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000
NWUS55 KGJT 261906
LSRGJT

PRELIMINARY LOCAL STORM REPORT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE GRAND JUNCTION CO
106 PM MDT SUN JUN 26 2016

..TIME...   ...EVENT...      ...CITY LOCATION...     ...LAT.LON...
..DATE...   ....MAG....      ..COUNTY LOCATION..ST.. ...SOURCE....
            ..REMARKS..

1215 PM     HAIL             7 SE STONER             37.50N 108.24W
06/26/2016  E0.25 INCH       MONTEZUMA          CO   COCORAHS


&&

EVENT NUMBER GJT1600728

$$

DC




000
NWUS55 KGJT 261906
LSRGJT

PRELIMINARY LOCAL STORM REPORT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE GRAND JUNCTION CO
106 PM MDT SUN JUN 26 2016

..TIME...   ...EVENT...      ...CITY LOCATION...     ...LAT.LON...
..DATE...   ....MAG....      ..COUNTY LOCATION..ST.. ...SOURCE....
            ..REMARKS..

1215 PM     HAIL             7 SE STONER             37.50N 108.24W
06/26/2016  E0.25 INCH       MONTEZUMA          CO   COCORAHS


&&

EVENT NUMBER GJT1600728

$$

DC



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000
NOUS45 KBOU 260859
PNSBOU
COZ030>051-262300-

Public Information Statement
National Weather Service Denver/Boulder CO
259 AM MDT SUN JUN 26 2016

...Today in metro Denver weather history...

22-26 In 2012...the maximum temperature exceeded 100 degrees for
        five consecutive days.  Two of the high temperatures on
        the 25th and 26th peaked at 105 degrees...which set the
        all time record for the month of June and tied the all
        time maximum temperature for Denver.
25-26 In 1969...high winds raked Boulder causing one fatality and
        some injuries.  One man was injured by a falling tree limb.
        At the National Center for Atmospheric Research in Boulder...
        sustained winds of 55 to 60 mph with wind gusts to 123 mph
        were recorded.  In downtown Boulder...winds averaged 30 to 40
        mph with gusts to 70 mph.  Widespread minor damage occurred...
        especially in the Table Mesa area of south Boulder.  Much
        tree damage occurred in the older areas of Boulder where
        several trees were uprooted.  A mobile home was overturned
        by the winds.  At Stapleton Airport...west winds gusted to
        43 mph on the 25th and 37 mph on the 26th.
      In 1975...strong winds damaged utility lines...buildings...
        vehicles...trees...and power lines in Boulder and other
        communities to the north of Boulder.  Microburst winds
        gusted to 45 mph at Stapleton International Airport on
        the 25th.
      In 1983...heavy rain fell in the foothills west of Denver with
        1.50 inches in 30 minutes at Intercanyon.  Heavy rain
        continued over metro Denver on the 26th with two-day
        storm totals at many locations ranging from 1.00 to 2.50
        inches.  Rainfall totaled 1.37 inches at Stapleton
        International Airport on the 26th.
      In 1985...one to two inches of rain fell over metro Denver.
        At Stapleton International Airport...rainfall totaled 0.93
        inches...thunderstorm winds gusted to 44 mph...and 7/10 inch
        hail was measured.  The air mass was unusually cold for the
        season...and snow fell in the foothills above 8 thousand
        feet.  The high temperature of only 63 degrees on the
        26th equaled the record low maximum reading for the date.
26    In 1873...there was a great deal of smoke from a large forest
        fire in the mountains to the southwest of the city and a
        smaller fire directly to the west.
      In 1874...fires at timberline to the west were visible from
        the city.  New and extensive fires were continually started
        from south to northwest along the ridge line.  Carelessness
        of tourists was the apparent cause of the fires.  Large and
        valuable tracts of timber had already been destroyed.
      In 1890...the only thunderstorm of the month produced a trace
        of rain.  A trace of rain also fell on 7 other days.  This
        was the only precipitation recorded during the month...
        making it the driest June on record.
      In 1893...northwest winds were sustained to 45 mph with gusts
        to 48 mph.
      In 1971...a microburst wind gust to 58 mph was recorded at
        Stapleton International Airport.  Dust devils were sighted.
      In 1980...strong gusty thunderstorm winds damaged several
        mobile homes in Thornton.  Thunderstorm winds gusted
        to 37 mph at Stapleton International Airport.
      In 1986...hail piled up 1 1/2 inches deep in Golden Gate
        Canyon and covered roadways an inch deep in Evergreen.
      In 1988...a tornado touched down 2 miles north of Watkins.
        It was on the ground for 15 minutes and did no reported
        damage.
      In 1989...two inch diameter hail fell at Kassler...1 inch hail
        at Louviers...and 1 1/2 inch hail at Tiny Town.
      In 1991...high winds...not associated with thunderstorms...
        damaged a home in the Green Mountain area.  The strong winds
        picked up a heavy metal and glass table on the deck of a
        house and threw it into the house.  The table was destroyed
        and the house received considerable damage.
      In 1992...3/4 inch diameter hail fell in south Aurora and near
        Buckley Air National Guard Base.  Golf ball size hail was
        reported in Parker.
      In 1994...the all-time highest recorded temperature in June
        and the second highest temperature ever recorded in Denver...
        104 degrees occurred.  This was the hottest day in Denver
        since August 8...1878...when the temperature reached 105
        degrees.
      In 2005...strong thunderstorm winds gusting to 58 mph damaged
        a garage and some nearby trees near Fort Lupton.  Winds
        also gusted to 58 mph near Watkins.  Thunderstorm winds
        gusted to 60 mph near Roggen.  Hail to 3/4 inch in diameter
        was measured in southwest Aurora.
      In 2009...severe thunderstorms moving through Denver and the
        surrounding metro area produced intense thunderstorm winds.
        At Denver International Airport...a wind gust blew a
        luggage car into a Southwest Airlines airplane causing
        some damage.  Peak wind gusts included:  68 mph at
        Denver International Airport...4 miles west of Rocky
        Mountain Metropolitan Airport and 12.5 miles north of Lowry
        AFB; 64 mph near Arvada and Parker; and 60 mph in
        Aurora/Cherry.
      In 2014...a severe thunderstorm produced a peak wind gust to
        58 mph approximately 9 miles northeast of Denver
        International Airport.  Offically...a peak wind gust to 54
        mph was measured from the northeast with just a trace of
        rainfall.
26-27 In 1965...wind gusts to 38 mph were recorded in downtown
        Boulder...causing widespread minor damage.  A microburst wind
        gust to 41 mph was recorded at Stapleton International
        Airport.

$$



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000
NWUS55 KPUB 260633
LSRPUB

PRELIMINARY LOCAL STORM REPORT...SUMMARY
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE PUEBLO CO
1233 AM MDT SUN JUN 26 2016

..TIME...   ...EVENT...      ...CITY LOCATION...     ...LAT.LON...
..DATE...   ....MAG....      ..COUNTY LOCATION..ST.. ...SOURCE....
            ..REMARKS..

0848 PM     HEAVY RAIN       5 NNW PUEBLO WEST       38.37N 104.79W
06/25/2016  M0.72 INCH       PUEBLO             CO   NWS EMPLOYEE

            24 HOUR TOTAL.

0625 PM     TSTM WND GST     4 S CHERAW              38.05N 103.51W
06/25/2016  M60 MPH          OTERO              CO   ASOS

            .

0558 PM     TSTM WND GST     4 S CHERAW              38.05N 103.51W
06/25/2016  M55 MPH          OTERO              CO   ASOS

            ASOS STATION LA JUNTA AIRPORT /LHX/.

0520 PM     TSTM WND DMG     3 N ORDWAY              38.26N 103.75W
06/25/2016                   CROWLEY            CO   TRAINED SPOTTER

            LARGE COTTON WOOD TREE DOWNED. TIME IS
            ESTIMATED. .

0438 PM     TSTM WND GST     5 NE BLENDE             38.29N 104.50W
06/25/2016  M56 MPH          PUEBLO             CO   OFFICIAL NWS OBS

            .


&&

$$

NWS PUEBLO CO
IRIS SYSTEM





000
NWUS55 KPUB 260249
LSRPUB

PRELIMINARY LOCAL STORM REPORT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE PUEBLO CO
849 PM MDT SAT JUN 25 2016

..TIME...   ...EVENT...      ...CITY LOCATION...     ...LAT.LON...
..DATE...   ....MAG....      ..COUNTY LOCATION..ST.. ...SOURCE....
            ..REMARKS..

0848 PM     HEAVY RAIN       5 NNW PUEBLO WEST       38.37N 104.79W
06/25/2016  M0.72 INCH       PUEBLO             CO   NWS EMPLOYEE

            24 HOUR TOTAL.


&&

$$

NWS PUEBLO CO
IRIS SYSTEM





000
NWUS55 KPUB 260240
LSRPUB

PRELIMINARY LOCAL STORM REPORT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE PUEBLO CO
840 PM MDT SAT JUN 25 2016

..TIME...   ...EVENT...      ...CITY LOCATION...     ...LAT.LON...
..DATE...   ....MAG....      ..COUNTY LOCATION..ST.. ...SOURCE....
            ..REMARKS..

0520 PM     TSTM WND DMG     3 N ORDWAY              38.26N 103.75W
06/25/2016                   CROWLEY            CO   TRAINED SPOTTER

            LARGE COTTON WOOD TREE DOWNED. TIME IS
            ESTIMATED. .


&&

$$

NWS PUEBLO CO
IRIS SYSTEM





000
NWUS55 KPUB 260147
LSRPUB

PRELIMINARY LOCAL STORM REPORT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE PUEBLO CO
747 PM MDT SAT JUN 25 2016

..TIME...   ...EVENT...      ...CITY LOCATION...     ...LAT.LON...
..DATE...   ....MAG....      ..COUNTY LOCATION..ST.. ...SOURCE....
            ..REMARKS..

0625 PM     TSTM WND GST     4 S CHERAW              38.05N 103.51W
06/25/2016  M60 MPH          OTERO              CO   ASOS

            .


&&

$$

NWS PUEBLO CO
IRIS SYSTEM





000
NOUS45 KBOU 260045
PNSBOU
COZ030>051-262300-

Public Information Statement
National Weather Service Denver/Boulder CO
645 PM MDT SAT JUN 25 2016

...This week in metro Denver weather history...

