISION
FOR THE LATEST ON THIS POTENTIAL SEVERE WEATHER EVENT. ADDITIONAL
WEATHER INFORMATION...CAN BE FOUND AT WEATHER.GOV/WASHINGTON OR
WEATHER.GOV/BALTIMORE.


000
NOUS41 KLWX 201858
PNSLWX

...SEVERE WEATHER SAFETY RULES...

DAMAGING THUNDERSTORMS ARE POSSIBLE THIS AFTERNOON INTO THE
OVERNIGHT. RESIDENTS ALL ACROSS THE BALTIMORE AND WASHINGTON DC
METRO AREAS...NORTH AND CENTRAL VIRGINIA...MUCH OF MARYLAND AND THE
EASTERN WEST VIRGINIA PANHANDLE SHOULD MONITOR THIS SITUATION VERY
CLOSELY AND ENSURE YOUR NOAA WEATHER RADIOS ARE SET TO ALERT MODE.
SEVERE WEATHER WARNINGS MAY BECOME NECESSARY. HERE ARE SOME SAFETY
RULES TO KEEP IN MIND WHEN SEVERE WEATHER IS EXPECTED OR IS
OCCURRING.

IF A WARNING IS ISSUED...SEEK SHELTER INDOORS IMMEDIATELY. A SEVERE
THUNDERSTORM IS DEFINED AS PRODUCING QUARTER SIZE OR GREATER HAIL
AND WIND GUSTS OF 58 MPH OR MORE.

TORNADOES OFTEN FORM VERY RAPIDLY FROM SEVERE THUNDERSTORMS. IF
YOU ARE IN A TORNADO WATCH...AND A SEVERE THUNDERSTORM WARNING IS
ISSUED FOR YOUR AREA...MONITOR LOCAL CONDITIONS CLOSELY AND BE
READY TO TAKE QUICK ACTION TO SAVE YOUR LIFE.

STAY TUNED TO NOAA WEATHER RADIO...COMMERCIAL RADIO OR TELEVISION
FOR THE LATEST ON THIS POTENTIAL SEVERE WEATHER EVENT. ADDITIONAL
WEATHER INFORMATION...CAN BE FOUND AT WEATHER.GOV/WASHINGTON OR
WEATHER.GOV/BALTIMORE.


000
NOUS43 KLMK 201753
PNSLMK

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE LOUISVILLE KY
0153 PM EDT Sat Jun 20 2015

...NWS Damage Survey for 06/19/2015 Tornado Event...

.Overview...Spiral bands wrapping around the remnants of Tropical
Storm Bill moved across central Kentucky and southern Indiana. One
band had significant rotation on radar near the Ohio River in Troy,
Indiana. This storm briefly dropped a tornado east of the city.

.Troy, Indiana Tornado...

EF Scale Rating:           EF-0
Estimated Peak Wind:       80 MPH
Path Length/Statue/:       0.3 miles
Path Width/Maximum/:       50 yards
Fatalities:                0
Injuries:                  0

Start Date:                Jun 19 2015
Start Time:                04:40 PM EDT
Start Location:            4 NNW Tell City, IN
Start Lat/Lon:             37.996N / 86.785W

End Date:                  Jun 19 2015
End Times:                 04:41 PM EDT
End Location:              3 NNW Tell City, IN
End Lat/Lon:               37.996N / 86.779W

Survey Summary:

The National Weather Service in Louisville, Kentucky, together with
Perry County Indiana emergency management conducted a storm survey
in Troy, Indiana on June 20th.

The survey team located a small tornado approximately 1 mile east
northeast of Troy.

There was substantial softwood and hardwood tree damage in an area
to the east of the industrial park, in a forested area.  Some trees
were snapped and others had large branches down in the tallest
portions of the forest.  The damage was in an area east of
Industrial Drive, north of Troy Ridge Road, and south of County Road
900.

An excellent video by Tracy Nugent was instrumental in the storm
survey across a very rugged area of forest and pasture northeast of
Troy.  The team traveled every possible farm road, county road, and
private driveway to get as close as possible to the damage.  Based
on the video, we suspect the tornado may have been a little
stronger, however we were unable to get to that deeply forested area.

The damage was confined to an area approximately a third of a mile
long and a width of approximately 150 yards downwind.

The survey team traveled roads inside Spencer County Indiana and
were unable to find any damage.

The survey team would like to thank Perry County emergency manager
Steve Hauser, along with NWS student volunteers Kyle Wilkins and
Melissa Dye.

The NWS also contacted the Hancock County, Kentucky emergency
director, Rick Montague.  No further damage was reported.


EF Scale: The Enhanced Fujita Scale classifies tornadoes into the
following categories:

EF0...Weak......65 to 85 MPH
EF1...Weak......86 to 110 MPH
EF2...Strong....111 to 135 MPH
EF3...Strong....136 to 165 MPH
EF4...Violent...166 to 200 MPH
EF5...Violent...>200 MPH

Note: The information in this statement is preliminary and subject to
change pending final review of the event and publication in NWS
storm data.

For the latest updates, please visit our webpage at
weather.gov/louisville.

You can follow us on Facebook at www.facebook.com/nwslouisville.

You can follow us on Twitter at @nwslouisville.

$$

RJS/JDG/MD/KW





000
NOUS43 KLMK 201753
PNSLMK

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE LOUISVILLE KY
0153 PM EDT Sat Jun 20 2015

...NWS Damage Survey for 06/19/2015 Tornado Event...

.Overview...Spiral bands wrapping around the remnants of Tropical
Storm Bill moved across central Kentucky and southern Indiana. One
band had significant rotation on radar near the Ohio River in Troy,
Indiana. This storm briefly dropped a tornado east of the city.

.Troy, Indiana Tornado...

EF Scale Rating:           EF-0
Estimated Peak Wind:       80 MPH
Path Length/Statue/:       0.3 miles
Path Width/Maximum/:       50 yards
Fatalities:                0
Injuries:                  0

Start Date:                Jun 19 2015
Start Time:                04:40 PM EDT
Start Location:            4 NNW Tell City, IN
Start Lat/Lon:             37.996N / 86.785W

End Date:                  Jun 19 2015
End Times:                 04:41 PM EDT
End Location:              3 NNW Tell City, IN
End Lat/Lon:               37.996N / 86.779W

Survey Summary:

The National Weather Service in Louisville, Kentucky, together with
Perry County Indiana emergency management conducted a storm survey
in Troy, Indiana on June 20th.

The survey team located a small tornado approximately 1 mile east
northeast of Troy.

There was substantial softwood and hardwood tree damage in an area
to the east of the industrial park, in a forested area.  Some trees
were snapped and others had large branches down in the tallest
portions of the forest.  The damage was in an area east of
Industrial Drive, north of Troy Ridge Road, and south of County Road
900.

An excellent video by Tracy Nugent was instrumental in the storm
survey across a very rugged area of forest and pasture northeast of
Troy.  The team traveled every possible farm road, county road, and
private driveway to get as close as possible to the damage.  Based
on the video, we suspect the tornado may have been a little
stronger, however we were unable to get to that deeply forested area.

The damage was confined to an area approximately a third of a mile
long and a width of approximately 150 yards downwind.

The survey team traveled roads inside Spencer County Indiana and
were unable to find any damage.

The survey team would like to thank Perry County emergency manager
Steve Hauser, along with NWS student volunteers Kyle Wilkins and
Melissa Dye.

The NWS also contacted the Hancock County, Kentucky emergency
director, Rick Montague.  No further damage was reported.


EF Scale: The Enhanced Fujita Scale classifies tornadoes into the
following categories:

EF0...Weak......65 to 85 MPH
EF1...Weak......86 to 110 MPH
EF2...Strong....111 to 135 MPH
EF3...Strong....136 to 165 MPH
EF4...Violent...166 to 200 MPH
EF5...Violent...>200 MPH

Note: The information in this statement is preliminary and subject to
change pending final review of the event and publication in NWS
storm data.

For the latest updates, please visit our webpage at
weather.gov/louisville.

You can follow us on Facebook at www.facebook.com/nwslouisville.