22-26 In 2012...the maximum temperature exceeded 100 degrees for
        five consecutive days.  Two of the high temperatures on
        the 25th and 26th peaked at 105 degrees...which set the
        all time record for the month of June and tied the all
        time maximum temperature for Denver.
25-26 In 1969...high winds raked Boulder causing one fatality and
        some injuries.  One man was injured by a falling tree limb.
        At the National Center for Atmospheric Research in Boulder...
        sustained winds of 55 to 60 mph with wind gusts to 123 mph
        were recorded.  In downtown Boulder...winds averaged 30 to 40
        mph with gusts to 70 mph.  Widespread minor damage occurred...
        especially in the Table Mesa area of south Boulder.  Much
        tree damage occurred in the older areas of Boulder where
        several trees were uprooted.  A mobile home was overturned
        by the winds.  At Stapleton Airport...west winds gusted to
        43 mph on the 25th and 37 mph on the 26th.
      In 1975...strong winds damaged utility lines...buildings...
        vehicles...trees...and power lines in Boulder and other
        communities to the north of Boulder.  Microburst winds
        gusted to 45 mph at Stapleton International Airport on
        the 25th.
      In 1983...heavy rain fell in the foothills west of Denver with
        1.50 inches in 30 minutes at Intercanyon.  Heavy rain
        continued over metro Denver on the 26th with two-day
        storm totals at many locations ranging from 1.00 to 2.50
        inches.  Rainfall totaled 1.37 inches at Stapleton
        International Airport on the 26th.
      In 1985...one to two inches of rain fell over metro Denver.
        At Stapleton International Airport...rainfall totaled 0.93
        inches...thunderstorm winds gusted to 44 mph...and 7/10 inch
        hail was measured.  The air mass was unusually cold for the
        season...and snow fell in the foothills above 8 thousand
        feet.  The high temperature of only 63 degrees on the
        26th equaled the record low maximum reading for the date.
26    In 1873...there was a great deal of smoke from a large forest
        fire in the mountains to the southwest of the city and a
        smaller fire directly to the west.
      In 1874...fires at timberline to the west were visible from
        the city.  New and extensive fires were continually started
        from south to northwest along the ridge line.  Carelessness
        of tourists was the apparent cause of the fires.  Large and
        valuable tracts of timber had already been destroyed.
      In 1890...the only thunderstorm of the month produced a trace
        of rain.  A trace of rain also fell on 7 other days.  This
        was the only precipitation recorded during the month...
        making it the driest June on record.
      In 1893...northwest winds were sustained to 45 mph with gusts
        to 48 mph.
      In 1971...a microburst wind gust to 58 mph was recorded at
        Stapleton International Airport.  Dust devils were sighted.
      In 1980...strong gusty thunderstorm winds damaged several
        mobile homes in Thornton.  Thunderstorm winds gusted
        to 37 mph at Stapleton International Airport.
      In 1986...hail piled up 1 1/2 inches deep in Golden Gate
        Canyon and covered roadways an inch deep in Evergreen.
      In 1988...a tornado touched down 2 miles north of Watkins.
        It was on the ground for 15 minutes and did no reported
        damage.
      In 1989...two inch diameter hail fell at Kassler...1 inch hail
        at Louviers...and 1 1/2 inch hail at Tiny Town.
      In 1991...high winds...not associated with thunderstorms...
        damaged a home in the Green Mountain area.  The strong winds
        picked up a heavy metal and glass table on the deck of a
        house and threw it into the house.  The table was destroyed
        and the house received considerable damage.
      In 1992...3/4 inch diameter hail fell in south Aurora and near
        Buckley Air National Guard Base.  Golf ball size hail was
        reported in Parker.
      In 1994...the all-time highest recorded temperature in June
        and the second highest temperature ever recorded in Denver...
        104 degrees occurred.  This was the hottest day in Denver
        since August 8...1878...when the temperature reached 105
        degrees.
      In 2005...strong thunderstorm winds gusting to 58 mph damaged
        a garage and some nearby trees near Fort Lupton.  Winds
        also gusted to 58 mph near Watkins.  Thunderstorm winds
        gusted to 60 mph near Roggen.  Hail to 3/4 inch in diameter
        was measured in southwest Aurora.
      In 2009...severe thunderstorms moving through Denver and the
        surrounding metro area produced intense thunderstorm winds.
        At Denver International Airport...a wind gust blew a
        luggage car into a Southwest Airlines airplane causing
        some damage.  Peak wind gusts included:  68 mph at
        Denver International Airport...4 miles west of Rocky
        Mountain Metropolitan Airport and 12.5 miles north of Lowry
        AFB; 64 mph near Arvada and Parker; and 60 mph in
        Aurora/Cherry.
      In 2014...a severe thunderstorm produced a peak wind gust to
        58 mph approximately 9 miles northeast of Denver
        International Airport.  Offically...a peak wind gust to 54
        mph was measured from the northeast with just a trace of
        rainfall.
26-27 In 1965...wind gusts to 38 mph were recorded in downtown
        Boulder...causing widespread minor damage.  A microburst wind
        gust to 41 mph was recorded at Stapleton International
        Airport.
27    In 1873...Pikes Peak was hidden from view by smoke from forest
        fires in the mountains to the southwest of the city.
      In 1927...the temperature cooled to a low of only 72 degrees...
        the all-time record high minimum for the month.
      In 1980...lightning injured 4 people on a baseball diamond in
        Broomfield.  The bolt seriously injured the pitcher while
        also striking (out) the batter...catcher and second baseman.
      In 1987...a microburst wind gust to 53 mph was recorded at
        Stapleton International Airport.
      In 1990...the temperature reached a high of 102 degrees...
        setting a new record maximum for the date.
      In 1993...thunderstorm winds gusted to 60 mph across parts of
        metro Denver.  A wind gust to 50 mph blew over a 30-foot
        canvas tent at an amusement park southeast of Denver.
        Fifteen people...mostly children...were injured.  Microburst
        wind gusts to 33 mph were recorded at Stapleton
        International Airport.
      In 2002...heavy rain...up to 3/4 inch...fell across sections of
        the Hayman burn area near Cheeseman Reservoir.  Several
        forest service roads were washed out and many culverts were
        plugged by debris.
      In 2004...heavy rain producing thunderstorms caused rock and
        mud slides across the Overland Fire burn area in Jamestown.
        An estimated 50 tons of sand...dirt...rock...and ash slid into
        town...filling a culvert under Main Street.  The slide covered
        150 to 225 feet of Main Street.  The flood was produced by
        half an inch of rain in 30 minutes.  A deluge of very heavy
        rainfall from nearly stationary thunderstorms caused flooding
        and flash flooding problems over parts of Jefferson and
        Douglas counties.  An automated rain gage in Golden measured
        3.60 inches of rainfall in one hour.  Numerous homes were
        flooded in Golden...including one that was 146 years old.
        The home was listed as a complete loss.  State Highway 93
        had to be closed from the Pine Ridge subdivision to the
        Golden Gate Canyon Road.   At the height of the storm...about
        4 feet of water covered State Highway 93 through Golden...
        forcing its temporary closure.  Several intersections were
        also flooded and impassable.  Rock and mud slides were
        reported in Golden Gate Canyon State Park.  At the Deer
        Creek Golf Course at Colorado 470 and Kipling...the greens
        were completely inundated by floodwaters.  Some backyards
        near the golf course were partially washed out.  In Douglas
        County...water up to a foot deep covered the roadways in
        Roxborough State Park.  The Waterton Canyon Road also had to
        be closed due to high water.
      In 2010...a severe thunderstorm produced hail up to 1 inch
        in diameter near Strasburg.  Hail up to 3/4 inch in diameter
        was reported in Aurora and Buckley Air Field.
      In 2014...a severe thunderstorm produced hail...up to 1 inch
        in diameter...near Ft. Lupton.
28    In 1873...there was a great deal of smoke over the city from
        forest fires in the mountains.
      In 1875...smoke from forest fires in the foothills south of
        Denver were visible from the city.
      In 1913...an apparent dry microburst produced southwest winds
        sustained to 44 mph with gusts to 48 mph in the city.
      In 1925...a thunderstorm produced north winds sustained to
        38 mph with gusts to 44 mph.
      In 1958...a microburst caused a brief wind gust to 58 mph at
        Stapleton Airport.
      In 1964...lightning struck several homes in metro Denver...
        sparking fires.  Some flooding occurred in the Stockyards
        area...at West 45th Avenue and St. Paul Street...and along
        Harvard Gulch.
      In 1997...strong microburst winds of unknown speed downed
        several trees...signs...and at least one light pole in the
        Fort Lupton area.  Two trees knocked over by the storm
        downed power lines causing scattered outages.
      In 2002...a thunderstorm wind gust to 60 mph was recorded in
        Parker.
      In 2005...severe thunderstorms produced wind gusts to 66 mph
        near Longmont and to 60 mph near Niwot.  No damage was
        reported.  A thunderstorm produced a wind gust to 55 mph
        at Denver International Airport during the afternoon.
29    In 1874...eight different fires in mountain forests were
        visible from the city.  All of the fires were extensive...
        and the volume of smoke from each was immense.  Three of
        these fires had been burning from the 18th with varied
        intensity.
      In 1911...an apparent dry microburst produced sustained winds
        to 45 mph.
      In 1960...a strong gust of wind blew a small foreign sedan off
        the highway near Brighton...injuring the driver.  East winds
        gusted to 40 mph at Stapleton Airport.
      In 1961...thunderstorm winds estimated as high as 40 to 50 mph
        occurred over southeast Denver.  No significant damage was
        reported.
      In 1962...heavy rain and small hail caused some flooding in
        southwest Denver.
      In 1995...upslope cloudiness with rain and fog cooled
        temperatures to record levels.  Low temperature of 47
        degrees equaled the record for the date.  High temperature
        of only 54 degrees set a new record low maximum for the
        date.  Rainfall totaled 0.90 inch at Denver International
        Airport and 0.41 inch at the site of the former Stapleton
        International Airport.
      In 2003...a severe thunderstorm in Parker produced hail to
        1 inch in diameter.
      In 2011...two airmen from the Colorado National Guard
        suffered minor injuries when they were struck by lightning.
        They were hit while on duty at a flight line at Buckley
        Air Force Base.  At Denver International Airport...a
        microburst produced a peak wind gust to 72 mph.
29-2  In 1990...almost a year to date after the record breaking heat
        in early July 1989...the third longest heat wave in Denver
        history started.  From June 29th through July 2nd the
        temperature reached 100 degrees or more on four consecutive
        days.  The highest reading of 102 degrees occurred on the
        29th...30th...and 1st.  Combined with the 102 degree reading
        on June 27th this would have been the longest heat wave on
        record...but the temperature climbed to only 98 degrees on
        June 28th.
29-15 In 2000...the 29th marked the beginning of a near record hot
        streak for metro Denver.  The high temperatures...as recorded
        at Denver International Airport...exceeded the 90 degree mark
        for 17 consecutive days from June 29th through July 15th.
        The record of 24 consecutive 90 degree or above days was
        set from July 13th through August 5th...2008.
30    In 1879...dense smoke from mountain forest fires covered the
        city and obscured the sun as it set behind the mountains.
      In 1900...a thunderstorm produced northwest winds to 44 mph
        with gusts to 58 mph...but only a trace of rain.
      In 1917...north winds were sustained to 47 mph with gusts to
        52 mph.
      In 1942...a strong thunderstorm produced hail and heavy rainfall
        in south Denver.  Leaves were stripped from trees and heavy
        rain caused street flooding which halted traffic.  Hail of
        unknown size reached a depth of 9 inches on the ground.
      In 1965...funnel clouds were observed to the south of Stapleton
        International Airport and in Jefferson County...15 miles
        southwest of the airport.  Later...a tornado touched down
        briefly 1 mile east of Littleton...causing only minor damage.
        Another tornado was observed 12 miles southwest of Stapleton
        International Airport in Jefferson County.  Hail to 3/4 inch
        in diameter fell in the Bear Valley area...12 miles south-
        southwest of Stapleton International Airport.  Yet another
        tornado was sighted 10 miles northwest of the airport.
        Cloudbursts accompanied by hail battered areas of Arapahoe
        and Adams counties east of Denver...damaging ripening grain
        fields.  At Lafayette...3.50 inches of rain fell in 30
        minutes...causing some flooding.
      In 1982...numerous funnel clouds were observed over southwest
        metro Denver.  Only one funnel touched down near the
        intersection of Jewell and Kipling.  The tornado was on the
        ground for about 5 minutes and caused no damage except for
        uprooting some trees.  In addition...thunderstorms produced
        heavy rain and hail in the foothills west of Denver.  Over
        an inch of rain fell in a short time near Idaho Springs...
        causing Clear Creek to overflow its banks and flood a few
        low lying areas of the town.  A few people were evacuated...
        and water and mud entered several stores.  The heavy rain
        also washed out several roads.  Hail piled up to a depth of
        3 to 4 inches near Idaho Springs.   Hail to 3/4 inch was
        reported at many places across metro Denver including
        Stapleton International Airport.  Lightning struck a
        chemistry building on the University of Colorado campus in
        Boulder and started a small fire.  Thunderstorm wind gusts
        to 60 mph were reported near Brighton.
      In 1984...heavy rain caused some street and basement flooding
        in Littleton.  One location received 1.56 inches of rain in
        75 minutes.
      In 1987...a weak tornado near Watkins stayed on the ground for
        5 minutes.
      In 1990...a small twister touched down in an open field just
        north of the Rocky Mountain Arsenal.  No damage was
        reported.
      In 1998...hail as large as 1 inch in diameter fell near
        Evergreen.
      In 2005...a severe thunderstorm produced hail as large as
        3/4 inch near Roggen.  The hail destroyed a wheat field.
      In 2006...the temperature reached a high of 98 degrees at
        Denver International Airport.  This marked the 19th day
        in June with a maximum temperature of 90 degrees or more
        setting a new all-time record for the month.
      In 2011...very strong thunderstorm winds were also observed
        across portions of the Urban Corridor. A peak wind gust to
        65 mph was recorded...2 miles northeast of Boulder with a
        gust to 63 mph at Front Range Airport at Watkins and
        7 miles southeast of Denver International Airport.  The
        peak wind gust measured at Denver International Airport
        itself was 45 mph.  A severe thunderstorm also produced
        one inch in diameter hail 2 miles south-southeast of
        Parker. In addition...a lightning strike destroyed a home
        in north Denver.
30-1  In 1873...heavy rainfall overnight totaled 1.42 inches.
        Mountain peaks to the southwest of the city were covered
        with fresh snow on the morning of the 1st.
1     In 1915...northeast winds sustained to 41 mph with gusts to
        50 mph occurred just before a thundershower in the evening.
        Rainfall was only 0.07 inch.
      In 1941...unusually heavy thunderstorm rains flooded
        basements and blocked traffic.  Water was curb high
        on many downtown streets.  The thunderstorm also pelted
        the city with hail of unknown size.  Rainfall in
        downtown Denver totaled 0.72 inch...but greater amounts
        likely occurred in other parts of the city.
      In 1960...a severe dust devil moving through an Adams County
        suburban area blew over a fireworks stand...injuring an 11-
        year-old boy customer and two women operators of the stand.
        The boy was found under the demolished stand 100 feet away.
      In 1961...hail as large as 1 1/4 inches in diameter was
        reported over east Denver.
      In 1967...golf ball size hail fell over portions of metro
        Denver.  Hail stones to 2 inches in diameter damaged roofs
        and broke windows in northeast Boulder.  Marble to golf ball
        size hail fell at the Boulder Airport.  A funnel cloud was
        sighted over the foothills near Boulder.  Hail stones of 1
        to 2 inches in diameter were measured at Jefferson County
        Airport near Broomfield.  Marble size hail fell in the
        vicinity of Arvada and Westminster.
      In 1982...severe thunderstorms dropped large hail in Denver...
        Boulder...Commerce City...Lakewood...Wheat Ridge...Golden...and
        Arvada.  Most locations reported hail size from 3/4 to 1 1/4
        inches in diameter.
      In 1990...the high temperature reached 102 degrees at
        Stapleton International Airport.
      In 1998...hail to 1 1/2 inches in diameter fell near Bennett.
      In 2001...the temperature climbed to a high of 101 degrees at
        Denver International Airport.
1-18  In 1874...a streak of 18 consecutive days of 90 degrees
        tied for second with another streak that was later set
        in the summer of 1901. The record of 24 consecutive days
        was established in the summer of 2008.
1-31  In 2012...it was the hottest July on record in Denver since
        weather records began in 1872.  The average temperature for
        the month was 78.9 degrees which was 4.7 degrees above
        normal. There were 27 days in which the high temperature
        equaled or exceeded 90 degrees...which established a new
        record.  There were also 7 days in which the temperature
        equaled or exceeded 100 degrees which tied the record
        set in 2005.
2     In 1879...a severe hail storm produced considerable damage
        in the vicinity of Arvada.  Some of the stones were
        unusually large...measuring 6.5 inches in circumference
        (2 inches in diameter) with an average weight of 1 ounce.
        The stones were uniformly large with one side concave.
        The greatest damage was to early wheat...cabbage...and vines.
        A tree just to the south of the weather station in downtown
        Denver was struck by lightning.  Residents in the house
        15 feet away were affected by the strike.
      In 1885...thunderstorm winds were sustained to 50 mph in the
        city.
      In 1892...an apparent cold front produced sustained northeast
        winds to 40 mph with gusts to 45 mph.
      In 1955...a apparent microburst wind gust to 69 mph was
        recorded at Stapleton Airport where the brief strong wind
        reduced the visibility to zero in blowing dust.
      In 1965...hail...up to 2 inches in diameter...struck southwest
        Adams and northeast Denver counties...damaging cars...windows...
        and foliage.  Hail accumulated up to a foot deep.  Wind
        gusts to 48 mph and hail to 1 inch in diameter fell at
        Stapleton International Airport where the large hail broke
        three storm windows and shredded shrubs at the U.S. Weather
        Bureau upper air building.
      In 1968...a pilot reported a tornado 10 miles southeast of
       Parker.
      In 1971...one inch diameter hail stones were reported in Adams
        County about 30 miles east of Denver.
      In 1987...a large tornado touched down 10 miles northeast of
        Stapleton International Airport.  The tornado was vertical
        and thick and kicked up a large dust and debris cloud.
        Later...it developed a sinuous rope-like shape as it slowly
        dissipated.  The tornado was visible for 15 minutes.  The
        twister occurred in open country and did only minor damage
        to a metal shed...porch...and mailbox.  A man was killed by
        lightning in southwest Aurora.  He was in his backyard and
        had a shovel in his hand at the time of the strike.  A group
        of soccer players were hit by lightning on a field in
        Boulder.  A 10-year-old boy was critically injured and
        hospitalized; fortunately he recovered.  Six other people
        were knocked to the ground by the strike.  Two of these were
        slightly injured.  Golf ball size hail fell just east of
        Littleton and at Highlands Ranch.  Hail as large as 3/4 inch
        in diameter was reported in Aurora and Parker and near Hudson
        and Franktown.
      In 1988...a 45-year-old man was injured by lightning at Cherry
        Creek Reservoir.  Administration of CPR probably saved his
        life.
      In 1990...the temperature reached a high of 100 degrees at
        Stapleton International Airport.
      In 1993...thunderstorm winds blew a roof off a barn near
        Parker...causing an estimated 15 hundred dollars damage.
      In 1994...thunderstorm winds downed power lines in Boulder...
        causing power outages.  Winds gusted to 66 mph in Boulder...
        64 mph in Arvada...and 60 mph in Golden.
      In 1998...a small tornado touched down briefly near Barr Lake...
        but caused no damage.
      In 2002...hail as large as 1 3/4 inches in diameter fell in
        the City of Denver and in Arapahoe County near Littleton.
        The low temperature of 69 degrees equaled the record high
        minimum for the date.
      In 2006...lightning struck a teenager in Castle Rock as he
        was mowing his lawn and listening to an iPod.  The teen
        suffered burns to his hands and feet...and had blood
        running from his ears when he was found.  The victim`s
        eardrums were ruptured...which damaged his hearing.
        Lightning also struck a house in Castle Rock causing
        extensive damage to the roof and side of the home.
        Heavy rains caused flash flooding at Castlewood Canyon
        State Park near Franktown.  The floodwaters destroyed
        four footbridges along the high trail.  A culvert and
        several roads were washed out in the area.  In addition...
        two driveways crossing Cherry Creek were washed out near
        Prairie Canyon Ranch.  Heavy rainfall also caused minor
        flooding on Murphy and Sand Creeks...just east of Buckley
        AFB.  Gun Club Road was closed between Alameda and
        Mississippi Avenues...north of the Murphy Creek Golf
        Course...where 3 feet of standing water reportedly covered
        the road.  A severe thunderstorm produced large hail to
        7/8 inch in diameter in south Aurora near Cherry Creek.

$$




000
NWUS55 KPUB 260018
LSRPUB

PRELIMINARY LOCAL STORM REPORT...CORRECTED
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE PUEBLO CO
618 PM MDT SAT JUN 25 2016

..TIME...   ...EVENT...      ...CITY LOCATION...     ...LAT.LON...
..DATE...   ....MAG....      ..COUNTY LOCATION..ST.. ...SOURCE....
            ..REMARKS..

0558 PM     TSTM WND GST     4 S CHERAW              38.05N 103.51W
06/25/2016  M55 MPH          OTERO              CO   ASOS

            ASOS STATION LA JUNTA AIRPORT /LHX/.


&&

$$

RMG





000
NWUS55 KPUB 260018
LSRPUB

PRELIMINARY LOCAL STORM REPORT...CORRECTED
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE PUEBLO CO
618 PM MDT SAT JUN 25 2016

..TIME...   ...EVENT...      ...CITY LOCATION...     ...LAT.LON...
..DATE...   ....MAG....      ..COUNTY LOCATION..ST.. ...SOURCE....
            ..REMARKS..

0558 PM     TSTM WND GST     4 S CHERAW              38.05N 103.51W
06/25/2016  M55 MPH          OTERO              CO   ASOS

            ASOS STATION LA JUNTA AIRPORT /LHX/.


&&

$$

RMG





000
NWUS55 KPUB 260017
LSRPUB

PRELIMINARY LOCAL STORM REPORT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE PUEBLO CO
617 PM MDT SAT JUN 25 2016

..TIME...   ...EVENT...      ...CITY LOCATION...     ...LAT.LON...
..DATE...   ....MAG....      ..COUNTY LOCATION..ST.. ...SOURCE....
            ..REMARKS..

0558 PM     NON-TSTM WND GST 4 S CHERAW              38.05N 103.51W
06/25/2016  M55 MPH          OTERO              CO   ASOS

            ASOS STATION LA JUNTA AIRPORT /LHX/.


&&

$$

NWS PUEBLO CO
IRIS SYSTEM





000
NWUS55 KPUB 260017
LSRPUB

PRELIMINARY LOCAL STORM REPORT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE PUEBLO CO
617 PM MDT SAT JUN 25 2016

..TIME...   ...EVENT...      ...CITY LOCATION...     ...LAT.LON...
..DATE...   ....MAG....      ..COUNTY LOCATION..ST.. ...SOURCE....
            ..REMARKS..

0558 PM     NON-TSTM WND GST 4 S CHERAW              38.05N 103.51W
06/25/2016  M55 MPH          OTERO              CO   ASOS

            ASOS STATION LA JUNTA AIRPORT /LHX/.


&&

$$

NWS PUEBLO CO
IRIS SYSTEM





000
NWUS55 KPUB 252350
LSRPUB

PRELIMINARY LOCAL STORM REPORT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE PUEBLO CO
550 PM MDT SAT JUN 25 2016

..TIME...   ...EVENT...      ...CITY LOCATION...     ...LAT.LON...
..DATE...   ....MAG....      ..COUNTY LOCATION..ST.. ...SOURCE....
            ..REMARKS..

0438 PM     TSTM WND GST     5 NE BLENDE             38.29N 104.50W
06/25/2016  M56 MPH          PUEBLO             CO   OFFICIAL NWS OBS

            .


&&

$$

NWS PUEBLO CO
IRIS SYSTEM





000
NWUS55 KPUB 252350
LSRPUB

PRELIMINARY LOCAL STORM REPORT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE PUEBLO CO
550 PM MDT SAT JUN 25 2016

..TIME...   ...EVENT...      ...CITY LOCATION...     ...LAT.LON...
..DATE...   ....MAG....      ..COUNTY LOCATION..ST.. ...SOURCE....
            ..REMARKS..

0438 PM     TSTM WND GST     5 NE BLENDE             38.29N 104.50W
06/25/2016  M56 MPH          PUEBLO             CO   OFFICIAL NWS OBS

            .


&&

$$

NWS PUEBLO CO
IRIS SYSTEM




  [top]

000
NOUS45 KPUB 252301
PNSPUB

COZ070-085-086-260001

Public Information Statement
National Weather Service Pueblo CO
501 PM MDT Sat Jun 25 2016

Pueblo              High today................. 96
                    Low This morning........... 63
                    Pcpn past 24 hrs........... .17
                    Peak wind gust...56 MPH from the
                    north at 438 PM MDT.

Colorado Sprgs      High today................. 88
                    Low This morning........... 60
                    Pcpn past 24 hrs........... T
                    Peak wind gust...46 MPH from the
                    North at 320 PM MDT.

Alamosa             High today................. 79
                    Low This morning........... 49
                    Pcpn past 24 hrs........... .04
                    Peak wind gust...31 MPH from the
                    Northwest at 450 PM MDT.


$$




000
NOUS45 KBOU 252146
PNSBOU

Public Information Statement
National Weather Service Pueblo CO
400 PM MDT SAT JUN 25 2016

Colorado Lightning Safety Awareness Week concludes today...with
wildfires being the final topic.