You can follow us on Twitter at @nwslouisville.

$$

RJS/JDG/MD/KW






000
NOUS43 KGLD 201203
PNSGLD

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE GOODLAND KS
600 AM MDT SAT JUN 20 2015

...ON THIS DATE IN WEATHER HISTORY...

IN 1987, THUNDERSTORMS PREVAILED EAST OF THE ROCKIES, PRODUCING
SEVERE WEATHER IN THE CENTRAL HIGH PLAINS REGION. THUNDERSTORMS
SPAWNED FOUR TORNADOES IN COLORADO,  AND PRODUCED WIND GUSTS TO 70
MPH AT GOODLAND,  KS.

IN 1994, BALL LIGHTNING STRUCK A HOME IN BENKELMAN, NEBRASKA AND
DAMAGED WIRING, A TELEVISION, A VCR, AND A FIREPLACE. WITNESSES
SAW THE RED BALL MOVE DOWN THE STREET WHERE IT BLASTED A HOLE IN THE
ROOF OF A NEIGHBOR AND STARTED A FIRE. A NEARBY TRANSFORMER WAS
ALSO DAMAGED CAUSING THE POWER TO BE OFF IN THE NEIGHBORHOOD FOR
ABOUT ONE HOUR. TOTAL DAMAGE WAS BETWEEN 15 AND 20 THOUSAND DOLLARS.

IN 2011, A SMALL CLUSTER OF THUNDERSTORMS MOVED ACROSS WALLACE
COUNTY, KANSAS DURING THE PRE-DAWN HOURS PACKING WINDS CLOSE TO 100
MPH.  TWENTY-FIVE IRRIGATION PIVOTS WERE OVERTURNED, AND NUMEROUS
GRAIN BINS, OUTBUILDINGS AND UTILITY POLES WERE DAMAGED OR DESTROYED.

LATER IN THE DAY, AN OUTBREAK OF DAMAGING TORNADOES OCCURRED OVER
GRAHAM AND NORTON COUNTIES IN KANSAS. A TOTAL OF SIXTEEN TORNADOES
WERE DOCUMENTED, INCLUDING THREE RATED EF3.  ONE TORNADO NARROWLY
MISSED THE TOWN OF ALMENA IN NORTON, COUNTY. FIVE PEOPLE ESCAPED
SERIOUS INJURY BY HIDING UNDER A TABLE IN THE BASEMENT WHEN THEIR
HOME WAS COMPLETELY DESTROYED.

$$


000
NOUS43 KGLD 201203
PNSGLD

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE GOODLAND KS
600 AM MDT SAT JUN 20 2015

...ON THIS DATE IN WEATHER HISTORY...

IN 1987, THUNDERSTORMS PREVAILED EAST OF THE ROCKIES, PRODUCING
SEVERE WEATHER IN THE CENTRAL HIGH PLAINS REGION. THUNDERSTORMS
SPAWNED FOUR TORNADOES IN COLORADO,  AND PRODUCED WIND GUSTS TO 70
MPH AT GOODLAND,  KS.

IN 1994, BALL LIGHTNING STRUCK A HOME IN BENKELMAN, NEBRASKA AND
DAMAGED WIRING, A TELEVISION, A VCR, AND A FIREPLACE. WITNESSES
SAW THE RED BALL MOVE DOWN THE STREET WHERE IT BLASTED A HOLE IN THE
ROOF OF A NEIGHBOR AND STARTED A FIRE. A NEARBY TRANSFORMER WAS
ALSO DAMAGED CAUSING THE POWER TO BE OFF IN THE NEIGHBORHOOD FOR
ABOUT ONE HOUR. TOTAL DAMAGE WAS BETWEEN 15 AND 20 THOUSAND DOLLARS.

IN 2011, A SMALL CLUSTER OF THUNDERSTORMS MOVED ACROSS WALLACE
COUNTY, KANSAS DURING THE PRE-DAWN HOURS PACKING WINDS CLOSE TO 100
MPH.  TWENTY-FIVE IRRIGATION PIVOTS WERE OVERTURNED, AND NUMEROUS
GRAIN BINS, OUTBUILDINGS AND UTILITY POLES WERE DAMAGED OR DESTROYED.

LATER IN THE DAY, AN OUTBREAK OF DAMAGING TORNADOES OCCURRED OVER
GRAHAM AND NORTON COUNTIES IN KANSAS. A TOTAL OF SIXTEEN TORNADOES
WERE DOCUMENTED, INCLUDING THREE RATED EF3.  ONE TORNADO NARROWLY
MISSED THE TOWN OF ALMENA IN NORTON, COUNTY. FIVE PEOPLE ESCAPED
SERIOUS INJURY BY HIDING UNDER A TABLE IN THE BASEMENT WHEN THEIR
HOME WAS COMPLETELY DESTROYED.

$$



000
NOUS43 KGLD 201203
PNSGLD

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE GOODLAND KS
600 AM MDT SAT JUN 20 2015

...ON THIS DATE IN WEATHER HISTORY...

IN 1987, THUNDERSTORMS PREVAILED EAST OF THE ROCKIES, PRODUCING
SEVERE WEATHER IN THE CENTRAL HIGH PLAINS REGION. THUNDERSTORMS
SPAWNED FOUR TORNADOES IN COLORADO,  AND PRODUCED WIND GUSTS TO 70
MPH AT GOODLAND,  KS.

IN 1994, BALL LIGHTNING STRUCK A HOME IN BENKELMAN, NEBRASKA AND
DAMAGED WIRING, A TELEVISION, A VCR, AND A FIREPLACE. WITNESSES
SAW THE RED BALL MOVE DOWN THE STREET WHERE IT BLASTED A HOLE IN THE
ROOF OF A NEIGHBOR AND STARTED A FIRE. A NEARBY TRANSFORMER WAS
ALSO DAMAGED CAUSING THE POWER TO BE OFF IN THE NEIGHBORHOOD FOR
ABOUT ONE HOUR. TOTAL DAMAGE WAS BETWEEN 15 AND 20 THOUSAND DOLLARS.

IN 2011, A SMALL CLUSTER OF THUNDERSTORMS MOVED ACROSS WALLACE
COUNTY, KANSAS DURING THE PRE-DAWN HOURS PACKING WINDS CLOSE TO 100
MPH.  TWENTY-FIVE IRRIGATION PIVOTS WERE OVERTURNED, AND NUMEROUS
GRAIN BINS, OUTBUILDINGS AND UTILITY POLES WERE DAMAGED OR DESTROYED.

LATER IN THE DAY, AN OUTBREAK OF DAMAGING TORNADOES OCCURRED OVER
GRAHAM AND NORTON COUNTIES IN KANSAS. A TOTAL OF SIXTEEN TORNADOES
WERE DOCUMENTED, INCLUDING THREE RATED EF3.  ONE TORNADO NARROWLY
MISSED THE TOWN OF ALMENA IN NORTON, COUNTY. FIVE PEOPLE ESCAPED
SERIOUS INJURY BY HIDING UNDER A TABLE IN THE BASEMENT WHEN THEIR
HOME WAS COMPLETELY DESTROYED.

$$



000
NOUS43 KGLD 201203
PNSGLD

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE GOODLAND KS
600 AM MDT SAT JUN 20 2015

...ON THIS DATE IN WEATHER HISTORY...

IN 1987, THUNDERSTORMS PREVAILED EAST OF THE ROCKIES, PRODUCING
SEVERE WEATHER IN THE CENTRAL HIGH PLAINS REGION. THUNDERSTORMS
SPAWNED FOUR TORNADOES IN COLORADO,  AND PRODUCED WIND GUSTS TO 70
MPH AT GOODLAND,  KS.

IN 1994, BALL LIGHTNING STRUCK A HOME IN BENKELMAN, NEBRASKA AND
DAMAGED WIRING, A TELEVISION, A VCR, AND A FIREPLACE. WITNESSES
SAW THE RED BALL MOVE DOWN THE STREET WHERE IT BLASTED A HOLE IN THE
ROOF OF A NEIGHBOR AND STARTED A FIRE. A NEARBY TRANSFORMER WAS
ALSO DAMAGED CAUSING THE POWER TO BE OFF IN THE NEIGHBORHOOD FOR
ABOUT ONE HOUR. TOTAL DAMAGE WAS BETWEEN 15 AND 20 THOUSAND DOLLARS.