During the past week we have presented lightning information and
safety rules.  Although wildfires are not an actual weather
phenomenon...wildfires are directly related to lightning and other
weather elements.

Normally...the wildfire threat in Colorado increases significantly
after the middle of June and usually peaks in early July...and
remains high through August and early September.  Colorado averages
about 2500 wildfires each year.

About half of all forest fires in Colorado are ignited by lightning.
Additionally...many rangeland and wheat field fires are caused by
lightning. Many of these lightning caused wildfires occur in the
absence of rain and are the result of what is referred to as dry
thunderstorms.

Lightning is often accompanied by strong winds from thunderstorms.
These winds can quickly turn smoldering organic material into a
raging fire.  Thunderstorm winds tend to be erratic in direction and
speed...posing one of the greatest dangers for firefighters.

Lightning that strikes the ground is usually divided into two
categories...negative and positive strikes...depending on the ionic
source region of the thunderstorm.  The negative strikes are far
more common than positive strikes.  The positive strikes are more
intense and have a longer duration than the negative strikes and are
more likely to ignite a fire.  Lightning detection technology
provides land managers and weather forecasters with the ability to
identify the general location and charge category of each lightning
strike.

National Weather Service forecasters help land managers and
firefighters by producing fire weather zone forecasts on a daily
basis.  Spot fire weather forecasts are also provided for those who
work on prescribed burns or specific wildfires.  Forecasters also
issue Red Flag Warnings for use by land managers when the
combination of dry vegetation and critical weather conditions will
result in a high potential for the development and spread of
wildfires.  Land managers...in turn...typically inform the general
public of the fire danger in national parks...forests...and other
public lands.

During periods of extreme fire danger in forests and rangelands...

You should avoid being in areas where you might become trapped by a
wildfire.

You should avoid the use of matches or anything else which could
ignite a fire.

Make sure that hot parts of motorized equipment...such as
mufflers...are not allowed to come in contact with dry grasses or
other potentially flammable material.

If you become trapped or cut off by a wildfire...seek shelter in
areas with little or no fuel...such as rock slide areas or lakes.

For more information on wildfires and fire safety...please check out
the following web addresses...

http://www.weather.gov/fire

http://www.nifc.gov

http://www.csfs.colostate.edu/

https://www.colorado.gov/pacific/dfpc/wildfire-information-resource-
center

Steve Hodanish
Senior Forecaster
NWS Pueblo, CO




000
NOUS45 KPUB 252146
PNSPUB

Public Information Statement
National Weather Service Pueblo CO
400 PM MDT SAT JUN 25 2016

Colorado Lightning Safety Awareness Week concludes today...with
wildfires being the final topic.

During the past week we have presented lightning information and
safety rules.  Although wildfires are not an actual weather
phenomenon...wildfires are directly related to lightning and other
weather elements.

Normally...the wildfire threat in Colorado increases significantly
after the middle of June and usually peaks in early July...and
remains high through August and early September.  Colorado averages
about 2500 wildfires each year.

About half of all forest fires in Colorado are ignited by lightning.
Additionally...many rangeland and wheat field fires are caused by
lightning. Many of these lightning caused wildfires occur in the
absence of rain and are the result of what is referred to as dry
thunderstorms.

Lightning is often accompanied by strong winds from thunderstorms.
These winds can quickly turn smoldering organic material into a
raging fire.  Thunderstorm winds tend to be erratic in direction and
speed...posing one of the greatest dangers for firefighters.

Lightning that strikes the ground is usually divided into two
categories...negative and positive strikes...depending on the ionic
source region of the thunderstorm.  The negative strikes are far
more common than positive strikes.  The positive strikes are more
intense and have a longer duration than the negative strikes and are
more likely to ignite a fire.  Lightning detection technology
provides land managers and weather forecasters with the ability to
identify the general location and charge category of each lightning
strike.

National Weather Service forecasters help land managers and
firefighters by producing fire weather zone forecasts on a daily
basis.  Spot fire weather forecasts are also provided for those who
work on prescribed burns or specific wildfires.  Forecasters also
issue Red Flag Warnings for use by land managers when the
combination of dry vegetation and critical weather conditions will
result in a high potential for the development and spread of
wildfires.  Land managers...in turn...typically inform the general
public of the fire danger in national parks...forests...and other
public lands.

During periods of extreme fire danger in forests and rangelands...

You should avoid being in areas where you might become trapped by a
wildfire.

You should avoid the use of matches or anything else which could
ignite a fire.

Make sure that hot parts of motorized equipment...such as
mufflers...are not allowed to come in contact with dry grasses or
other potentially flammable material.

If you become trapped or cut off by a wildfire...seek shelter in
areas with little or no fuel...such as rock slide areas or lakes.

For more information on wildfires and fire safety...please check out
the following web addresses...

http://www.weather.gov/fire

http://www.nifc.gov

http://www.csfs.colostate.edu/

https://www.colorado.gov/pacific/dfpc/wildfire-information-resource-
center

Steve Hodanish
Senior Forecaster
NWS Pueblo, CO




000
NOUS45 KBOU 252146
PNSBOU

Public Information Statement
National Weather Service Pueblo CO
400 PM MDT SAT JUN 25 2016

Colorado Lightning Safety Awareness Week concludes today...with
wildfires being the final topic.

During the past week we have presented lightning information and
safety rules.  Although wildfires are not an actual weather
phenomenon...wildfires are directly related to lightning and other
weather elements.

Normally...the wildfire threat in Colorado increases significantly
after the middle of June and usually peaks in early July...and
remains high through August and early September.  Colorado averages
about 2500 wildfires each year.

About half of all forest fires in Colorado are ignited by lightning.
Additionally...many rangeland and wheat field fires are caused by
lightning. Many of these lightning caused wildfires occur in the
absence of rain and are the result of what is referred to as dry
thunderstorms.

Lightning is often accompanied by strong winds from thunderstorms.
These winds can quickly turn smoldering organic material into a
raging fire.  Thunderstorm winds tend to be erratic in direction and
speed...posing one of the greatest dangers for firefighters.

Lightning that strikes the ground is usually divided into two
categories...negative and positive strikes...depending on the ionic
source region of the thunderstorm.  The negative strikes are far
more common than positive strikes.  The positive strikes are more
intense and have a longer duration than the negative strikes and are
more likely to ignite a fire.  Lightning detection technology
provides land managers and weather forecasters with the ability to
identify the general location and charge category of each lightning
strike.

National Weather Service forecasters help land managers and
firefighters by producing fire weather zone forecasts on a daily
basis.  Spot fire weather forecasts are also provided for those who
work on prescribed burns or specific wildfires.  Forecasters also
issue Red Flag Warnings for use by land managers when the
combination of dry vegetation and critical weather conditions will
result in a high potential for the development and spread of
wildfires.  Land managers...in turn...typically inform the general
public of the fire danger in national parks...forests...and other
public lands.

During periods of extreme fire danger in forests and rangelands...

You should avoid being in areas where you might become trapped by a
wildfire.

You should avoid the use of matches or anything else which could
ignite a fire.

Make sure that hot parts of motorized equipment...such as
mufflers...are not allowed to come in contact with dry grasses or
other potentially flammable material.

If you become trapped or cut off by a wildfire...seek shelter in
areas with little or no fuel...such as rock slide areas or lakes.

For more information on wildfires and fire safety...please check out
the following web addresses...

http://www.weather.gov/fire

http://www.nifc.gov

http://www.csfs.colostate.edu/

https://www.colorado.gov/pacific/dfpc/wildfire-information-resource-
center

Steve Hodanish
Senior Forecaster
NWS Pueblo, CO



  [top]

000
NWUS55 KBOU 252050
LSRBOU

PRELIMINARY LOCAL STORM REPORT...SUMMARY
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE DENVER CO
250 PM MDT SAT JUN 25 2016

..TIME...   ...EVENT...      ...CITY LOCATION...     ...LAT.LON...
..DATE...   ....MAG....      ..COUNTY LOCATION..ST.. ...SOURCE....
            ..REMARKS..

0219 PM     HAIL             3 ESE PERRY PARK        39.24N 104.93W
06/25/2016  E0.75 INCH       DOUGLAS            CO   TRAINED SPOTTER

0227 PM     HAIL             3 N LARKSPUR            39.23N 104.90W
06/25/2016  E0.75 INCH       DOUGLAS            CO   PUBLIC

            HEAVY RAIN ALSO REPORTED AT THE COLORADO RENAISSANCE
            FESTIVAL.


&&

$$

FCOOPER




000
NWUS55 KBOU 252050
LSRBOU

PRELIMINARY LOCAL STORM REPORT...SUMMARY
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE DENVER CO
250 PM MDT SAT JUN 25 2016

..TIME...   ...EVENT...      ...CITY LOCATION...     ...LAT.LON...
..DATE...   ....MAG....      ..COUNTY LOCATION..ST.. ...SOURCE....
            ..REMARKS..

0219 PM     HAIL             3 ESE PERRY PARK        39.24N 104.93W
06/25/2016  E0.75 INCH       DOUGLAS            CO   TRAINED SPOTTER

0227 PM     HAIL             3 N LARKSPUR            39.23N 104.90W
06/25/2016  E0.75 INCH       DOUGLAS            CO   PUBLIC

            HEAVY RAIN ALSO REPORTED AT THE COLORADO RENAISSANCE
            FESTIVAL.


&&

$$

FCOOPER




000
NWUS55 KBOU 252023
LSRBOU

PRELIMINARY LOCAL STORM REPORT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE DENVER CO
223 PM MDT SAT JUN 25 2016

..TIME...   ...EVENT...      ...CITY LOCATION...     ...LAT.LON...
..DATE...   ....MAG....      ..COUNTY LOCATION..ST.. ...SOURCE....
            ..REMARKS..

0219 PM     HAIL             3 ESE PERRY PARK        39.24N 104.93W
06/25/2016  E0.75 INCH       DOUGLAS            CO   TRAINED SPOTTER


&&

$$





  [top]

000
NOUS45 KGJT 251904
PNSGJT

NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE GRAND JUNCTION CO
1206 PM MDT SAT JUN 25 2016

The following are preliminary 24 hour precipitation reports from
western Colorado and eastern Utah, ending around 8 AM SATURDAY. The
first value is rainfall or water amounts in snow, and the second
value is snowfall, when appropriate. Amounts are in inches.


**********************24 HOUR PRECIPITATION**********************

LOCATION              24 HOUR     TIME/DATE   COMMENTS
                     PRECIPITATION           OF
                     /INCHES/   MEASUREMENT

COLORADO

...EAGLE COUNTY...
   EAGLE 13SSE           0.02   100 AM  6/25  W CO CRN SITE
   AVON 2N               0.01   700 AM  6/25  UNOFFICIAL STATION

...GUNNISON COUNTY...
   PITKIN 1.1 SW         0.20   921 AM  6/25  COCORAHS

...LA PLATA COUNTY...
   ROCKWOOD 6.9 NNW      0.04   843 AM  6/25  COCORAHS

...MESA COUNTY...
   GRAND JUNCTION 9W     0.05   100 AM  6/25  W CO CRN SITE

...MOFFAT COUNTY...
   CRAIG 30N             0.23   100 AM  6/25  W CO CRN SITE
   MASSADONA             0.08  1000 AM  6/25  W CO COOP SITE
   DINOSAUR 2E           0.04   100 AM  6/25  W CO CRN SITE

...MONTEZUMA COUNTY...
   CORTEZ 8SE            0.01   100 AM  6/25  W CO CRN SITE

...MONTROSE COUNTY...
   MONTROSE              0.10   100 AM  6/25  AVIATION SITE
   MONTROSE 11ENE        0.06   100 AM  6/25  W CO CRN SITE
   MONTROSE 7.3 ENE      0.01   703 AM  6/25  COCORAHS

...RIO BLANCO COUNTY...
   RIFLE 23NW            0.01   100 AM  6/25  W CO CRN SITE

...ROUTT COUNTY...
   STEAMBOAT SPRINGS 6.  0.05   840 AM  6/25  COCORAHS
   OAK CREEK 0.3 WSW     0.05   911 AM  6/25  COCORAHS
   STEAMBOAT SPRINGS 1.  0.04   831 AM  6/25  COCORAHS
   STEAMBOAT SPRINGS 1.  0.03   638 AM  6/25  COCORAHS
   STEAMBOAT SPRINGS 7.  0.02   744 AM  6/25  COCORAHS
   STEAMBOAT SPRINGS 2.  0.02   902 AM  6/25  COCORAHS
   STEAMBOAT SPRINGS 1.  0.02   748 AM  6/25  COCORAHS
   STEAMBOAT SPRINGS 1.  0.02   728 AM  6/25  COCORAHS

$$

ADL




000
NOUS45 KBOU 251439
PNSBOU

Public Information Statement
National Weather Service Pueblo CO
600 AM MDT SAT JUN 25 2016

Colorado Lightning Safety Awareness Week concludes today...with
wildfires being the final topic.

During the past week we have presented lightning information and
safety rules.  Although wildfires are not an actual weather
phenomenon...wildfires are directly related to lightning and other
weather elements.

Normally...the wildfire threat in Colorado increases significantly
after the middle of June and usually peaks in early July...and
remains high through August and early September.  Colorado averages
about 2500 wildfires each year.

About half of all forest fires in Colorado are ignited by lightning.
Additionally...many rangeland and wheat field fires are caused by
lightning. Many of these lightning caused wildfires occur in the
absence of rain and are the result of what is referred to as dry
thunderstorms.

Lightning is often accompanied by strong winds from thunderstorms.
These winds can quickly turn smoldering organic material into a
raging fire.  Thunderstorm winds tend to be erratic in direction and
speed...posing one of the greatest dangers for firefighters.

Lightning that strikes the ground is usually divided into two
categories...negative and positive strikes...depending on the ionic
source region of the thunderstorm.  The negative strikes are far
more common than positive strikes.  The positive strikes are more
intense and have a longer duration than the negative strikes and are
more likely to ignite a fire.  Lightning detection technology
provides land managers and weather forecasters with the ability to
identify the general location and charge category of each lightning
strike.

National Weather Service forecasters help land managers and
firefighters by producing fire weather zone forecasts on a daily
basis.  Spot fire weather forecasts are also provided for those who
work on prescribed burns or specific wildfires.  Forecasters also
issue Red Flag Warnings for use by land managers when the
combination of dry vegetation and critical weather conditions will
result in a high potential for the development and spread of
wildfires.  Land managers...in turn...typically inform the general
public of the fire danger in national parks...forests...and other
public lands.

During periods of extreme fire danger in forests and rangelands...

You should avoid being in areas where you might become trapped by a
wildfire.

You should avoid the use of matches or anything else which could
ignite a fire.

Make sure that hot parts of motorized equipment...such as
mufflers...are not allowed to come in contact with dry grasses or
other potentially flammable material.

If you become trapped or cut off by a wildfire...seek shelter in
areas with little or no fuel...such as rock slide areas or lakes.

For more information on wildfires and fire safety...please check out
the following web addresses...

http://www.weather.gov/fire

http://www.nifc.gov

http://www.csfs.colostate.edu/

https://www.colorado.gov/pacific/dfpc/wildfire-information-resource-
center

Steve Hodanish
Senior Forecaster
NWS Pueblo, CO




000
NOUS45 KPUB 251439
PNSPUB

Public Information Statement
National Weather Service Pueblo CO
600 AM MDT SAT JUN 25 2016

Colorado Lightning Safety Awareness Week concludes today...with
wildfires being the final topic.

During the past week we have presented lightning information and
safety rules.  Although wildfires are not an actual weather
phenomenon...wildfires are directly related to lightning and other
weather elements.

Normally...the wildfire threat in Colorado increases significantly
after the middle of June and usually peaks in early July...and
remains high through August and early September.  Colorado averages
about 2500 wildfires each year.

About half of all forest fires in Colorado are ignited by lightning.
Additionally...many rangeland and wheat field fires are caused by
lightning. Many of these lightning caused wildfires occur in the
absence of rain and are the result of what is referred to as dry
thunderstorms.

Lightning is often accompanied by strong winds from thunderstorms.
These winds can quickly turn smoldering organic material into a
raging fire.  Thunderstorm winds tend to be erratic in direction and
speed...posing one of the greatest dangers for firefighters.

Lightning that strikes the ground is usually divided into two
categories...negative and positive strikes...depending on the ionic
source region of the thunderstorm.  The negative strikes are far
more common than positive strikes.  The positive strikes are more
intense and have a longer duration than the negative strikes and are
more likely to ignite a fire.  Lightning detection technology
provides land managers and weather forecasters with the ability to
identify the general location and charge category of each lightning
strike.

National Weather Service forecasters help land managers and
firefighters by producing fire weather zone forecasts on a daily
basis.  Spot fire weather forecasts are also provided for those who
work on prescribed burns or specific wildfires.  Forecasters also
issue Red Flag Warnings for use by land managers when the
combination of dry vegetation and critical weather conditions will
result in a high potential for the development and spread of
wildfires.  Land managers...in turn...typically inform the general
public of the fire danger in national parks...forests...and other
public lands.

During periods of extreme fire danger in forests and rangelands...

You should avoid being in areas where you might become trapped by a
wildfire.

You should avoid the use of matches or anything else which could
ignite a fire.

Make sure that hot parts of motorized equipment...such as
mufflers...are not allowed to come in contact with dry grasses or
other potentially flammable material.

If you become trapped or cut off by a wildfire...seek shelter in
areas with little or no fuel...such as rock slide areas or lakes.

For more information on wildfires and fire safety...please check out
the following web addresses...

http://www.weather.gov/fire

http://www.nifc.gov

http://www.csfs.colostate.edu/

https://www.colorado.gov/pacific/dfpc/wildfire-information-resource-
center

Steve Hodanish
Senior Forecaster
NWS Pueblo, CO




000
NOUS45 KPUB 251201
PNSPUB

Public Information Statement
National Weather Service Pueblo CO
600 AM MDT SAT JUN 25 2015

Colorado Lightning Safety Awareness Week concludes today...with
wildfires being the final topic.