IN 2011, A SMALL CLUSTER OF THUNDERSTORMS MOVED ACROSS WALLACE
COUNTY, KANSAS DURING THE PRE-DAWN HOURS PACKING WINDS CLOSE TO 100
MPH.  TWENTY-FIVE IRRIGATION PIVOTS WERE OVERTURNED, AND NUMEROUS
GRAIN BINS, OUTBUILDINGS AND UTILITY POLES WERE DAMAGED OR DESTROYED.

LATER IN THE DAY, AN OUTBREAK OF DAMAGING TORNADOES OCCURRED OVER
GRAHAM AND NORTON COUNTIES IN KANSAS. A TOTAL OF SIXTEEN TORNADOES
WERE DOCUMENTED, INCLUDING THREE RATED EF3.  ONE TORNADO NARROWLY
MISSED THE TOWN OF ALMENA IN NORTON, COUNTY. FIVE PEOPLE ESCAPED
SERIOUS INJURY BY HIDING UNDER A TABLE IN THE BASEMENT WHEN THEIR
HOME WAS COMPLETELY DESTROYED.

$$


000
NOUS44 KSHV 200125
PNSSHV

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE SHREVEPORT LA
800 PM CDT THU JUN 18 2015

...HEAVY RAINFALL ASSOCIATED WITH THE REMNANTS OF TROPICAL DEPRESSION
BILL WILL CAUSE THE RED RIVER TO RISE AGAIN ACROSS THE BASIN DURING THE
END OF JUNE AND FIRST TWO WEEKS OF JULY.

THE RED RIVER`S MAJOR RESERVOIRS REMAIN SWOLLEN BY STORED FLOOD
WATERS FROM THE HISTORIC HEAVY RAINFALL DURING MAY OF 2015.  THE
GREATLY REDUCED FLOOD STORAGE CAPACITY OF THESE RESERVOIRS HAVE
INCREASED THE FLOODING THREAT ON THE RED RIVER.

MUNICIPALITIES AND CITIZENS ARE URGED TO REMAIN DILIGENT IN EFFORTS
TO KEEP INFORMED...AND BE PREPARED FOR ANOTHER POTENTIAL FLOOD EVENT.

THE 7 PM FRIDAY STAGE ON THE RED RIVER NEAR DEKALB TEXAS AT PECAN
POINT WAS 26.67 FEET. THE RIVER WILL CONTINUE TO RISE TO NEAR
33.5 FEET ON WEDNESDAY JUNE 24.

THE 7 PM FRIDAY STAGE ON THE RED RIVER AT INDEX ARKANSAS NORTH OF
TEXARKANA WAS 20.54 FEET. THE RIVER WILL RISE TO NEAR 27.1 FEET
ON WEDNESDAY JUNE 24.

THE 7 PM FRIDAY STAGE ON THE RED RIVER AT FULTON ARKANSAS WAS
20.65 FEET. EXPECT FLUCTUATIONS DUE TO RESERVOIR RELEASES
FROM MILLWOOD RESERVOIR WITH A RISE TO NEAR 22 FEET BY EARLY
WEDNESDAY JUNE 24.

THE 7 PM FRIDAY STAGE ON THE RED RIVER AT SHREVEPORT LOUISIANA WAS
28.34 FEET.  EXPECT THE RIVER TO DECLINE SLIGHTLY OVER SEVERAL DAYS
WITH EXPECTED RISES AT MID TO END OF NEXT WEEK APPROACHING FLOOD
LEVELS. PREPARE FOR MODERATE TO MAJOR FLOOD LEVELS OF 32 FEET OR
HIGHER AROUND THE FIRST OF JULY. FLOOD STAGE AT SHREVEPORT IS 30 FEET.

THE 7 PM FRIDAY STAGE ON THE RED RIVER AT COUSHATTA LOUISIANA WAS
33.19 FEET. THE RED RIVER WILL RECEDE TO NEAR 31.0 FEET BY WEDNESDAY
JUNE 24. EXPECT RISES THE FIRST WEEK OF JULY. FLOOD STAGE AT
COUSHATTA IS 31 FEET.

THE 6:30 PM FRIDAY STAGE ON THE RED RIVER AT GRAND ECORE LOUISIANA
WAS 38.76 FEET. THE RED RIVER WILL RECEDE TO NEAR 34 FEET BY WEDNESDAY
JUNE 24. EXPECT RISES NEAR END OF FIRST WEEK IN JULY.  FLOOD STAGE AT
GRAND ECORE IS 33 FEET.

$$

25



000
NOUS41 KCLE 192001
PNSCLE

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE CLEVELAND OH
400 PM EDT FRI JUN 19 2015

...EF-1 TORNADO CONFIRMED IN STARK COUNTY OHIO...

THE NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE IN CLEVELAND OHIO HAS CONFIRMED AN EF-1
TORNADO IN STARK COUNTY OHIO.

LOCATION...STARK COUNTY (UNIONTOWN...HARTVILLE...MARLBORO TWP)
DATE...JUNE 18 2015
ESTIMATED TIME...7:07 PM TO 7:18 PM EDT
MAXIMUM EF-SCALE RATING... EF-1
ESTIMATED WIND SPEED... 105 MPH
MAX PATH WIDTH...100 YARDS
MAX PATH LENGTH...9 MILES
START LOCATION...UNIONTOWN OHIO (LAT/LON 40.9768/-81.4045)
MIDDLE LOCATION...2 SSE HARTVILLE OHIO (LAT/LON 40.9327/-81.3202)
ENDING LOCATION...5 ESE HARTVILLE OHIO (LAT/LON 40.9317/-81.2526)

SUMMARY... AN EF-1 TORNADO TOUCHED DOWN IN UNIONTOWN NEAR THE
UNIONTOWN FIRE DEPARTMENT AND TRAVELED EAST-SOUTHEAST ALONG AN
INTERMITTENT PATH FOR APPROXIMATELY NINE MILES. MOST OF THE DAMAGE
OBSERVED WAS TO TREES THAT WERE UPROOTED OR SNAPPED PART OF THE WAY
UP OFF OF THE GROUND. A NEWLY CONSTRUCTED DAIRY BARN IN MARLBORO
TOWNSHIP NEAR STATE ROUTE 44 AND ST. PETERS CHURCH ROAD HAD
SIGNIFICANT ROOF DAMAGE. MINOR ROOF AND SIDING DAMAGE WAS OBSERVED
ALONG THE TORNADO PATH.

$$

NWS CLEVELAND


000
NOUS41 KCLE 192001
PNSCLE

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE CLEVELAND OH
400 PM EDT FRI JUN 19 2015

...EF-1 TORNADO CONFIRMED IN STARK COUNTY OHIO...

THE NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE IN CLEVELAND OHIO HAS CONFIRMED AN EF-1
TORNADO IN STARK COUNTY OHIO.

LOCATION...STARK COUNTY (UNIONTOWN...HARTVILLE...MARLBORO TWP)
DATE...JUNE 18 2015
ESTIMATED TIME...7:07 PM TO 7:18 PM EDT
MAXIMUM EF-SCALE RATING... EF-1
ESTIMATED WIND SPEED... 105 MPH
MAX PATH WIDTH...100 YARDS
MAX PATH LENGTH...9 MILES
START LOCATION...UNIONTOWN OHIO (LAT/LON 40.9768/-81.4045)
MIDDLE LOCATION...2 SSE HARTVILLE OHIO (LAT/LON 40.9327/-81.3202)
ENDING LOCATION...5 ESE HARTVILLE OHIO (LAT/LON 40.9317/-81.2526)

SUMMARY... AN EF-1 TORNADO TOUCHED DOWN IN UNIONTOWN NEAR THE
UNIONTOWN FIRE DEPARTMENT AND TRAVELED EAST-SOUTHEAST ALONG AN
INTERMITTENT PATH FOR APPROXIMATELY NINE MILES. MOST OF THE DAMAGE
OBSERVED WAS TO TREES THAT WERE UPROOTED OR SNAPPED PART OF THE WAY
UP OFF OF THE GROUND. A NEWLY CONSTRUCTED DAIRY BARN IN MARLBORO
TOWNSHIP NEAR STATE ROUTE 44 AND ST. PETERS CHURCH ROAD HAD
SIGNIFICANT ROOF DAMAGE. MINOR ROOF AND SIDING DAMAGE WAS OBSERVED
ALONG THE TORNADO PATH.

$$

NWS CLEVELAND



000
NOUS43 KLMK 191836
PNSLMK

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE LOUISVILLE KY
236 PM EDT Fri Jun 19 2015

...NWS Damage Survey for 06/18/2015 Anderson County Wind Damage...