During the past week we have presented lightning information and
safety rules.  Although wildfires are not an actual weather
phenomenon...wildfires are directly related to lightning and other
weather elements.

Normally...the wildfire threat in Colorado increases significantly
after the middle of June and usually peaks in early July...and
remains high through August and early September.  Colorado averages
about 2500 wildfires each year.

About half of all forest fires in Colorado are ignited by lightning.
Additionally...many rangeland and wheat field fires are caused by
lightning. Many of these lightning caused wildfires occur in the
absence of rain and are the result of what is referred to as dry
thunderstorms.

Lightning is often accompanied by strong winds from thunderstorms.
These winds can quickly turn smoldering organic material into a
raging fire.  Thunderstorm winds tend to be erratic in direction and
speed...posing one of the greatest dangers for firefighters.

Lightning that strikes the ground is usually divided into two
categories...negative and positive strikes...depending on the ionic
source region of the thunderstorm.  The negative strikes are far
more common than positive strikes.  The positive strikes are more
intense and have a longer duration than the negative strikes and are
more likely to ignite a fire.  Lightning detection technology
provides land managers and weather forecasters with the ability to
identify the general location and charge category of each lightning
strike.

National Weather Service forecasters help land managers and
firefighters by producing fire weather zone forecasts on a daily
basis.  Spot fire weather forecasts are also provided for those who
work on prescribed burns or specific wildfires.  Forecasters also
issue Red Flag Warnings for use by land managers when the
combination of dry vegetation and critical weather conditions will
result in a high potential for the development and spread of
wildfires.  Land managers...in turn...typically inform the general
public of the fire danger in national parks...forests...and other
public lands.

During periods of extreme fire danger in forests and rangelands...

You should avoid being in areas where you might become trapped by a
wildfire.

You should avoid the use of matches or anything else which could
ignite a fire.

Make sure that hot parts of motorized equipment...such as
mufflers...are not allowed to come in contact with dry grasses or
other potentially flammable material.

If you become trapped or cut off by a wildfire...seek shelter in
areas with little or no fuel...such as rock slide areas or lakes.

For more information on wildfires and fire safety...please check out
the following web addresses...

http://www.weather.gov/fire

http://www.nifc.gov

http://www.csfs.colostate.edu/

https://www.colorado.gov/pacific/dfpc/wildfire-information-resource-
center

Steve Hodanish
Senior Forecaster
NWS Pueblo, CO




000
NOUS45 KPUB 251201
PNSPUB

Public Information Statement
National Weather Service Pueblo CO
600 AM MDT SAT JUN 25 2015

Colorado Lightning Safety Awareness Week concludes today...with
wildfires being the final topic.

During the past week we have presented lightning information and
safety rules.  Although wildfires are not an actual weather
phenomenon...wildfires are directly related to lightning and other
weather elements.

Normally...the wildfire threat in Colorado increases significantly
after the middle of June and usually peaks in early July...and
remains high through August and early September.  Colorado averages
about 2500 wildfires each year.

About half of all forest fires in Colorado are ignited by lightning.
Additionally...many rangeland and wheat field fires are caused by
lightning. Many of these lightning caused wildfires occur in the
absence of rain and are the result of what is referred to as dry
thunderstorms.

Lightning is often accompanied by strong winds from thunderstorms.
These winds can quickly turn smoldering organic material into a
raging fire.  Thunderstorm winds tend to be erratic in direction and
speed...posing one of the greatest dangers for firefighters.

Lightning that strikes the ground is usually divided into two
categories...negative and positive strikes...depending on the ionic
source region of the thunderstorm.  The negative strikes are far
more common than positive strikes.  The positive strikes are more
intense and have a longer duration than the negative strikes and are
more likely to ignite a fire.  Lightning detection technology
provides land managers and weather forecasters with the ability to
identify the general location and charge category of each lightning
strike.

National Weather Service forecasters help land managers and
firefighters by producing fire weather zone forecasts on a daily
basis.  Spot fire weather forecasts are also provided for those who
work on prescribed burns or specific wildfires.  Forecasters also
issue Red Flag Warnings for use by land managers when the
combination of dry vegetation and critical weather conditions will
result in a high potential for the development and spread of
wildfires.  Land managers...in turn...typically inform the general
public of the fire danger in national parks...forests...and other
public lands.

During periods of extreme fire danger in forests and rangelands...

You should avoid being in areas where you might become trapped by a
wildfire.

You should avoid the use of matches or anything else which could
ignite a fire.

Make sure that hot parts of motorized equipment...such as
mufflers...are not allowed to come in contact with dry grasses or
other potentially flammable material.

If you become trapped or cut off by a wildfire...seek shelter in
areas with little or no fuel...such as rock slide areas or lakes.

For more information on wildfires and fire safety...please check out
the following web addresses...

http://www.weather.gov/fire

http://www.nifc.gov

http://www.csfs.colostate.edu/

https://www.colorado.gov/pacific/dfpc/wildfire-information-resource-
center

Steve Hodanish
Senior Forecaster
NWS Pueblo, CO




000
NOUS45 KBOU 251200
PNSBOU

Public Information Statement
National Weather Service Pueblo CO
600 AM MDT SAT JUN 25 2015

Colorado Lightning Safety Awareness Week concludes today...with
wildfires being the final topic.

During the past week we have presented lightning information and
safety rules.  Although wildfires are not an actual weather
phenomenon...wildfires are directly related to lightning and other
weather elements.

Normally...the wildfire threat in Colorado increases significantly
after the middle of June and usually peaks in early July...and
remains high through August and early September.  Colorado averages
about 2500 wildfires each year.

About half of all forest fires in Colorado are ignited by lightning.
Additionally...many rangeland and wheat field fires are caused by
lightning. Many of these lightning caused wildfires occur in the
absence of rain and are the result of what is referred to as dry
thunderstorms.

Lightning is often accompanied by strong winds from thunderstorms.
These winds can quickly turn smoldering organic material into a
raging fire.  Thunderstorm winds tend to be erratic in direction and
speed...posing one of the greatest dangers for firefighters.

Lightning that strikes the ground is usually divided into two
categories...negative and positive strikes...depending on the ionic
source region of the thunderstorm.  The negative strikes are far
more common than positive strikes.  The positive strikes are more
intense and have a longer duration than the negative strikes and are
more likely to ignite a fire.  Lightning detection technology
provides land managers and weather forecasters with the ability to
identify the general location and charge category of each lightning
strike.

National Weather Service forecasters help land managers and
firefighters by producing fire weather zone forecasts on a daily
basis.  Spot fire weather forecasts are also provided for those who
work on prescribed burns or specific wildfires.  Forecasters also
issue Red Flag Warnings for use by land managers when the
combination of dry vegetation and critical weather conditions will
result in a high potential for the development and spread of
wildfires.  Land managers...in turn...typically inform the general
public of the fire danger in national parks...forests...and other
public lands.

During periods of extreme fire danger in forests and rangelands...

You should avoid being in areas where you might become trapped by a
wildfire.

You should avoid the use of matches or anything else which could
ignite a fire.

Make sure that hot parts of motorized equipment...such as
mufflers...are not allowed to come in contact with dry grasses or
other potentially flammable material.

If you become trapped or cut off by a wildfire...seek shelter in
areas with little or no fuel...such as rock slide areas or lakes.

For more information on wildfires and fire safety...please check out
the following web addresses...

http://www.weather.gov/fire

http://www.nifc.gov

http://www.csfs.colostate.edu/

https://www.colorado.gov/pacific/dfpc/wildfire-information-resource-
center

Steve Hodanish
Senior Forecaster
NWS Pueblo, CO




000
NOUS45 KBOU 251200
PNSBOU

Public Information Statement
National Weather Service Pueblo CO
600 AM MDT SAT JUN 25 2015

Colorado Lightning Safety Awareness Week concludes today...with
wildfires being the final topic.

During the past week we have presented lightning information and
safety rules.  Although wildfires are not an actual weather
phenomenon...wildfires are directly related to lightning and other
weather elements.

Normally...the wildfire threat in Colorado increases significantly
after the middle of June and usually peaks in early July...and
remains high through August and early September.  Colorado averages
about 2500 wildfires each year.

About half of all forest fires in Colorado are ignited by lightning.
Additionally...many rangeland and wheat field fires are caused by
lightning. Many of these lightning caused wildfires occur in the
absence of rain and are the result of what is referred to as dry
thunderstorms.

Lightning is often accompanied by strong winds from thunderstorms.
These winds can quickly turn smoldering organic material into a
raging fire.  Thunderstorm winds tend to be erratic in direction and
speed...posing one of the greatest dangers for firefighters.

Lightning that strikes the ground is usually divided into two
categories...negative and positive strikes...depending on the ionic
source region of the thunderstorm.  The negative strikes are far
more common than positive strikes.  The positive strikes are more
intense and have a longer duration than the negative strikes and are
more likely to ignite a fire.  Lightning detection technology
provides land managers and weather forecasters with the ability to
identify the general location and charge category of each lightning
strike.

National Weather Service forecasters help land managers and
firefighters by producing fire weather zone forecasts on a daily
basis.  Spot fire weather forecasts are also provided for those who
work on prescribed burns or specific wildfires.  Forecasters also
issue Red Flag Warnings for use by land managers when the
combination of dry vegetation and critical weather conditions will
result in a high potential for the development and spread of
wildfires.  Land managers...in turn...typically inform the general
public of the fire danger in national parks...forests...and other
public lands.

During periods of extreme fire danger in forests and rangelands...

You should avoid being in areas where you might become trapped by a
wildfire.

You should avoid the use of matches or anything else which could
ignite a fire.

Make sure that hot parts of motorized equipment...such as
mufflers...are not allowed to come in contact with dry grasses or
other potentially flammable material.

If you become trapped or cut off by a wildfire...seek shelter in
areas with little or no fuel...such as rock slide areas or lakes.

For more information on wildfires and fire safety...please check out
the following web addresses...

http://www.weather.gov/fire

http://www.nifc.gov

http://www.csfs.colostate.edu/

https://www.colorado.gov/pacific/dfpc/wildfire-information-resource-
center

Steve Hodanish
Senior Forecaster
NWS Pueblo, CO




000
NWUS55 KBOU 250212
LSRBOU

PRELIMINARY LOCAL STORM REPORT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE DENVER CO
812 PM MDT FRI JUN 24 2016

..TIME...   ...EVENT...      ...CITY LOCATION...     ...LAT.LON...
..DATE...   ....MAG....      ..COUNTY LOCATION..ST.. ...SOURCE....
            ..REMARKS..

0716 PM     HAIL             3 NW SNYDER             40.35N 103.62W
06/24/2016  M1.50 INCH       MORGAN             CO   TRAINED SPOTTER

            TREE DAMAGE WAS ALSO EXPERIENCED.


&&

$$

NGUSACK




000
NOUS45 KPUB 242256
PNSPUB

COZ070-085-086-242355

Public Information Statement
National Weather Service Pueblo CO
455 PM MDT Fri Jun 24 2016

Pueblo              High today................. 98
                    Low This morning........... 59
                    Pcpn past 24 hrs........... .03
                    PEAK WIND GUST...47 MPH FROM THE
                    WEST AT 400 PM MDT.

Colorado Sprgs      High today................. 91
                    Low This morning........... 56
                    Pcpn past 24 hrs........... T
                    PEAK WIND GUST...35 MPH FROM THE
                    SOUTHWEST AT 245 PM MDT.

Alamosa             High today................. 85
                    Low This morning........... 54
                    Pcpn past 24 hrs........... T
                    PEAK WIND GUST...30 MPH FROM THE
                    NORTHWEST AT 329 PM MDT.


$$




000
NOUS45 KBOU 242147
PNSBOU

Public Information Statement
National Weather Service Pueblo CO
400 PM MDT FRI JUN 24 2015

Colorado Lightning Safety Awareness Week continues through tomorrow.
Today we discuss lightning medical issues for survivors.

The facts about lightning strike victims...

In Colorado...cloud-to-ground lightning flashes occur nearly a half
million times each year.  With millions of visitors and extensive
outdoor activities...it is not surprising that...on average...three
people are killed by lightning while 13 are injured. Last year, one
person was killed while hiking on Mount Yale. Seventeen other people
were injured in several lightning strike incidents across the
Centennial State.

While any lightning fatality is tragic...injuries caused by
lightning can be devastating to both the victim and the family.  For
those who have a family member or relative that suffers a
significant disability from lightning...life changes forever.  In
addition to the physical pain and mental anguish suffered by the
victim and their family...the incident may lead to a loss of income
for all involved as medical expenses can drain the familys financial
resources.

If someone is struck by lightning...it is critically important that
they receive the appropriate medical attention immediately.  Some
deaths can be prevented if the victims are attended to promptly.
Lightning victims do not carry an electrical charge and are safe to
handle.  First...Check to see that the victim is breathing and has a
pulse...and start cardio-pulmonary resuscitation...CPR if needed.
Then have someone dial 9-1-1.

If possible...move the victim to a safer place.  Do not let the
rescuers become lightning victims.  Lightning can strike the same
place twice.

Lightning strike victims may face many mental challenges that they
will have to live with for the rest of their lives.  When the brain
is affected by a lightning strike...the person often has difficulty
with many of the mental processes that most people take for granted.
The person may suffer from short-term memory loss...and may have
difficulty storing new information and accessing old information.
Victims may often find it very difficult to carry on more than one
task at a time... and may be easily distracted.  Their personality
may change and they may become easily irritated.

Lightning strike victims often becoming easily fatigued and may
become exhausted after only a few hours of work.  This may be
because mental tasks that were once automatic may now require
intense concentration to accomplish.  Although some victims may
sleep excessively at first...after a few weeks many find it
difficult to sleep more than two or three hours at a time.

Another common long-term problem for survivors is pain.

Medically...pain is difficult to quantify.  Lightning strike victims
often suffer irreparable nerve damage that causes intense pain that
affects the ability to function.  Many survivors complain of chronic
headaches...some of which are very intense and debilitating.

Lightning Strike and Electric Shock Survivors...International...is a
support group to individuals and families that are struggling with
life after a lightning injury.  Helpful information is available at
their web address:

www.lightning-strike.org

In addition...NOAAs lightning website contains abundant information
on lightning safety and can be found at...

www.lightningsafety.noaa.gov

Lightning information specific for the State of Colorado can be
found at...

www.weather.gov/pub/lightning

The lightning topic for tomorrow will be lightning caused fires.

Steve Hodanish
Senior Forecaster
NWS Pueblo, CO




000
NOUS45 KPUB 242147
PNSPUB

Public Information Statement
National Weather Service Pueblo CO
400 PM MDT FRI JUN 24 2015

Colorado Lightning Safety Awareness Week continues through tomorrow.
Today we discuss lightning medical issues for survivors.

The facts about lightning strike victims...

In Colorado...cloud-to-ground lightning flashes occur nearly a half
million times each year.  With millions of visitors and extensive
outdoor activities...it is not surprising that...on average...three
people are killed by lightning while 13 are injured. Last year, one
person was killed while hiking on Mount Yale. Seventeen other people
were injured in several lightning strike incidents across the
Centennial State.

While any lightning fatality is tragic...injuries caused by
lightning can be devastating to both the victim and the family.  For
those who have a family member or relative that suffers a
significant disability from lightning...life changes forever.  In
addition to the physical pain and mental anguish suffered by the
victim and their family...the incident may lead to a loss of income
for all involved as medical expenses can drain the familys financial
resources.

If someone is struck by lightning...it is critically important that
they receive the appropriate medical attention immediately.  Some
deaths can be prevented if the victims are attended to promptly.
Lightning victims do not carry an electrical charge and are safe to
handle.  First...Check to see that the victim is breathing and has a
pulse...and start cardio-pulmonary resuscitation...CPR if needed.
Then have someone dial 9-1-1.

If possible...move the victim to a safer place.  Do not let the
rescuers become lightning victims.  Lightning can strike the same
place twice.

Lightning strike victims may face many mental challenges that they
will have to live with for the rest of their lives.  When the brain
is affected by a lightning strike...the person often has difficulty
with many of the mental processes that most people take for granted.
The person may suffer from short-term memory loss...and may have
difficulty storing new information and accessing old information.
Victims may often find it very difficult to carry on more than one
task at a time... and may be easily distracted.  Their personality
may change and they may become easily irritated.

Lightning strike victims often becoming easily fatigued and may
become exhausted after only a few hours of work.  This may be
because mental tasks that were once automatic may now require
intense concentration to accomplish.  Although some victims may
sleep excessively at first...after a few weeks many find it
difficult to sleep more than two or three hours at a time.

Another common long-term problem for survivors is pain.

Medically...pain is difficult to quantify.  Lightning strike victims
often suffer irreparable nerve damage that causes intense pain that
affects the ability to function.  Many survivors complain of chronic
headaches...some of which are very intense and debilitating.

Lightning Strike and Electric Shock Survivors...International...is a
support group to individuals and families that are struggling with
life after a lightning injury.  Helpful information is available at
their web address:

www.lightning-strike.org

In addition...NOAAs lightning website contains abundant information
on lightning safety and can be found at...

www.lightningsafety.noaa.gov

Lightning information specific for the State of Colorado can be
found at...

www.weather.gov/pub/lightning

The lightning topic for tomorrow will be lightning caused fires.

Steve Hodanish
Senior Forecaster
NWS Pueblo, CO




000
NOUS45 KGJT 241930
PNSGJT

Public Information Statement..change Tues to Weds
Preliminary Record Event Report
National Weather Service Grand Junction CO
130 PM MDT FRI Jun 24 2016

...Record high temperature Thursday...

Across Eastern Utah...

At Castlevalley, the temperature was 102 degrees. This tied the
previous record high set in 1981.



$$




000
NOUS45 KGJT 241907 CCA
PNSGJT

NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE GRAND JUNCTION CO
1211 PM MDT FRI JUN 24 2016

The following are preliminary 24 hour precipitation reports from
western Colorado and eastern Utah, ending around 8 AM FRIDAY. The
first value is rainfall or water amounts in snow, and the second
value is snowfall, when appropriate. Amounts are in inches.