.Alton, Kentucky...

Peak Wind:                 70-75 MPH
Fatalities:                0
Injuries:                  0

Start Date:                Jun 18, 2015
Start Time:                6:08 PM EDT
Start Location:            1 SSE Alton, KY

End Date:                  Jun 18, 2015
End Times:                 6:14 PM EDT
End Location:              2 NNW Tyrone, KY

Survey Summary:
The National Weather Service, in conjunction with Anderson County
emergency management, determined that the damage in the community of
Alton was straight-line wind damage between 70 and 75 mph.

The damage began at approximately 6:08 PM at Floridatile on Alton
Road, where a car port was blown 400 yards ENE across a field and
into the parking lot of the maintenance shop.  Two semi-trailers
were toppled over onto their sides. The maintenance shop`s roof
sustained substantial damage.

East of the shop on the 1200 block of Alton road, a private
residence had several Bradford Pear trees blown over, all facing due
east.  One house sustained roof damage.

Further east at the daycare center at Chico Drive and Lawrenceburg
Road, the roof sustained substantial damage on the upwinds (western)
face and was thrown 50 yards and landed on some cars in an auto body
shop`s parking lot.  Several buildings just west of US 127 had minor
roof and siding damage.

The survey team investigated a radar couplet from Thursday evening
further east of the main damage area.  The team drove on Jenny
Lillard Road and came across an area with five or six trees knocked
down.  The team classified this damage as straight-line wind damage
between 65 and 70 mph.

Note: The information in this statement is preliminary and subject to
change pending final review of the event and publication in NWS
storm data.

For the latest updates, please visit our webpage at
weather.gov/louisville.

You can follow us on Facebook at www.facebook.com/nwslouisville.

You can follow us on Twitter at @nwslouisville.

$$
RJS/JDG/BG/KW





000
NOUS43 KLMK 191836
PNSLMK

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE LOUISVILLE KY
236 PM EDT Fri Jun 19 2015

...NWS Damage Survey for 06/18/2015 Anderson County Wind Damage...

.Alton, Kentucky...

Peak Wind:                 70-75 MPH
Fatalities:                0
Injuries:                  0

Start Date:                Jun 18, 2015
Start Time:                6:08 PM EDT
Start Location:            1 SSE Alton, KY

End Date:                  Jun 18, 2015
End Times:                 6:14 PM EDT
End Location:              2 NNW Tyrone, KY

Survey Summary:
The National Weather Service, in conjunction with Anderson County
emergency management, determined that the damage in the community of
Alton was straight-line wind damage between 70 and 75 mph.

The damage began at approximately 6:08 PM at Floridatile on Alton
Road, where a car port was blown 400 yards ENE across a field and
into the parking lot of the maintenance shop.  Two semi-trailers
were toppled over onto their sides. The maintenance shop`s roof
sustained substantial damage.

East of the shop on the 1200 block of Alton road, a private
residence had several Bradford Pear trees blown over, all facing due
east.  One house sustained roof damage.

Further east at the daycare center at Chico Drive and Lawrenceburg
Road, the roof sustained substantial damage on the upwinds (western)
face and was thrown 50 yards and landed on some cars in an auto body
shop`s parking lot.  Several buildings just west of US 127 had minor
roof and siding damage.

The survey team investigated a radar couplet from Thursday evening
further east of the main damage area.  The team drove on Jenny
Lillard Road and came across an area with five or six trees knocked
down.  The team classified this damage as straight-line wind damage
between 65 and 70 mph.

Note: The information in this statement is preliminary and subject to
change pending final review of the event and publication in NWS
storm data.

For the latest updates, please visit our webpage at
weather.gov/louisville.