**********************24 HOUR PRECIPITATION**********************

LOCATION              24 HOUR     TIME/DATE   COMMENTS
                     PRECIPITATION           OF
                     /INCHES/   MEASUREMENT

COLORADO

...DELTA COUNTY...
   CEDAREDGE 10.5 NNW    0.03   852 AM  6/24  COCORAHS
   CEDAREDGE 1.0 NE      0.03   823 AM  6/24  COCORAHS

...EAGLE COUNTY...
   EAGLE 13SSE           0.36   100 AM  6/24  W CO CRN SITE
   VAIL 0.9 WNW          0.22   636 AM  6/24  COCORAHS
   VAIL 2.6 E            0.10   653 AM  6/24  COCORAHS
   WOLCOTT 2.3 N         0.02   716 AM  6/24  COCORAHS
   WOLCOTT 2N            0.02   800 AM  6/24  UNOFFICIAL STATION

...GARFIELD COUNTY...
   SHOSHONE              0.17   830 AM  6/24  W CO COOP SITE
   RIFLE                 0.04   100 AM  6/24  AVIATION SITE
   GLENWOOD SPRINGS 7.0  0.04   747 AM  6/24  COCORAHS
   CARBONDALE 4.6 NNE    0.03   707 AM  6/24  COCORAHS
   GLENWOOD SPRINGS 5.3  0.02   659 AM  6/24  COCORAHS
   CARBONDALE 0.3 WNW    0.01   806 AM  6/24  COCORAHS

...GUNNISON COUNTY...
   GUNNISON 6.6 N        0.13   701 AM  6/24  COCORAHS
   SOMERSET 12.5 N       0.12   609 AM  6/24  COCORAHS
   CIMARRON 11.2 S       0.09   645 AM  6/24  COCORAHS
   GUNNISON 0.8 N        0.06   849 AM  6/24  COCORAHS
   PITKIN 1.1 SW         0.05   822 AM  6/24  COCORAHS
   GUNNISON 3SW          0.04   900 AM  6/24  W CO COOP SITE

...LA PLATA COUNTY...
   ROCKWOOD 6.9 NNW      0.13   709 AM  6/24  COCORAHS
   BAYFIELD 7.0 N        0.03   728 AM  6/24  COCORAHS
   DURANGO .35 E         0.01   701 AM  6/24  COCORAHS

...MESA COUNTY...
   COLORADO NM           0.06   900 AM  6/24  W CO COOP SITE
   COLLBRAN 2SW          0.02   900 AM  6/24  W CO COOP SITE
   GRAND JUNCTION 4.6 E  0.02   840 AM  6/24  COCORAHS
   GRAND JUNCTION 5.1 E  0.02   703 AM  6/24  COCORAHS

...MOFFAT COUNTY...
   CRAIG 4.9 WNW         0.11   623 AM  6/24  COCORAHS
   DINOSAUR 2E           0.10   100 AM  6/24  W CO CRN SITE
   CRAIG 1.2 ESE         0.08   704 AM  6/24  COCORAHS
   DINOSAUR 0.3 SW       0.03   703 AM  6/24  COCORAHS

...MONTEZUMA COUNTY...
   MANCOS 3.8 WNW        0.15   816 AM  6/24  COCORAHS
   MANCOS 3.5 ENE        0.03   709 AM  6/24  COCORAHS
   CORTEZ 8SE            0.01   100 AM  6/24  W CO CRN SITE

...MONTROSE COUNTY...
   MONTROSE #2           1.38   900 AM  6/24  W CO COOP SITE
   MONTROSE 10.1 S       0.26   625 AM  6/24  COCORAHS
   MONTROSE 3.9 WNW      0.25   640 AM  6/24  COCORAHS
   MONTROSE 1.2 ESE      0.19   735 AM  6/24  COCORAHS
   MONTROSE 7.3 ENE      0.14   716 AM  6/24  COCORAHS
   MONTROSE 1.2 WSW      0.12   857 AM  6/24  COCORAHS
   MONTROSE 4.0 NW       0.12   720 AM  6/24  COCORAHS
   MONTROSE 2.0 SSE      0.09   622 AM  6/24  COCORAHS
   MONTROSE 1.9 ESE      0.08   657 AM  6/24  COCORAHS
   MONTROSE 2.9 ESE      0.04   728 AM  6/24  COCORAHS
   MONTROSE 11ENE        0.02   100 AM  6/24  W CO CRN SITE

...OURAY COUNTY...
   OURAY .23 NNW         0.06   646 AM  6/24  COCORAHS
   OURAY                 0.06   731 AM  6/24  W CO COOP SITE

...PITKIN COUNTY...
   ASPEN                 0.36   100 AM  6/24  AVIATION SITE

...RIO BLANCO COUNTY...
   MEEKER 15W            0.15   100 AM  6/24  W CO CRN SITE
   MEEKER 14.3 ESE       0.15   716 AM  6/24  COCORAHS
   MEEKER                0.05   100 AM  6/24  AVIATION SITE
   RIFLE 23NW            0.02   100 AM  6/24  W CO CRN SITE
   RANGELY 1E            0.01   655 AM  6/24  W CO COOP SITE

...ROUTT COUNTY...
   STEAMBOAT SPRINGS .1  0.31   628 AM  6/24  COCORAHS
   STEAMBOAT SPRINGS 0.  0.25   642 AM  6/24  COCORAHS
   STEAMBOAT SPRINGS 1.  0.22   719 AM  6/24  COCORAHS
   STEAMBOAT SPRINGS 1.  0.06   658 AM  6/24  COCORAHS
   STEAMBOAT SPRINGS 1.  0.05   601 AM  6/24  COCORAHS

UTAH

...SAN JUAN COUNTY...
   HOVENWEEP NM          0.02   840 AM  6/24  E UT COOP SITE

...UINTAH COUNTY...
   FORT DUCHESNE         0.01   710 AM  6/24  E UT COOP SITE

$$

ADL




000
NOUS45 KGJT 241907 CCA
PNSGJT

NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE GRAND JUNCTION CO
1211 PM MDT FRI JUN 24 2016

The following are preliminary 24 hour precipitation reports from
western Colorado and eastern Utah, ending around 8 AM FRIDAY. The
first value is rainfall or water amounts in snow, and the second
value is snowfall, when appropriate. Amounts are in inches.

**********************24 HOUR PRECIPITATION**********************

LOCATION              24 HOUR     TIME/DATE   COMMENTS
                     PRECIPITATION           OF
                     /INCHES/   MEASUREMENT

COLORADO

...DELTA COUNTY...
   CEDAREDGE 10.5 NNW    0.03   852 AM  6/24  COCORAHS
   CEDAREDGE 1.0 NE      0.03   823 AM  6/24  COCORAHS

...EAGLE COUNTY...
   EAGLE 13SSE           0.36   100 AM  6/24  W CO CRN SITE
   VAIL 0.9 WNW          0.22   636 AM  6/24  COCORAHS
   VAIL 2.6 E            0.10   653 AM  6/24  COCORAHS
   WOLCOTT 2.3 N         0.02   716 AM  6/24  COCORAHS
   WOLCOTT 2N            0.02   800 AM  6/24  UNOFFICIAL STATION

...GARFIELD COUNTY...
   SHOSHONE              0.17   830 AM  6/24  W CO COOP SITE
   RIFLE                 0.04   100 AM  6/24  AVIATION SITE
   GLENWOOD SPRINGS 7.0  0.04   747 AM  6/24  COCORAHS
   CARBONDALE 4.6 NNE    0.03   707 AM  6/24  COCORAHS
   GLENWOOD SPRINGS 5.3  0.02   659 AM  6/24  COCORAHS
   CARBONDALE 0.3 WNW    0.01   806 AM  6/24  COCORAHS

...GUNNISON COUNTY...
   GUNNISON 6.6 N        0.13   701 AM  6/24  COCORAHS
   SOMERSET 12.5 N       0.12   609 AM  6/24  COCORAHS
   CIMARRON 11.2 S       0.09   645 AM  6/24  COCORAHS
   GUNNISON 0.8 N        0.06   849 AM  6/24  COCORAHS
   PITKIN 1.1 SW         0.05   822 AM  6/24  COCORAHS
   GUNNISON 3SW          0.04   900 AM  6/24  W CO COOP SITE

...LA PLATA COUNTY...
   ROCKWOOD 6.9 NNW      0.13   709 AM  6/24  COCORAHS
   BAYFIELD 7.0 N        0.03   728 AM  6/24  COCORAHS
   DURANGO .35 E         0.01   701 AM  6/24  COCORAHS

...MESA COUNTY...
   COLORADO NM           0.06   900 AM  6/24  W CO COOP SITE
   COLLBRAN 2SW          0.02   900 AM  6/24  W CO COOP SITE
   GRAND JUNCTION 4.6 E  0.02   840 AM  6/24  COCORAHS
   GRAND JUNCTION 5.1 E  0.02   703 AM  6/24  COCORAHS

...MOFFAT COUNTY...
   CRAIG 4.9 WNW         0.11   623 AM  6/24  COCORAHS
   DINOSAUR 2E           0.10   100 AM  6/24  W CO CRN SITE
   CRAIG 1.2 ESE         0.08   704 AM  6/24  COCORAHS
   DINOSAUR 0.3 SW       0.03   703 AM  6/24  COCORAHS

...MONTEZUMA COUNTY...
   MANCOS 3.8 WNW        0.15   816 AM  6/24  COCORAHS
   MANCOS 3.5 ENE        0.03   709 AM  6/24  COCORAHS
   CORTEZ 8SE            0.01   100 AM  6/24  W CO CRN SITE

...MONTROSE COUNTY...
   MONTROSE #2           1.38   900 AM  6/24  W CO COOP SITE
   MONTROSE 10.1 S       0.26   625 AM  6/24  COCORAHS
   MONTROSE 3.9 WNW      0.25   640 AM  6/24  COCORAHS
   MONTROSE 1.2 ESE      0.19   735 AM  6/24  COCORAHS
   MONTROSE 7.3 ENE      0.14   716 AM  6/24  COCORAHS
   MONTROSE 1.2 WSW      0.12   857 AM  6/24  COCORAHS
   MONTROSE 4.0 NW       0.12   720 AM  6/24  COCORAHS
   MONTROSE 2.0 SSE      0.09   622 AM  6/24  COCORAHS
   MONTROSE 1.9 ESE      0.08   657 AM  6/24  COCORAHS
   MONTROSE 2.9 ESE      0.04   728 AM  6/24  COCORAHS
   MONTROSE 11ENE        0.02   100 AM  6/24  W CO CRN SITE

...OURAY COUNTY...
   OURAY .23 NNW         0.06   646 AM  6/24  COCORAHS
   OURAY                 0.06   731 AM  6/24  W CO COOP SITE

...PITKIN COUNTY...
   ASPEN                 0.36   100 AM  6/24  AVIATION SITE

...RIO BLANCO COUNTY...
   MEEKER 15W            0.15   100 AM  6/24  W CO CRN SITE
   MEEKER 14.3 ESE       0.15   716 AM  6/24  COCORAHS
   MEEKER                0.05   100 AM  6/24  AVIATION SITE
   RIFLE 23NW            0.02   100 AM  6/24  W CO CRN SITE
   RANGELY 1E            0.01   655 AM  6/24  W CO COOP SITE

...ROUTT COUNTY...
   STEAMBOAT SPRINGS .1  0.31   628 AM  6/24  COCORAHS
   STEAMBOAT SPRINGS 0.  0.25   642 AM  6/24  COCORAHS
   STEAMBOAT SPRINGS 1.  0.22   719 AM  6/24  COCORAHS
   STEAMBOAT SPRINGS 1.  0.06   658 AM  6/24  COCORAHS
   STEAMBOAT SPRINGS 1.  0.05   601 AM  6/24  COCORAHS

UTAH

...SAN JUAN COUNTY...
   HOVENWEEP NM          0.02   840 AM  6/24  E UT COOP SITE

...UINTAH COUNTY...
   FORT DUCHESNE         0.01   710 AM  6/24  E UT COOP SITE

$$

ADL




000
NOUS45 KGJT 241906 CCA
PNSGJT

NOUS45 KGJT DDHHMM
PNSGJT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE GRAND JUNCTION CO
1211 PM MDT FRI JUN 24 2016

The following are preliminary 24 hour precipitation reports from
western Colorado and eastern Utah, ending around 8 AM FRIDAY. The
first value is rainfall or water amounts in snow, and the second
value is snowfall, when appropriate. Amounts are in inches.

**********************24 HOUR PRECIPITATION**********************

LOCATION              24 HOUR     TIME/DATE   COMMENTS
                     PRECIPITATION           OF
                     /INCHES/   MEASUREMENT

COLORADO

...DELTA COUNTY...
   CEDAREDGE 10.5 NNW    0.03   852 AM  6/24  COCORAHS
   CEDAREDGE 1.0 NE      0.03   823 AM  6/24  COCORAHS

...EAGLE COUNTY...
   EAGLE 13SSE           0.36   100 AM  6/24  W CO CRN SITE
   VAIL 0.9 WNW          0.22   636 AM  6/24  COCORAHS
   VAIL 2.6 E            0.10   653 AM  6/24  COCORAHS
   WOLCOTT 2.3 N         0.02   716 AM  6/24  COCORAHS
   WOLCOTT 2N            0.02   800 AM  6/24  UNOFFICIAL STATION

...GARFIELD COUNTY...
   SHOSHONE              0.17   830 AM  6/24  W CO COOP SITE
   RIFLE                 0.04   100 AM  6/24  AVIATION SITE
   GLENWOOD SPRINGS 7.0  0.04   747 AM  6/24  COCORAHS
   CARBONDALE 4.6 NNE    0.03   707 AM  6/24  COCORAHS
   GLENWOOD SPRINGS 5.3  0.02   659 AM  6/24  COCORAHS
   CARBONDALE 0.3 WNW    0.01   806 AM  6/24  COCORAHS

...GUNNISON COUNTY...
   GUNNISON 6.6 N        0.13   701 AM  6/24  COCORAHS
   SOMERSET 12.5 N       0.12   609 AM  6/24  COCORAHS
   CIMARRON 11.2 S       0.09   645 AM  6/24  COCORAHS
   GUNNISON 0.8 N        0.06   849 AM  6/24  COCORAHS
   PITKIN 1.1 SW         0.05   822 AM  6/24  COCORAHS
   GUNNISON 3SW          0.04   900 AM  6/24  W CO COOP SITE

...LA PLATA COUNTY...
   ROCKWOOD 6.9 NNW      0.13   709 AM  6/24  COCORAHS
   BAYFIELD 7.0 N        0.03   728 AM  6/24  COCORAHS
   DURANGO .35 E         0.01   701 AM  6/24  COCORAHS

...MESA COUNTY...
   COLORADO NM           0.06   900 AM  6/24  W CO COOP SITE
   COLLBRAN 2SW          0.02   900 AM  6/24  W CO COOP SITE
   GRAND JUNCTION 4.6 E  0.02   840 AM  6/24  COCORAHS
   GRAND JUNCTION 5.1 E  0.02   703 AM  6/24  COCORAHS

...MOFFAT COUNTY...
   CRAIG 4.9 WNW         0.11   623 AM  6/24  COCORAHS
   DINOSAUR 2E           0.10   100 AM  6/24  W CO CRN SITE
   CRAIG 1.2 ESE         0.08   704 AM  6/24  COCORAHS
   DINOSAUR 0.3 SW       0.03   703 AM  6/24  COCORAHS

...MONTEZUMA COUNTY...
   MANCOS 3.8 WNW        0.15   816 AM  6/24  COCORAHS
   MANCOS 3.5 ENE        0.03   709 AM  6/24  COCORAHS
   CORTEZ 8SE            0.01   100 AM  6/24  W CO CRN SITE

...MONTROSE COUNTY...
   MONTROSE #2           1.38   900 AM  6/24  W CO COOP SITE
   MONTROSE 10.1 S       0.26   625 AM  6/24  COCORAHS
   MONTROSE 3.9 WNW      0.25   640 AM  6/24  COCORAHS
   MONTROSE 1.2 ESE      0.19   735 AM  6/24  COCORAHS
   MONTROSE 7.3 ENE      0.14   716 AM  6/24  COCORAHS
   MONTROSE 1.2 WSW      0.12   857 AM  6/24  COCORAHS
   MONTROSE 4.0 NW       0.12   720 AM  6/24  COCORAHS
   MONTROSE 2.0 SSE      0.09   622 AM  6/24  COCORAHS
   MONTROSE 1.9 ESE      0.08   657 AM  6/24  COCORAHS
   MONTROSE 2.9 ESE      0.04   728 AM  6/24  COCORAHS
   MONTROSE 11ENE        0.02   100 AM  6/24  W CO CRN SITE

...OURAY COUNTY...
   OURAY .23 NNW         0.06   646 AM  6/24  COCORAHS
   OURAY                 0.06   731 AM  6/24  W CO COOP SITE

...PITKIN COUNTY...
   ASPEN                 0.36   100 AM  6/24  AVIATION SITE

...RIO BLANCO COUNTY...
   MEEKER 15W            0.15   100 AM  6/24  W CO CRN SITE
   MEEKER 14.3 ESE       0.15   716 AM  6/24  COCORAHS
   MEEKER                0.05   100 AM  6/24  AVIATION SITE
   RIFLE 23NW            0.02   100 AM  6/24  W CO CRN SITE
   RANGELY 1E            0.01   655 AM  6/24  W CO COOP SITE

...ROUTT COUNTY...
   STEAMBOAT SPRINGS .1  0.31   628 AM  6/24  COCORAHS
   STEAMBOAT SPRINGS 0.  0.25   642 AM  6/24  COCORAHS
   STEAMBOAT SPRINGS 1.  0.22   719 AM  6/24  COCORAHS
   STEAMBOAT SPRINGS 1.  0.06   658 AM  6/24  COCORAHS
   STEAMBOAT SPRINGS 1.  0.05   601 AM  6/24  COCORAHS

UTAH

...SAN JUAN COUNTY...
   HOVENWEEP NM          0.02   840 AM  6/24  E UT COOP SITE

...UINTAH COUNTY...
   FORT DUCHESNE         0.01   710 AM  6/24  E UT COOP SITE

$$

ADL




000
NOUS45 KGJT 241906
PNSGJT

NOUS45 KGJT DDHHMM
PNSGJT

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE GRAND JUNCTION CO
1211 PM MDT FRI JUN 24 2016

The following are preliminary 24 hour precipitation reports from
western Colorado and eastern Utah, ending around 8 AM FRIDAY. The
first value is rainfall or water amounts in snow, and the second
value is snowfall, when appropriate. Amounts are in inches.

**********************24 HOUR PRECIPITATION**********************

LOCATION              24 HOUR     TIME/DATE   COMMENTS
                     PRECIPITATION           OF
                     /INCHES/   MEASUREMENT

COLORADO

...DELTA COUNTY...
   CEDAREDGE 10.5 NNW    0.03   852 AM  6/24  COCORAHS
   CEDAREDGE 1.0 NE      0.03   823 AM  6/24  COCORAHS

...EAGLE COUNTY...
   EAGLE 13SSE           0.36   100 AM  6/24  W CO CRN SITE
   VAIL 0.9 WNW          0.22   636 AM  6/24  COCORAHS
   VAIL 2.6 E            0.10   653 AM  6/24  COCORAHS
   WOLCOTT 2.3 N         0.02   716 AM  6/24  COCORAHS
   WOLCOTT 2N            0.02   800 AM  6/24  UNOFFICIAL STATION

...GARFIELD COUNTY...
   SHOSHONE              0.17   830 AM  6/24  W CO COOP SITE
   RIFLE                 0.04   100 AM  6/24  AVIATION SITE
   GLENWOOD SPRINGS 7.0  0.04   747 AM  6/24  COCORAHS
   CARBONDALE 4.6 NNE    0.03   707 AM  6/24  COCORAHS
   GLENWOOD SPRINGS 5.3  0.02   659 AM  6/24  COCORAHS
   CARBONDALE 0.3 WNW    0.01   806 AM  6/24  COCORAHS

...GUNNISON COUNTY...
   GUNNISON 6.6 N        0.13   701 AM  6/24  COCORAHS
   SOMERSET 12.5 N       0.12   609 AM  6/24  COCORAHS
   CIMARRON 11.2 S       0.09   645 AM  6/24  COCORAHS
   GUNNISON 0.8 N        0.06   849 AM  6/24  COCORAHS
   PITKIN 1.1 SW         0.05   822 AM  6/24  COCORAHS
   GUNNISON 3SW          0.04   900 AM  6/24  W CO COOP SITE

...LA PLATA COUNTY...
   ROCKWOOD 6.9 NNW      0.13   709 AM  6/24  COCORAHS
   BAYFIELD 7.0 N        0.03   728 AM  6/24  COCORAHS
   DURANGO .35 E         0.01   701 AM  6/24  COCORAHS

...MESA COUNTY...
   COLORADO NM           0.06   900 AM  6/24  W CO COOP SITE
   COLLBRAN 2SW          0.02   900 AM  6/24  W CO COOP SITE
   GRAND JUNCTION 4.6 E  0.02   840 AM  6/24  COCORAHS
   GRAND JUNCTION 5.1 E  0.02   703 AM  6/24  COCORAHS

...MOFFAT COUNTY...
   CRAIG 4.9 WNW         0.11   623 AM  6/24  COCORAHS
   DINOSAUR 2E           0.10   100 AM  6/24  W CO CRN SITE
   CRAIG 1.2 ESE         0.08   704 AM  6/24  COCORAHS
   DINOSAUR 0.3 SW       0.03   703 AM  6/24  COCORAHS

...MONTEZUMA COUNTY...
   MANCOS 3.8 WNW        0.15   816 AM  6/24  COCORAHS
   MANCOS 3.5 ENE        0.03   709 AM  6/24  COCORAHS
   CORTEZ 8SE            0.01   100 AM  6/24  W CO CRN SITE

...MONTROSE COUNTY...
   MONTROSE #2           1.38   900 AM  6/24  W CO COOP SITE
   MONTROSE 10.1 S       0.26   625 AM  6/24  COCORAHS
   MONTROSE 3.9 WNW      0.25   640 AM  6/24  COCORAHS
   MONTROSE 1.2 ESE      0.19   735 AM  6/24  COCORAHS
   MONTROSE 7.3 ENE      0.14   716 AM  6/24  COCORAHS
   MONTROSE 1.2 WSW      0.12   857 AM  6/24  COCORAHS
   MONTROSE 4.0 NW       0.12   720 AM  6/24  COCORAHS
   MONTROSE 2.0 SSE      0.09   622 AM  6/24  COCORAHS
   MONTROSE 1.9 ESE      0.08   657 AM  6/24  COCORAHS
   MONTROSE 2.9 ESE      0.04   728 AM  6/24  COCORAHS
   MONTROSE 11ENE        0.02   100 AM  6/24  W CO CRN SITE

...OURAY COUNTY...
   OURAY .23 NNW         0.06   646 AM  6/24  COCORAHS
   OURAY                 0.06   731 AM  6/24  W CO COOP SITE

...PITKIN COUNTY...
   ASPEN                 0.36   100 AM  6/24  AVIATION SITE

...RIO BLANCO COUNTY...
   MEEKER 15W            0.15   100 AM  6/24  W CO CRN SITE
   MEEKER 14.3 ESE       0.15   716 AM  6/24  COCORAHS
   MEEKER                0.05   100 AM  6/24  AVIATION SITE
   RIFLE 23NW            0.02   100 AM  6/24  W CO CRN SITE
   RANGELY 1E            0.01   655 AM  6/24  W CO COOP SITE

...ROUTT COUNTY...
   STEAMBOAT SPRINGS .1  0.31   628 AM  6/24  COCORAHS
   STEAMBOAT SPRINGS 0.  0.25   642 AM  6/24  COCORAHS
   STEAMBOAT SPRINGS 1.  0.22   719 AM  6/24  COCORAHS
   STEAMBOAT SPRINGS 1.  0.06   658 AM  6/24  COCORAHS
   STEAMBOAT SPRINGS 1.  0.05   601 AM  6/24  COCORAHS

UTAH

...SAN JUAN COUNTY...
   HOVENWEEP NM          0.02   840 AM  6/24  E UT COOP SITE

...UINTAH COUNTY...
   FORT DUCHESNE         0.01   710 AM  6/24  E UT COOP SITE

$$

ADL




000
NOUS45 KGJT 241906 CCA
PNSGJT

NOUS45 KGJT DDHHMM
PNSGJT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE GRAND JUNCTION CO
1211 PM MDT FRI JUN 24 2016

The following are preliminary 24 hour precipitation reports from
western Colorado and eastern Utah, ending around 8 AM FRIDAY. The
first value is rainfall or water amounts in snow, and the second
value is snowfall, when appropriate. Amounts are in inches.

**********************24 HOUR PRECIPITATION**********************

LOCATION              24 HOUR     TIME/DATE   COMMENTS
                     PRECIPITATION           OF
                     /INCHES/   MEASUREMENT

COLORADO

...DELTA COUNTY...
   CEDAREDGE 10.5 NNW    0.03   852 AM  6/24  COCORAHS
   CEDAREDGE 1.0 NE      0.03   823 AM  6/24  COCORAHS

...EAGLE COUNTY...
   EAGLE 13SSE           0.36   100 AM  6/24  W CO CRN SITE
   VAIL 0.9 WNW          0.22   636 AM  6/24  COCORAHS
   VAIL 2.6 E            0.10   653 AM  6/24  COCORAHS
   WOLCOTT 2.3 N         0.02   716 AM  6/24  COCORAHS
   WOLCOTT 2N            0.02   800 AM  6/24  UNOFFICIAL STATION

...GARFIELD COUNTY...
   SHOSHONE              0.17   830 AM  6/24  W CO COOP SITE
   RIFLE                 0.04   100 AM  6/24  AVIATION SITE
   GLENWOOD SPRINGS 7.0  0.04   747 AM  6/24  COCORAHS
   CARBONDALE 4.6 NNE    0.03   707 AM  6/24  COCORAHS
   GLENWOOD SPRINGS 5.3  0.02   659 AM  6/24  COCORAHS
   CARBONDALE 0.3 WNW    0.01   806 AM  6/24  COCORAHS

...GUNNISON COUNTY...
   GUNNISON 6.6 N        0.13   701 AM  6/24  COCORAHS
   SOMERSET 12.5 N       0.12   609 AM  6/24  COCORAHS
   CIMARRON 11.2 S       0.09   645 AM  6/24  COCORAHS
   GUNNISON 0.8 N        0.06   849 AM  6/24  COCORAHS
   PITKIN 1.1 SW         0.05   822 AM  6/24  COCORAHS
   GUNNISON 3SW          0.04   900 AM  6/24  W CO COOP SITE

...LA PLATA COUNTY...
   ROCKWOOD 6.9 NNW      0.13   709 AM  6/24  COCORAHS
   BAYFIELD 7.0 N        0.03   728 AM  6/24  COCORAHS
   DURANGO .35 E         0.01   701 AM  6/24  COCORAHS

...MESA COUNTY...
   COLORADO NM           0.06   900 AM  6/24  W CO COOP SITE
   COLLBRAN 2SW          0.02   900 AM  6/24  W CO COOP SITE
   GRAND JUNCTION 4.6 E  0.02   840 AM  6/24  COCORAHS
   GRAND JUNCTION 5.1 E  0.02   703 AM  6/24  COCORAHS

...MOFFAT COUNTY...
   CRAIG 4.9 WNW         0.11   623 AM  6/24  COCORAHS
   DINOSAUR 2E           0.10   100 AM  6/24  W CO CRN SITE
   CRAIG 1.2 ESE         0.08   704 AM  6/24  COCORAHS
   DINOSAUR 0.3 SW       0.03   703 AM  6/24  COCORAHS

...MONTEZUMA COUNTY...
   MANCOS 3.8 WNW        0.15   816 AM  6/24  COCORAHS
   MANCOS 3.5 ENE        0.03   709 AM  6/24  COCORAHS
   CORTEZ 8SE            0.01   100 AM  6/24  W CO CRN SITE

...MONTROSE COUNTY...
   MONTROSE #2           1.38   900 AM  6/24  W CO COOP SITE
   MONTROSE 10.1 S       0.26   625 AM  6/24  COCORAHS
   MONTROSE 3.9 WNW      0.25   640 AM  6/24  COCORAHS
   MONTROSE 1.2 ESE      0.19   735 AM  6/24  COCORAHS
   MONTROSE 7.3 ENE      0.14   716 AM  6/24  COCORAHS
   MONTROSE 1.2 WSW      0.12   857 AM  6/24  COCORAHS
   MONTROSE 4.0 NW       0.12   720 AM  6/24  COCORAHS
   MONTROSE 2.0 SSE      0.09   622 AM  6/24  COCORAHS
   MONTROSE 1.9 ESE      0.08   657 AM  6/24  COCORAHS
   MONTROSE 2.9 ESE      0.04   728 AM  6/24  COCORAHS
   MONTROSE 11ENE        0.02   100 AM  6/24  W CO CRN SITE

...OURAY COUNTY...
   OURAY .23 NNW         0.06   646 AM  6/24  COCORAHS
   OURAY                 0.06   731 AM  6/24  W CO COOP SITE

...PITKIN COUNTY...
   ASPEN                 0.36   100 AM  6/24  AVIATION SITE

...RIO BLANCO COUNTY...
   MEEKER 15W            0.15   100 AM  6/24  W CO CRN SITE
   MEEKER 14.3 ESE       0.15   716 AM  6/24  COCORAHS
   MEEKER                0.05   100 AM  6/24  AVIATION SITE
   RIFLE 23NW            0.02   100 AM  6/24  W CO CRN SITE
   RANGELY 1E            0.01   655 AM  6/24  W CO COOP SITE

...ROUTT COUNTY...
   STEAMBOAT SPRINGS .1  0.31   628 AM  6/24  COCORAHS
   STEAMBOAT SPRINGS 0.  0.25   642 AM  6/24  COCORAHS
   STEAMBOAT SPRINGS 1.  0.22   719 AM  6/24  COCORAHS
   STEAMBOAT SPRINGS 1.  0.06   658 AM  6/24  COCORAHS
   STEAMBOAT SPRINGS 1.  0.05   601 AM  6/24  COCORAHS

UTAH

...SAN JUAN COUNTY...
   HOVENWEEP NM          0.02   840 AM  6/24  E UT COOP SITE

...UINTAH COUNTY...
   FORT DUCHESNE         0.01   710 AM  6/24  E UT COOP SITE

$$

ADL




000
NOUS45 KGJT 241906
PNSGJT

NOUS45 KGJT DDHHMM
PNSGJT

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE GRAND JUNCTION CO
1211 PM MDT FRI JUN 24 2016

The following are preliminary 24 hour precipitation reports from
western Colorado and eastern Utah, ending around 8 AM FRIDAY. The
first value is rainfall or water amounts in snow, and the second
value is snowfall, when appropriate. Amounts are in inches.

**********************24 HOUR PRECIPITATION**********************

LOCATION              24 HOUR     TIME/DATE   COMMENTS
                     PRECIPITATION           OF
                     /INCHES/   MEASUREMENT

COLORADO

...DELTA COUNTY...
   CEDAREDGE 10.5 NNW    0.03   852 AM  6/24  COCORAHS
   CEDAREDGE 1.0 NE      0.03   823 AM  6/24  COCORAHS

...EAGLE COUNTY...
   EAGLE 13SSE           0.36   100 AM  6/24  W CO CRN SITE
   VAIL 0.9 WNW          0.22   636 AM  6/24  COCORAHS
   VAIL 2.6 E            0.10   653 AM  6/24  COCORAHS
   WOLCOTT 2.3 N         0.02   716 AM  6/24  COCORAHS
   WOLCOTT 2N            0.02   800 AM  6/24  UNOFFICIAL STATION

...GARFIELD COUNTY...
   SHOSHONE              0.17   830 AM  6/24  W CO COOP SITE
   RIFLE                 0.04   100 AM  6/24  AVIATION SITE
   GLENWOOD SPRINGS 7.0  0.04   747 AM  6/24  COCORAHS
   CARBONDALE 4.6 NNE    0.03   707 AM  6/24  COCORAHS
   GLENWOOD SPRINGS 5.3  0.02   659 AM  6/24  COCORAHS
   CARBONDALE 0.3 WNW    0.01   806 AM  6/24  COCORAHS

...GUNNISON COUNTY...
   GUNNISON 6.6 N        0.13   701 AM  6/24  COCORAHS
   SOMERSET 12.5 N       0.12   609 AM  6/24  COCORAHS
   CIMARRON 11.2 S       0.09   645 AM  6/24  COCORAHS
   GUNNISON 0.8 N        0.06   849 AM  6/24  COCORAHS
   PITKIN 1.1 SW         0.05   822 AM  6/24  COCORAHS
   GUNNISON 3SW          0.04   900 AM  6/24  W CO COOP SITE

...LA PLATA COUNTY...
   ROCKWOOD 6.9 NNW      0.13   709 AM  6/24  COCORAHS
   BAYFIELD 7.0 N        0.03   728 AM  6/24  COCORAHS
   DURANGO .35 E         0.01   701 AM  6/24  COCORAHS

...MESA COUNTY...
   COLORADO NM           0.06   900 AM  6/24  W CO COOP SITE
   COLLBRAN 2SW          0.02   900 AM  6/24  W CO COOP SITE
   GRAND JUNCTION 4.6 E  0.02   840 AM  6/24  COCORAHS
   GRAND JUNCTION 5.1 E  0.02   703 AM  6/24  COCORAHS

...MOFFAT COUNTY...
   CRAIG 4.9 WNW         0.11   623 AM  6/24  COCORAHS
   DINOSAUR 2E           0.10   100 AM  6/24  W CO CRN SITE
   CRAIG 1.2 ESE         0.08   704 AM  6/24  COCORAHS
   DINOSAUR 0.3 SW       0.03   703 AM  6/24  COCORAHS

...MONTEZUMA COUNTY...
   MANCOS 3.8 WNW        0.15   816 AM  6/24  COCORAHS
   MANCOS 3.5 ENE        0.03   709 AM  6/24  COCORAHS
   CORTEZ 8SE            0.01   100 AM  6/24  W CO CRN SITE

...MONTROSE COUNTY...
   MONTROSE #2           1.38   900 AM  6/24  W CO COOP SITE
   MONTROSE 10.1 S       0.26   625 AM  6/24  COCORAHS
   MONTROSE 3.9 WNW      0.25   640 AM  6/24  COCORAHS
   MONTROSE 1.2 ESE      0.19   735 AM  6/24  COCORAHS
   MONTROSE 7.3 ENE      0.14   716 AM  6/24  COCORAHS
   MONTROSE 1.2 WSW      0.12   857 AM  6/24  COCORAHS
   MONTROSE 4.0 NW       0.12   720 AM  6/24  COCORAHS
   MONTROSE 2.0 SSE      0.09   622 AM  6/24  COCORAHS
   MONTROSE 1.9 ESE      0.08   657 AM  6/24  COCORAHS
   MONTROSE 2.9 ESE      0.04   728 AM  6/24  COCORAHS
   MONTROSE 11ENE        0.02   100 AM  6/24  W CO CRN SITE

...OURAY COUNTY...
   OURAY .23 NNW         0.06   646 AM  6/24  COCORAHS
   OURAY                 0.06   731 AM  6/24  W CO COOP SITE

...PITKIN COUNTY...
   ASPEN                 0.36   100 AM  6/24  AVIATION SITE

...RIO BLANCO COUNTY...
   MEEKER 15W            0.15   100 AM  6/24  W CO CRN SITE
   MEEKER 14.3 ESE       0.15   716 AM  6/24  COCORAHS
   MEEKER                0.05   100 AM  6/24  AVIATION SITE
   RIFLE 23NW            0.02   100 AM  6/24  W CO CRN SITE
   RANGELY 1E            0.01   655 AM  6/24  W CO COOP SITE

...ROUTT COUNTY...
   STEAMBOAT SPRINGS .1  0.31   628 AM  6/24  COCORAHS
   STEAMBOAT SPRINGS 0.  0.25   642 AM  6/24  COCORAHS
   STEAMBOAT SPRINGS 1.  0.22   719 AM  6/24  COCORAHS
   STEAMBOAT SPRINGS 1.  0.06   658 AM  6/24  COCORAHS
   STEAMBOAT SPRINGS 1.  0.05   601 AM  6/24  COCORAHS

UTAH

...SAN JUAN COUNTY...
   HOVENWEEP NM          0.02   840 AM  6/24  E UT COOP SITE

...UINTAH COUNTY...
   FORT DUCHESNE         0.01   710 AM  6/24  E UT COOP SITE

$$

ADL




000
NWUS55 KPUB 241612
LSRPUB

PRELIMINARY LOCAL STORM REPORT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE PUEBLO CO
1012 AM MDT FRI JUN 24 2016

..TIME...   ...EVENT...      ...CITY LOCATION...     ...LAT.LON...
..DATE...   ....MAG....      ..COUNTY LOCATION..ST.. ...SOURCE....
            ..REMARKS..