You can follow us on Facebook at www.facebook.com/nwslouisville.

You can follow us on Twitter at @nwslouisville.

$$
RJS/JDG/BG/KW





000
NOUS43 KLMK 191836
PNSLMK

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE LOUISVILLE KY
236 PM EDT Fri Jun 19 2015

...NWS Damage Survey for 06/18/2015 Anderson County Wind Damage...

.Alton, Kentucky...

Peak Wind:                 70-75 MPH
Fatalities:                0
Injuries:                  0

Start Date:                Jun 18, 2015
Start Time:                6:08 PM EDT
Start Location:            1 SSE Alton, KY

End Date:                  Jun 18, 2015
End Times:                 6:14 PM EDT
End Location:              2 NNW Tyrone, KY

Survey Summary:
The National Weather Service, in conjunction with Anderson County
emergency management, determined that the damage in the community of
Alton was straight-line wind damage between 70 and 75 mph.

The damage began at approximately 6:08 PM at Floridatile on Alton
Road, where a car port was blown 400 yards ENE across a field and
into the parking lot of the maintenance shop.  Two semi-trailers
were toppled over onto their sides. The maintenance shop`s roof
sustained substantial damage.

East of the shop on the 1200 block of Alton road, a private
residence had several Bradford Pear trees blown over, all facing due
east.  One house sustained roof damage.

Further east at the daycare center at Chico Drive and Lawrenceburg
Road, the roof sustained substantial damage on the upwinds (western)
face and was thrown 50 yards and landed on some cars in an auto body
shop`s parking lot.  Several buildings just west of US 127 had minor
roof and siding damage.

The survey team investigated a radar couplet from Thursday evening
further east of the main damage area.  The team drove on Jenny
Lillard Road and came across an area with five or six trees knocked
down.  The team classified this damage as straight-line wind damage
between 65 and 70 mph.

Note: The information in this statement is preliminary and subject to
change pending final review of the event and publication in NWS
storm data.

For the latest updates, please visit our webpage at
weather.gov/louisville.

You can follow us on Facebook at www.facebook.com/nwslouisville.

You can follow us on Twitter at @nwslouisville.

$$
RJS/JDG/BG/KW





000
NOUS43 KLMK 191836
PNSLMK

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE LOUISVILLE KY
236 PM EDT Fri Jun 19 2015

...NWS Damage Survey for 06/18/2015 Anderson County Wind Damage...

.Alton, Kentucky...

Peak Wind:                 70-75 MPH
Fatalities:                0
Injuries:                  0

Start Date:                Jun 18, 2015
Start Time:                6:08 PM EDT
Start Location:            1 SSE Alton, KY

End Date:                  Jun 18, 2015
End Times:                 6:14 PM EDT
End Location:              2 NNW Tyrone, KY

Survey Summary:
The National Weather Service, in conjunction with Anderson County
emergency management, determined that the damage in the community of
Alton was straight-line wind damage between 70 and 75 mph.

The damage began at approximately 6:08 PM at Floridatile on Alton
Road, where a car port was blown 400 yards ENE across a field and
into the parking lot of the maintenance shop.  Two semi-trailers
were toppled over onto their sides. The maintenance shop`s roof
sustained substantial damage.

East of the shop on the 1200 block of Alton road, a private
residence had several Bradford Pear trees blown over, all facing due
east.  One house sustained roof damage.

Further east at the daycare center at Chico Drive and Lawrenceburg
Road, the roof sustained substantial damage on the upwinds (western)
face and was thrown 50 yards and landed on some cars in an auto body
shop`s parking lot.  Several buildings just west of US 127 had minor
roof and siding damage.

The survey team investigated a radar couplet from Thursday evening
further east of the main damage area.  The team drove on Jenny
Lillard Road and came across an area with five or six trees knocked
down.  The team classified this damage as straight-line wind damage
between 65 and 70 mph.

Note: The information in this statement is preliminary and subject to
change pending final review of the event and publication in NWS
storm data.

For the latest updates, please visit our webpage at
weather.gov/louisville.

You can follow us on Facebook at www.facebook.com/nwslouisville.

You can follow us on Twitter at @nwslouisville.

$$
RJS/JDG