0211 PM     HAIL             PEYTON                  39.03N 104.48W
06/23/2016  M1.00 INCH       EL PASO            CO   AMATEUR RADIO

            .


&&

$$

NWS PUEBLO CO
IRIS SYSTEM





000
NWUS55 KGJT 241343
LSRGJT

PRELIMINARY LOCAL STORM REPORT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE GRAND JUNCTION CO
742 AM MDT FRI JUN 24 2016

..TIME...   ...EVENT...      ...CITY LOCATION...     ...LAT.LON...
..DATE...   ....MAG....      ..COUNTY LOCATION..ST.. ...SOURCE....
            ..REMARKS..

0621 PM     TSTM WND GST     1 W CRAIG               40.52N 107.57W
06/23/2016  M70 MPH          MOFFAT             CO   TRAINED SPOTTER

            TREES UPTO 13 INCH DIAMETER SNAPPED OR UPROOTED. DOWNED
            POWER LINES RESULTED IN POWER OUTAGE FOR ONE HOUR.


&&

EVENT NUMBER GJT1600727

$$

DC




000
NOUS45 KPUB 241245
PNSPUB

Public Information Statement
National Weather Service Pueblo CO
600 AM MDT FRI JUN 24 2015

Colorado Lightning Safety Awareness Week continues through tomorrow.
Today we discuss lightning medical issues for survivors.

The facts about lightning strike victims...

In Colorado...cloud-to-ground lightning flashes occur nearly a half
million times each year.  With millions of visitors and extensive
outdoor activities...it is not surprising that...on average...three
people are killed by lightning while 13 are injured. Last year, one
person was killed while hiking on Mount Yale. Seventeen other people
were injured in several lightning strike incidents across the
Centennial State.

While any lightning fatality is tragic...injuries caused by
lightning can be devastating to both the victim and the family.  For
those who have a family member or relative that suffers a
significant disability from lightning...life changes forever.  In
addition to the physical pain and mental anguish suffered by the
victim and their family...the incident may lead to a loss of income
for all involved as medical expenses can drain the familys financial
resources.

If someone is struck by lightning...it is critically important that
they receive the appropriate medical attention immediately.  Some
deaths can be prevented if the victims are attended to promptly.
Lightning victims do not carry an electrical charge and are safe to
handle.  First...Check to see that the victim is breathing and has a
pulse...and start cardio-pulmonary resuscitation...CPR if needed.
Then have someone dial 9-1-1.

If possible...move the victim to a safer place.  Do not let the
rescuers become lightning victims.  Lightning can strike the same
place twice.

Lightning strike victims may face many mental challenges that they
will have to live with for the rest of their lives.  When the brain
is affected by a lightning strike...the person often has difficulty
with many of the mental processes that most people take for granted.
The person may suffer from short-term memory loss...and may have
difficulty storing new information and accessing old information.
Victims may often find it very difficult to carry on more than one
task at a time... and may be easily distracted.  Their personality
may change and they may become easily irritated.

Lightning strike victims often becoming easily fatigued and may
become exhausted after only a few hours of work.  This may be
because mental tasks that were once automatic may now require
intense concentration to accomplish.  Although some victims may
sleep excessively at first...after a few weeks many find it
difficult to sleep more than two or three hours at a time.

Another common long-term problem for survivors is pain.

Medically...pain is difficult to quantify.  Lightning strike victims
often suffer irreparable nerve damage that causes intense pain that
affects the ability to function.  Many survivors complain of chronic
headaches...some of which are very intense and debilitating.

Lightning Strike and Electric Shock Survivors...International...is a
support group to individuals and families that are struggling with
life after a lightning injury.  Helpful information is available at
their web address:

www.lightning-strike.org

In addition...NOAAs lightning website contains abundant information
on lightning safety and can be found at...

www.lightningsafety.noaa.gov

Lightning information specific for the State of Colorado can be
found at...

www.weather.gov/pub/lightning

The lightning topic for tomorrow will be lightning caused fires.

Steve Hodanish
Senior Forecaster
NWS Pueblo, CO




000
NOUS45 KPUB 241245
PNSPUB

Public Information Statement
National Weather Service Pueblo CO
600 AM MDT FRI JUN 24 2015

Colorado Lightning Safety Awareness Week continues through tomorrow.
Today we discuss lightning medical issues for survivors.

The facts about lightning strike victims...

In Colorado...cloud-to-ground lightning flashes occur nearly a half
million times each year.  With millions of visitors and extensive
outdoor activities...it is not surprising that...on average...three
people are killed by lightning while 13 are injured. Last year, one
person was killed while hiking on Mount Yale. Seventeen other people
were injured in several lightning strike incidents across the
Centennial State.

While any lightning fatality is tragic...injuries caused by
lightning can be devastating to both the victim and the family.  For
those who have a family member or relative that suffers a
significant disability from lightning...life changes forever.  In
addition to the physical pain and mental anguish suffered by the
victim and their family...the incident may lead to a loss of income
for all involved as medical expenses can drain the familys financial
resources.

If someone is struck by lightning...it is critically important that
they receive the appropriate medical attention immediately.  Some
deaths can be prevented if the victims are attended to promptly.
Lightning victims do not carry an electrical charge and are safe to
handle.  First...Check to see that the victim is breathing and has a
pulse...and start cardio-pulmonary resuscitation...CPR if needed.
Then have someone dial 9-1-1.

If possible...move the victim to a safer place.  Do not let the
rescuers become lightning victims.  Lightning can strike the same
place twice.

Lightning strike victims may face many mental challenges that they
will have to live with for the rest of their lives.  When the brain
is affected by a lightning strike...the person often has difficulty
with many of the mental processes that most people take for granted.
The person may suffer from short-term memory loss...and may have
difficulty storing new information and accessing old information.
Victims may often find it very difficult to carry on more than one
task at a time... and may be easily distracted.  Their personality
may change and they may become easily irritated.

Lightning strike victims often becoming easily fatigued and may
become exhausted after only a few hours of work.  This may be
because mental tasks that were once automatic may now require
intense concentration to accomplish.  Although some victims may
sleep excessively at first...after a few weeks many find it
difficult to sleep more than two or three hours at a time.

Another common long-term problem for survivors is pain.

Medically...pain is difficult to quantify.  Lightning strike victims
often suffer irreparable nerve damage that causes intense pain that
affects the ability to function.  Many survivors complain of chronic
headaches...some of which are very intense and debilitating.

Lightning Strike and Electric Shock Survivors...International...is a
support group to individuals and families that are struggling with
life after a lightning injury.  Helpful information is available at
their web address:

www.lightning-strike.org

In addition...NOAAs lightning website contains abundant information
on lightning safety and can be found at...

www.lightningsafety.noaa.gov

Lightning information specific for the State of Colorado can be
found at...

www.weather.gov/pub/lightning

The lightning topic for tomorrow will be lightning caused fires.

Steve Hodanish
Senior Forecaster
NWS Pueblo, CO




000
NOUS45 KBOU 241244
PNSBOU

Public Information Statement
National Weather Service Pueblo CO
600 AM MDT FRI JUN 24 2015

Colorado Lightning Safety Awareness Week continues through tomorrow.
Today we discuss lightning medical issues for survivors.

The facts about lightning strike victims...

In Colorado...cloud-to-ground lightning flashes occur nearly a half
million times each year.  With millions of visitors and extensive
outdoor activities...it is not surprising that...on average...three
people are killed by lightning while 13 are injured. Last year, one
person was killed while hiking on Mount Yale. Seventeen other people
were injured in several lightning strike incidents across the
Centennial State.

While any lightning fatality is tragic...injuries caused by
lightning can be devastating to both the victim and the family.  For
those who have a family member or relative that suffers a
significant disability from lightning...life changes forever.  In
addition to the physical pain and mental anguish suffered by the
victim and their family...the incident may lead to a loss of income
for all involved as medical expenses can drain the familys financial
resources.

If someone is struck by lightning...it is critically important that
they receive the appropriate medical attention immediately.  Some
deaths can be prevented if the victims are attended to promptly.
Lightning victims do not carry an electrical charge and are safe to
handle.  First...Check to see that the victim is breathing and has a
pulse...and start cardio-pulmonary resuscitation...CPR if needed.
Then have someone dial 9-1-1.

If possible...move the victim to a safer place.  Do not let the
rescuers become lightning victims.  Lightning can strike the same
place twice.

Lightning strike victims may face many mental challenges that they
will have to live with for the rest of their lives.  When the brain
is affected by a lightning strike...the person often has difficulty
with many of the mental processes that most people take for granted.
The person may suffer from short-term memory loss...and may have
difficulty storing new information and accessing old information.
Victims may often find it very difficult to carry on more than one
task at a time... and may be easily distracted.  Their personality
may change and they may become easily irritated.

Lightning strike victims often becoming easily fatigued and may
become exhausted after only a few hours of work.  This may be
because mental tasks that were once automatic may now require
intense concentration to accomplish.  Although some victims may
sleep excessively at first...after a few weeks many find it
difficult to sleep more than two or three hours at a time.

Another common long-term problem for survivors is pain.

Medically...pain is difficult to quantify.  Lightning strike victims
often suffer irreparable nerve damage that causes intense pain that
affects the ability to function.  Many survivors complain of chronic
headaches...some of which are very intense and debilitating.

Lightning Strike and Electric Shock Survivors...International...is a
support group to individuals and families that are struggling with
life after a lightning injury.  Helpful information is available at
their web address:

www.lightning-strike.org

In addition...NOAAs lightning website contains abundant information
on lightning safety and can be found at...

www.lightningsafety.noaa.gov

Lightning information specific for the State of Colorado can be
found at...

www.weather.gov/pub/lightning

The lightning topic for tomorrow will be lightning caused fires.

Steve Hodanish
Senior Forecaster
NWS Pueblo, CO




000
NWUS55 KGJT 240311
LSRGJT

PRELIMINARY LOCAL STORM REPORT...CORRECTED
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE GRAND JUNCTION CO
911 PM MDT THU JUN 23 2016

..TIME...   ...EVENT...      ...CITY LOCATION...     ...LAT.LON...
..DATE...   ....MAG....      ..COUNTY LOCATION..ST.. ...SOURCE....
            ..REMARKS..

0730 PM     TSTM WND DMG     1 NW STEAMBOAT SPRINGS  40.49N 106.84W
06/23/2016                   ROUTT              CO   PUBLIC

            ONE TO TWO FOOT DIAMETER TREES DOWN ON US
            40. TIME ESTIMATED FROM RADAR.

0730 PM     TSTM WND DMG     1 NW STEAMBOAT SPRINGS  40.48N 106.83W
06/23/2016                   ROUTT              CO   LAW ENFORCEMENT

            NUMEROUS LARGE TREES DOWN. WIND SPEED
            UNKNOWN. TIME ESTIMATED FROM RADAR.


&&

$$

NWS GRAND JUNCTION CO
IRIS SYSTEM





000
NWUS55 KGJT 240254
LSRGJT

PRELIMINARY LOCAL STORM REPORT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE GRAND JUNCTION CO
854 PM MDT THU JUN 23 2016

..TIME...   ...EVENT...      ...CITY LOCATION...     ...LAT.LON...
..DATE...   ....MAG....      ..COUNTY LOCATION..ST.. ...SOURCE....
            ..REMARKS..

0735 PM     TSTM WND GST     4 NW STEAMBOAT SPRINGS  40.52N 106.87W
06/23/2016  M49 MPH          ROUTT              CO   AWOS

            AWOS STATION STEAMBOAT SPRINGS AIRPORT
            /SBS/.


&&

$$

NWS GRAND JUNCTION CO
IRIS SYSTEM





000
NWUS55 KGJT 240254
LSRGJT

PRELIMINARY LOCAL STORM REPORT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE GRAND JUNCTION CO
854 PM MDT THU JUN 23 2016

..TIME...   ...EVENT...      ...CITY LOCATION...     ...LAT.LON...
..DATE...   ....MAG....      ..COUNTY LOCATION..ST.. ...SOURCE....
            ..REMARKS..

0735 PM     TSTM WND GST     4 NW STEAMBOAT SPRINGS  40.52N 106.87W
06/23/2016  M49 MPH          ROUTT              CO   AWOS

            AWOS STATION STEAMBOAT SPRINGS AIRPORT
            /SBS/.


&&

$$

NWS GRAND JUNCTION CO
IRIS SYSTEM





000
NWUS55 KBOU 240210
LSRBOU

PRELIMINARY LOCAL STORM REPORT...CORRECTED
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE DENVER CO
810 PM MDT THU JUN 23 2016

..TIME...   ...EVENT...      ...CITY LOCATION...     ...LAT.LON...
..DATE...   ....MAG....      ..COUNTY LOCATION..ST.. ...SOURCE....
            ..REMARKS..

0658 PM     HAIL             11 NNE AKRON            40.31N 103.13W
06/23/2016  M0.75 INCH       WASHINGTON         CO   PUBLIC

0637 PM     TSTM WND GST     3 N CROOK               40.90N 102.80W
06/23/2016  M60.00 MPH       LOGAN              CO   TRAINED SPOTTER

0631 PM     TSTM WND GST     CROOK                   40.86N 102.80W
06/23/2016  M60.00 MPH       LOGAN              CO   CO-OP OBSERVER

0540 PM     TSTM WND GST     1 N STRASBURG           39.75N 104.30W
06/23/2016  E60.00 MPH       ADAMS              CO   PUBLIC

0534 PM     HAIL             16 NW MERINO            40.65N 103.57W
06/23/2016  M1.00 INCH       LOGAN              CO   TRAINED SPOTTER

0510 PM     HAIL             2 N PAWNEE PASS         40.66N 103.48W
06/23/2016  M0.50 INCH       LOGAN              CO   TRAINED SPOTTER

0505 PM     HAIL             3 NNW PAWNEE PASS       40.67N 103.51W
06/23/2016  M1.50 INCH       LOGAN              CO   TRAINED SPOTTER

0445 PM     TSTM WND DMG     8 N FORT COLLINS        40.67N 105.07W
06/23/2016                   LARIMER            CO   PUBLIC

            80 MPH WINDS WHICH DESTROYED 2 OUTBUILDINGS

0440 PM     TSTM WND GST     2 N PAWNEE PASS         40.66N 103.48W
06/23/2016  M50.00 MPH       LOGAN              CO   TRAINED SPOTTER


&&

$$

NGUSACK




000
NWUS55 KGJT 240140
LSRGJT

PRELIMINARY LOCAL STORM REPORT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE GRAND JUNCTION CO
740 PM MDT THU JUN 23 2016

..TIME...   ...EVENT...      ...CITY LOCATION...     ...LAT.LON...
..DATE...   ....MAG....      ..COUNTY LOCATION..ST.. ...SOURCE....
            ..REMARKS..

0739 PM     HAIL             5 NNW STEAMBOAT SPRINGS 40.54N 106.87W
06/23/2016  E0.25 INCH       ROUTT              CO   PUBLIC

            REPORT OF PEA SIZED HAIL FALLING.


&&

$$

ADL





000
NWUS55 KGJT 240140
LSRGJT

PRELIMINARY LOCAL STORM REPORT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE GRAND JUNCTION CO
740 PM MDT THU JUN 23 2016

..TIME...   ...EVENT...      ...CITY LOCATION...     ...LAT.LON...
..DATE...   ....MAG....      ..COUNTY LOCATION..ST.. ...SOURCE....
            ..REMARKS..

0739 PM     HAIL             5 NNW STEAMBOAT SPRINGS 40.54N 106.87W
06/23/2016  E0.25 INCH       ROUTT              CO   PUBLIC

            REPORT OF PEA SIZED HAIL FALLING.


&&

$$

ADL





000
NWUS55 KBOU 240132
LSRBOU

PRELIMINARY LOCAL STORM REPORT...CORRECTED
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE DENVER CO
732 PM MDT THU JUN 23 2016

..TIME...   ...EVENT...      ...CITY LOCATION...     ...LAT.LON...
..DATE...   ....MAG....      ..COUNTY LOCATION..ST.. ...SOURCE....
            ..REMARKS..

0658 PM     HAIL             11 NNE AKRON            40.31N 103.13W
06/23/2016  M0.75 INCH       WASHINGTON         CO   PUBLIC

0637 PM     TSTM WND GST     3 N CROOK               40.90N 102.80W
06/23/2016  M60.00 MPH       LOGAN              CO   TRAINED SPOTTER

0540 PM     TSTM WND GST     1 N STRASBURG           39.75N 104.30W
06/23/2016  E60.00 MPH       ADAMS              CO   PUBLIC

0534 PM     HAIL             16 NW MERINO            40.65N 103.57W
06/23/2016  M1.00 INCH       LOGAN              CO   TRAINED SPOTTER

0510 PM     HAIL             2 N PAWNEE PASS         40.66N 103.48W
06/23/2016  M0.50 INCH       LOGAN              CO   TRAINED SPOTTER

0505 PM     HAIL             3 NNW PAWNEE PASS       40.67N 103.51W
06/23/2016  M1.50 INCH       LOGAN              CO   TRAINED SPOTTER

0445 PM     TSTM WND DMG     8 N FORT COLLINS        40.67N 105.07W
06/23/2016                   LARIMER            CO   PUBLIC

            80 MPH WINDS WHICH DESTROYED 2 OUTBUILDINGS

0440 PM     TSTM WND GST     2 N PAWNEE PASS         40.66N 103.48W
06/23/2016  M50.00 MPH       LOGAN              CO   TRAINED SPOTTER


&&

$$

NGUSACK




000
NWUS55 KBOU 240108
LSRBOU

PRELIMINARY LOCAL STORM REPORT...CORRECTED
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE DENVER CO
708 PM MDT THU JUN 23 2016

..TIME...   ...EVENT...      ...CITY LOCATION...     ...LAT.LON...
..DATE...   ....MAG....      ..COUNTY LOCATION..ST.. ...SOURCE....
            ..REMARKS..

0637 PM     TSTM WND GST     3 N CROOK               40.90N 102.80W
06/23/2016  M60.00 MPH       LOGAN              CO   TRAINED SPOTTER

0540 PM     TSTM WND GST     1 N STRASBURG           39.75N 104.30W
06/23/2016  E60.00 MPH       ADAMS              CO   PUBLIC

0534 PM     HAIL             16 NW MERINO            40.65N 103.57W
06/23/2016  M1.00 INCH       LOGAN              CO   TRAINED SPOTTER

0510 PM     HAIL             2 N PAWNEE PASS         40.66N 103.48W
06/23/2016  M0.50 INCH       LOGAN              CO   TRAINED SPOTTER

0505 PM     HAIL             3 NNW PAWNEE PASS       40.67N 103.51W
06/23/2016  M1.50 INCH       LOGAN              CO   TRAINED SPOTTER

0445 PM     TSTM WND DMG     8 N FORT COLLINS        40.67N 105.07W
06/23/2016                   LARIMER            CO   PUBLIC

            80 MPH WINDS WHICH DESTROYED 2 OUTBUILDINGS

0440 PM     TSTM WND GST     2 N PAWNEE PASS         40.66N 103.48W
06/23/2016  M50.00 MPH       LOGAN              CO   TRAINED SPOTTER


&&

$$

NGUSACK




000
NWUS55 KBOU 240108
LSRBOU

PRELIMINARY LOCAL STORM REPORT...CORRECTED
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE DENVER CO
708 PM MDT THU JUN 23 2016

..TIME...   ...EVENT...      ...CITY LOCATION...     ...LAT.LON...
..DATE...   ....MAG....      ..COUNTY LOCATION..ST.. ...SOURCE....
            ..REMARKS..

0637 PM     TSTM WND GST     3 N CROOK               40.90N 102.80W
06/23/2016  M60.00 MPH       LOGAN              CO   TRAINED SPOTTER

0540 PM     TSTM WND GST     1 N STRASBURG           39.75N 104.30W
06/23/2016  E60.00 MPH       ADAMS              CO   PUBLIC

0534 PM     HAIL             16 NW MERINO            40.65N 103.57W
06/23/2016  M1.00 INCH       LOGAN              CO   TRAINED SPOTTER

0510 PM     HAIL             2 N PAWNEE PASS         40.66N 103.48W
06/23/2016  M0.50 INCH       LOGAN              CO   TRAINED SPOTTER

0505 PM     HAIL             3 NNW PAWNEE PASS       40.67N 103.51W
06/23/2016  M1.50 INCH       LOGAN              CO   TRAINED SPOTTER

0445 PM     TSTM WND DMG     8 N FORT COLLINS        40.67N 105.07W
06/23/2016                   LARIMER            CO   PUBLIC

            80 MPH WINDS WHICH DESTROYED 2 OUTBUILDINGS

0440 PM     TSTM WND GST     2 N PAWNEE PASS         40.66N 103.48W
06/23/2016  M50.00 MPH       LOGAN              CO   TRAINED SPOTTER


&&

$$

NGUSACK




000
NWUS55 KBOU 240108
LSRBOU

PRELIMINARY LOCAL STORM REPORT...CORRECTED
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE DENVER CO
708 PM MDT THU JUN 23 2016

..TIME...   ...EVENT...      ...CITY LOCATION...     ...LAT.LON...
..DATE...   ....MAG....      ..COUNTY LOCATION..ST.. ...SOURCE....
            ..REMARKS..

0637 PM     TSTM WND GST     3 N CROOK               40.90N 102.80W
06/23/2016  M60.00 MPH       LOGAN              CO   TRAINED SPOTTER

0540 PM     TSTM WND GST     1 N STRASBURG           39.75N 104.30W
06/23/2016  E60.00 MPH       ADAMS              CO   PUBLIC

0534 PM     HAIL             16 NW MERINO            40.65N 103.57W
06/23/2016  M1.00 INCH       LOGAN              CO   TRAINED SPOTTER

0510 PM     HAIL             2 N PAWNEE PASS         40.66N 103.48W
06/23/2016  M0.50 INCH       LOGAN              CO   TRAINED SPOTTER

0505 PM     HAIL             3 NNW PAWNEE PASS       40.67N 103.51W
06/23/2016  M1.50 INCH       LOGAN              CO   TRAINED SPOTTER

0445 PM     TSTM WND DMG     8 N FORT COLLINS        40.67N 105.07W
06/23/2016                   LARIMER            CO   PUBLIC

            80 MPH WINDS WHICH DESTROYED 2 OUTBUILDINGS

0440 PM     TSTM WND GST     2 N PAWNEE PASS         40.66N 103.48W
06/23/2016  M50.00 MPH       LOGAN              CO   TRAINED SPOTTER


&&

$$

NGUSACK




000
NWUS55 KBOU 240108
LSRBOU

PRELIMINARY LOCAL STORM REPORT...CORRECTED
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE DENVER CO
708 PM MDT THU JUN 23 2016

..TIME...   ...EVENT...      ...CITY LOCATION...     ...LAT.LON...
..DATE...   ....MAG....      ..COUNTY LOCATION..ST.. ...SOURCE....
            ..REMARKS..

0637 PM     TSTM WND GST     3 N CROOK               40.90N 102.80W
06/23/2016  M60.00 MPH       LOGAN              CO   TRAINED SPOTTER

0540 PM     TSTM WND GST     1 N STRASBURG           39.75N 104.30W
06/23/2016  E60.00 MPH       ADAMS              CO   PUBLIC

0534 PM     HAIL             16 NW MERINO            40.65N 103.57W
06/23/2016  M1.00 INCH       LOGAN              CO   TRAINED SPOTTER

0510 PM     HAIL             2 N PAWNEE PASS         40.66N 103.48W
06/23/2016  M0.50 INCH       LOGAN              CO   TRAINED SPOTTER

0505 PM     HAIL             3 NNW PAWNEE PASS       40.67N 103.51W
06/23/2016  M1.50 INCH       LOGAN              CO   TRAINED SPOTTER

0445 PM     TSTM WND DMG     8 N FORT COLLINS        40.67N 105.07W
06/23/2016                   LARIMER            CO   PUBLIC

            80 MPH WINDS WHICH DESTROYED 2 OUTBUILDINGS

0440 PM     TSTM WND GST     2 N PAWNEE PASS         40.66N 103.48W
06/23/2016  M50.00 MPH       LOGAN              CO   TRAINED SPOTTER


&&

$$

NGUSACK




000
NWUS55 KGJT 240107
LSRGJT

PRELIMINARY LOCAL STORM REPORT...CORRECTED
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE GRAND JUNCTION CO
707 PM MDT THU JUN 23 2016

..TIME...   ...EVENT...      ...CITY LOCATION...     ...LAT.LON...
..DATE...   ....MAG....      ..COUNTY LOCATION..ST.. ...SOURCE....
            ..REMARKS..

0615 PM     TSTM WND DMG     1 SW CRAIG              40.51N 107.56W
06/23/2016                   MOFFAT             CO   PUBLIC

            20 FEET LONG LIMB DOWN WITH 3.5 INCH
            DIAMETER. 70 MPH ESTIMATED WIND GUST.


&&

$$

JM





000
NWUS55 KGJT 240107
LSRGJT

PRELIMINARY LOCAL STORM REPORT...CORRECTED
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE GRAND JUNCTION CO
707 PM MDT THU JUN 23 2016

..TIME...   ...EVENT...      ...CITY LOCATION...     ...LAT.LON...
..DATE...   ....MAG....      ..COUNTY LOCATION..ST.. ...SOURCE....
            ..REMARKS..

0615 PM     TSTM WND DMG     1 SW CRAIG              40.51N 107.56W
06/23/2016                   MOFFAT             CO   PUBLIC

            20 FEET LONG LIMB DOWN WITH 3.5 INCH
            DIAMETER. 70 MPH ESTIMATED WIND GUST.


&&

$$

JM





000
NWUS55 KGJT 240106
LSRGJT

PRELIMINARY LOCAL STORM REPORT...CORRECTED
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE GRAND JUNCTION CO
706 PM MDT THU JUN 23 2016

..TIME...   ...EVENT...      ...CITY LOCATION...     ...LAT.LON...
..DATE...   ....MAG....      ..COUNTY LOCATION..ST.. ...SOURCE....
            ..REMARKS..

0655 PM     TSTM WND GST     2 ESE HAYDEN            40.48N 107.22W
06/23/2016  M59 MPH          ROUTT              CO   AWOS

            AWOS STATION HAYDEN AIRPORT /HDN/ CORRECTED
            FOR THUNDERSTORM WIND GUST.


&&

$$

NWS GRAND JUNCTION CO
IRIS SYSTEM





000
NWUS55 KGJT 240106
LSRGJT

PRELIMINARY LOCAL STORM REPORT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE GRAND JUNCTION CO
706 PM MDT THU JUN 23 2016

..TIME...   ...EVENT...      ...CITY LOCATION...     ...LAT.LON...
..DATE...   ....MAG....      ..COUNTY LOCATION..ST.. ...SOURCE....
            ..REMARKS..

0655 PM     NON-TSTM WND GST 2 ESE HAYDEN            40.48N 107.22W
06/23/2016  M59 MPH          ROUTT              CO   AWOS

            AWOS STATION HAYDEN AIRPORT /HDN/.


&&

$$

NWS GRAND JUNCTION CO
IRIS SYSTEM





000
NWUS55 KGJT 240106
LSRGJT

PRELIMINARY LOCAL STORM REPORT...CORRECTED
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE GRAND JUNCTION CO
706 PM MDT THU JUN 23 2016

..TIME...   ...EVENT...      ...CITY LOCATION...     ...LAT.LON...
..DATE...   ....MAG....      ..COUNTY LOCATION..ST.. ...SOURCE....
            ..REMARKS..

0655 PM     TSTM WND GST     2 ESE HAYDEN            40.48N 107.22W
06/23/2016  M59 MPH          ROUTT              CO   AWOS

            AWOS STATION HAYDEN AIRPORT /HDN/ CORRECTED
            FOR THUNDERSTORM WIND GUST.


&&

$$

NWS GRAND JUNCTION CO
IRIS SYSTEM





000
NWUS55 KGJT 240045
LSRGJT

PRELIMINARY LOCAL STORM REPORT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE GRAND JUNCTION CO
645 PM MDT THU JUN 23 2016

..TIME...   ...EVENT...      ...CITY LOCATION...     ...LAT.LON...
..DATE...   ....MAG....      ..COUNTY LOCATION..ST.. ...SOURCE....
            ..REMARKS..

0643 PM     TSTM WND DMG     1 SW CRAIG              40.51N 107.56W
06/23/2016                   MOFFAT             CO   PUBLIC

            20 FEET LONG LIMB DOWN WITH 3.5 INCH
            DIAMETER. 70 MPH ESTIMATED WIND GUST.


&&

$$

JM





000
NWUS55 KGJT 240038
LSRGJT

PRELIMINARY LOCAL STORM REPORT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE GRAND JUNCTION CO
638 PM MDT THU JUN 23 2016

..TIME...   ...EVENT...      ...CITY LOCATION...     ...LAT.LON...
..DATE...   ....MAG....      ..COUNTY LOCATION..ST.. ...SOURCE....
            ..REMARKS..

0624 PM     TSTM WND GST     2 SE CRAIG              40.50N 107.52W
06/23/2016  M59 MPH          MOFFAT             CO   ASOS

            ASOS STATION CRAIG - MOFFAT COUNTY AIRPORT
            /CAG/.


&&

$$

NWS GRAND JUNCTION CO
IRIS SYSTEM





000
NWUS55 KGJT 240038
LSRGJT

PRELIMINARY LOCAL STORM REPORT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE GRAND JUNCTION CO
638 PM MDT THU JUN 23 2016

..TIME...   ...EVENT...      ...CITY LOCATION...     ...LAT.LON...
..DATE...   ....MAG....      ..COUNTY LOCATION..ST.. ...SOURCE....
            ..REMARKS..

0624 PM     TSTM WND GST     2 SE CRAIG              40.50N 107.52W
06/23/2016  M59 MPH          MOFFAT             CO   ASOS

            ASOS STATION CRAIG - MOFFAT COUNTY AIRPORT
            /CAG/.


&&

$$

NWS GRAND JUNCTION CO
IRIS SYSTEM





000
NWUS55 KBOU 240002
LSRBOU

PRELIMINARY LOCAL STORM REPORT...CORRECTED
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE DENVER CO
602 PM MDT THU JUN 23 2016

..TIME...   ...EVENT...      ...CITY LOCATION...     ...LAT.LON...
..DATE...   ....MAG....      ..COUNTY LOCATION..ST.. ...SOURCE....
            ..REMARKS..

0534 PM     HAIL             16 NW MERINO            40.65N 103.57W
06/23/2016  M1.00 INCH       LOGAN              CO   TRAINED SPOTTER

0510 PM     HAIL             2 N PAWNEE PASS         40.66N 103.48W
06/23/2016  M0.50 INCH       LOGAN              CO   TRAINED SPOTTER

0505 PM     HAIL             3 NNW PAWNEE PASS       40.67N 103.51W
06/23/2016  M1.50 INCH       LOGAN              CO   TRAINED SPOTTER

0445 PM     TSTM WND DMG     8 N FORT COLLINS        40.67N 105.07W
06/23/2016                   LARIMER            CO   PUBLIC

            80 MPH WINDS WHICH DESTROYED 2 OUTBUILDINGS

0440 PM     TSTM WND GST     2 N PAWNEE PASS         40.66N 103.48W
06/23/2016  M50.00 MPH       LOGAN              CO   TRAINED SPOTTER


&&

$$

NGUSACK




000
NWUS55 KBOU 232349
LSRBOU

PRELIMINARY LOCAL STORM REPORT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE DENVER CO
549 PM MDT THU JUN 23 2016

..TIME...   ...EVENT...      ...CITY LOCATION...     ...LAT.LON...
..DATE...   ....MAG....      ..COUNTY LOCATION..ST.. ...SOURCE....
            ..REMARKS..

0534 PM     HAIL             4 WSW WILLARD           40.52N 103.54W
06/23/2016  M1.00 INCH       MORGAN             CO   TRAINED SPOTTER

0510 PM     HAIL             2 N PAWNEE PASS         40.66N 103.48W
06/23/2016  M0.50 INCH       LOGAN              CO   TRAINED SPOTTER

0505 PM     HAIL             3 NNW PAWNEE PASS       40.67N 103.51W
06/23/2016  M1.50 INCH       LOGAN              CO   TRAINED SPOTTER

0445 PM     TSTM WND DMG     8 N FORT COLLINS        40.67N 105.07W
06/23/2016                   LARIMER            CO   PUBLIC

            80 MPH WINDS WHICH DESTROYED 2 OUTBUILDINGS

0440 PM     TSTM WND GST     2 N PAWNEE PASS         40.66N 103.48W
06/23/2016  M50.00 MPH       LOGAN              CO   TRAINED SPOTTER


&&

$$

NGUSACK




000
NWUS55 KGJT 232348
LSRGJT

PRELIMINARY LOCAL STORM REPORT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE GRAND JUNCTION CO
548 PM MDT THU JUN 23 2016

..TIME...   ...EVENT...      ...CITY LOCATION...     ...LAT.LON...
..DATE...   ....MAG....      ..COUNTY LOCATION..ST.. ...SOURCE....
            ..REMARKS..

0337 PM     HAIL             MONTROSE                38.48N 107.87W
06/23/2016  E0.25 INCH       MONTROSE           CO   PUBLIC

            HEAVY RAIN...GUSTY WINDS TO 40 MPH OR GREATER AND SMALL
            PEBBLE SIZE HAIL


&&

EVENT NUMBER GJT1600726

$$

MALEKSA




000
NOUS45 KPUB 232256
PNSPUB

COZ070-085-086-232356

Public Information Statement
National Weather Service Pueblo CO
456 PM MDT Thu Jun 23 2016

Pueblo              High today................. 96
                    Low This morning........... 60
                    Pcpn past 24 hrs........... .04
                    PEAK WIND GUST...46 MPH FROM THE
                    NORTH AT 423 PM MDT.

Colorado Sprgs      High today................. 90
                    Low This morning........... 56
                    Pcpn past 24 hrs........... .06
                    PEAK WIND GUST...29 MPH FROM THE
                    NORTH AT 242 PM MDT.

Alamosa             High today................. 87
                    Low This morning........... 47
                    Pcpn past 24 hrs........... 0
                    PEAK WIND GUST...43 MPH FROM THE
                    NORTH AT 418 PM MDT.


$$




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